OCR Interpretation


Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, August 30, 1905, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1905-08-30/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

2
HOLLYWOOD CAR
JUMPS THE TRUCK
W. B. IRWIN MEETS INSTANT
DEATH
THRILLING WORK OF RESCUE
Motorman and Conduotor of 111 Fated
Coach Win the Plaudlta of the
Paiaengera by Sticking
to Their Potta
Continued From !■»«» O".
despaired of. He sustained a crashed
hip and Internal Injuries.
The body of W. B. Irwln was taken
from beneath the wreckage when th«
car was raised. His left side wan
mangled terribly and the left leg was
broken In several places. Physicians
say that death must have been Instan
taneous.
Chaffee May Die
At a late hour last night the Injured
were reported In a slightly Improved
condition with the exception of Chaf
fee,'whose recovery is in doubt.
An Inquest will be held this morning
at Pierce brothers' morgue,
I Passengers are loud in commenda
tion of what they, term the heroism of
the motorman and conductor In stick
ing to their posts. .
Ten minutes after the accident oc
curred claim agents were at the wreck
and an attempt was made to ascertain
the exact condition of the brakes.
Victim Manager of Concern
. W.B . Invln, who lost his life in the
Wreck, ha* been in California twenty
five years. For two yearß he has been
manager of the Standard Biscuit com
pany and occupied a similar position
in Oakland. He was 40 years of age
and a native of Ohio. His home was
"on Edgar street, near Effle street,-ln
the hills west ' of Los Angeles. He
leaves a widow, but no children.
TROLLEY WRECK
-BRES ELEVEN
(Continued from I'oc« One.)
were In the greatest danger, but with
such swiftness did the accident take
f: place that they had not even started to
'get out of their seats.
.:; While Mrs. . Nolan moaned and cried
■iSiu a room of the Randall, home, her
husband," stretched out on the parlor
> floor, of the residence of A. McNally,
half conscious, besought those who
gathered around tdT tell him* whether or
jnot his wife had been Injured. '
Conductor Driving Car ' \
, Whatley had assumed temporary
control of the. car while the motorman,
Charles Carr, was repairing the head
light which had become out of order.
"When Carr surrendered the controllei
to Whatley he warned him that the car
was going at too high a rate of speed
and. that it should be reduced by half.
•Whatley failed to heedhls advice.
■ He is an old conductor and familiar
\ with the track. -' The cars of the Los
'Angeles railway have the right of way
j over those of the Los Angeles-Pacific
and it is the duty of the crew of the
former cars to turn the switch where
the University line branches off at Bur-
I Dngton avenue.
jj When the car started to leave the
!■' rails Whatley sought to apply the
. brakes, but his efforts were of no avail.
The front of the vestibule was driven
In by the impact with the posts. What
ley was thrown toward the rear. When
he was found he was in the center of'
; the car. One foot was caught between
the side of the car and the ground, and
there was a mass of wreckage over and
' about him. It was at first believed
that he was dead. Carr, the motor
man • who was but .: slightly injured,
, Quickly recovered his senses and im
mediately started in to assist those
v/ho had not been able to get free of
.wreckage. Mrs. Nolan, Mrs. W. A,
Elliott and Miss Dena Askerooth were
taken out In an unconscious condition.
The latter- two, with Miss Poor, Miss
Johnson, Nolan and John Klemm were
taken to the McNally home. ?• ; J
Whatley Wedged In Debris
It was at first believed that What
ley was dead. He was in a position
where it was exceedingly difficult to
extricate his body from the place
where It had been wedged. After
twenty minutes' work he was taken
out as one dead and placed in an open
lot across the street from the scene of
the accident. With him was taken O.
K. Kohl, also in an unconscious con
dition. Later, both were taken to the
receiving hospital.
Passengers of the wrecked car com
pletely exonerated Motorman Carr
from any blame and all who were able
Sto talk rationally testified to the fact
that he had warned Whatley of the
danger of running at too high a rale
of speed.
"The headlight refused to work,"
said Carr last night, "and after re
questing Whatley to take the control
ler I went to work on the light. I
found that I could not fix It where
It was situated, so' reaching down 1
took it from the holder. I was In tha
front part of the car when the acci
dent happened. I had already told
Whatley to run at half speed but he
railed to take the warning. I do not
have any idea how fast we were run
ning "at the time, but I suppose It was
pretty fast. After the wreck those
of us who were not severely hurt, to
gether'with the crowd which quickly
ONE KILLED, ELEVEN INJURED;
FAULTY BRAKES CAUSE WRECK
j; SCENE OF WRECK OF HOLLYWOOD CAR. ABOVE IS E. D. CHAF. .
I . FEE, ONE.OF THE INJURED. BELOW' ARE W. B. IRWIN, WHO
5.; WAS KI£LEbV~AND,!VIISS EDNA WEBB, WHO WAS SEVERELY
• ; INJJJREP-.- <„r,V■ '-'■'.'; ~C' r
{■■ : vi;" 4 i "%, *'\ 'x--. ■.* .. '.■:;, S-*'S'.j
assembled) ;' werit'fo (tfiet assistance of
those whose injuries were greater' than
our own." '-....' „-. . ■
Miss ! Dena^ Askerooth,, 1327 ...-East
Twenty-eighth . street, whose, injuries
consisted In a lacerated shoulder and
bruises, was able'.tQ give only a partial
account of how theaeddent took place.
C"I wasvsea,ted in the^ear'idi the 'car, 1 , 1
she said, ."and did not have even time
to thlnk'bpfare l'reallzed'that.%va£ in
a wreck^v. My 'flrst^ impulse was;' to. try,
and jump. Had I done so it is probable
that I would have fallen directly be
neath the car. There was a crash and
then I did not remember anything more
until It was all over and I found my
self in the McNally home."
At 3 o'clock this morning Dr. D. W,
Stewart, who 'is in attendance upon
Mr. and Mrs. Nolan, said that, his
patients were resting as easily as could
be expected and while the injuries were
serious he was hopeful for • their re
covery. . ■ .
PASADENA CAR IS DERAILED
Leaves Track on Curve Near Garvanza
Villa — Passengers Uninjured
While proceeding at an ordinary rate
of speed yesterday afternoon an elec
tric car of the Pasadena division of the
Paciflc Electric company Jumped the
track near the Garvanza villa, but none
of the passengers were 'lnjured beyonj
slight bruises. _ __
The accident occurred at a curve, and
the car is said to have been under con
trol when it left the track. A wrecking
crew from Pasadena cleaned the track.
MAIL WAGON STRUCK BY CAR
Driver Seriously Injured as Result of
an Accident
William K. Banders, driver of a mall
wagon, was knocked from his seat by
an east-bound car near Fifth and
Crocker streets at 6 o'clock yesterday
morning and severely Injured. '
The wagon was struck between the
front and rear wheels and Sanders was
thrown on his hip, which was severely
bruised. He also sustained slight cuts
on the head. He was sent to the receiv
ing hospital. ,
INJURED WOMAN LOST
Mrs. McMamle, Hurt In Street Car
Wreck, Is Missing
Mrs. Edna 33. McMamle, 1539 Echo
Park road, who wu slightly Injured In
the Hollywood street car wreck yester
day morning did not return to her home
when. released from the receiving hos
pltal and her husband nuked the aid
of the police last night In- searching
for her.
After receiving medical attention at
the receiving hospital yesterday morn.
Ing Mrs. McMamle said that she felt
able to return to her home and was re
leased by the police surgeons.
LOS ANGELES HERALD j WEDNESDAY MORNING, AUGUST, .30, 190$.
ENVOYS AGREE f
lilicill
(Continued from Para One.)
the.' Japanese compromise proposal of
fast Wednesday they were delivered to
Baron. Komura' this morning. M. Wltte
Went ,to the conference declaring he
was. powerless to change the dot of an
"1" or, the cross of a "t" in his instruc
tions. Emepror Nicholas' word had
been given not only to him but to Pres
ident Roosevelt, the head of a foreign
state.
Agree to the Russian Position
When Baron Komura, therefore, first
offered the new basis of compromise
outlined In the Associated Press dis
patches last, night, viz., the complete
renunciation of indemnity, coupled with
a proposition • for the redemption' of
Sakhalin' at "a price to be fixed by a
mixed tribunal, consisting of represen
tatives of . the neutral powers, which
was in fact, if not In words, the solu
tion offered by the president,. M. Witte
again returned a non-possumus. ■■ It
was what M. Witte termed .in his in
terview with the Associated Press the
"psychological moment."
M. Witte did not flinch. He feared a
rupture and, as he expressed it after
ward, he was stunned by what. 1 hap
pened. Baron Komura gave way on all
the disputed points. With the pres
cience that has enabled the Japanese
to gauge the mental processes of their
adversaries on the field of battle and
upon the sea they had realized in ad
vance that peace could be obtained In
no other way. They had warned their
government. President Roosevelt had
also, it is believed, advised Japan that
it was better to meet the Russian po
sition than to take the responsibility
of continuing the war for the purpose
of collecting tribute. .' The. mikado,: at
the advice of the ' cabinet and : elder
statesmen, yesterday . had . sanctioned
the final concession. When Baron Ko
mura yielded the rest was mere child's
play. .....
Articles 10 and 11, dealing with the
interned warships and the limitation
of Russia's sea power in the Far East,
were withdrawn. Japan agreed that
only that portion of the Chinese East
ern railroad couth of Chantfu, the posi
tion occupied by Oyama, should ba
ceded to Japan. Both sides, when the
deadlock wu» broken, wanted a "Just
and lasting" peace, and in that respect
it was decided to practically neutralize
Sakhalin, each country binding itself
not to' fortify Its half, of the. island,
and Japan assuming an obligation not
to fortify La Perouse strait, between
Sakhalin and Hokkaido, which would
bar 1 Ruoeld's •commercial route to the
Pacific.
The * plenipotentiaries went ' further.
They decided to add a new clause' in
the nature of a broad provision for
mutual commercial privileges, by which
each country will secure for the other
the benefit of tho "most favored na
tion" clause and ' the ■ "open door."
j The' new treaty therefore will be a
wonderfully friendly document, of ' a
character almost to raise the suspicion
that the two countries have not ne
gotiated peace, but have concluded the
basis of a future alliance. There is,
however, no ■ evidence, as rumored,
that any secret clauses are. to be ap
pended to the present treaty. . .** ,-
Before leaving the, conference build
ing felicitations were exchanged with
the president at Oyster. Bay. Both
Baron- komura and' M/j.Witte ,tele;
graphed. 'The former confined himself
to apprising Mr. Roosevelt of the con
ditions upon which peace had, been
concluded. M. Witte frankly laid his
tribute at the president's feet. In hia
message he said: "History will as
cribe to you the glory," and added the
expression of Russia's hearty apprecia
tion of the president's' "generous ini
tiative." Mr. Roosevelt replied with
words of thanks and congratulation.
Russians Jubilate Loudly
Then began the jubilation; M. Wltte
and Baron de Rosen returned to the
hotel for luncheon. The Japanese had
remained at. the conference hall to
lunch with Mr. Pelrce. The hews that
peace had been concluded had preceded
the Russian plenipotentiaries, and such
scenes of wild rejoicing have never
before been r wlthessed in the state of
New Hampshire as greeted them upon
their arrival at the hotel. , M. Wltte,
dazed at the sudden and happy termi
nation of the conference, was fairly
overpowered by the. tremendous ova
tion >he "received. ' He could only ex
press his gratitude, by shaking the hand
of everybody, 1 and in response to the
volley of questions fired at him as to
the terms, murmured, '."We pay not a
kopeck and we get half of Sakhalin."
Afterward in his room when he had
partially recovered ; himself he declared
that he coy Id not have dreamed of such
a victory,- for: he regards lt'a diplo
matic triumph of the. first . magnitude.
This : he makes . no attempt to . conceal
and if is the general .verdict 'here to
night. . The Russians are overjoyed at
the result.', "We have .had our Llao
Yangs and Mukdens on land. I .' they say,
"and our Tsushlmas on sea, but the
Japanese have their Portsmouth,
CANDY MANUFACTURER
BEING RUINED BY BEES
NEW YORK, Augf. 29.— A candy
manufacturer, owning an extensive
plant on Barclay ■ street, appealed to
the board of health yesterday for pro
tection against thousands of honey
bees which, he declares, are robbing
him of large quantities of sweets. If
the health authorities do not. act the
candy maker says he will appeal to the
police. £ , /
.Since early last spring, the complain
ant asserts, the bees have attacked his
employes and customers and made his
establishment the base of operation for
filling with honey 28 hives on the roof
of a near-by building occupied by a
firm, which deals' in beekeepers' sup
plies.
"I am in the unique position of. be
ingn g the only, man In. New Yorkwbp Is
being dally robbed of enough sugar to
keep five million bees busy making a
m t ropolit tin ' brand of honey," : the
candy maker said last night. "Bee ex.
pert* tell me that a hive as large as
those on the Vezey street building con
tains about 2(0,000 bees. - They are mak
ing- a good thing out 'of me." '
PRETENDING TO
CHECK BOYCOTT
CHINESE AUTHORITIES ADOPT
QUEER TACTICS
ENFORCE ITS OBSERVANCE
Official Ordered to Suppress Attack on
American Goods Begins by
.. Fining Merchants Who
Have Used Them
By Associated Presx, j '
SHANGHAI, Aug. 29.— Chang Chien,
who has been ordered by the ministry
to commence to concert measures to
settle the boycott, today met the Chin
ese chamber of commerce and the prin
cipal piece goods dealers. He began
by fining several dealers- 4000 taels
for alleged breaches of the boycott. He
then brdered all to sign an agreement
to buy no more American, goods from
foreign merchants of any, nationality.
Regarding goods contracted for be
lore the boycott was started, he stated
his Intention of opening an offlcp,
granting passes and stamping such
goods, thus permitting their sale In the.
interior.
He olso nnnounced his- Intention of
opening offices In thirty-six principal
trade centers In China, where goods
so stamped will bo passed. This will
require an Initial sum of 200,000 taels
which Shanghai dealers must pay, thus
tivertlng impending financial ruin. Per
manent boycotting muchlnery Is thus
created, available against any branch
of any foreign . trade in China, and it
also means the practical Imposition
of new taxation against all treaty
tariffs. . ■' . '■• •■ ■
BOYCOTT CAUSES ALARM
Returned Students- From Japan and
America Feed the Fire
By Associated Press.
PEKIN, Aug. 29.— The American
boycott almost overshadows the peace
negotiations as a topic of interest in
China. Accounts reaching Pekln from
trading centers Indicate that the move
ment attained its greatest . strength
early in August, and since then has
been decreasing. Nowhere except in
Shanghai has American business re
ceived a serious blow.'
The boycott would have been equally
successful at Tien Tsln, which is a
distributing market for American
goods second only to Shanghai, ex
cept for the determined repression of
Yuan Shlkal, who is almost the only
Chinese viceroy really ruling his- own
province.' ' ■ - ■
■■Many important merchants who em
barked in the boycott now repent of the
scheme, but it has passed beyond their
control Into the hands of agitators, tjie
majority of whom : are. students, many
recently returned from Japan and some
from America, who relate at meetings
and in newspapers lurid Btorles of out
rages received at the hands of Ameri
can immigration officials. The agita
tors are active principally in the central
and southern ' cities. They have aban
doned the original demand that Chinese
students and merchants be admitted to
America as freely as those of other
nationalities, and now are demanding
the unrestricted entry of all Chinese.
They argue that If this movement suc
ceeds the same coercion may. be em
ployed against Canada, Australia, Java
and all countries In which Chinese live.
Native Papers Fan the Agitation
The native newspapers which have
become influential only since the Boxer
uprising and ' the number whereof is
multiplying are" a powerful factor in
fanning' the. agitation.
The best Informed foreigners believe
that the boycott has passed Its climax
and will gradually subside; that the
cessation of orders for American goods
is merely temporary and that a decrease
of orders now will result in a corre
sponding Increase later iiiithe year.
The end of the Russo-Japanese war,
by opening Manchuria, will give a great
impetus to American trade. That coun
try practically has been closed to im
ports throughout the war, largely be
cause the armies monopolized all means
of transportation.
The guilds have launched the move
ment by forming a permanent organiza
tion and have plenty of funds to send
orators about the country and sow cir
culars broadcast. They boast of re
ceiving many contributions and mes
sages from American sympathizers.
Proportionately, as the first boycott
succeeds, the weapon may be expected
to be employed' against any government
that offends the Chinese.
FIREMAN SUFFOCATED
CHICAGO, Aug. 29.— Groping through
smoke to the top floor of the barns of
a department store on North Clark
street to rescue four children whom he
believed to be cut off by flames, Lieut.
William M. Mayer of the | fire depart
ment was suffocated by the smoke last'
night. Ills dead body was found'sev
eral minutes later by other firemen.
While a fire was blazing in the barns
spectators called out that the family of
Louis Nelson, the foreman of the barns,
was cut off by the flames. Mayer
learned that the rooms of the family
were on the third floor In the rear.
Without waiting for any of his men to
accompany him, he seized an ax and
dashed into the building. ... . .
J The fire, which was blazing In the
hay, gave out a thick smoke. Groping
along he managed to find his way to
Jhe roofs, only to^ discover that the
family already had escaped.
JJEN/CE tf/JwT BEACH
+* Last Week of the Venice Assembly
Wednesday, Aug. 30— Another Day of Thrilling Interest
AtrDITORIfJM, S p. m.-I,ft»t nppeftranee of the HON. ViWAAMU R. BMTTHH
In ffrfen on "CONSTRUCTIVE DEMOCRACY." Subject, "THE UNFINISHED
REPUBLIC." » n. m.— Only appearance of the popular contralto, Mlbh
MOLLIB BTKHLBT WILSON. 8:20 p. m.— BEAUTIFUL ILLUSTRATED POPU-
LAR LECTURE by PROF. CHAS. ZUF.BMN of the Untrerslty of Chicago on
"WASHINGTON TUB SUPERB: OUR NATIONAL CAPITAL.." (9:30( 9:30 p. m.-
AMPIUTHRATER, 7:80 to 0:30 p. m.— Concert by Arend's Venice Bund.
TOMORROW, THURSDAY-IN TUB AFTRRNOON-BARA nHARATI «nd
HENRY FRANK on "MY SPIRITUAL, AND RKLIOIOUH EXPKRIKNCEH. 11
;1N THE EVENING, the popular Cornetlut, MISS MATTLKF3 LOEH, and lust
' popular stereoptlcon lecture by PROF. ZUKBLIN of the University of Chicago, on
i ''WILLIAM MORRIS."
SPECIAL NOTlCR— During thl* mAt week of the Venice Assembly, admlaslon
| to the evening performances Is reduced to 26 centt.
ARTISTS OP fnmlnrf Tlia Miicirni Fnctivnl ARTISTS OF 1
California coming— 1 tte nusicai festival America
Venice Auditorium
Under the Sole Direction of SYDNRY LLOYD WRIOHTSON.
i SIX' ORHAT DAYS OP GREAT MUSIC— FROM SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER, S,
TO FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER ft. INCLUSIVH.
SUNDAY— IO:3O a. m., Blf Rpll*lous Service. Free; 2:30 p. m., SAcred Concert. ■
. admlaslon 26c; 8 p. m., "ST. PAUL," admission 250. 800 voices and orchestra of
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thurnday, Frlday-THREB PERFORMANCKS
.A DAY. 10:30 a. m., Hand Concert with Soloist, admlnslon 10c; 4 p. m., Organ Ito-
cltal, and 4:80 p. m. Ballad Concert, admission 260 for both; 8:15 p. m.,- All-Star
' Cast In Operas, Song Recitals, Piano Recitals, Bongs of All Nations and Ono
Dramntio Evening, admlnston 80<\ i" «.'■■
Season ticket 13.60 for 17 pnrformnnr.es; dally ticket for three performances
■ for any day 76c. Tickets for sale at the Venice Bureau of Information, 218 West
. Fourth street, or at thn Venice Auditorium, or at the Abbot Klnney Land Office
on, Windward avenue, Venice (next to powtofflee). •„ s , '♦"■ , :
LIVE IN VENICE IN COMFORT AT SMALL COBT. "
In our cozy villas and tents you can live cheaper than elsewhere. Prices ranfcs •
from $15 a month up; everything furnished for hounekeftplng; Kfts for cooking,
electric lights and laundry without charge. For further Information apply to
A. C. Walter Co., Bunk bldg., Venice. ' .•...,,; «y
VENICE INFORMATION BUREAU. 21fi W. Fourth St.. Angelus Hotel.
n/roßOSco's burbank theater. fgffi?#Sjg
J*M>: ...Special Matinee Today... <
>: A. Doll's House :-:
, HenriK Ibsen's Fascinating Study,
With Miss Blanche Hall as Nora
Harry • Mestayer as "Krogntad." William Bernard as "Helmer." Bennett South- .
ard as "Dr. Rank," and Jane Kelton as "Mrs. Linden." Staged under the direc-
tion 'Of Harry Mestayer.- Usual evening prices will prevail. . . , ■■■
TONIGHT— AII WeeK-Big Matinee Saturday— TONlGHT
——The Missourians^— — -•
.An excellent comedy drama of the "Show me" state. A 'cast full of favorites. ~.
U. 8. SPANISH WAR VETERANS' NIGMT. THURSDAY, AUGUST 81. .
NEXT WEEK— Biggest play of the year to celebrate Burbank's seventh year
of unprecedented success, "IF I WERE KING." E. H. Sothern's recent triumph.
Matinees every Sunday and Saturday, 10c and 26c. no higher. Evenings, 10c, ;:se,
35c. 50c. Don't forget the special Labor Day matinee, Monday. September 4. ' ■ .
f~\f}T>HF\lM SPRING BTREET. Batwrni Seoond and Third
... Both *hon.« 1447. ■ '
MODERN VAUDEVILLE V $&5 HIS \B
YANKEE DOODLE BOYS— Around the World In Twenty Minutes, i .
Howard bros., with Flying JACOB'S DOo 9, the Cleverest
Banjos. " ■ Canines. • ■■;...».■•«*♦'
JOSKPHINR AINSLBV, Comedienne. EDMUND DAY A CO.. "The Sheriff."
JAMBS J. MORTON, Monologlst. "THE QUEEN'S FAN."
ORPHBVM MOTION PICTURES. Last Week of the Great Sensation of Two
-•Continents, COL. GASTON BORDBVBRRV; King of Sharpshooters. ■• ,
Prices — 10c, 25c, 50c. . . . . . Matinees Wednesday, .Saturday, .Sunday.
■ S^DJJJirn OPERJf HOUSE MAIN ST - B » tw ««» Ftrtt «n« 8«m>««.
MjKSZ*\U urctcsr n\juac Phonw: Main IM7; Horn* 4U. ;
. The Family Theater
• ■ \Vny; Wpm6n bin. , • .■•■■
Matinees Sunday, Tuesday, Saturday, 10c and_ 25c. Evenings, -10c, 250,80 c.
Neat Week— By Unanimous Demand— QUO VADIS r . i
Swtt aenn THt? gITFD \ ' BEtASCO,' MATJJR * CO., Proprietors
Cl^/TJUI/ inCStICK> ' ■ ■■■ phonM! Mua M»0; Horn* XI . ..
:' ; • - Tonight— Matinee Tomorrow ' ..;:■'-'. ;
ANNIVERSARY "WEEK— Celebration of the first, year of thn Belasco theater Stock
•Company in a magnificent production, Bulwer Lytton's play .- • ;. f":,r: y £
:, Souvenir, Matinee Saturday, when every lady will bo' presented' with : a handsome
', souvenir.;: . ' "■■'.' '••'.•''» "V.'t : ';V.\. ."'. '■, ;•■;:•'■.•.■ ■ ;,'.-\' ■->•>' ''¥'<■* \_ >]-•'■ " .'"*. .'•'; •"c '.' ,'■' \.'
t NEXT WEEK— A - Sumptuous Production of the New. and Enormously ;i Successful
• Japaflese Play, ".THJ3. HEART 'OF THE .GEISHA," wlth-JUXXET-CROSBY.In h?r
■'• Original role. .■•,';...•. i -".-.' v. •-. •-.'.'< <■• '■•'-', ~"i ■ •' '.'■vi.^-- . I , ;; >f'*i A;, : .;.;,,' -?.. *►:•■
f^HUTES:, ' : Every Afternoon and Evening
■*■* Grand Open Air Concerts by Donatelli's Italian Band. Chutes Theater Freer
Welch, • Francis Musical Extravaganza Company prosonts "The Isle of Shampaln."
Thirty chorus girls and comedians. Evening performances only. .Visit the Japan- ■
ese Tea Garden. "One Hundred Other Diverting Features. ; Admission. 10c. > ; ■
tw a him at>T% hat I . Thursday, friday and Saturday
LfL.JtV4V^n,nt^,iJ nstL.l* NIGHTS THIS WEEK. 'AT 8 P. Mi—
*-* JOHN D. PITTS' NEW AND SENSATIONAL LECTURE .ON ."Ae-
TOUNDING FORGERIES NOW IN THE BIBLE, THE WORK OF DEBIGN- <
ING PRIESTCRAFT." ADMISSION 25 CENTS. „-{•.•<
Labor Day ExcursioitS
To Catalina Island../
Saturday, September 2
=== $2.50 for the Round Trip '
Special Trolley train will leave Depot,; 6th and
Main, at 10:30 P. M., connecting with steamer at
. . San Pedro. , Returntag leave t/lvalon, at 4 P.M.
Monday September ,4th (ijabor Day.) ',"
• • Why don't you spend the Holiday at the
.^cTVlagic Isle? ' • '•
. The Pacific Electric Railway
FIND DISTRESS
IN PARISHES
By Associated Press.
NEW ORLEANS, Aug. 29.—Follow
ing Is the official yellow fever report
to 6 o'clock p. 111. Tuesday: New cases.
45; total to date, 1832. Deaths. 7; total,
267. New foci, 9; total, 429. Under treat
ment, 174.
Owing to the fact that the total num
ber of foot which have been printed
from day to day is misleading and that
the number of cases reported under
treatment Is inaccurate on account of
a defect In the formula on which they
were. figured, these figures hereafter
Will be dropped. ■ ".. ■
Reports of new cases from the coun
try are: '.'.'•■<
Lake Providence, 3; Amelia, 4; Bayou
Bouef, 2; Arderlne, 2; Houma, 1; Ken
ner, 6; Hamon City, 3; Ninth ward of
Jefferson parish, It St. Rose, 8; Patter
son, 3; Waveland plantation, 6; Port
Barrow, 1.
The most Important development .of
the yellow fever situation today was the
report of Dr. C. MHo Brady, who had
been sent by the state board of health
on a tour of Inspection of the bayous
and lakes in Jefferson parish where
there are^muny settlements of fisher
men in' constant - communication 1 -with
New Orleans. '■'■■'. i; '■'•'■:'■.'■'■
Dr. Brady' made the ; trip with -Dr.
Bhanley of North Dakota. ■'.* Without .
completing their Investigations'*' they j
turned up thirty-five cases of "yellow
fever, mostly along: Bayou Batataria,
learned that deaths had occurred and
found much suffering.
v After Dr. Brady had made his report
the state board decided to organize im
mediately a relief party consisting of
a physician and two nurses. A large •
supply of medicines and provisions also',
will be forwarded. '''\ ?lr
The local' situation continues to be
most hopeful.
ITALIAN ' BTEAMBHIP AGENT '-'
FAILB IN BAN FRANCISCO
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 29.— Michael
G. Tonlnl, local agent for an Italian
steamship company, filed a petition"' in
bankruptcy today, fixing his liabilities
at 167,716.; His failure caused quite a
sensation in the Italian quarter, '.' ;
Swollen face, throbbing?
nerves, ugly teeth— the V
result of experimenting. '
The other fellow stuck to
SOZODONT
3 Forms: , Liquid, Powder . & Paste
. ASK YOUR DENTIST

xml | txt