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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, September 15, 1905, Image 1

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Sixteen Pages
IN TWO PARTS
VOL. XXXII, NO. 349-
BUNKERS SCORES
FELLOW BOODLERS
DECLARES HE WAS DESERTED
BY THEM
REASON WHY HE CONFESSED
Declares He Told the Truth Because
They Did Nothing to Aid. His
Wife and Child When
Trouble Came
By Associated Press.
SACRAMENTO, Sept. 14.— Forgetful
of the restraint he had hitherto exer
cised; forgetful, apparently of his pre
dicament and surroundings; realizing
apparently that his voice, scarcely
audible before, was filling the court
room with its volume, Harry Bunkers
furnished the feature of this morning's
session in telling Attorney Grove L.
Johnson, under cross-examination, why
he had decided to make the confession
which he has made of the Emmons
trial a legislative sensation.
His attitude was full of wrath as he
denounced his alleged associates In
bribe-taking. His eyes blazed and ho
leaned forward from the witness chair
as he said:
"I was deserted by my friends — tho
men who called themselves my friends
and promised to stand by me — who
promised to take care of my wife and
child. I heard that Senator Emmons
and his wife were In San Francisco.
They knew their financial situation and
they did not go near them. My wife
was working her heart's blood out and
they did nothing. That's why I done
it."
There was nothing of the prison air
about Bunkers during his utterance.
He looked rather the avenger, and tha
defense seemed to shrink back under the
unexpected tirade. But a moment later
Bunkers had himself under restraint
and only when he promised that ho
would testify against the others Impli
cated did he again allow his feelings
to get the upper hand.
Bunkers finished his confession and
the prosecution finished its examina
tion of him within fifteen minutes after
court had convened. His statement
was as follows:
Bunkers' Statement
"On Monday, after our first talk
about investigating building and loan
associations, Jordan told me there would
be three companies to be taken care of
per $500. On Tuesday he said one had
dropped out and that two must be
taken care of for per $350 to each sena
tor. The companies mentioned were
the Phoenix, Renters, and the Pacific
States companies. That was the under-
Dtandlng I had with Jordan. We were
not to issue any subpoenas for th*)
Phoenix, and if we had to, we were to
return a favorable report. According
to the proposal of Jordan we were to
protest per $500 apiece, the three com
panies named.
"Before the first meeting of the com
mittee I had a conversation with Em
mons at his desk. I told him Jordan
had said he would be able to bring up
something good for us. He said there
was nothing to it; that was what he
liked to hear.
"According to Jordan the Phoenix
and Renters companies remained in.
We were to do anything he wanted us
to do; either to fail to issue subpoenas
or return a favorable report"
"Take the witness," said District At
torney Seymour, and there was a buzz
of excitement as Grove L. Johnson be
gan the cross examination.
In answer to a rapid fire of questions
from Mr. Johnson, Bunkers admitted
that he had been on trial in the same
court on a charge of bribe taking.
Bunkers In Awkward Position
"Were your answers the same on that
occasion as on this?" was asked.
"No."
"At which time, then, did you commit
perjury — at that time or this?" Inquired
Mr. Johnson.
Bunkers did not reply until Attorney
Jones had entered an objection to the
question, whereupon Mr. Johnson said:
"This witness is not feeble-minded;
not under the influence of narcotics;
he has education and intelligence
enough to be a state senator. He
knows better than any one else on
which occasion he commlted perjury."
The court overruled the objectl- i and
the question was repeated.
Bunkers shifted uneasily In his seat
and finally said:
"The way I explain it is that I told
the truth this time, and told a He the
other time."
"Then you commlted perjury the
other time?" thundered the attorney
for the defense.
"Mr. Jones objected to this question
as insulting and no answer was re
quired.
Mr. Johnson, addressing the court,
eald:
"I now ask the district attorney to
file a complaint against the witness
for perjury. As a citizen of Sacra
mento I will swear to that complaint."
Bunkers grew a shade paler at this
but the court ordered the cross-ex
amination - to . proceed. In' answer to
questions Bunkers said: .
"What I stated at the . former trial
{Continued on Paxa Xwoj.
Los Angeles Herald.
VENERATED DEMOCRATIC STATESMAN JOINS THE MAJORITY
PATRICK A. COLLINS
MARCHED OFF BY
MASKED ROBBER
RIVERSIDE CITIZEN HELD UP
ON HIS DOORSTEP
BRUTALLY BEATEN AND BOUND
J. 8. Barber Is Forced to Accompany
Highwayman to an Orchard, Where
an Accomplice Assists in
Plundering Him
Special to The Herald.
RIVERSIDE, Sept. 14.— Under a full
moon, in front of his own home and at
the early hour of 9:30, I. S. Barber was
last night confronted by a masked man
and at the muzzle of a revolver was
bidden to move on to a more secluded
place for an Interview.
Mr. Barber, who lives on Market
street between Fifth and Sixth streets,
within a block of the police office, was
returning from a lecture and started
to enter his home by way of the alley
when he discovered a man loitering
there. He continued on to Market
street and approached his house from
the front. Almost at his own doorstep
he was halted and marched on to Fifth
street where. In an orchard, another
masked figure appeared. The accom
plices then went through Mr. Barber's
pockets for money, and finding only
$1.60, demanded the roll of bills which
they Insisted they had seen paid to
him shortly before. Barber told them
they were mistaken in the person and
made a grab for one of the masks. The
face revealed was that of a Mexican.
When the man found himself un
masked he said: "Now you'll know
me," and dealt Barber a blow on the
head with a piece of hose. After bind
ing their unconscious victim securely
and dragging htm out of sight under
the trees the highwaymen disappeared.
As Mrs. Barber was away from home
for the night and the children were in
bed, Mr. Barber's absence was not no
ticed until shortly before six o'clock in
the morning, when Mrs. Barber return
ing found her husband's bed empty
and notified the police. At about the
same time a neighbor, William Hotch
kiss, heard some one calling, and, find
ing the injured man, helped carry him
to his home.
Mr. Barber sustained severe Injuries
about the head from which he remain
ed unconscious most of the night. He
is still confined to his bed, and pneu
monia Is feared.
Mr. Barber says that both of his as
sailants were Mexicans, one being tall
and the other short No clew has yet
been found.
LIGHTNING STRIKES
AN EXHIBITION TENT
Four Are Killed, Six Seriously Injured
and a Dozen More Stunned
by the Bolt
By Associated Press.
INDIANOLA, lowa, Sept. 14.— Four
men were killed, six were perhaps fa
tally Injured and a dozen more were
stunned by a bolt of lightning that
wrecked a crowded poultry exhibition
tent at the county fair here today.
Thousands of chickens were killed.
The dead:
RAY ANDERSON.
CARL PETERSON.
THEODORE YOUNG, all of Indlan
ola.
BLAINE WRIGHT, Pleasantvllle.
Seriously injured:
Dr. Carpenter. '
J. McGranahan.
,Earl Barker.
CJ'.-Shellbergeiv
John Smith, all of Indlanola, ' 1
LOS ANGELES. CAL., FRIDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 15, i9°s-
YIELD HOMAGE
TO MISSOURI
FAIR EXERCISES ATTENDED
BY THOUSANDS
FOLK THE GUEST OF HONOR
Celebration at Portland on Behalf of
the "Parent State of Old Oregon"
Followed by a Banquet and
Pyrotechnic Display
By Associated Press. '-.•.*.—> v.
PORTLAND, Sept. 14.— Hundreds of
persons who hall Missouri as their
home, and thousands more eager to see
and hear the man who cleansed Missouri
officialdom of corruption, assembled in
the auditorium of the Lewis and Clark
exposition to do honor to the parent
state of "old Oregon," and the chief
executive who represents her.
Long before the hour at which the
exercises commenced the large build
ing was overcrowded, and when Gover
nor Joseph W. Folk, accompanied by
Governor George E. Chamberlain of
Oregon and municipal and exposition
officials appeared on the speaker's
stand, he was received with round upon
round of applause.
Welcoming speeches were made by
Governor Chamberlain, Mayor Harry
Lane of Portland, and President Goode
of the exposition, the keynotes of; all
the speoches being the Important his
torical relations between Oregon and
Missouri, and tributes to the work ac
complished by the visiting governor.
The responses were made by Governor
Folk and President H. H. Kern of the
Missouri Lewis and Clark commission.
Governor Folk's response, which was
brief, was received with great applause.
Following the exercises at the audi
torium, a public reception took place
at the Missouri state building in honor
of Governor Folk and the visiting Mls
eourians, the Missouri commission and
their ladles acting as hosts,
Tonight a banquet was tendered to
Governor Folk. Commissioner E. E. E.
McJimsey presided. Speeches were
made by former U. S. Attorney George
H. Williams of Portland, Judge W. D.
Fenton, Commissioner Kern, President
Goode and Governor Folk, whose sub
ject was "Missouri, the Mo&er of Ore
gon." •
During the banquet a special displa]
of fireworks on the exposition lake took
place in which many pieces emblematic
of Missouri or depicting her prominent
men were the features.
ROBBED THE COMPANY
OF $10,000 A MONTH
Ticket Sellers and Choppers Make a
Heavy Rakeoff by Tampering
With Machinery
By Associated Pre*»
. NEW YORK, Sept. 14.— Employes of
the Interborough company, according
to an announcement yesterday In a
local police court, have been robbing
the company of $10,000 a month. The
thefts have been confined to "L" tick
ets and were effected by a partnership
of sellers and choppers.
Detectives of the company discovered
that the Inside of the glass compart
ment of the chopping box was mado
wet and the tickets which stuck were
taken out by means of a steel rod wlt*>
chewing gum fastened to its end. The
extracted tickets were .then disposed
of through the ticket sellers.
Two of the detectives allege that they
caught Joseph . Temperman, a '.ticket
chopper, in the act of removing tickets
In this fashion. He was arrested and
held tor examination.
MAYOR COLLINS
OF BOSTON, DEAD
LEADING DEMOCRATIC FIGURE
PASSES AWAY
NEWS CAUSES A SENSATION
Distinguished Character In National
and Massachusetts Political Life
Expires Unexpectedly at Hot
Springs, Virginia
By Associated Press.
BOSTON, Sept 14.— The death of
Mayor Patrick A. • Collins, at Hot
Springs, Va., was announced here to
day by M. J. Curran, secretary to the
mayor.
Mayor Collins was one of the leading
Democrats of the country. He was
born In Fermoy, Ireland, In 1844, and
came to this country when only four
years of age.
Passing through an apprenticeship to
the upholstery business and saving
money he took up the study of law, and
was elected to the Massachusetts
legislature In which he served from
1869 to 1871. From 1882 to 1888 he 3at
In congress, and from 1893 to 1897 was
consul at Liverpool.
He was sent as a delegate to five
Democratic national conventions, being
presiding officer at that of 1888.'
For many years Mayor Collins de
voted much of his scunty leisure to the
cause of home rule for Ireland, and he
was the first national president of the
Irish Land League in this country.
A man of broad Democratic sym
pathies, in the purest sense of the
word, and of scholarly refinement,
Mayor Collins was regarded as one
of the last members of the so-called
"Old School" In national life. The gen
eral respect In which he was held as a
national figure was enhanced by the
affection In which he was held by tho
people of Boston.
Whole City Mourns
The news of the mayor's death, when
It, became circulated throughout the
city, caused a profound sensation." Ex
pressions of grief were heard on all
sides.
It is expected that the funeral of
Mayor Patrick A. Collins will be held
on Monday or Tuesday next.
• During the afternoon flags were half
.masted throughout the city and at the
flre alarm stations sixty-one blows
were struck, one for each year of
Mayor Collins' life.
Daniel Helton, chairman of the board
of aldermen, will act as Mayor Col
lins' successor, and will probably hold
the office until the close of the year.
IDAHO TOWN VISITED
BY CONFLAGRATION
Grangeville Suffers Loss Estimated
at $200,000, and Believed to Have
Originated With Incendiary
By Associated Press.
GRANGEVILLE, Idaho, Sept. 14.—
Fire swept the heart of the business dis
trict at an early hour this morning, and
before the flames were extinguished a
loss of approximately $200,000 was
credited to an Incendiary.
The citizens of the town turned out
shortly before 7 o'clock when the alarm
was given, but the fire leaped from
building to building with extraordinary
rapidity. Telephone communication
was soon destroyed, but the fire itself
answered the purpose of summoning
help, and fire fighters came from miles
around.
The heaviest loser was the mercan
tile firm of Alexander & Frledrlch, their
loss being estimated at $90,000, Of which
$75,000 was on stock and $15,000 on build-
Ing. The Jersey house, the largest hotel
in the town, was also burned, entailing
a loss of about $30,000. George K. Reed,
the proprietor, was in Spokane.
METHODIST PASTOR TO
BE INVESTIGATED
Charges of Unbecoming Conduct, Fal
sifying and Heresy Read Against
Vancouver Minister
By Associated Press.
EVERETT, Wash., Sept. 14.— Charges
of conduct unbecoming a minister, fal
sifying and heresy were read today
against Rev. T. B. Elliott, pastor of tho
Methodist church at Vancouver, Wash.,
before the annual session of the Puget
Sound Methodist Episcopal conference.
A select committee was named to In
vestigate the charges.
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIANS
VISITING SAN FRANCISCO
Special to The Herald. [
SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. , 14.—
Ex-Mayor Fred Eaton of Los An- ;
geles, who fathered the Owens
rfver water Bupply movement In
the south, is at the Palace.
Major and. Mrs. Carlos Sanchez ',
arrived here last evening from Los
Angeles and will spend a week be
fore making a tour of the north. ;
Prior, to returning they. Intend vis
iting Yellowstone park, ;•: ■ '. ■',
WILL BE LAVISHLY FETED ON RETURN FROM ENGLAND
CONSUELO, DUCHESS OF MARLBOROUGH
CABLE RIGHT TO
ORIENT ASSURED
NEGOTIATIONS WITH JAPAN
COMPLETED
CHINA. GRANTS CONCESSION
Work Will Be Immediately Proceeded
With and the Far East Pierced
at Three Distinct
Points
By Associated Press.
NEW YORK, Sept. 14.— Through
American enterprise, the way has been
won to connect the western continent
by direct submarine telegraphic lines
with the empires of Japan and China.
Clarence H. Mackay, president of the
Commercial Pacific Cable company,
today made the announcement that his
company has secured the necessary
concessions to enter Yokohama, Japan,
and Shanghai, China. Yesterday the
last step in a series of diplomatic nego
tiations, which were begun at the wish
of President McKlnley and which have
extended over a period of about three
years, was taken when Mr. Takahlra,
the Japanese minister to the United
States, affixed his signature to Japan^s
agreement with the Commercial Cable
company for landing rights at Yoko
hama. An agreement for landing
rights at Shanghai was signed by
China several weeks ago.
When these new . cables are com
pleted, Mr. Mackay said, their length,
added to other cables already laid or
about to be built, will form part of a
system which extends two-thirds of the
distance around the globe. .
The cable connections with both
Japan and China will be made by ex
tending the present lines of the com
pany which run from San Francisco
through the stations of Honolulu,
Midway, Guam and Manila, j Japan will
be reached by laying a cable from
Guam In the Pacific ocean direct to
Yokohama. The cable to China will be
laid from Manila to Shanghai.
In announcing the successful issue of
the long negotiations Mr. Mackay said
today: "We fchall proceed at once with
the manufacture and laying of these
cables, which will take several months.
The Commercial Pacific Cable company
will then pierce the far east at thrwe
points, namely, the Philippines, China
and Japan."
NEBRASKA REPUBLICANS
■ INDORSE ADMINISTRATION
Praise Roosevelt As Peacemaker and
His Utterances as to Railroads
' and Corporations
By Associated Press, 'mjflb
LINCOLN, Neb., Sept. 14.— The Ne
braska Republicans at their state con
vention nominated the following ticket:
Justice of the supreme court, Charles
B. Letton of Falrbury; regents of the
university, U. G. Lyford of Falls City
and Frederick Abbott of Columbus.
The platform indorses the adminis
tration of President Roosevelt and
praises him for bringing about peace
between Russia and Japan. The plat
form continues:
"We heartily approve President
Roosevelt's recent utterances as to the
control of railroads and large corporate
Interests.".
On . the , question ol ; passes the com
mittee . recommends that . a law be
enacted to prevent their, distribution, „
PRICE: DAILY, BY CARRIER, 65 CTS. PER MONTH
MISS ROOSEVELT
VISITS TSI AN
PARTY CALLS ON EMPRESS
OF CHINA
RECEIVE HANDSOME GIFTS
I Members of Party Are Presented With
Costly Bracelets and Rings — Oc.
caslon Marked by Absence
of Formality
By Associated Press.
PEKING, Sept 14, noon.— Miss Alice
Roosevelt, Mrs. Rockhill, wife of the
American minister, Mrs. Newlands,
wife of Senator Newlands, and other
ladles of Miss Rosevelt's party went to
the summer palace Wednesday and
spent the night. Yesterday they were
repelved In formal audience by the
dowager empress. Mrs. Rockhill, who
was first presented to the empress, in
troduced Miss Roosevelt first and after
ward the other ladies of the party. The
empress moved among the ' visitors,
chatting informally and presenting
them with handsome gifts of bracelets
and rings. This was followed by an
inspection of the grounds of the sum
mer palace. The whole visit was re
markable on account of the absence of
formality.
Returning to Peking in the evening
the party attended an "at home" at
the German minister's, where General
Corbln and wife and Senator Newlands
and wife are being entertained. | The
party spent today seeing the sights of
Peking. Tomorrow all will go to Tien
Tsing to attend a reception given by
Viceroy Yuan Shai Kai.
DANGEROUS ORANGE PEST
REPORTED FROM MEXICO
Six States Infested With a Maggot
Whose Fecundity Is Described
as Astonishing
By Associated Press.
SAN FRANCISCO, Sept, 14.— John
Isaac after acting as representative for
California in a conference with the
horticultural authorities of Mexico, has
just reported that he has discovered
that six and perhaps more states In
Mexico are harboring a foe of oranges
which there is reason to dread ' if .it
should be permitted to enter Califor
nia.
He reports that he found thousands
of oranges and mangoes have been de
stroyed within three months by the
Mexicans In an attempt to eradicate
the orange maggot, which has occa
sioned much damage.
The orange maggot proceeds from the
eggs of the insect known as the trypetu
ludens. The fecundity of this insect is
something astonishing.
The Infested section from which
California would have most to fear Is
the state of Guerrero, as its port of
Acapulco is one of the principal ship
ping points In Mexico.
MUST DIE FOR MURDER
- •-; IN SANTA BARBARA
By Associated Press.
SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 14.— Walter
Warner, who murdered Maria Tamayo
In Santa Barbara on June 10, 1904, must
die on the scaffold. 'The supreme court
destroyed his last chance of escape to
day, by denying the , petition ' for a re
hearing; "Warner^ will : shortly.; be 'i re
jseatenced and «xecuted> . .
Main News Section
WILL BE DINED
RIGHT ROYALLY
DUCHESS OF MARLBOROUGH
■ TO BE HONORED GUEST
ARMY OF MUSICIANS ENGAGED
Mrs. Clarence H. Mackay Will Enter.
tain Her Old School Friend, and
Elaborate Preparations Are
Now in Progress
Special to The Her aid.
NEW YORK, Sept. 14.— There will be
a musician for every guest that dines
with Mrs. Clarence H. Mackay at Har
bor hill, Roslyn, L. 1., on September 23/
This entertainment Is in honor of the
duchess of Marlborough. The duchess,'
who was Miss Consuelo Vanderbllt," is
expected early next week, and Mrs.
Mackay will have her as her house
guest over the end of the week. 8
The dinner will rank as one of the
greatest society events of this autumn.
Mrs. Mackay was one of the brides
maids at the wedding of the duchess
and was her school friend almost teri
years ago.
After dinner Mrs. Nathan . Franko,
one of the conductors at the Metropoli
tan opera house, and an opera house
orchestra of sixty musicians will give
the concert. The musicians will go in
a private car and stay at Roslyn over
night An army of florists will' turn
Harbor hill Into a bower of flowers,'
and there will be a host of caterers em
ployed, who will provide the dinner and
midnight supper. Probably not more
than sixty guests will be present
CIRCUS TROUPE LEFT
PENNILESS IN FRANCE
Part of McCaddon Show Reaches New
York the Rest Being Hopelessly
Stranded Abroad
By Associated Frees.
NEW YORK, Sept 14.— A number of.
the members of the McCaddon j circus,
which "was recently stranded at Gren
oble, In Southern France, arrived here
on the steamer Roma today. Four of
the party were cabin passengers, among
whom was C. M. McLeod, advance
agent of the circus. The rest came
over In the steerage. '
McLeod said the troupe had num
bered about 300 persons, and that it was
stranded because of a collection for
rent levied by a French financial in
stitution on the receipts of the show.
One hundred and twenty members were
left destitute. The .American consul
at Grenoble, Charles P. H. Nason, cared
for them.
Many members of the circus are still
at Grenoble or Paris, so destitute that
they depend for support upon private
subscriptions.
PRESIDENTS UNWELCOME
CALLER FOUND INSANE
By Associated Press.
MINEOLA, L. L, Sept. 14.— Isaac
Schamus, who was arrested at Oyster
Bay Tuesday, after having made ef
forts to see the president In order to
present to him a plan for handling the
anthracite coal output, was today de
clared insane after an examination.
THE DATS NEWS
FORECAST
Southern California: Fair FrL
day; brisk west winds. Maximum
temperature In Los Angeles yes.
terday, 82 degrees; minimum, 55
degrees.
PART-f,,
I—Bunkers1 — Bunkers scores fellow boodlers. .
2 — Market holds canal contract.
3—lmmense3 — Immense crowd attends opening
4— Editorial.
s—City5 — City news.
6-7 — Classified advertisements.
I—Forgery1 — Forgery is charged.
2.3 — Southern California news.
4.5.6— Public advertising.
7 — Markets.
EASTERN
Insurance committee begins Investi
gation of the Metropolitan company.
W. J. Bryan suggests arbitration '
measures to the president.
Contract for feeding Panama labor- "
ers confirmed after investigation.
FOREIGN
Miss Alice Roosevelt and party are *
guests of the empress of China. • • -■■
JVlrs. Mackay to entertain duchess of
Marlborough with great splendor.
Treaty of peace and Anglo-Japanese
alliance will be published simul
taneously. ' .
COAST
Bunkers continues his testimony re- J
garding the bribery cases. „
Well known Riverside man killed by ',
premature blast. - ,-.-•, . •
. Masked robber marches citizen from -
his own doorstep In Riverside.
LOCAL
Pretty young stenographer is • twice <
arraigned on charges of forgery. • j
Chinese lottery raided. Woman hides j
tickets In her dress. - •• ■•-. !
James Connor sues Los '■ Angeles In- !
f lrmary (or (23 5 which • he alleges was . ■' j
stolen from him by an employe of that j
Institution during his confinement thera ;
•ome months affo, ••-*",* — ■.«•-.;■■.•" 5

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