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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, June 01, 1906, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1906-06-01/ed-1/seq-2/

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AIM BOMB AT
ROYAL CARRIE
SIXTEEN INSTANTLY KILLED
AT MADRID
King Alfonso and Princess Victoria
. Narrowly Escape — As»astin Be*
lleved to Have Been an
Anarchist
when an electric wire deflected the
bomb, but at least sixteen persons,
most of them belonging to the personal
and military escorts, were killed.
Many others were Injured.
The following «re the killed:
CAPTAIN BAROSSA, commanding
part cf the king's escort.
LIEUTENANT RETSINET.
LIEUTENANT PRENDERGAST.
SIX SOLDIERS.
THH MARQUISE OF COLOSA.
HER DAUGHTER.
DON ANTONIO CALVO.
HIS NIECE, aged 6 years.
JOSE SOLA, 7 years of age.
LOUIS FONSECA.
One royal groom, who was leadr
ing one of the horses drawing the coach
carrying the king and queen.
Several of those killed wcro standing
on the balcony of the house from which
the bomb was thrown.
The explosion occurred Just as the
royal couple were about to enter the
palace. The route ot the cortege had
been diverted from Arsenal street to
Mayor street, owing to the popular de
sire.
The procession had . just passed
through Mayor street and was about to
turn into the esplanade leading to the
palace when an explosion shook the
buildings In the vicinity, stunnlr.g a
large number of people and throwing
the cortege into confusion.
The royal coach was brought to a
sudden atop by the shock, officers and
soldiers of the escort falling to the
ground about the equery and horses
that had been killed.
The screams of the terrified multi
tude mingled with the groans of the
dying, i It was immediately seen that
the royal coach was intact except as it
had been damaged by flying splinters.
.King Alfonso immediately alighted
and assisted Queen Victoria out of the
carriage. They then entered another
coach and were driven swiftly to the
palace.
All of this happened so quickly that
people away from the immediate vi
cinity were not aware of the tragedy
and , continued to acclaim their sov
ereign. Soon, however, there appeared
the ■ empty royal coach with horses
missing and the others spattered with
blood.
The grooms and drivers looked
deathly -pale in their spangled uni
forms. Then came a boy shouting that
a bomb had been thrown at the king.
The appearance of the king and
queen In a coach brought out delirious
ovations.
The' bomb, which waa concealed in a
bouquet, was of polished steel, half a
centimeter thick. It was thrown from
a third floor window. The house, ac
cording to some reports, belongs to
the , queen mother, having been be
queathed to her by a philanthropist
and being the only house she owns In
Madrid.
Kills Horses and Groom
The house is opposite the Church of
the Sacrament and the captain gener
al's residence. The royal procession
had come to a temporary stop with the
royal , carriage exactly opposite the
house when the bomb was thrown.
The missile fell to the right of the
royal carriage, between the hindmost
pair of horses and the front pair of
wheels. The explosion killed two
horses and a groom.
The. Duke of Solomayer, who was
riding on the right of the carriage,
was slightly wounded.
■ The scene of the tragedy presented
a i horrible spectacle, with dead men
and horses lying about literally torn
to • pieces. Intense excitement pre
vailed, the mob invading the streets
while the forces of the guards sought
to maintain order and block the ap
proaching streets.
• The bodies were wrapped up In
blankets and removed on litters, while
the wounded were taken to hospitals
In ambulances. The pavement was lit
erally covered with blood and the up
per stories of the buildings nearest
were spattered with it.
The place from which the bomb was
thrown is a boarding house. The
chamber' from which the missile was
hurled was taken May 22 by a man
from Barcelona giving the name of
Moral. When the police surrounded
the house the man attempted to flee,
but was captured. Another man es
caped over the roofs of the houses.
The great arches and naves, usually
sombre, were lighted up by thousands
of electric lights which lined the cor
nices and framed the marble altar with
an aureole of light.
At the left of the altar arose a throne
•upon ■ a dais, over which hung a ma
jestic canopy of light silk, exquisitely
wrought with gold embroideries. At
the back of the throne flared the arms
of Spain.
oTwo richly gilded armchairs of mar
velous workmanship occupied the dais.
S
; One of the oldest pianos in America. More than 50,000 in ■
I use by musicians and music lovers in our country. Its tone '<■
; is of delicate quality yet very powerful. The Kroeger is I
; strictly a home piano. It should have your consideration j;
; before you purchase. 1 Very liberal terms arranged with '<■
; responsible people. S
Southern California Music Co. \
Victor, lUflaa Huale Box aa« Pianola Agent*. 't
332-334 So. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. \
SAN DBCO RIVERSID* SAN BERNARDINO S
on which also rented two noft Rtlken
cushion*, upon which lh« bridal couplo
knelt. Immediately faring the throne
were (elided dlvana, on which were
.seated tinmen Chrlatlno, PrlnceM H«nry
of T?attenb#rn, the fnfnntM, the princes
and the members of the Hattenberg
and other royal fnmlilpn.
BMlrte them were tho forelßn prince*,
archdukes and grnnrl dukos in their
rlchent court uniforms, with the prln
rpss«s And durhe«n<>ft In ■• murveloua
court (towns with trains four yard*
long, mrnngps nnd hair bUzlng with
jewels and with filmy whlln mantillas
floating brightly over their heads and
shoulders, mantillas being rigidly re
quired.
Mr. Whlterldge, the American special
envoy, who was In evening dress, sat
among the other envoys, and Minister,
Collier und Mrs. Collier were seated
with the resident diplomats.
The wife of the American minister,
who whk the only American woman
present, wore a Parisian court gown of
white lace over white satin embroidered
with silver roses. Mr. Whiterldge and
Mr. Collier were consplclous owing to
the fact that they did not wear uni
form*. The ministers of the crown and
the highest officers of state sat further
back, and then came the nobility, the
grandees, the Knights of the Golden
Fleece nnd the field marshals, each In
their distinctive uniforms, their breasts
sclntillntlng with high orders, the silken
vestments of tho envoys of China, Per
sia, Slam and Morocco lending the
scene additional touch of oriental color.
As the royal couple entered the as
semblage arose and two hundred chor
isters intoned a processional hymn.
The king looked calm, happy and
slightly pale, as usual. - Across the
breast of his field marshal's uniform
was the blue and white sash of the or
der of Charles 111, and on his breast
sparkled the orders of the Garter and
of the Golden Fleece.
Bride Enters With Mother
The bride entered with her mother,
brother and Queen Christina, tho sil
vered embroidery of her wedding dress
reflecting the myriad of lights until
the bride seemed to be robed in Jewels.
Her veil, slightly drawn aside, revealed
her clear, fine features, with cheeks
full of youthful color.
The king advanced to meet the brido
and they stood together as the marriage
service began. The ceremony was per
formed with all the impressiveness of
the Roman ritual. Cardinal Sancha,
archbishop of Toledo, robed In crimson
silk, officiating, assisted by. a special
nuncio of the pope and tho highest
dignitaries of the church, with scores
of acolytes and incense bearers.
Ceremonies Last an Hour
The ceremonies, which lasted nearly
an hour, terminated with the nuncio
pronouncing the pope's benediction on
the newly married couple, and the
chanting of the te deum.
As the king and Princess Victoria
■were pronounced man and wife, the
news was signaled to the waiting
crowds and all Madrid broke into fran
tic demonstrations of joy, while can
non boomed and church bells chimed.
KING AND PRINCESS
ARE JOINED IN HOLY
BONDS OF MATRIMONY
MADRID, May 31.— The marriage of
King Alfonso and Princess Victoria
fina was celebrated today.
King Alfonso and his bride left the
church at 12:80 p. m. The announce
ment of the wedding by the firing of
artillery salutes was wildly acclaimed
by the people.
The city awoke today under a cloud
less sky, with dazzling sunshine adding
its glories to the bewildering maze of
color In. which tho streets were envel
oped.
From an early hour the centers pre
sented an aspect of extreme animation.
The entire night had been passed
amid the din of fireworks and singing
and dancing and thousands of provin
cials, unable to secure shelter, spent
the night In cafes and in the streets.
At 8 o'clock crowds densely packed
the main thoroughfares, and the troops
took up their positions, stopping all
traffic and the whole city took on an
air of feverish expectancy.
Guards in Attire
The esplanade fronting the royal
palace was occupied by regiments of
the royal guards in full gala uniform,
with glittering breastplates and hel
mets.
They formed semi-circles, guarding
the approaches to the palace from the
crowds eager to gain points of vantage.
The massive outlines of the palace
were without decorations, save the
royal standard floating above. De
tachments of halberdiers, with quaint
cockades, stood with halberds crossod
at the princess gate leading to the pal
ace courtyard.
All along the route of the cortege
hurried preparations were going on.
Troops lined both sides of the street
in solid ranks for miles.
The scene from the Puerta Del Sol to
the Parlo palace was one of striking
brilliancy. All the buildings were re
splendent with the yellow and red col
ors of Spain, woven Into sunbursts,
huge rosettes and graceful streamers
looped from roof to roof, and arches
of roses from which were suspended
enormous flower baskets and trailing
vines.
The wedding cortege started from the
royal palace at 9:30 a. m. amid the
ringing of church bells, the firing of
artillery salutes nnd the clamorous
enthusiasm of the crowds massed
along the route. Ahead rode trumpet
ers In crimson velvet suits of the time
LOS ANGELES HERALD: FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE 1, 1906.
of Philip II Bounding the approach of
the roynl party.
Following them mine the personnel
of the royal household, the heralds
mounted on stallions from th* royal
ftud And capnrlMinifil in oriental style,
pach led hy n. cadet of the royn.l rlrtln*
academy, nnrt the priiifrries nnd Broom*
from th« royal stablps lfddlnK the
king's favorite horses with pold em
broidered saddles, cloths find rolotvd
plumes, accompanied hy poften nnd rid
ing mastera and all the bewildering
equipment of a luxurious rourt.
Next came a long line of gala coaches
of the Spanish grandees, each of a dis
tinctive color, with panels richly paint
ed, glided and jeweled and drawn by
magnificent horses In sliver harness
adorned with tall plumes matching the
livery. I <
Within rode the nobility of Spain; the
men with their breasts covered with
orders and the women In wedding at
tire.
But the brilliancy of this part of the
cortege waa far surpassed when the
famous royal gala conches came into
view, each drawn by eight superb white
horses with golden and silver harness
and lofty colored plumage, looking like
the coaches depicted on some illum
inated page of a fnlry book.
These coaches formed one of the
moat striking features of the cortege.
They were marvels of luxury, some of
tortoise shells, others of mahogany, set
with panels painted by famous artists
—all ornamented with precious metals
and emblazoned with the royal in
(lgnis.
They wore relics of bygone days,
when kings and queens rode In golden
vehicles, but they had been renovated
in all their original splendor for this
occasion.
The tnont Interesting coaches were
the Amaranth coach for the court la
dles; the Cypher coach for the lords In
waiting; the coach of the ducal crown
for the Infantas and the shell coach for
the queen mother.
As the king*; coach appeared It was
greeted by a grent roar, while the mul
titude wildly waved hundkerchlefs, fnns
and parasols. Ills majesty could plainly
be seen smiling and bowing to the pop
ular greetings.
He woro the uniform of a field mar
shal, his hat surmounted by a sweeping
white plume. Around his coach was
a cavalcade of royal guards, heralds,
equerries and pages, holding back the
enthusiastic populace.
Immediately following the royal
coach came the bride's party, forming
another glittering array of gala coaches
bearing the lords and ladles in waiting
and the princes and princesses of the
house of Battenberg, and finally came
the famed mahogany coach with the
radiant bride, Princess Victoria, at
tended by her mother and Queen Maria
Christina.
Bride Receives Ovation
The appearance of the princess who
was about to become their queen
aroused the people to the highest pitch
of emotion, men and women cheering
and shouting friendly salutations, while
others from the balconies of the houses
along the route showered flowers on thn
princess and let loose hundreds of
pigeons carrying long, bright streamers.
The bride looked most charming and
graciously acknowledged the continued
ovations. >•">"":,,
As the cortege entered the Puerta del
Sol the picture presented was strikingly
beautiful, with buildings ablaze with
color, the streets packed by a dense
mass of humanity, the baclconlea
crowded with people, the swarming
windows, housetops and trees, and In
contrast the stately royal cavalcade
deffllng slowly amid the enthusiastic
clamor of the populace.
On reaching the chamber of deputies
the cortege came in sight of the church
of St. Jeronimo el Real, which was mag
nificently adorned for the ceremony.
Over the entrance was suspended an
immense canopy of red and yellow vel
vet embroidered with Spanish es
cutcheons and supported by gold-tipped
lances. Awaiting the bridal ' party
stood lines of halberdiers and palace
guards.
Play Spanish National Anthem
The massed bands played the Span
ish national anthem as the bridal
couple, with measured steps, passed
within the church. The interior of the
church presented a scene of rare beauty
as the royal couple entered.
One of the Injured proved to be a son
in-law of Premier Moret's private sec
retary.
Stranger Rents Apartment
' According to an official statement it
Is not known whether one or more
bombs were thrown. The statement
continues that It is impossible to ascer
tain at present the author of the out
rage, although It is known that a Cata
lonian named Manuel Duran look an
apartment in the house from which the
bomb was thrown May 22. paying In
advance with a 800 peseta bill. He was
well dressed, of elegant appearance and
showed a fondness for flowers.
Frederick "W. AVhitridge, the Ameri
can special envoy, went to the royal
palace late this afternoon, where he
was assured that the king and queen
were ■■ resting quietly, considering the
circumstances.
The duke of Solemayer's wounds are
not serious.
Mr. Whitridge also called at the for
eign office and on behalf of the United
States expressed profound sympathy
with the "Spanish sovereigns and people.
Horrible Scene Presented
The scene in the vicinity of the explo
sion was horrible. As the municipal
guards hastily improvised litters to
bear off the mangled corpses, deusu
crowds pressed in upon them, causing
indescribable confusion.
Soldiers occupied ull the streets lead
ing to the locality, making it almost Im
possible to reach the Hpot from a dis
tance. However, the Associated PreßS
correspondent was on tho scene soon
after the explosion and received an ac
count of the affair from the duke of
Veragua and Colonel Rafael de Chague,
the officers who assisted Queen Victo
ria as she alighted from her coach to
take another.
The bomb was thrown from above,
striking the ground and exploding not
far from the royal carriage. One of the
Holdlers of the king's escort and two
other BOldiers were killed and one of
the horses drawing the royal coach was
killed, while the injured numbered
scores.
Bodies Torn to Pieces
The bodies of many persons were ter
ribly torn by the force of the exploslnn.
The news of the attempted assassina
tion spreal throughout the city with
great rapidity, turning the rejoicings of
the people to awe. The telegraph offices
were invaded by struggling masses, but
a rigid censorship was instituted.
The explosion would not have oc
curred If the cortege had followed the
route originally plunned, but returning
it was determined to retrace part of
Mayor street and give the people fur
ther opportunity to observe the pageant.
It was Jn front of 188 Mayor street that
the bomb exploded.
This in wlihlu hulf a block of the
esplanade leading to thn royal palace.
WEDDING DRESS IS
MADE OF FINEST
SPANISH PRODUCTS
The wedding dress has : attracted
great interest in Bpaln, aa it is truly a
Spanish product In fabric and flnlsh,
except for the wonderful Brussels laco
which had been brought to adorn it.
It waa a fancy of the king and the
queen mother that the wedding dress
should be. made In Spain, and the Prin
cess Kna RfaolnnMy fell In with this
patriots sentiment. The dress Is,
therefore, one of the special presents
from tho king and l« a marvel of ele*
K.incfl.
The silk was manufactured from a
sprclnl pattern In one of the large Span
ish silk Mtahitohmrnts. tt wns made
with nil the nrtlatlc skill of the court
dressmakers.
Wonderful Silver Embroidery
The silk Is heavily overlaid with won
derful silver embroidery with soft frill*
r>f the finest Urusnels lnce said to hftve
cost *5o ft ynrd. The lacea were publicly
exhibited before being put on the drees,
nnd excited the admiration and aston
ishment of the aristocratic ladles of
Madrid. . .
' Oransre blossoms fire profusely used
with the sliver embroideries and laces
for the corsafte, and oven In dainty
clusters for the train, which Is, four
yards long. Aoclrdlnff to Spanish tra
ditions the bride must afterward pre*
sent this wedding dress to the Virgin
de la Paloma, the popular protrcctress
of maternity.
TWELVE PERSONS
WOUNDED DURING
BIG CELEBRATION
By Associated Preaa.
HAVANA, May 31.— Twelve persons
were wounded at Clenfuegon today by
the premature explosion of fireworks fit
the celebration of King Alfonso's wed
ding. At the Spanish caßlno In Havana
tonight there was a banquet In honor
of the wedding.
President Palma was represented by
Secretary of the Treasury Sterling and
Secretary of Agriculture Castro. .
The Spanish club of Havana and
other cities were decorated In honor of
the event.
KING AND QUEEN TO
RESIDE AT LA GRANJA
DURING HONEYMOON
The/ cnstle which Alfonso and his
queen have chosen for their honeymoon
Is in the Spanish Versailles, known as
La Granja. It is a quaint nnd quiet
spot, far removed from the Inquisitive
throngs of the capital and with all the
picturesque and romantic surroundings
suitable for a royal honeymoon.
The palace Is situated at the foot of
the Imposing Pico de Panalara in the
Guadarrama mountains, high above
the sea level. The little village dates
from ancient times, when Henry IV
built a chapel there and dedicated it
to St. Hdefonso.
BIG ESTATE GOES
TO UNIVERSITY
Provisions Are Practically Identical,
but Different San Francisco
Trust Companies Are Named
as Executors
By Associated Press.
FRESNO, Cal., May 31.— A second
and last will of M. Theo. Kearney, the
Fresno capitalist who died a few days
ago while on his way to Germany for
his health, was found this morning at
Kearney's castle on his estate ten
miles west of here and filed by Attor
ney W. K. Harris and Manager Frlzelle
of the Kearney ranch this morning.
The provisions of the will are practi
cally the same as the will discovered
in San Francisco yesterday. The prop
erty Is left to the University of Cali
fornia.
Makes Two Wills
Mr. Kearney made two wills. The
first, writen at the St. Francisco hotel
in May, 1004, named the Union Trust
company as the executor and also
mentioned William F. Alvord as . a
trustee.
In the second, which was made in
November of last year at the Chateau
Fresno park, the Mercantile Trust
company of San Francisco is named as
the executor and the name of Prof. S.
W. Hilgard is substituted for that of
Alvord.
The news that Kenrney had changed
his executors did not create much sur
prise, for he frequently changed his
bankers, as he did his lawyers, and he
never assigned a reason for his action.
There is no mention made in the will
as to where his body shall be burled.
Leaves Estate to University
■ Kearney left to the state university
property which Is valued by the ex
perts at $1,000,000, which yields an
enormous annual income. The alfalfa
lands yielded a gross annual revenue
of $40,000, and the income from the sale
of the raisin crop was between $80,000
and $100,000 a year.
Kearney spent money lavishly on the
estate und careful management will
make the net Income much larger.
The sum of $60 Is left to any woman
who can successfully claim to be his
widow. ; , *'.-■.
Another sum of $50 is to be given to
any child, male or female, who can
successfully claim to be his offspring.
Special Provisions Made
In case tho will conflicts with the
provisions of the civil code (section
1313), the following gentlemen will
have the joint use of the estate: Win.
F. Alvord (now dead), James D.
Phelan, W. H. Crocker, John Parrott
and Joseph D. Grant.
Special letters of administration
were granted to the Union Trust com
pany this morning by Judge Austin, in
accordance with the terms of the first
will, 'l'lils was before the second will
was filed. ,•,
Frank 11, Powers of the firm of Hel
ler, Powers & Ehman arrived here
last night in behalf of the Union Trust
company. When he learned that the
lust will had named the Mercantile
Trust company as executor of the es
tate he wild that there would be no
contest.
RELATIVES SEEK RENO MINER
Fear Entertained That Fred H. Kec.
gan Has Met Foul Play at
San Francisco
liy Associated Press.
BAN FRANCISCO. May 31.— Fred H.
Keegau, a mining man of iteno, Nov.,
who possesses large holdings In the
Bullfrog and Tonopah ' districts, Is
mlHutng and his ulster, Miss Emily
Keegan, who resides at 1591 Page street,
feam he has met u'jtli foul play.
She has reported' his disappearance
to the police.
Keegan arrived in this city from the
south and had a large sum of money
on hla person at the time.
On Tuesday night he dropped out of
sight. The detectives are endeavoring
to gain a trace of his whereabouts.
Owing to the lumi of bmlno* Urn
Tttlk-u-I'..um department cf Ui« Hnutit
em California llualu company' will be
open Wednesday anil Saturday evening?
tor tlit* uccuuimodatloii o( Herald sub
•crlbtri.
HOUSE SHAVES
TWO SALARIES
POLITICAL PLUMS REDUCED
PERCEPTIBLY
Senate Passes Knox Immunity Bill
and Military Academy Bill— Rail*
road Rate Bill Nears
an End
By Ae«oclAt«d Press.
WASHINGTON, Mny 31.— The Demo
crats today demanded roll calls on
every possible parliamentary point
Notwithstanding these delays the
house passed the diplomatic and con
sular appropriation bill, carrying an ap
propriation of 12.734,869.
A number of amendments were
adopted, among which were changing
tho salary of the ambassador to Japan
from $17,500 to $12,000, and fixing the
salaries of the ministers to Delgium,
the Netherlands and Luxemburg at
$10,000 per year Instead of $12,000, as
fixed by the bill when originally re
ported.
The legislative, executive and Judicial
appropriation bill and the postoHlce ap
propriation bill were sent to conference,
the house adjourning at 4:15 until noon
tomorrow, the minority threatening to
cause a roll call on three amendments
to a bill correcting the military record
of Benjamin F. Graham. ■ ,v
Graham was mustered out of the ser
vice of the Unltf 1 States army In 1865,
and at the time he alleged that he
knew no reason other than that he
voted tho Democratic ticket at the
election held by his regiment (the
Nineteenth Ohio volunteers) a short
time previously.
Mr. Dalzell decided to adjourn rather
than go through the weariness of two
more roll calls.
RATE BILL NEAR AN END
But Eleven Amendments Remain to
Be Disposed Of
By Associated Press.
"WASHINGTON, May 31.— There are
but eleven amendments in the railroad
ratebill to be disposed of by the con
ferees of the senate and the house.
Twenty amendments disposed of was
the record made today.
The senate has receded on but three
amendments while the house conferees
have accepted thirty-nine. Those on
which the senate proceeded are of minor
Importance.
The provisions still in dispute include
the express company amendment, those
relating to oil and the ownership of
producing properties by common car
riers, the anti-pass amendment, the
sleeping car provision, "Jim Crow"
cars, the bill of lading provision, the re
tention or rejection of the words "in
its judgment" and "fairly remunera
tive" and the side track amendment.
The prediction was confidently made
that a complete agreement will be.
reached on the measure tomorrow. The
conferees are to meet at 10 o'clock.
SENATE PASSE3 THREE BILLS
Considerable Time Taken Discussing
Nomination of J. Wlckersham
By Associated Press.
WASHINGTON, May 31.— The senate
today passed the Knox Immunity bill
and the lighthouse bill, with practically
no debate, passed the military academy
bill and was or.ly prevented from pass-
Ing the employers' liability bill by a
motion at 2 p. m. to go Into executive
session.
Most of the afternoon was devoted
to consideration in executive eesslon of
the nomination of Judge James Wicker
sham to be Judge of the United States
circuit court for the district of Alaska,
but he was not confirmed.
The charges against him which have
prevented confirmation for three years
were urged strongly by Senators Mc-
Cumber, Hansbrough, Nelson, Teller,
Pettus and a number of others. He
was defended by Senators Foraker,
Dillingham, Bailey, Culberson and
others. No vote was had nor did it
appear that one Is Imminent. He Is
serving on a- recess appointment.
At f>:so p. m. the senate adjourned.
FRENCHMAN KILLS
MICHIGAN MAN
Adventurer Who Acted as Traveling
Companion Supposed to Have
Sailed for Europe Fol.
lowing Tragedy
By Associated Press.
PEKING, May 31.— Reuben Morley
of Hnginaw, Mich., was murdered on
the bolder of Mongolia, 400 miles north
of Peking, on Sept. 2 by a French
adventurer styling himself La Verger,
with whom he waa traveling.
John Morley of Cleveland, Ohio, re
turned today from un expedition fol
lowing his brother's route, during
which he obtained convincing evidence
from French missionaries and Chinese
showing that Iteuben Morley left a
Chinese Inn on the morning of Sept. 2
to visit a lake ten miles distant.
The Frenchman returned at night
with Morley's rifle and saddle bugs
and told tho servants that Morley had
proceeded alone to Mongolia.
The Frenchman was seen burning
Morley's papers, and Mongols found
Morley's . pack horse, carrying . his
packs, among a herd of wild horses.
Weeks afterward a man' resembling
Le Verger cashed . Morley'a letter of
credit at Colombo, Ceylon, and sailed
for . Kurope.
The presumption la that he either
shot Morley or drowned him In a lake.
GALE BLOWS BARK TO ATOMS
Huge Waves Completely Destroy a
Chilean Vessel at Valparaiso.
Five Men Drown
By AsunHntdl I'rena.
NEW YORK, May 81.— A cable to the
Herald from Valparaiso. Chile, Bays:
The harbor \vu» visited Tuesday by
a fearful gale. The Chilean bark
AntofoKnsta was blown ashore, the
huge waves reducing her to small frag
ments In less than five minutes. The
crew had Just been saved by the reg
ulation life boat.
A shore boat with six men capulssed
late, in the night. .Five men were
drowned.
The cutter Juan --. Ferdlnandes wan
uuu ivm-MU, I'Ut l ' |B crew was aaveil.
AMUSEMfNTS _^^_
BiiLASCO THEATER r^i^oTl^T^^rp^^ir
— Phon««: Main tSiOj Horn* S«T.
TONIOHT — Ma<lnt« Tomorrow.
Only four morn performances of thn urestput Performance ev»r given by a
slork company In this city, the Belasco Theater Work Company's ■u»r«ni«
success,
Rip Van Winkle
With George W. Bsrnum In Ms greatest rol«, nip, Assisted by ths entlra ]}«•
lasco Theater Stock Company.
Prices: Rvppy night, 25c to 760. MATINKB TOMOIttIOW, 280 td 60c.
■ NRXT WKEK — Another of Charles Froliman'a great comedy succesgoa. .tune.
TTOTCHKISS THEATER ffta*
**• A TONIGHT AHI> AtX tilts WERK. MAT§. SATWnbAY ANh stlNiuv
Opening Wrrk of Ihe nip; Minimi narleai]ii« Srn.nn.
With fln Incomparable company headed by tho famous German comedians
KOLB C&DILL
Presenting- tot the Opening Bill Judson C. Brusla's musical iatlt-e.
1.0.U.
The >«♦ will Inol.idjnjii T. Dllloa, nohrrt O. PHkln and Itrnil* Tannehlli. .
PRICES ALWAYS THE SAMH — Kvcnlngs, 25c, 3Gc. 60a and 7Hc. Regular
Mntlnees Saturday and Sunday, 15c. 250 BSc. Stats always ar-lUn* si* flays
"hoad. BOTH THONEH K25.
ORPHEUM THEATER SWUNG STREET, Bet Sertnd anrt Third
- — — — ■ i uotn Phones Ml.
MODERN VAUDEVILLE
Fred KnrnoVi I.nmlnn Comedr Co. In "Mumming Birds," or "A Night In an Eng-
lish Music Hall;" Krnn. Wnlah A Mrlnnr, Comedy Acrobats; Mnrveloua Frank
A Little Hob with their acrobatic dog Tip! rnprlor. ljj-nn A Vat, Daintiest
Girl Act in Vaudeville; Knutrr A Koater. Musical Comedy; The Great France*
Una, Balancing; and Juggling; Orpheum Motion Plctureai Argenantl Trio. New
Selections from Italian Opera.
Matinees daily except Monday, 10c and 35c. Evenings, 10c, 25c, BOc.
Q. RAND OPERA HOUSE Mamstr^t, B ? t g .«»y A ,d second,
TUB FAMILY THEATER.
ULRICH STOCK COMPANY
Kg LURED FROM HOME
Atfltlnftes Sunday, Tuesday, Saturday, 10c and 26c. Bvenlngs, lOc* 26c, BOc. '
NEXT WEBK — "I-ost In a Big City."
MASON OPERA HOUSE &&.^ T &. wr .
A SUMMER BBASON OF BURLESQUK.
COMMENCING MONDAY, JUNK 4— WITH SPECIAL SUNDAY NIGHT PRO-
DUCTION AND SATURDAY MATINEE. Harry James* Travesty Stars from
New York City, nire and Cnity, Bobby North, .Inmrn J. Krlloj-, H«Mrmnr.v
«;i«»x, lOdtvard Gallagher, I.lllle Snuthrrlnnil, presenting tho Greatest of Modern
Funmakers. *
FIDDLE-DEE-DEE
With an American Beauty Chorus that will make you sit up and take notice.
SEAT BAL.E NOW ON. POPULAR PRICE3^2r.O. BOc. 7Sc. $1.00.
IyrASON OPERA HOUSE Ko^ettn .
■*•»•*■ TONIGHT, FRIDAY—DON'T MISS IT— ONLY TIME HERE
ELLEN BEACH YAW
IN SONO RECITAL, assisted by SENOR HICARDO RUIZ, Violinist; Wtn. Mead,
flute; Mary O'Donoufirhue and Mrs. T. Newman, Accompanists. Seats now on
sale at Blrkcl's Music Store, 345 South 6prlng street. Prices 50c, 75c, $1.00,
»I.RO and $2.00.
TWTOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER pp l hh X 00 t ne S '"2-o laln>
•^•^ Only three more matchless performances, TONIGHT, TOMORROW MAT-
INEE and TOMORROW NIGHT:
cTVIIZPAH
Ella Wheeler 'Wilcox and Luscombe Searelle's blblicAl drama.
NKXT WHISK — "The Girl I Left Behind Me." Seats Belling. _^
rpHE CHUTES Admission 10c
•*• Free Roller Skating Rink Now Open
THIS CELEBRATED MIMIOURNUS,
SKETCH ARTISTS.
16— O THEIR FREE ATTRACTION S— IS \
EVKRY AFTERNOON AND EVENING. V .
LAST PERFORMANCE— JI'IV E .'Ull) (SUNDAY) — DR. CARVER'S I'VVK
DIVING HORSKS. ■ .
PANORAMA ROLLER SKATING RINK J^VvVoUyVp^
The Belasco Th«at«r,
RINK OPEN ALL DAY
OPEN EVERY DAY IN THE WEEK. Admission, Mornings, 9 to 11:30, 10c;
Noon, 11:30 to 1:30, 10c, with Bkates, 25c; Afternoon, 2 to 6, 20c; Nights. 7 to 11
(EXCEPT TUESDAYS), 25c. Excellent music every afternoon and night. '
Largest and Best Skating Floor in the City. _if
QRLEY'S GRAND AVE. RINK For Nice People
ONE MILE INTERNATIONAL BACK SATURDAY EVENING, JUNK S.
PROF. JOS. WALSTEIN vs. PAUL HARNER
of San Francisco. (Amateur champion of London)
10 A. M., Admission Free; 2 P. M., Admission 20c: 7:30 P. M. Admission 25c.
Music by the Los Anj?eleg Military Banfl. Automobile watchman free.- The
rink Is available for clubs and parties any evening after 10:30. CLOSED ON-
SUNDAYS. NO TIPPING PERMITTED.
OLLER SKATING AT DREAMLAND Sa V in L £treets.
Urenmlund Convert Bund, Home Phone 8824.
Daily except Sunday, 9:30 to 11:30 a. m.; 2:00 to 6:00 p. m.; 7:30 to 10:30.
p m Admission, morning, 10c; afternoon, 20c; evening-s, 2Bc. Special Society
Night every Thursday evening. The fluent nnd longest utralshtntrar akatlns
floor In Ihe west. Skate a block without a turn. Tho best steel roller ball-
bearing skates and finest equipment in the city. Professional Instructors for.
beginners. ,
<iA Rest Amid
YSp^jfcE^wSw To a tired person the very thought of a rest at a
\Hpfi=?Sj2j' mountain resort a mile above the
Ye Alpine Tavern
Is such a place. Telephone and trolley connect it with the city.
And though only two hours distant it has all the isolation -
of a remote resort. Five through cars a day.
The Pacific Electric Ryv
STEAMER SINKS;
TWO LOSE LIVES
By Associated Press.
DKTROIT. ' Mich., May 31.— The
steamer Krln. upbound and towing the
schooner Danforth, was run Into and
cut in two by the steamer Cowle In
the St. Clair river Just below St. Clalr
early today and two of the liirm s
crew were drowned. The dead:
MJIB. MARY HEED, Spanish River,
Ont.
MRS. HUBERT, cook, Cleveland.
Nine members of the Krln'« crew and
the 13-year-old Bon of Mrs. need were
saved. Captain Sullivan and the boy
and Mate George Patterson of Port
Dalhousle, Ont.. James Dagden and
Grove Shook of Windsor, Ont.. and
Thomas Lyon and Oeorge Fan«naw of
aiovei-BVille. N. Y.. wore picked up by
fishermen. '
Schooner Did Not Stop
Officers of the schooner Panforth
ehurgs that tho Cowle did not stop ona
assist In the rescue of the Krln's crew.
The Krlii Bank so rapidly after the
collision that those member* of the
crew who were uslee-p had little chance
for their lives..
The Erin is owned by Thomas Con.
lon of Thoreld, Ont, and the Cowle
by the United States Transportation
company of Cleveland. The collision
occurred during a fog. The Cowle Is
a modern steel freighter and is not
thought to have been much damaged,
while the Erin was a wooden vessel of
the old type.
Three Reach Shore
By A«Aoclat< I Press.
COURT WRIGHT, Ont, May 81.—
The chief engineer, first mate and fire*
mini of the wrecked steamer Krln have
come ashore alive, having caught some
wreckage on which they have drifted.
SUGAR COMPANY BANKRUPT
Petition Flled In Federal Court at
Omaha Declares Big Concern
Insolvent
By Associated Pr«sa.
OMAHA. Neb.. May 81.— A petition
was filed in the federal court today
asking that the Standard Beet Sugar
company be declared bankrupt.
On May 8 C. W. H. Fergu»on of Lin
coln was appointed receiver for -the,
company and the petitioners claim
that since then steps have been taken
to give certain creditor* preference Jn
the /matter of payments.
The petition is flled on the part of a
number of farmers who furnished beeU
to the , factory and the Union , Paclrto
Jtallroad company, which held : claims ■
for freight. The Standard Is one of th« ;
lurgeHt beet sugar concerns In the west.'

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