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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, July 07, 1906, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1906-07-07/ed-1/seq-2/

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ENGLISHMAN ENDS
LIFE WITH RAZOR
SPENCER-STANHOPE DEAD IN
RIVERSIDE HOTEL „',
Doctor Was Preparing to Take Un.
balanced Patltnt Abroad— Victim
Comes of Noted Family
in London
flpeelal to The nerald.
RIVERSIDE, July 6.— E. C. Spencer-
Stanhope, an Engllßh remittance man,
was found dead at noon today In his
room at the Hotel Holyrood. He had
nearly severed his head from his body
with a raaor.
.Dr. R. H. Martin, who had for come
time been attending Stanhope, and D.
Cochrane, proprietor of the hotel, made
the gruesome discovery.
Stanhope was accustomed to sleep
late, but when he did not appear at
neon his door was burnt open. Stan
hope was 39 years old and had lived tn
Riverside about four years ago on a
ranch purchased soon after his arrival
here. He has been suffering of late
from melancholia, and becoming
alarmed at his condition. Dr. Martin
arranged to take the man back to his
people In. England. Tho trip was to
have been made just as soon as Dr.
Martin could arrange his affairs here.
• Stanhope came from one of the most
prominent families of England. His
father Is a "K. C. B." and a member
of parliament. The dead man was an
only son. A sister, and his father sur
vive Stanhope. The body will be em
balmed and sent to England for burial.
IS KNOWN IN LOS ANGELES
Hotel Nadeau Attaches Say He Acted
as Though Unbalanced
.E. C. Spenoer-Stanhope when in Los
Angeles on visits usually stayed at
Hotel Nadeau. He had been a visitor
here for years.
.'Attaches say that the man has been
losing weight for some time and his
condition and conduct led many to be
lieve that his mind was becoming
affected.
'Spencer-Stanhope was, here last on
July 3. In saying goodby to Proprietor
Alden he seemed to be worried about
something and kept on asking after his
bill had been settled whether every
thing was all right. He was assured
that it was. and then the man hurried
to the station to return to West River
side, where his orange grove was
located.
British Vies Consul White says he
knew Stanhope ac a British subject.
YOUTHS EXPLODE BIG BOMB
San Francisco Residents Almost
Thrown Into Panic as Windows
of Houses Are Shattered
By >««orintetf PreM.
SAN FRANCISCO, July 6.— A piece
of iron pipe loaded with giant powder
exploded at 7:30 at the corner of Filbert
and Flllmore streets, filled the air with
fragments of metal and scattered the
■windows of two houses.
The explosion almost created a panic.
The residents- «f the adjacent streets
rushed from their houses In terror,
thinking that dynamite saved" from the
fire had blown up a block of buildings.
The bomb was manufactured for the
celebration of the Fourth and was set
off by a gang of boys in a vacant lot
near ths house of engine company No.
20. The police are now investigating
the. affair.
Suter Uses an Alias
,By Associated Tress.
' ,SAN FRANCISCO, July 6.— The police
hwe learned that Robert Soalter, who
was arrested yesterday for burglary, is
in resa.l life Richard Suter, a well kn.own
man of this city and a former officer
Ja the British navy. After remaining
In jail for several hours Suter was ad
mitted to bail.
1 Reduced jsLsipii
f Prices |
I Onr~Special Of » I
<g Of All New, Used and Second £
| Hand Pianos |
Is Proving EVERYDAY to be a BARGAIN S3
Cg DAY at the BIG STORE o.
(3a STANDARD MAKES, like the CHICKERING, VOSE, STECK, are cP
"*J offered at greatly reduced prices during this sale, and many slightly £32)
fM used and second hand pianos are offered at prices way below their ™
*2i real value, and all because w« must have room, and that at once
t^ The carpenters are now at work tearing out partitions, the pianos Jn- 1
t» must be removed NOW. „
C-J -riff WT nWHl TTMim^i.-nM bmbii Wl
C§ KRANICH&BACHS BffW^^^^M, if
£> each Instrument; come see for { SJI
[S P""*"- TODAY. TONIGHT, TOMORROW, but don't delay too <$*
long If you want the finest of the lot offered.. Pianolas, Pianola- K2~
c? I lanos, Orchestrelles, Vocallon Organs are Included In thla sale. We J<J
DJ> ihall expect you to call. =
c§ Southern California Music Co. £
(g Victor, Zon-O-Phone «n4 Regius Agents , >*&
-s> 332-334 S. Broadway, Los Angeles '&
••• Ul»«o, HlymraM*. tf»a Uvrm.rdl.o. J2-)
BIG VESSEL GOES ASHORE
United st.ites Transport Thomas
Strikes Coral Reef Near
Island of Guam
Hy .A "•floriated Press.
MANILA, July 7.— Tho United StfttPß
transport Thomas la reported to be
nshore on a coral reef near the Island
of Guam.
Oeneral Wood has asked the secre
tary of war for authority to send the
transport Meade to take off the pas
sengers and cargo of the Thomas,
whose position is favorable as long as
good -weather prevails.
Thn Thomas Is reported to have run
on thp reef a distance of 100 feet. Rf
forts to dislodge her havo thus far heon
futile. AH on board, the Thomas are
safe. She carried no troops.
PRUSSIAN POLICE
NAB ANARCHIST
SEATTLE MAN IS ARRESTED AT
ALTONA
August Rosenberg, Whose Actions
Aroused the Suspicions of Secret
Agents, Said to Have Hoarded
Many Explosives
By Associated Presa.
ALTONA, Prussia, July «.— lt be
came known today that August Rosen
berg, an alleged anarchist from Seattle,
Wash., was arrested here Tuesday, July
3, as he was leaving the train arriving
at Altona.
Acting on Information received from
the police of New York, the authorities
were watching for Rosenberg, who has
relatives here.
Rosenberg, who was accompanied by
his wife, came to Europe on the Ham
burg-American liner Patricia, which
left New York .Tune 16 and arrived at
Hamburg June 20.
The prisoner affirms that he Is an
American citizen. His baggage has
been forwarded to another part of Ger
many and has not yet been searched
by the police.
DEADLY EXPLOSIVES FOUND
Search of Rosenberg's Home Reveals
an Extensive Bomb Plant
Sv Associated Press.
SEATTLE, July 6.— German Consul
Geissler of this city, at whose Instance
the police searched the former home of
August Rosenberg, the alleged an
archist arrested yesterday at Altona,
Prussia, is said to have at least two
secret agents looking up further de
tails of Rosenberg's mode of life in
Seattle.
The outfit found by the police, con
sisting of 200 bottles of acids and ex
plosives, a well equipped furnace, cru
cibles, mortars and several hundred
pounds of scrap iron, still remains in
the basement of 2206 Sixth avenue,
where Rosenberg lived when in Seattle.
Consul Geissler has made no effort
so far to secure the stuff as evidence,
and the police do not feel called upon
to act further unless requested by the
German authorities.
The consul was notified of the arrest
of Rosenberg at Altona, but declined to
say whether he has had further in
structions from his home government.
Find Body in River
By Associated Press.
SACRA3IENTO, July 6.— The body of
B. O. Burns, who disappeared Saturday,
was found in the river today. He was
mentally unbalanced since the earth
quake in San Francisco, where he for
merly worked as a machinist. It is be
lieved that he committed suicide.
Shasta County Drenched
By Associated Press.
REDDING, Jufy 6.— A heavy elec
trical and rain storm is raging this
evening in the northern and eastern
part of Shasta county. A severe rain
fell in Redding tonight after the hottest
day of the season. The thermometer
reached 98 degrees.
LOS ANGELES HERALD* SATURDAY MORNING, JULY 7, 190«.
PREMIER WARD
SEEKS TREATY
NEW ZEALANDER TALKS OF
RECIPROCITY
Visits President Roosevelt to Talk
Over Details, but Admits Such a
Condition Is Hard to
Secure
By Associated Press.
OYSTER HAY, 1,. 1., July «.-"\Vhen
Sir Joseph Ward, tho new premier of
Now Zealand, stepped from the train nt
Oyster Bay today to keep a luncheon
engagement with President Uoosevelt,
he frnnkly snld the thing nearest his
heart In America was the development
of a reciprocity trenty between New
Zealand nnd the United States. When
Sir Joseph returned tn the station two
hours later, having fulfilled his lunch
eon engagement, lie remarked:
"Reciprocity is not an easy thing to
bring about in this country." >
Sir Joseph, adhering to the rules he
had laid down for himself In his jour
ney around the world, declined to dis
cuss the exchange of Ideas between
himself nnd President Roosevelt.
"My hearty belief In your president
as a statesman of strength, breadth
and courage," he said, "has been most
pleasantly and emphatically confirmed."
From his frank statement on arriv
ing at Oyster Bay that he intended
discussing the possibility of reciprocity
with the president, his later comments
on that subject are Interesting as in
dicating the business like plan he pro
poses.
Would Reduce Tariff
"New Zealand," he said, "is ready to
make a universal 10 per cent reduction
in her tariff to the' United States in re
turn for a like concession and Is pre
pared to make such a treaty binding
without action on the part of the New
Zealand parliament.
"She now grants this reduction to
Great Britain and would be glad to do
so to the United States.
"If this is too broad a proposition we
would be" glad to make this reduction
on specicflc articles which each nation
buys abroad."
The premier Instanced wool and gum
used in the manufacture of varnish
and said what New Zealand wants is
certain grades of pine lumber, tinned
salmon and many kinds of manufact
ured goods. He said there might be
opposition in New Zealand to reducing
their tariff on lumber..
"But," added he, "you have special
Interests In this country, too."
The New Zealand premier here ad
mitted he knew of a number of reci
procity treaties now awaiting action
at the hands of the United States sen
ate.
"New Zealand," he continued, "Is a
county- capable of maintaining a pop
ulation of twenty to forty millions. You
are building the Panama canal, and
are our nearest English speaking
neighbor except Australia.
"Our trade is growing, our interests
are identical. It would seem wise
statesmanship to cultivate our relations
along the commercial line and we are
■willing."
Sir Joseph will sail from San Fran
cisco for home on the Sierra July 12.
FOURTH CLAIMS
MANY VICTIMS
In Addition to the List of Casualties
3551 Persons Were Maimed or
Injured, Some of Them
x Fatally
By Associated Press.
CHICAGO, July 6.— Fifty-one lives
were thrown away and 3551 celebrants
maimed or injured, some of them fatal
ly, is the record of this year's "glorious"
Fourth, as compiled by correspondents
of the Tribune up to an early hour
today.
The loss of life almost equals that of
last year, when fifty-nine persons were
killed, while every record for the num
ber of Injured was broken. Almost 1000
more were in hospitals yesterday or
swathed in bandages than on the day
following the holiday last year.
That the death list will continue to
grow for several days is Indicated by a
largo number of dispatches recording
injuries believed tn be falul. The dead
ly toy pistol was responsible for a big
percentage of the injuries and six of
the dead.
How many of the injured are infected
with the germs of tetanus cannot be
estimated.
THAW'S MOTHER
SAILS EOS HOME
* on i tamed from page our.
Equitable Life Assurance society $149,
040, which was the value of a single
policy Mr. White had carried on his life
for a number of years.
Ther* are several policies for com
paratively small amounts issued by the
Equltable"on the life of Mr. White on
which no claim for payment hos yet
been presented. The face value of
these policies is about $65,000, but their
value to the beneficiaries Is JfiO.OOO.
When Mr. White took out these poll
clps his physical condition was not per
fect and the contract he made with the
Equitable provided that if death oc
curred within a certain period a deduc
tion of a stipulated percentage should
be made for In tho fuce value of each
policy.
The bullet which Harry Thaw fired
into the nrchltcct's head terminated his
life within the period mentioned In the
policies and consequently reduced their
value.
Socialists Nominate Havwood .
1 !y Ahhik'luli'il Press.
DKNVER, July 6.— lt just transpires
thut. the Socialist party of Colorado
held a convention in this city on the
Fourth of July und nominated a full
state ticket, headed by Wlllium I),
lluywood, secretary-treasurer of the
Western Federation of Miuers, vow In
prison In Idaho, for governor.
Two Parish In Flames
By AmuM'iuted Press.
LIBBY, Mont., July 6.— Fire here to
day destroyed the Bellevue. the prin
cipal hotel In the city. Michael Brink
and John Mullliu perlehed in • the
flames.
POSSE CAPTURES PRISONERS
Exciting Chase In Washington Ends
In Capture of Two and
Death of One
By AM<vlAt»d Press.
RPOKANR, July fi— The exciting
chnne nfter threp prisoners who PSrnpefl
from Jail at Asotln, Wnoh., July 3, rame
to a succPßsful pud i;,Qt night at Oooso
IslniTd, In the Snnkp river.
Two nrp In custody; the third was
klllod. The men stole a hnnt nnd fled
down th« liver, pursued hy a possp,
Including Harry Draper of Hpnkane nnd
his bloodhounds.
Thp capture took place about. 1(1 p.
tn, Pied Ulan/* was shot ly one of tho
posse, dying A fow hours later. Frank
Hrown and Mlrnnpi Kurns are ,ielns
taken bnck to Asotln.
JUDGE A. H. TANNER
SECURES PARDON
ANNOUNCEMENT IS MADE AT
PORTLAND T
Convicted on His Own Testimony of
Perjury, Influence Is Brought to
Bear Which President
Heeds
By Associated Press.
PORTLAND, Ore., July 6.-Former
Judge A. H. Tanner, who committed
perjury in order to shield his law part
ner, the late United Stales Senator John
It. Mitchell, was pardoned by the presi
dent June 2G
The announcement was made by As-
Fistant Attorney General Frar.cls J.
Honey today.
Judge Tanner was convicted on his
own confession that he had perjured
himself before the federal grand jury
In testifying that the partnership agree
ment of the firm of Mitchell & Tanner
had been in existence several years,
whereas it wns less than three months
old.
Confessed to Save Son
In an interview gfven to the Asso
ciated Press at the time he said that he
had confessed in order to save his son.
who was a clerk in the law office of
Mitchell & Tanner and who had drawn
up <he contract, from going to prison.
He excused his conduct in perjuring
himself by saying that he had been on
intimate terms with Mitchell since his
boyhood and that it had been Mitchell
who first gave him his start In the law
business, not to mention his having
been Jlitchell's partner for more than
a decade.
Judge Tanner was r.ever sentenced,
as it was generally understood that the
government would allow him Immunity
In consideration of the service he ren
dered it when he later went on the
witness stand during Mitchell's trial in
the government's behalf.
DEATHS OF THE DAY
Major General Meckel
By Associated Pre3s.
BERLIN, July 6.— Major General
Meckel, formerly professor of military
tactics in Japan, died today. He went
to Japan In 1885, stayed there three
years, reorganized the Japanese army
and wrote a noted book on tactics.
Field ' Marshal Oyama, after the battle
of Mukden, telegraphed to General
Meckel, ascribing; the former's success
to Meckel's instructions. The emperor
of J.-ipan conferred the grand cross of
the Order of the Sacred Treasure on
the general after the battle. I
Harrison Terrell
By Associated Press.
WASHINGTON, July C.-Harrison
Terrell, who became known throughout
the country during the last years of the
life of. Gen. Grant as his faithful at
tendant and nurse in New York and on
Mount McGregor, died in this city last
night. While on duty in the war de
partment yesterday he fell and frac
tured his skull. He was carried to the
emergency hospital, where he died
without regaining consciousness.
Rev. Dr. H. L. Moyer
By Associated Presa.
CINCINNATI, July 6.— Rev. Dr. H.
T-i. Moyer, pastor of the Church of the
New Jerusalem in this city and for
twenty-five years pastor of the largest
church of his denomination in Chicago,
drepped dead of heart disease at his
home today. Dr. Moyer was the origi
nator of the parliament of religions,
which was one of the features of the
world's fair in 1893.
Dr. Fritz Schaudlns
By AB«ncIat»(l I'ress.
WASHINGTON, July 6r- Dr. C. H.
Stltes of the public health and marine
hospital service today received notice
of the death at Genoa of Dr. Fritz
Schaudins of the imporial Gorman
health office. He was known particu
larly for his investigation of malaria.
Professor Langdell
By ApsntMiitcd Prc3i
CAMBRIDOE. Mass., July 6.—Chris
topher Columbus Langdell, LLi.D.,
Dane professor of law emeritus at Har
vard university and an authority on
law, died suddenly at his home in this
city today from heart disease. He was
born In Hiltsboro county, New Hamp
shire, In 1826.
Mrs. Elizabeth Meacjher
Ny Associated Ptpkh.
NEW YORK, July 6.— Mrs. Elizabeth
M. J. Meagher, wMow of Geneyal
Thomas F. Meagher, who led the,
famous Irlsh^brigade In the Civil War,
died yesterday at her home in Rye,
Westchester county, of heart disease.
Mrs. John C. Meiggs
By A>«'irt,itMl I'reM.
LONDON. July 6.— Mrs. Melggs,
widow of John C. Meiggs, the railroad
contractor, died in London July 3. She
was one of the oldest members of the
American colony.
HARD BOILED EGG
FOR BABY'S BREAKFAST
Special to The Herald.
LONG BEACH, July 6.— A singular
coincidence occurred hero today. A
fresh egg was sold by H. I S. Wright,
a grocer. When opened the egg hud
the appearance and substance o£ hav
ing been hard boiled.
A Mexican living near Compton re
ported the birth of a Mexican baby at
Compton with a full set of teeth.
Promotion Company Moves
V.y AlKnclated I'reis.
SAN FRANCISCO, July 6.— The Cali
fornia Promotion company ha* moved
to new quarters in the California build
ing, Stockton and Geary streets.^ in
Union square, where' all Calif ornlans
as well as visitors to the state will be
supplied with information wmcernlng
California.
PACKING HOUSES
ARE UP TO DATE
THIS IS VERDICT OF JOINT
' COMMITTEE
Chlcagoans Who Inspect Btock Yards
and Slaughtering Pens Say Prod.
ucts Are Clean and
Wholesome
By Annotated Press.
CHICAGO. July «.— Tlio report of Hip
joint, committee of the C'hlenßo Com
itiprrliil iiKsrirlHtlnn mid Illinois mnnii
fiietiirets, nppointpri to liiventlßiite Mm
parkins Imlnwtrlns of Chicago, together
With the report of th» experts who nc
coitipnnled them, was made public to
day.
Tim com m lt toe snys
"That v board of experts of the rhnr
acter employed with professional idenis
and Biildod mid Influenced by an ►'«
thetlc dense, which embodies something
of necessity and Fomethliiff more of
'luxury' should find the product whole
some, the yards 'Kenerally clenn' nnd
the Inspection 'efficient' seems to your
commute to cover the situation.
"As a result of this Investigation we
ourselves have no hesitancy In statins
that the product!) at the yards nre
wholesome and proper food. We find
that the companies have been Improv
ing the conditions and products from
yenr to year; thut Improvements arc
constantly being made and will be
made, and we believe that the condi
tions and Biirroundlngn at the plants
carefully protect the quality of the
product."
Plants Up to Date
The experts who accompanied the
committee say that part of most of the
plants are up to date, yet in each of
these are some sections that are indif
ferently Rood nnd In most of them
something that they can't approve of.
"The committee can cite no better
evidence of the truth of this stnteaient
than the very Improvements that are
under way everywhere. These better
ments relate in some places to minor
things, and in others they mean a com
plete rebuilding of old plants. Gener
ally speaking 1 , the more recently built
plants are the best."
The report then plves the preserva
tives used, but does not discuss the
question of the harmfulness from the
preservatives employed on the one
hand, nor the supposedly Increased
dangers resulting- from the use of un
preserved products or products differ
ently preserved on the other. ,
Recommends Scientific Inquiry
It especially commends these ques
tions for further scientific Inquiry. The
committee embodied In their report a
letter from Prof. William H. Welch of
Johns Hbpkins university, Baltimore,
who said:
"In view of the absence of any pos
sible danger to health, arising from the
use of the meat of cattle affected with
only localized tuberculosis, or actf
nomycosls (lumpy jaw) of slight or
moderate extent, it would, in my opin
ion, be extravagant and indeed absurd
to condemn the carcasses of such cat
tle, provided the animals are well nour
ished and otherwise In good condi
tion.
"It is, of course, understood that the
diseased parts and organs are com
pletely removed and destroyed and that
proper precautions are takrtn to guard
against the accidental' contamination
of the- meat with tubercle baccilli dur
ing and after slaughtering. As re
gards tuberculosis, I consider that all
reasonable demands are met by the
condemnation of the carcasses affected
with extensive, active tuberculosis and
with generalized tuberculosis.
"The demands solely of public health
would doubtless be met by less stringent
regulations."
"The committee believes that the ante
mortem inspection is of far less im
portance than the inspection of the
dressed carcasses and feel that If either
men or funds could be released In part
from this Inspection and expended for
additional post-mortem work an in
creased efficiency might result.
Meat Specialists Needed
"The committee considered It oC the
utmost importance that greatly Im
proved facilities be provided in the
United States for the training of men in
the important specialty of meat in,
spection.
"It Is the opinion of the committee
that diseased animals reaching the
yards do not get into the stock yards'
slaughtering houses.
"After carefully considering the pro
cedure directed by the government of
ficials the committee think it fairly cer
tain that no improper use is made of
unborn calves in the Inspected plants.
"It isf our opinion that^the dressed
meat of the yards Is wholesome and a
proper article for human food.
"The methods employed in preserving
meats are for the most part cleanly,
nothing seriously objectionable being
observed In any of the houses. The
pickling of meats has uot presented
any very objectionable features. It la
suggested that the skewer used in in
specting hams be immersed In boiling
water between tests, and that Kreat
care should be exercised In selecting
healthy operatives, especially the tester.
Canning Department Clean
"Your committee Is of the opinion
that the canning departments visited
are in general in a clean condition and
that the handling- of the material Is
done In a cleanly manner by properly
dressed, healthy persons and that the
finished canned meats offered for sal*
constitute a wholesome and in varying
degrees nutritious articles of diet.
"The use of any spoiled meat unfit
for food was not here noticed, though
It must be conceded that some of the
canned goods contained material which
is of a low nutritive value, such, as
pigs' snouts, tripe, etc. It Is therefore
recommended that the cans be cor
rectly labeled as to their contents, so
that the purchaser may be able to form
a correct estimate as to their nutrltve
value.
"It Is believed that the government
inspection should be extended to a
supervision of all the materials used
for canned goods, Flnco they are finally
distributed In packages bearing 1 tho
declaration tlmt they contain govern
ment Inspected material. As it in at
present there Is no disinterested super
vision 'which guarantees the fact that
nothing other than proper material Is
placed in tho cans. -^
Uncooked Sausage
"It is suggested that for the un
cooked sausage business the meat be
ing inspected for trichinae be handled
in especially sanitary rooms. and thut
specific rules be adopted and enforced
for the hands of these , operators.
"It Is believed that the standard of
sanitary surroundings und care should
be higher for these uncooked products
than for those which are to be washed
and cooked before being eaten. | All
cutting and trimming meats should be
watched, whether pickled or fresh.
Thii I* believed to be the rule at pres
' .AMUSEMENfS
MASON OPERA HOUSE ' "" it c. wtatt
lessee and Man««er.
Bargain Matinee Today — 25c and 50c
rr\ • 1 a. HICK nnil r.tf»T r-ry • a «**<•«
Tonight ianWW Twirly-Whirly
A fHIBAT HIT. \ 1)OOI» SHOW A Onod Rexervpfi Sent for 2nO.
ASON OPERA HOUSE h. c. wtatj.
— >• . Lessee and Managei
9 ALB ok BBATI Axu noxun yon
Nat C. Goodwin
Now in Progress
TTJKR, WRIT AND THI'tlR NIOHTti AND SAT. MAT., JULY 10, 11, 12, H— The
Great Farcical Comedy Hit —
THE GENIUS
FTUDAT AND BATUttpAt NIUUTB, JULY 13, 14— Mr. Goodwin In his original
rola of nicliard Carewe In
When We Were Twenty-One
I'ltirKfl— r.Of t.i $?.nn, j
ORPHEUM THEATER Spring It,/B«twa«l Second and Thlr4
„_______„__„__ - M i uotn I 'nones 1447
cTWODERN VAUDEVILLE
Kniirnmnn Troupe, nnd t!i -pi-trst Trlok ■•yollsu; Irving .1. ........ Premier Colored
Comnilnn; «}nr««*ll«> Uron., Skntnrliil Ilollrrl«ni; 'I. \H*..u. n,.», ,,„, "King ot
Knlns. 1 ' Hrmlrli'ki* * I'rcwnH, HlnßlnK nnd Unnrlnn Kntcrtnlnorn: I'rnhM,
Wllldtllngr mid tinltntor: Oi-|ili<*mii Motion I'lrlnrrm Kelly A Vl.il.Mfr, the
Fashion Plate Hlhrliik Duo
Matinees daily except Monday, 10c nnd 2Sn. Evenlnsrs. 10c, 25c, 60c.
GRAND^QPERA HOUSE "gtait Bjjtw^Firjujna ■«».•
The Family Theater (^
ULRICH STOCK COMPANY Presents tho Oreat War Dramn. •
MARCHING THROUGH GEORGIA
N>xt M wV%-^AT d TVn7"vO^:n ? 8 "il&i&tf? aml 25C - Event "* a - »* »»C Me-
•QELASCO THEATER ™ =
■*—'' LAST THHKH TIMES—SXATINB3B TODAY— The Belasco Theater "stock
Company's enormous success —
The Heart of Maryland
I'rlres: Every niKht, 25c to 7nc: Matinee tomorrow. 25c to 50c.
NEXT WEEK — Tho famous f»rrr. WHAT lIAI'IMCTHI) TO JONES.
HOTCHKISS THEATER Fourth and B^tJJ '
_ Spring Phones 523.
T. J. WHITEi Munflgcr. Direction E. F.-SBAMANS
KOLB C& DILL AND BEN T. DILLON
ROLY-PQLY
Lilly Sutherland, Charlotte Vidot. Maude K. Williams and the beauty chorus.
"Won't You Como nnd Sponn With Mo?" Evenings, 25c, Sac, 50c, 75c. Mati-
nees Saturday ami Sunday, lfic, 25c. 3oe.
OROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER sixth and Main.
Phones 1270.
MATIN'IOE TODAY — Performance Tonight— l,ast Times of "THE EN-
SIGN."
Week starting TOMORROW AFTERNOON— Mark E. Swan's delightful
comedy: THE LADY FROM LARAMIE ■
With Jessio Mao Hall in fier original role. Matinees every Sunday and Sat-
urday, 10c and USc. Evenings, 10c, 25c, 35c, 50c. Next "Week — "THE lIAI.K-
11H1.1.D." Now then! s
/TpHE CHUTES - ' admission ioc.
Oiirrntnl nnilrr the Mont Liberal Mnnnßeinent of any Park In 11k* World
FREE SKATING RINK, Admission and Skates Free
THEATER PERFORMANCE FREE. MERRY-GO-ROUND FREE.
PAVILION PERFORMANCE CHUTES FREE.
FREE. PICNIC GROUNDS FREE.
MINIATURE RAILWAY FREE. ZOO FREE.
A GREAT MUSICAL TREAT
Commencing on WEDNESDAY EVENING nrxt and eoutlnulnft every
Wednesday nlKbt therenfter. v
PROFESSOR STARK SS T 2 ? s^ofs RR T CC s HES J RA
-will give n CONCERT x Tyf/V^i PA"C*r7
a la STRAUSS at J-»ii V X S LiiT O,
Third and Main sts.. continuing the whole evening.
/"CHAUTAUQUA AT LONG BEACH Jal ' ° *• »• IJW6 -
CHAUTAUQUA j
The list of talent is complete and is tho strongest that has been presented in.
years. The following subjects aro represented: Science, Literature, Travel,
Art. Music. Sociology, Political Economy, besides a full line of class work.
For official program address _" '■'•. ._ r
REV. CHESTER P. DORLAND, Pres.. Long Beach, Cal.
TVyrORLEY'S GRAND Ays. RINK For Nicei^People
SPECIAL ATTRACTIONS
PROF. FRANKS and BABY LILLIAN
THE WOSDEU SKATEUS.
Pally change of program. Popular prices. Closed Sundays. Throe daily ses-
sions— lon : tn :; 2p ; ni ;; 7j2oj|WiK____________^__^
ROLLER SKATING AT DREAMLAND m^stheet"
t "aTTtlaceTfor uadies and gentlemen
Cool — No Dust — Perfect Ventilation
Dreniiilnnd Concert Ilnnil Afternoon nnd Evening I'rlue Skating Contests for
('iiuiilfN. He»elnuliiK Monday Kvenlnsr, July 0. _\
l-oneest and lnrßint straightaway floor !n tho city. No tipping permitted.
firntUnvinlv Instructors. MornitiK admission, free, .afternoon 15c, evening 25c.
Closed Sunday. Thursday evening Society night. Admission 50c. i
T3ASE BALL~~ .■"".. CHUTES PARK
Los Angeles vs. Fresno
Game called at 3 p. m.; Sundays, 2:30. Admission, 25c; grandstand, 250. Ladles
free, except Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.
0^ Week-End
Trolley Trips
There is a big rush shoreward these hot days.
Our service to
Long Beach, Naples, Alamitos, bay
City, Huntington and Newport
is designed to meet the popular needs.
Saturday and Sunday the round trip rate to Mount
Lowe is $2.00 and to Rubio Canyon 50c.
The Pacific Electric
Railway Company
ent, but the system employed permits
too many exceptions.
"The lard and lard compounds are
wholesome."
Closets Ar« Not "Modern*.
Regarding hygiene and sanitation the
commute nays some of the cloaeta are
not of modern, nor proper construction,
not well located, often deficient and
often ventilated Into* the work rooms.
This 'they regard hb dangerous and
unhygienic. In a few houseti they
found Biitlefaetory modem closets, en
tirely new.
Borne supervision in advised. The
niHilli al members of the committee
paid especial attention to the health of
the operatives,' particularly in regard
to tuberculosis. They were not able
to detect tn ths examination any evi
dence of the dtseaee.
1 in cloetn* the report the committee
refors to the new United States meat
Inspection bill and suys that Its pro
visions ure ho stringent that If, under
Its execution unwholesome meat unfit
for human consumption gets Into Inter
state or foreign commerce the respon
sibility for such a circumstance must
rest with the federal authorities.
Commissioners Raise ToR
Special to The Herald
SAN FRANCISCO, July 6.— The board
of harbor commissioners today raised
the toll on grain and flour from 2V4 to
5 cents and that on lumber from D to
10 cents per thousand feet.
Hank Ouru T.,ul u hr
The Consolidated Bank of Loe \n
(rel««. 131 South Broadway, in the
Chamber of Commorc* building. wtU b»
open tonight, as usual, to tccommodiU
the publlo la ventral and its old pat-

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