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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, July 18, 1906, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1906-07-18/ed-1/seq-8/

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DESIRED SITE
GOES TO ANOTHER
PASADENA COMMITTEE FAILS
TO RAISE MONEY
Private Speculator Outbids Board of
Trade Representative* on Land
Desired for Convention
H...
f-asad*na Agency.
iGVi Ku.'t Colorado Htr«ot-
Telephone Main 'Si.
PASADENA. July 17.— With tho sale
of the desired six-acre Carmelita, tract
today In the probate court to F. E.
Crawford of this city seems to disap
pear the chance for a convention hall
for the west side, If Indeed the ex
perience In trying to push forward a
scheme, which was but little desired
by the people of that district, dues not
disappoint and dishearten the leaders
In the movement ns to bring about the
abandonment ot th« whole scheme for
the present at least.
No one represented the board of
trade convention hall committee In the
bidding this forenoon for the simple
but sufficient reason that something
less than $40,000 had been raised,
while the Crawford bid was $45,000, and
It was said that this shrewd gentle
man stood ready, If opposed, to run
the bidding up to as much as JfiO.OOO.
There Is some suggestion that pos
sibly Crawford can bo prevailed upon
to dispose of his purchase to the con
vention hall committee, for a con
sideration, of course, and that n little
later the needed amount can be raised.
But the fact remains that residents of
the west side did not appear very
anxious to get the building there, Judg
ing by their delay In raising the money
needed for the site.
This condition of affairs was pre-
mised in The Herald a week ago, as
well as tho probability that an effort
to place the convention hall in the east
ern portion of the city would meet
with more success.
There are those who think that as
soon as no further chance of a con
vention hall on the west side exists
leading residents of the east side will
take the matter up and push it
through.
The city's great desire to own the
property in question was carefully ex
plained ot Mr. Crawford, but apparent
ly without effect.
The city's next step In the matter
will be awaited with Interest.
Crown City Notes
Prof. E. A. Batchelder, former in
structor in design at harvard uni
versity, will succeed Miss Sterritt as
head of the Throop art department.
Mrs. A. Hazard Halsted. wife of the
president of the Pasadena Ice company,
died this morning at the residence on
North Grand avenue, after an illness
extending over a long term of years.
Altadena residents are aroused at the
carlessness of hunters in the foothills
adjacent to the little city. Accidents
by reason of illy directed shots are
narrowly avoided almost every day. It
is likely that a deputy constable will
be employed to look after the careless
hunters.
The committee having in charge the
annual Pasadena picnic to be held at
Long Beach on August 9, met this af
ternoon and made up a list of the sports
proposed for the day. They will in
clude spoon and egg races, potato
races, sack races, hurdle races and a
number of dashes for men and boys.
Messrs. Webb, Seeley and James were
named to solicit money from the local
merchants to cover the expenses of
the picnic.
WOULD BITE THE OFFICER
Insane Woman Causes Excitement on
Pasadena Streets While Be.
ing Arrested
Epeeial to The Herald.
PASADENA, July 17.— The sight of
a carriage with Its two horses on a wild
run, while two officers held on to a
struggling woman inside the carriage,
attracted considerable attention on
North Fair Oaks avenue at 5:30 o'clock
this evening.
It was Patrolmen Sehultz and Top
ping carrying to the city bastile under
arrest a wildly insane, middle aged wo
man, Mrs. William Oenshaw of No. 305
Lincoln avenue.
The unfortunate woman has been
violent for several days and when this
afternoon she undertook to bombard
the plate glass windows in the neigh
borhood the husband concluded to de
lay action no longer and secured a
warrant fur her commitment.
Mrs Oenshaw refused to accompany
the officers to the station and a rough
and tumble scrimmage followed, with
the woman very greatly in the major
ity.
"Tennessee's" public carriage was
called for and the woman carried bodily
to a seat therein. Here she scratched
and fought until It Inked as though
the policemen would reach the station
totally unflit for duty by reason of
wounds.
She tried to bite off Officer Schultz's
ear and falling, took a bull dog hold on
Officer Copping's neck, so that haste
was called for and a flying return to
the police station made to the astonish
ment of the whole force.
Later this evening Constable Newell
took the unfortunate woman to the
county hospital. The immediate cause
of her derangement Is not known her
husband and neighbors saying that she
has been violent occasionally before
today and that she has been acting
queerly for a long time.
HOPES TO GET BUILDING
Congressman McLachlan Holds Out
Brave Prospects Before Pasa.
dena Citizens
Srodnl to The lloralcl.
PASADKNA, July 17.— Congressman
McLachlan Mated this afternoon that
the next thln X which hf> will undertake
in the national congress will be the
securing of an appropriation for a new
poatofflce building. nuts]
He called attention to his work for
the federal building at Los Angel™ and
to the fact that the final needed ap
propriation for this building has now
been obtained, leaving his hands free
for the work of looking after a good
appropriation for Panndena.
Mr. McLachlan is of the opinion that
the delay In going after the federal
building for the Crown city was wise
In that the city has been passing
through a period of remarkable growth
and is now mimelontly large to impress
congress with the need for a large
and commodious building Instead of
one suited to a city of barely 9000 pop
ulation as Indicated by the United
States census of 1900.
Had. the effort been made earlier and
succeeded, only a small building could
naturally have been secured. Now Con
gressman McLachlan says he can safely
aik for a splendid appropriation and
set It too.
REFORESTING IS DECIDED ON
Commercial Organization* at San
Bernardino to Undo Lumber.
1 men's Work
Special to The llemld.
PAN BERNARDINO. July 17.—A»
slstnnt Forester Lull of th<» forestry
bureau nt Wnahlnaiton attended A Joint
meftlnß of the forestry committee of
the commercial organization* of this
city, Riverside, Kedlands, Colton and
Highland here.
The meeting rilnruMPd the outlay of
the fund provided by the people of this
vnlley nnd by the Kovernment, the
whole amounting to $3000.
Nurseries will be eot.ibllshed at suit
able points In the mountains north of
this city, where trees will be prope
jrntc.l by thousands and transplanted
nt the favorable season of the year to
the spots thnt In the past have been
bared by the lumbermen, who for years
were nilowed to strip the hills of valu
able timber.
SAN PEDRO ACQUIRES
INDUSTRIAL PLANTS
SHIP FOUNDRY AND STAMPING
FIRM SWELL PAYROLLS
Nob Hill Dwellers Meet to Form a
Company to Enable Miner Syndl.
cate to Acquire Dirt for Harbor
Filling Purposes
3poclal to The Hernld.
SAN PEDRO, July 17.— With ship
ping jinaktng such gains in the past
year at this place it has been decided
that a ship foundry Is much needed and
steps have been taken to have one
constructed at once.
The Marine Supply company, which
has done business here for several
years in a small way, will now be
greatly enlarged and a foundry for the
casting of iron repairs for ships and
engines will be placed therein. In con
nection with the foundry will be a pat-
tern shop and a cupola large enough
to take care of the largest Iron work
needed. This will Include the work
that may develop from any contem
plated shipbuilding. bulkheadlng,
dredging, leveling of hills or building
of wharves. A specialty will also be
made of brass work.
It is currently reported that the
Metal Stamping company, a large con-
cern, has made arrangements with the
owners of the land lying east of AVil
mlngton whereby It will get possession
of a large tract and on It erect a fac
tory. The officials of the works state
that they will employ a large number
of men and the payroll will be in exces3
of $10,000 per month. While the works
will he on Long Beach territory It will
be much closer to San Pedro, and the
latter city will be benefited thereby by
the men spending their money here.
The passenger steamer Anvil, which
had been purchased by the California
Southern Steamship company, and
was expected to ply between this place
and Ocenn Park, stopping at interme
diate points, has been libeled at San
Francisco to the amount of $7000 for
repairs and will not come now. It is
likely that another vessel will be
bought by the company as the amount
asked by the creditors of the vessel
named is considered in excess of its
worth.
The people of Nob hill, in this city,
held another meeting last night to
considering the question of allowing
Lieut. Miner the privilege of taking
the dirt from their land for his fill in
the outer harbor. Attorney Denis and
Engineer Purcell appeared for Lieut.
Miner and stated the plans best for the
people to consider. It is likely that
the property owners of the hill will or
gairize In the regular way under the
state laws so that they will be able
to do business with the people who
want the dirt.
BULKHEAD WORK BEGUN
Extensive Improvements for Long
Beach Ocean Front Inaugurated.
Long Beach Budget
special to Th<; Herald.
LONG BEACH, July 17.— Contractor
Plantico today began jettying the piles
for the bulkhead which is to skirt the
thirty-five-foot cement walk on Sea
side boulevard, from Alamitos to Pine
avenues.
Charles Baettge, the wharfinger, has
posted signs along the outer wharf
warning boat agents and others against
loud talking. The new rules are dis
tasteful to the boat agents, some of
whom have of late become quite noisy
In their competition for trade. Now
they are not allowed to talk above their
natural tones of voice.
Mrs. A. S. Hawley reported today
that a daylight burglar visited her
home on North Atlantic avenue Satur
day afternoon and got away with $28
in money and several small articles of
value. Neighbors saw the man enter
the dwelling. He was attired in a neat
gray suit and carried a satchel. It is
supposed that he was an agent, who,
finding no one at home, proceeded to
wrcni-h open the screen door and help
himself to what he could find.
Mlrs Mary Fremont was stung by a
bee last Friday afternoon and her hand
swelled to such a size and became so
painful that It was necessary to call In
a physician. On extracting the stinger
Is was found that the bee had Inocu
lated her flesh with some poisonous
pollen. The wound is a very painful
one, but the young lady is said to be
out of danger. Miss Fremont is a
daughter of the late General Fremont.
ELKS TO HAVE CLUB HOUSE
Nearly All Preliminary Details Com-
pleted by Long Beach
Lodge
Special to The Herald.
LONG BEACH. July 17.— At the meet
ing of the Elks lnst night the question
of building the proposed riw club house
was referred to the building committee,
with power to act. With nearly all the
preliminary details arranged, the build
ing now Is a certainty.
It is said that the sale of the bonds
which are to be issued has been assured
and two-thirds of the Ltock already
subscribed. A bond and stock issue Is
to be adopted nimilar to that carried
out when the Masonic temple was
erected.
LABOR LAW TO BE TESTED
Unions of RedUnds Decide to Carry
a Case to the State Supreme
Court
Special tn The Herald
SAN HKKNARDINO, July 17.-The
teat of the eight-hour labor ordinance
In ltedlandu will ko to the supreme
court of the Htnte. In the recorder's
court at Kedlands Street Superintend
ent Iveeon was found not guilty of fail
ure to report the fact that the street
contractor was working his men more
than eight hours on public work.
The case has now been appealed to
the Buperlor court and it will he heard
here soon. The suit was brought
through the InHt.gp.tlon of the unions
of Hedlands, and an effort will be made
to secure a decision Involving the valid
ity of the ordinance -
LOS ANGELES HERALD: WEDNESDAY MORNING, JULY 18. 1906.
WILBUR PLEADS
FOR NOBLER RACE
JUVENILE JUDGE SPEAKS AT
' CHAUTAUQUA
Every Child Should Be Better and
Nobler Than Its Predeces.
aor, Is His Declara*
tlon
Special to The Ifernld.
LONO BBACH, July 17.— At the an
nual meeting of the Chautnuqtia bb
sembly this Afternoon the following
were elected to moinber«hlp In the
board of directors: Jntnrsi A. Mlllrr.
W. W. Lmvn nnd Mrs. Lucy R, Orals
of Long Hooch: Prof. J. It. Hoopp, U.
S. C« and President O. A. Onten of
Pomona college. Mr. Lowe and Mrs.
L. R. Craig were elected to nucccrd
themselves. ThQ other members of tho
board whose terms rndod this year
wero Prof. Oeorge H. Crow of Loa
Anßfles, Miss Crow and P. W. Ives.
Upon the motion of \v. W. Lowe,
Prof. Crow wns Klven the honor of an
emeritus presidency of the association
for life.
Rev. C. P. Dorland, president of the
old board, prpsldrd at the meeting to
day and William it. Knight ncted as
secretary. The new board will meet
Friday to receive the reports of otll
cers and to elect Its officers. The other
members of the board of directors be
sides those elected today are: Rev.
K. B. Oage, Mrs. E. Cireenlenf, W. H.
Knisht and Rev. Isaac Jewell, whose,
terms expire In 1907; and Mnlcolm
Macleod, Mrs. L, E. Garden-Maeleod,
B. R. Bumßiirdt, S. Townsend, C. P.
Dorland and Jnmes A. Foshay, whose
terms expire in 190 S.
President Dorland stated today that
It had been finally decided that Miss
Elinor Dcterlng, Albert AVeston, Miss
Nino Brown and John King, all of
this city, hHd won the schoarshlps
offered for the pale of tickets. Miss
Deteringr hns chosen the scholarship
offered by U. S. C, Albert Weston the
one offered by Throop, nna Miss Brown
the one offered by Occidental.
Prof. Kent continued the Old Testa
ment study thlrf morning, using as his
topic "Isaiah and His Inspired Guid
ance of Judah." He spoke interesting
ly of Isaiah's work as statesman, so
cial reformer and religious teacher.
Judge Wilbur Speaks
The lecture of the current events
hour was given today by Judge Cur
tis D. Wilbur of the' juvenile court
on tire subject, "The Duty of Parents
to Children as shown by the Juvenile
Court." He emphasized the fact that
the first essential to parenthood Is a
clean, pure life from birth up. Every
thing that Improves or educates a man
or ivomanis'a fulfilment of the pur
pose of parenthood. The evolution of
the race, he said, demands that every
child should be better and nobler than
Its predecessor. Judge Wilbur spoke
of the habits of the parents before the
child was born, emphasizing the effects
of bad habits upon the offspring. He
said that after the birth of the child
the habits of the parents should be no
less guarded, because the children are
bound to copy after them.
He urged that parents take care to
prolong their lives as long as possible
and take no unnecessary risks, since
the orphan or half-orphan Is more apt
to "go wrong" than are other children.
He urged, too, that for this reason par
ents should not patronize the divorce
courts.
"The records of the juvenile court
show," he said, "that the parents of
!)0 per cent of the youthful offenders
have been separated, either by death or
otherwise."
Religious training In the home is
necessary, and children Ehould be sent
to school with regularity. Truancy
was said to be the first symptom of
a moral breakdown.
Lectures on Art
This afternoon Dr. Hector Alliott
gave another lecture dealing with art.
His subject was "The Graphic Arts."
He explained fully the work of wood,
steel and copper engraving, etching-,
mezzotinting, aqua-tinting and photog
raphy and gave a history of these arts.
The prelude before the lecture was
Unusually _ Interesting. The Royal
Italian band played three numbers.
Richard B. Harrison, the colored read
er, who Is popular with Chautauquans,
read' two of Paul Laurence Dunbar's
poems, aud two Spanish musicians,
one of whom Is blind, furnished pleas-
Ing music on the guitar, fife and a pe
culiar one-stringed Instrument discov
ered by the blind musician.
Tonight Bishop John W. Hamilton
lectured on "Public Morals in the
Light of Recent Events."
Tomorrow afternoon and night Mrs.
Martha Gielow will entertain the Chau
tatiquans with readings of plantation
folklore and reminiscences of old plan
tation days. Mrs. Gielow Is a favorite
and her entertainments are ranked
among the strongest of the course.
Thursday night Herbert O. Hadley,
attorney general of Missouri, will lec
ture, telling about the litigation
against Standard Oil and the general
evils of commercial combinations
which restrain trade. Mr. Hadley's
connection with cases against the
Standard Oil, the 'Waters-Pierce and
tho Republic companies attracted na
tional attention and the Chautauqua
management believe they have se
cured the strongest possible man to
discuss this universally Interesting
question.
To the local chamber of commerce
Is due the credit for making It finan
cially possible to have Hadley on the
course. Hadley will be the guest of
honor at a banquet given in the Cos
mopolitan club rooms after the lecture.
AGED EXPLORER NOW
IN SOLDIERS' HOME
By Associated Press.
SOLDIERS' HOME, July 17.— Prof.
T. J. Alley, lately admitted to the home,
is an intrepid traveler and explorer.
He resided In Jerusalem for years,
assisting In the work of compiling the
Kncyclopedea of Missions.
Together with American Consul Wal
lace he made many expeditions and
took several pictures, some that have
never hetjn reproduced.
He began taking pictures at Jaffa and
continued across the Jordan, and to
lands beyond the Jordan.
He haw pictures of the Dead sea and
around Mount Nebo, t'isgalt and Plains
of Moah.
He has had many of these pictures
reproduced In colored stereoptlcon
views. His finest one shows the rock
hewn city of Petrea, portraying the
temples and houses.
Slot Machines Must Go
Tly Aeaoclated Press.
OAKLAND. July 17.— Chief of Police
Wilson announced today that all Blot
machines In the city must cease oper
ation. Thin order Includes all the card
machine*.
WILL SEEK A 'SETTLEMENT
Edison Electric Company Secure* a
Conference Over Patadena
Lighting Bill
Bp*>etAi to Ths Ilprnld.
PASADENA, July 17.— An effort vrnt>
mnde today by representatives of the
Edison Electric company to nrrlve at
n settlpmriit of the eight months' ctreet
lighting bill which the city has thus
for steadily refused to pay.
Judge 11. 11. Klnmroth npppnrrd bo
fore the council for thr company nnd
nsked that some stop he tnken either
to pay the bill n« It stands or to nny
what It will be willing to pay. He re
minded the Council that his clients hnd
offered to discount the. November bill
In the sum of $500.
Mayor AVnterhousp nnd one member
of the conference committee appointed
In March to consult with the Edison
people. Inolsted (hut no nuch formal
offer hnd been mnde.
Judge Klamroth rrcnlled the offer of
arbitration mnde by his client* and
stated thnt thnt offer Is still open.
Quite a wordy war followed between
the two parties, ending In a tardy nd
mlsslon that both tides had been mis
understood.
The whole bill of over $11,000 Ti-ns
referred to the original committee of
conference, to which was nddrd the
city attorney, with Instructions to re
port in two weeks.
Judge Klnmroth stated thnt the Edl
pon people will at once place Its offer
In writing and present It to the com
mittee.
WILL OFFER SITE
• FOR HOUSEHOLD TENT
NORTH PASADENA CITIZEN HAS
i PITY ON SECT
New Neighborhood Is Up in Arms at
the Alleged Excesses of Pastor
Post and His Noisy Congrega.
tlon
Special to The Herald.
PASADENA, July 17.— Thirty-one cit
izens residing in the neighborhood of
No. 34 Delacy street, now occupied by
the so-called Household of God, peti
tioned the city council today for relief
from the "screaming, pounding and
howling indulged In during the greater
part of both day and night."
They assert that It is Impossible for
the people In the neighborhood to sleep
and that the Household Is a public
nuisance.
This is the latest development in the
campaign citizens appear to be waging
against the Household and if Pastor
Post's fears are, well founded ought to
bring about another earthquake to
night.
The council referred the petition to
Councilman Barnes and his standing
committee, that of building and
grounds.
Councilman Root hinted at a final
settlement of the question when he
told of one of his constituents, touched
by the situation which confronts the
Household, Is willing to give the or
ganization the use of a lot for their
tent free of charge.
One week from today .final report
must be made as to the situation and
the Household thus obtains another
short respite.
Unless some Indignant property own
er swears out a warrant against them
Pastor Post and his congregation will
not now be disturbed until the comit
tee offers its .report.
Inquiry this evening shows that Al
bert Lusher, living at No. 961 Klrkwood
avenue, is the person referred to by
Councilman Root as willing to give a
haven to the noisy sect and that his
offer when made will consist of a srood
sized lot not far from his own resi
dence, but so situated as to make the
noise comparatively harmless.
The site is some two or three blocks
from the North Fair Oaks avenue street
car line and in the extreme northern
part of the city, facts which make the
offer a bit impracticable.
The Household naturally desires a
more convenient location, preferably
In the downtown district, and may de
cline the offer with thanks unless It is
ousted from its present location and
none other appears.
Meanwhile the shoutings and the
singings continue with scarcely abated
fervor and penetration. $
FIGHTS COLTON ORDINANCE
San Bernardino Business Man Objects
to Payment of Liecnse In
Neighboring Town
Special to The Hornlrl.
SAN BERNARDINO, July 17.— A.
Fink, manager of the San Bernardino
Credit house, Is to make a test of the
Colton city ordinance under which he
was arrested for soliciting orders for
an outside house without a license. He
insists that he maintains a place of
business in Colton as well as In San
Bernardino and is therefore entitled to
do business without the payment of a
license In Colton.
On the other hand, the Colton people
declare that Fink does not carry a
stock of goods In their town, merely
having his card Rtuck up in a show
window, for which he pays a nominal
rent. He makes the point In bringing
the test that he is being taxed as a
merchant in Colton because he is a
non-resident, which is discriminating.
On this ground the Colton laundry
ordinance was knocked out last week.
ORANGE GROWERS TO
FORM A BIG UNION
Special to The Herald,
SAN BERNARDINO, July 17.— Tho
new organization of orange growers in
this county, brought about largely
through the efforts of A. Gregory of
Hedlands, promises to be the largest
single organization operating in this
county.
•It has already signed up tho High
land Fruit Growers' association, which
controls a large amount of fruit in
that section.
The new organization will control
nearly all the fruit heretofore con
trolled In this county by the California
Citrus union, and it will get a large
amount of fruit besides that has in the
past season been shipped by other or
ganizations. It is the design to make
It ub nearly a mutual organization of
growers as possible.
EXTENSIVE GAS LINES
TO BE CONSTRUCTED
Special tn The Hnrnld.
SAN BKnNARDINO, July 17.— Not
only will the linos of the San Bernar
dino Gas & Electric company be ex
tended to Highland, on the oast of this
city, but a line also will he extended
to the went to tho Illalto colony. These
extensions will require more than
forty miles of pipe. This is one of the
most extensive khb systems in Southern
California outside of Los Angeles. Th«
llqbs when completed will cover a dis
tance of more than ten miles east and
west.
An application has been presented to
the supervisors for a franchise in the
streets. The contracts for laying the
pipe already have been let.
MUST WAIT FOR THE MONEY
Patadena Advertises for Fire Engine,
but Will Not Pay Until Bonds
Are Available
Special to The HernM
PASADENA. July 17.— The city coun
cil decided today to advertise for hlds
for another fire engine to add to the
present equipment of the fire depart
ment.
Arrangements will b*» made If posslhle
to buy this engine on time, paying for
It some time between tl.ln nnd next
June, providing the STa.OOfl bond Issue
row tied up by the Kdison company's
Injunction suit becomes available by
thai time. Otherwise the money Will
reeds he drawn from ;he genernl funds
of the city.
According to the plnn proposed by the
city uttorney the city will offer to pay
Interest on the deferred payment at the
rate of 6 per cent.
Every possible effort will be mnde to
pet thp needed engine without delny,
but It Is fenred that from five to seven
months will elapse before the much
needed > addition to the department
equipment can be on the ground.
LONG BEACH TO CELEBRATE
Corner Stone of New Blxby Hotel Will
Be Laid Next Saturday
Afternoon
Special to The Hrrnld.
LONG BRACH, July 17.— 1t has been
decided that the corner stone of the
new Hlxby hotel shall he Inld Satur
day afternoon. The following program
has been arranged, to begin at 3
o'clock: Music by the Royal Italian
bnnd; Invocation, Hey. C. T. Murphy;
address by Mayor F. H. Downs: ad
dress by Li A. Perce. president of the
chamber of commerce; Address by S.
Townsend of the Long Beach realty
board: laying of the corner stone by
Jothnm Hlxby.
Jean Drake has been appointed chnlr
mnn of the reception committee. Invi
tations have already been forwarded to
the business associations of all sur
roundlng towns.
f Th-* Quality Stor* \
SPECIAL
Genuine Irish Linen
Shirts
$1.05
Attached or detached cuffs
for comfort and economy.
The linen fabric has ; no-
equal. See windows. , .:1
Mullen & Bluett
Clothing Co.
Corner Spring and First
f ""*"\
$30.00
Round Trip
Excursion
to
Salt Lake City
on
July 21st
On account of Pioneer Re-
union. Good until August
20th to return. Get tickets
at 250 South Spring St., Flrsl
St. Staion, or any Salt Lake
Route Station in California.
_ — , j
Keep your foods daintily cool
and wholesome with ICE. It's
economy. Ice PRICES to fam-
ilies REDUCED.
I. fas than 50 lbs 30c per 100
60 to 150 Jlis 36c per 100
160 lbs. and upwards 30c per 100
LOS ANGELES ICE AND
COLD STORAGE CO.
Either Phono Ex. 6.
T "Time Is Gold"
Have It with the Sunset Phone
— In your homo be. daily.
Telephone Alula 47, Contract
l>r|)t.,
Kuunet T. & T. Co.
A Talking
Machine
Will bring unlimited joy to friends and family. It is no
•longer necessary to put up with the old-time "scratchy"
tone which sent "shivers" over you.
TODAY the Talking Machine is so improved that
musicians — critical people as they must be — admit the
musical qualities of this most popular music maker. Grand
Opera may be enjoyed every day; Squsa and Pryor will
play their brilliant music at your instant command.
Caruso, Barnes, Sembrich,
Melba will singr their choicest
songs whenever you dictate
and. ALL at but LITTLE EXPENSE. A good Talking
Machine costs but a few dollars when the pleasure it^gives
is correctly measured.
Ours Is a
Free Offer
You can have one of these marvelous instruments. You
can enjoy the finest music known to the world today,
played upon a perfect Talking Machine that will cost you
absolutely nothing.
Think what pleasure you can
have in the country, the moun-
tains, at the beach, as well as
in the city home
Have you ever thought how very lovely music must sound
among the trees, far up on the mountain side where quiet
reigns? Imagine a calm, still night, the stars shining, the
moon throwing its light upon the country beneath you.
You place a fine band record, by the incomparable SOUSA,
upon a machine and start it. You lean back against some
cedar bough and listen — it is ideal music. The sound car-
ries through the canyons and echoes and re-echoes, and
you think it is so fine that you place one of CARUSO'S
fine records and immediately you hear the magnificent
voice ringing out clear and strong and you are enraptured.
No other such voice do you ever expect to hear. Then you
try a banjo selection, a cornet or trombone solo ; and finally,
after hearing a few selections by the Haydn quartet you
listen to the clear notes of the bugle as it sounds "Lights
Out," and reluctantly you place the machine and records in
safe keeping, voting it the greatest entertainer of the age-
something you would^not be without.
If there are two things that one really needs when on
a vacation it is a little music and the news, and what bet-
ter quality, could you ask than THE HERALD and one
of these
Talk=o= Phones
which we give you absolutely free. Read our offer below ;
then come and let us arrange to send you the paper to your
1 home for a time, then to you wherever you spend your va-
cation; then to your home later when you are back again;
and let us give you an order on the old reliable music
house THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MUSIC CO.,
332-334 South Broadway; or their other branches: San
Diego, Riverside and San Bernardinq. And they will fit
you out with a Talking Machine at No Cost to You, Re-
member. Come, Let's Talk It Over.
Read Our Offer
Plan No. 1 Plan No. 2
Par 533.00 onah and receive Slkb an agreement to take the
value to the amouat of »ua.BU. Dally Herald for al* mouth.,
uH f,. 11.. n. i payln* each raontb the regular
Talk-e-Phone »25.©0 .„!,.. ri,.tl.,n price of 650 per
Dallr Hernld. « raoataa. 3.00 monthi purchase »35.00 worta
nerorda to value ot *5.©0 of recorda within a period of
Thla mMM that you will re- 83 week., four co.cent recorda
celve »85 wertk of recorda at on delivery ot the ' machine
the price eatabll.ued by the aad two «0-rent recorda each
manufacturera. JVo more. No week thereafter until the full
leaa. You Day for recorda only amouat of recorda haa beea
Bad you niuat hare them. purcbuaed.
Address All W_W .f J X"^^ 'Talk*,
cation, to AlCsiaild Wl-/»Dep<.
* ■MLiJHi
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