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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, October 15, 1906, Image 6

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6
CROWD HISSES
ANGEL CAPTAIN
SERAPHS HAVE BAD DAY AND
SEATTLE WINS
Errors In Two Innings Result In
Many Tallies for the Slwath
Band— Score
7 to 2
. Ange.s. 2; Seattle, 7
Hlnve the days when Charley Rellly
Incurred the displeasure of Los An
geles random, no homo player received
,such a hissing and hooting as did Cap
tain Frank DJllon yesterday afternoon
tit Chutes park, whero tho Angola lost
to Seattle by a score of 7 to 2 otter a
ragged exhibition by local talent.
Although Dillon suffered more than
was coming to him through a misun
derstanding of the crowd, he turned a
trick early in the game which was
'anything but captain like Driven to
finger by a decision of XTmplro Mahaf
fey In thn third, when tho latter called
Blankenshlp safe as Dillon endeavored
to tag him on the line, tho Angel cap
tain banged tho ball on tho ground
whllo Blunkcnshlp flashed down to soc-
Then came the big cat call from stand
unit bleacher and all for Mr. Dillon.
This was but a fragment to what was
coming, However. Burns, who occupied
I the box for Ix>s Angeles yesterday, was
not altogether successful and did sev
eral things that appeared foolish from
the diamond fide.
>?.' Whatever crltlcsm may bo dealt Dil
lon, no one doubts his intent to win If
ithere Is a possible chance. Often Angel
; players havo been thn subject of scath
*ing remarks after some unfortunate
'episode, with Frank dealing out the
'burners. Such wag In order yesterday.,
In the. eighth inning Burns was ob
' served to start for the bench and then
return when Nagle walked toward the
box. As Dillon and Burns hnd Just
concluded a word contest it was taken
for granted that Burns had been or
jdered oft the field and Dillon camo in
•for more call down.
■:'■■', Every appearance of Frank from that
time on meant a fresh storm of con
demnation. "When Burns came to baf
he was given a rousing cheer. The fact
of the matter was that Burns voluntari
ly left the field and later decided to
I continue.
V Burns took . exception to Dillon's or
der , when he called for Brashear to
'take a ball which descended directly
' over the pitcher's box in the eighth.
■ Dillon claimed that as Burns had
fallen down on a bunt in the third and
then thrown wild to third it was
. a safer proposition for Brashear to
;take the catch. Hence trouble.
Perhaps It was well that a little
' extra excitement occurred, as the An
gela behaved very badly and helped
■Seattle lengthen the run column.
* "Rube" Vickcra was out for Russ
Hall and proved very stingy when
singles were needed. -In the early in
nings "Rube" was told he wouldn't do.
/Along toward the end they applauded
him. Thus the fickleness of buseball.
■ Rube was- very, much *to the good
,with men- on bases, and though he al
>lowed four men to , walk, . struck out
seven Seraphs. .'-,••.
"•' To Van Buren, center fielder of the
iSi washes, must be accredited a sensa-
Itional and artistic bit : of work In the
.second, when he committed a deliberate
robbery by freezing Bernard's Texan
'leaguer back of second.. Ninety-nine
'< times out of a hundred such a drive
would have fallen safe, but Van put
on an extra spurt and with a final ef
fort' reached for and held the ball,
coming within an ace of falling on his
face. ' - i . : •• •
. Mr. Van Burcn, as luck would have
it, came next to bat and started an
awful moss when he singled to center.
Both teams made two runs In the first.
Van Buren drove safely to center and
reached second as Burns threw wild to
. catch him at first. Blankenshlp came
■ along and ""hit to Burns. The latter
promptly fell down and In a sitting
posture threw wild to third In an ef
fort to head oft the flying Van Buren.
• Blankenship In the meanwhile kept
on toward second, but started back as
Brashear flashed the ball to Toman.
Blank dodged back and forth and when
finally hedged in botween Dillon and
Toman made a wild dive under the for
mer, recovering first. Dillon swung at
him with the ball, but Mahaffey said
safe. .
. Frank immediately became vexed and
slammed the ball on the diamond, Blan
kenship annexing second. Eddie House
holder and his big club put In an ap
pearance and Nagle jumped away as
House slammed one to short. Van
Buren scored. Householder started to
second and Blankenship was caught at
the plate by Toman's throw, House
. holder reaching third. Burns then
broke all records for wild pitching and
hit the top . of the stand. Householder
coming in.
An awful mixup and series of 'wild
throws resulted In the Keventh, when
four more came over for Seattle. The
ball was* tossed to every part of the
diamond 'while Slwash runners leaped
around the bases.
An Immense crowd witnessed the
Kame yesterday and remained to watch
Jack O'Brien give his customary vau
'.deville performance.
\Tho score:
JL.OS ANGKt.ES.
AB R BH SB I'O A E
Uenmrd.'cf 4 1 10,5 0 0
Kugln, us 5 0 0 0 2 6 1
Oavath. rf 4 0 1 o l 0 0
ISi-Hsliear, 3b 4 () 1 0 S 2 0
Dillon lv ' 3 0 0 0 11 0 1
Carlisle. If 3 ,0102 1 0
Tomun, ")> 3 0 0 0 2 3 1
Kager, c 3 1 0 0 2 2 0
Hums, p 4 0 1 0 1 4 1
Totals 33 2 5 0 ?18 4
HKATTLK. J
Kane, Ib 5 12 2 2 3 1
Van Buren. cf 4 3 2 12 0 0
iiiunkenship, c 4 12 0 7 on
Householder, rf r, 2 113 l) 0
(.'roll, If 4 0 2 0 1 0 0
KtrWb, ib 4 OlO'G 0 0
Mott, 3b 4 0 0 0 4 0 0
iM«-Kuiii', an 4 0 10 2 4 2
Vlckcrs, t> 4 0 0 0 1 0 0
'Totals 88 7 11 "4 27 7 1
ttttgtf BCOnU BY INNINGS.
Los Angeles 1 (I 0 0 0 0 1 0 0— 2
Uuae hit* 1 0 000018 I—s
Beuttle 1 02000400-7
Huh.! hits .......! 1 3 10 0 3 1 I— ll
SUMMARY.
. Two base hit— Brashear. First base on
errors— Los Angeles 1, Seattle 1. Lett <m
base*— Loa Angeles 1, Seattle 8. liases
on balls— O« Vickera 4. Struck out— By
Vickera 7. Double plays— Kane to Me
' Kiiho to Strelb, Toman to Nagle to un
ion. Wild pitches— Vickers 1, Burns t
lilt by pitched ball— Olaokenshlp, Eager,
Van Hiiien. Time of game— l:ss, Umpire
-Mahaffey. .
Look for the Bullfrog.
Everything you want you will nnd la
the clasitltled page— a modem encyclo
pedia. Ooi cent a vioitl.
CHAMPIONSHIP FLAG
WAVES OVER CHICAGO
AMERICAN WHITE SOX
TEERI HO DEMONSTBATION ACCORDED
President Murphy of Losing Club Gives Praise to
Comiskey's Men and Says That Best Team
Won—Nationals Are Not Forgotten.
Keceive a Great Ovation
njr Afcoclated Press.
CHICAGO, Oct. 14.— The Chicago
club of the American baseball league is
the champion of the world. By Winning
today's game, 8 to 3, ngulnst the
local club of the Nntlonal league
the Americans earned the right to fly
the world's championship pennant, as
well as the pennmit of the American
league, to ride to the grounds next «ea
son In carriages and to have "World's
Champions" lettered on tho blankets
worn by their horses. Today's game
wns the sixth of the series and the
fourth victory for the Americans.
When the last National batsman hod
gone out and the stunning fact that the
new champions had been created
burned Its Impression through tho
minds of excited thousands, a crowd
surged around the box where sat
Charles W. Murphy, president of . the
losing Hub. He smiled gamely at re
quest!! for a speech, and said:
"The best team won. They won be
cause they played better ball. ! Too
much praiso cannot be given to Presi
dent Comtskey mul Captain Jones and
the team which, by unprecedented
pluck, climbed In mtdseatiou from rov
enth place to the top of their own
league, and then topped oft that great
accomplishment by winning the world's
championship from the team that tnado
a runaway race In the National league
contest. I call: for three cheers for
President Comlskey nnd his team."
Cheer ufter cheer followed tho speech,
but they were lost to the hearing of
most of the crowd, which was busily
cheering other things— the Individual
players, the players collectively, and
thumping said players pn the back with
fiuch enthusiasm that every one of them
had to fight a way out to the waiting
■carriages. . ,
The cheers for the losers were not
lacking. They had lost the greatest
distinction which baseball offers to itu
votaries, but the still a great team,
and the crowd which followed their
carriages through crowded blocks did
not spare their throats in saying so.
Oomlskey'B face was wreathed in
smiles long before- the game was over,
for the Americans put the victory In
storage in the first two innings. When
Schulte went out at first after an
abortive race, and the great series was
over, Comiskey shook hands with such
of his players as he could reach. The
others were fighting to save themselves
from their friends and had no time for
congratulations save pounding each
other on the back. <■ ■ •
The crowd seemed loath to leave the
grounds when the game was over.
Thousands poured out of the bleach
ers and circus seats on to the field,
while those in the stands stood up ami
watched the spectacle. The yells and
sereechlngs of noise-making devices
which had been rending the air all day
during the game apparently to the limit
were redoubled. It was pandemonium
let loose.
The players tried to cling together for
mutual protection, but it was useless.
A few moments sufficed to make each
one the center of a densely packed half
crazed throng out of which he had to
fight his way. I
The wives of sucli Americans as were
married were waiting for their spouses
In the carriages to carry them away
safely from tho hero worshiping mob.
A crowd of small boys tore th» ■wire
screen from a ticket window after tho
game was over and got Into the field
merely to stand on the historic ground
and share in the excitement.
The victory was a fairly earned one,
which Is shown not only by the fact
that the Americans won four out of six
games, incidentally making It unneces
sary to play the seventh, but by the
hits and runs the Americans, all told,
made 22 runs, compared with 18 by
the Nationals. They made thirty-nine
baso hits as against thirty-seven for
the Nationals. The Nationals made but
five errors, compared with fourteen by
the Americans. The latter also made
the greater number of extra base hits,
but the ground rules made nearly all
of them good for only two bases.
Among the expert critics of baseball
it In generally admitted that to the
American pitchers most of the credit is
due. This despite the fact that the
American pitchers have but twenty
six strike outs to their credit, against
thirty-five for the Nationals. The
Americans gave nineteen bases on balls,
ii:i against eighteen by the Nationals.
Notwithstanding this the American
pitchers were effective when hits meant
runs, particularly against such men as
Chance, Schulte, Steinfeldt and Kling.
These .men, all consistent hitters, were
all but helpless during most of the
series. On the other hand the Ameri
cans, popularly called the "hltless
wonders," batted more strongly than
their opponents, who d-rlng the Bea
son had done the heaviest batting In
the National league. .
In stealing bases the Nationals had a
shade over the Americans. Catcher
Kllng and Sullivan, who caught tho
entire series, were both formidable to
baßo runners, but of the total of thir
teen bases stolen tho Nationals got
eight.
Over 19.000 paid admissions had been
registered at the gate at noon, the
balmy weather and the holiday bring
ing the crowds out early.
The grounds being full to bursting the
gates were cloned and play was begun
at 2:15 o'clock. Completely encircling
thn grounds was a closely packed
crowd of enthusiasts. Small pennants
bearing the names of the owners'
favorite team, were In nearly every
hand.
One man on the top seat of tho
bleachers had a'u unearthly sound-pro
ducer, uy turning a crank It gave out
orodigious noises, half groan and halt
••■all. To the supporters of the Na-
tionals during the first two innings the
Bound 'was expressive of their feelings.
A brass band of six pieces occupied
part of one box for the first time dur
ing the aeries, but could scarcely make
Itself heard above the din. When,
however, popular aha were played the
crowd Joined in and sang to the
music.
I A total of fourteen hltx, two of them
doubles, tells the story of today's game
and now It was won. Captain Chance
replaced Mordecat Brown In the pitch
ers' box in the second, although Brown
had pitched a hard game on Krtday.
The 'Americans connected with his
weakened delivery for eight safe hits
In the two Innings and then retired to
the bench. Overall, who was called In
yesterday to retrieve that game, was
again culled upon . and held the Amer.
ilraiiH to six hits and one run during
«h« remainder of the game.
\ Ills support was fexcelleiit. Time and
LOS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 15, 1905.
again Tinker and Evers, by blocking
hits, prevented runs, as did Hoffman
In center by spectacular running
catches. Sheckard also mado a great
backward running catch which kept
the score down.
When the Americans Assumed a lead
of six runs the Nntlonal players were
n grimly determined looking lot, but
try as they would, they could not solve
tho puzzling delivery of Vr. White, the
opposing pitcher. Time after time the
heavy hitters of the team batted out
easy ones when hits meant' runs.
All told they gathered only six safe
ties oft White. Part of the crowd
rooted hard for a ninth Inning rally.
Tinker, to his evident chagrin, went
out. Bvera raised flickering hopes by
a scratch double to right, but Kllng
promptly failed. Qessler, a substitute,
batted for Overall and was" allowed to
walk. Hoffman singled to left and
Evers scored. Sheckard was safe on
an error. Schults now camo to bat.
With all the burden of, a forlorn hope
on his shoulders, he -hit a grounder
straight to Donohue and tho series
passed into baseball history.
The attendance at today's game was
19,249, making the total attendance for
the series 99,845. Tho receipts for to
day's game were 120,861 and the total
for the six games was $105,640. Of this
amount the players' share Is $33,402.
•The American league men, with
twenty-one men, will receive $25,062.
The Nationals' share for nineteen men
will be $8,350. Tho receipts for last
year's championship series was $68,435
and of last year's American-National
series, $26,774.
AMERICANS.
ABRBIIPO A C
Hahn, rf 5 2 4 0 0 0
Jones, cf s 2 0 3 0 0
Isbell, 2b B 13 14 0
Davis, 8S 5 2 2 14 0
Rohe, 3b 5 12 3 4 1
Donohue. lb 4 0 2 15 11
Dougherty, If 3 0 1 0 0 1
Sullivan, c 4 0 0 3 ID
Whiter, p 3 2 0 12 0
Totals 37 8 14' 27 10 3
NATIONALS.
AB R BH PO A E
Hoffman, cf 5 1 2 3 0 0
Scheekard. If 3 0 0 2 O'O
Sehulte, rf 5 0 1 l) 0 0
Chance, lb 2 0 0 9 0 0
Steinfeldt, 3b 3 0 0 0 ' 0 0
Tinker, ss 4 0 1 2 li 0
Evers, 2b 4 112 0 0
Kling, c 4 1 1 U 2 0
Brown, p 1 0 0 010
Overall, p 2 0 1 0 1 0
Gossler, x 0 0 0 U U •)
Totals 33 3 7 24 10 0
x— Batted for Overall in the ninth.
SCORE BY INNINGS.
Americans 3 4 0 0 0 00 1 x— B
Nationals 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 I—3
SUMMARY.
Left on bases— Americans 9, Nationals
9. Two base hits— Schulte, Overall, EV
ers, Donohue, Davis. Hits— Oft Brown 8,
Oft Overall 6. Sacrifice hits— Sheckard,
Jones. Stolen base— Rohe 1. 1 Double
plays— Davis to Donohue. Struck ' out—
By Overall 3, by White 2. Bases on balls
—Off Brown 1, oft Overall 2, oft White i.
Hit with ball— Chance. Time of Bame—
1:53. .Umpires— O'Loughlln and John
stone.
GAME BY INNINGS
First Inning
Nationals— Hoffman singled to left
and went to second on Dougherty's
fumble of the hit. Scheckard sacri
ficed perfectly and with Hoffman on
third, the crowd cried for a score. They
were promptly gratified, for Schulte,
whose two-bagger -yesterday brought in
two runs, swung on the first ball
pitched and knocked it into the right
field crowd for two bases, Hoffman
scoring and Schulte was out at third
a moment later when Whtto stopped
Chance's grounder and threw it to
Rohe. Chance was safe at first. Stcln
feldt ■waited for four barl ones. Tinker
Hew out to Jones. One run.
Americans— Hahn hit an awkward
bounder yhlch Evers stopped ■with his
bare hand, but being off his balance
could not throw it. Jonos forced Hahn
and ■went to Becond on Isbell's sharp
single to right. Davis doubled to right
and Jones scored. Schulte claimed that
he was under the hit when some one
in the crowd pushed him. Captain
Chance protested against allowing the
hit but Umpire Loughlln allowed It to
stand. With men at second and third,
and the infield playing close in, Rohe
hit ' to Tinker, who threw Isbell out
at the plate. Rohe stole second. Dono
hue, with an opportunity similar to
Rohe's, doubled to left, scoring Davis
and Rohe. Doherty grounded out to
Chance unassisted.* Three runs.
Second Inning
Nationals— Donohue fumbled Evers'
grounder and the runner was safe.
Kllng hit Into a double play and both
retired. Brown struck out. No runs.
Americans— Sullivan out, Tinker to
Chance. White grounded out, Brown to
Chance. Hahn singled between third
and short. Jones walked. ' Isbell
singled to Evcrs. The bases were full
when Davis came to bat. Tinker
jumped and tried to get his liner, but
merely blocked it and Hahn and Jones
scored. Rohe singled but Isbell was
held at third, Tinker having blocked
the ball. Overnll at this crisis, with the
bases full, replaced Brown. Donohuo
hit over second base, livers getting the
ball by fast work, but not in time to
effect a put out. Isbell Rcored on the
hit. Dougherty walked, forcing Davis
across the plate. Kulllvau struck out.
Fuur runs.
Third Inning
Nationals— Hoffman went out, Don
ohue making a great stop and White
covering first. Bheckard grounded out,
iKbf'll to Donohue. Hchulto flew out
to Donohue. No runs.
Americans— White went out easily,
Overall to Chance. Hahn flow out to
Sheckard.' Jones new to Tinker. No
runs.
Fourth Inning
Nationals— White threw four bad
ones in a row, and Chance walked.
Ftelnfeldt knocked a ily to Jones.
Tinker forced Chance, livers out, Ib
bell to Donohue. Nn runs.
Americans— lsbell out, Tinker mak
ing a great running stop and throw to
Chance. Davis fouled out to Kllng.
Rohe singled to right center. Hoffman
sprinted back to the crowd and caught
Donohue's lly Jumping. No runs.
Fifth Inning
Nationals— Kling hit In front of the
plate and waa safe. Overall doubled to
right. Hoffman struck out. Kllng
scored on .Bheckard's out, Isbell to
Donohue, the latter making a wonder
ful atop of a bad throw. Bchulte went
out, Davis to Donohue. One run.
1 Aiiicrlruuu— JJohei lv lined out to Xv
tr*. Bnlllvmt struck otit, Whlt« v-nikfrt.
ltnhn singled to left. Jones forced
Hahn. No runs.
Sixth Inning
Nntlonnls— Chanco was hit In the font
by a. pitched bnll. Rtelnfeldt popped
out to Rohe. Tinker sinßlrfl to eent«r,
tivcrft fouled out to Sullivan. Chance
out, stealing. No runs.
Americans— lsbfill fouted out to
Chnnce. P-avls fouled out to Kllng.
Roho out, Tinker to Chance. No runs.
Seventh Inning
Nationals— Kllng out, White to Dona
hue. Overall followed suit, Rohe to
Donohuo. Hoffman out, libell to Dono
hue. No runs-
Americans— Donohue struck out. ■Do
herty bunted to Chance and was. sate,
Chance dropping tho ball In trying to
touch the runner. Sulllvru flew out to
Hoffman. White's fly was captured by
fiheckard after a hard backward run-
No runs. HKAt
Eighth Inning
Nationals— Shockfinl was Riven a
pass. Schulte out to Donohue uu»vt>nl.it
rrl. Chance out, Davis to Donohue.
Stelnfeldt's hoavy hit was captured by
Jones in far left center.
Americans— Hahn singled to left.
Jones sacrificed. Isbell scored llnnu
with a drive to center nnd reached sec
nnd on the throw home. Davis out,
Tinker to Chance. Hoffman captured
Kohe's liner. One run,
Ninth Inning
Nationals— Tinker out, Rohe to Dono
hue. Evers got a scratch double to
right. Kllng out, Itoho to Donohue.
Oesslcr batted for Overall and was al
lowed to walk. Hoffman singled to left,
scoring Kvcrs. Shecknrd was safe on
Rohe'a fumble. Schulte grounded out
to Donohue. Ono run.
FEW MEN IN EITHER
LEAGUE BATTED .300
Following Is a record of American
and National league batsmen who have
attained a batting of .250 or more dur
ing the season which camo to a close
two weeks ago:
National League
Player and Club R. H. SB. SH. PC.
Wagner, Plttsburg 9« 10 J 43 5 .330
Ferguson, New York.... 2 5 1 0 .33!!
Lumlcy, Brooklyn 67 147 29 18 .3<!>
Btclnfeldt, Chicago 77 Ml I'u 21 .3^5
Donlln, New York 15 38 10 2 .314
McCarthy, Brooklyn 21 89 8 8 .313
Chance, Chicago U) 140 01 18 .3W
I.obert, Cincinnati 30 73 17 11 .305
Clarke, Plttsburg 65 123 13 Tl .30)
Devlin, New York 73 141 45 13 .280
Muggins, Cincinnati 76 153 33 21 .205
Klliik, Chicago 41 95 9 8 .294
Mowery, Cincinnati 3 14 2 0 .M
Leach, Pittsburg 60 125 15 14 .257
Lush, Philadelphia 27 52 5 0 .2SI
Strange, New York .....44 82 17 8 .283
Tcnney, Boston 65 143 17 12 .281
Seymour, New York ....68 153 22 7 .2SU
Schulte, Chicago 72 H7 24 30 .279
Welmer, Cincinnati ......10 29 1 1 .27)
Mathcwson, Now York.. 7 24 0 4 .279
Cransfleld, Philadelphia.. 4s 138 14 13 .275
Ivlagee, Philadelphia 73 145 40 8 .271
Sheckard, Chicago 85 138 27 41 .2*3
Arndt, St. Louis 31 t» 5 4 .27')
Burch. St. Louis 37 83 13 6 .209
Bresnahan, New Y0rk... 65 101 20 4 .268
Beaumont, Plttsburg 48 80 2 IS .2U7
Phelps, Plttsburg 12 40 3 4 .207
Barry, St. Louis 62 130 17 15 .207
Delehanty, Cincinnati. ..63 101 20 11 .205
Rltehey, Plttsburg 45 119 8 23 .204
Bennett,' St. Louis 64 150 1U 20 .268
Bates, Boston ..48 121 12 11 .202
Nealon, Plttsburg 79 135 36 14. .261
Jordan, Brooklyn 58 105 17 9 .269
Titus, Philadelphia 60 122 13 18 .259
Evers, Chicago 66 120 41 19 .259
Ganley, Plttaburg 68 121 19 31 .258
Moran. Chicago 20 55 6 6 .!5S
Howard, Boston 41 130 12 10 .25*
Thomas, Philadelphia.. ..74 118 19 13 .250
Shannon, New York 76 144 26-18 .258
Murray, St. Louis 13 29 4 0 .254
Doom. Philadelphia 28 83 12 9 .25*
Batch, Brooklyn ....14 48 3 6 .253
Schlei. Cincinnati 44 93 : 7 7. .25:1
Smoot, Cincinnati 48 133 2 11 .250
Brain, Boston 39 121 13 16 .250.
Team Averages
Teams. R. H. SH. SB. PC.
Chicago 608 1235 205 243 .261
Plttsburg 522 1231 173 150 .261
Philadelphia .500 1130 141 356 .243
New York .587 1102 141 223 .242
Cincinnati ..419 1140 148 145 .23S
St. Louis 473 1151 123 98 .237
Brooklyn 466 1054 114 154 .22!)
Boston- 483 1017 109 83 .224
American League
Player and Club R. H. SB. SH. PC.
Stone, St. Louis 78 184 1332 .303
Clark, Cleveland 12 4G 1 1 .34S
Lajote. Cleveland 75 180 14 14 .313
F. Smith, Chicago 5 12 2 0 .333
Elberfeld. New Y0rk. ...44 94 5 15 .32!)
Chase, New York 75 171 25 31 .328
Seybold. Athletics 43 131 14 10 .315
Cobb, Detroit 34 94 15 21 .311
Flick, Cleveland 87 lU3 13 32 .312
Keeler, New York 91 Iti4 30 20 .311
Rossman, Cleveland 38 96 16 5 .304
Grlmshaw, Boston 41 107 9 ( .W
Stahl, Boston 68 160 17 14 .305
Congalton, Cleveland 41 101 19 11 .302
HemphUl, St. Louis 81 153 10 30 .301
Murphy, Athletics 47 132 9 17 .295
Payne, Detroit 22 58 6 4 .294
Davis, Athletics 91 149 10 23 .291
Turner, Cleveland 70 145 14 23 .289
Yeager, Now York 16 30 4 2 .288
Crawford, Detroit 62 147 8 16 .287
Williams, New York 62 126 19 12 .287
Isbell, Chicago 67 146 29 37 .286
Wakefleld, Washington,. l6 55 8 3 .286
Bay. Cleveland 48 78 10 19 .283
Bemls, Cleveland 27 75 6 6 .283
McGulro, New Y0rk...... 8 36 X 2 .283
Altlzer, Washington 56 105 14 SI .283
Bradley, Cleveland 31 83 18 15 .280
Schreck, Athletics 29 93 3 5 .275
Rickey, St. Louia.. 19 46 3 4 .ilo
Anderson, Washington.. ss 146 4 32 .275
Davis, Chicago 56 123 10 28 .274
Hickman, Washington... 47 105 7 7 .274
Rohe, Chicago...; 8 41 S 5 .273
La Porto, New York 55 106 0 9 .273
Wallace. St. Louis 59 115 13 22 .272
Cross, Washington 53 121 12 18 .272
Collins, Boston 18 38 2 1 . .2«s
Ferris. Boston 49 131 12 8 .267
Winter, Boston 8 18 2 2 .265
Uurtsi'l, Athletics 86 130 li 33 .2G4
Mclntyre, Detroit 30 112 9 26 .263
Bender, Athletics 9 24 1 1 .251
Tannchlll. Boston 12 18 2 0 .241
Jones. Detroit 41 84 2 18 .201
Conroy, New York 60 128 16 28 .260
Freeman, Boston 36 83 16 6 .256
Jonos, Bt. Louis 42 120 31 24 .216
Donohue, Chicago 65 127 23 32 .255
Hoffman, Now Y0rk.. ..31 71 14 28 .254
Graham, Boston ....11* 21 1 2 .253
O'Brien. St. Louis M 114 16 20 .253
Parent, Boston 63 133 14 15 .251
Jonos, Chicago 74 113 22 27 .250
Thomas, New York 10 19 2 3 .250
Team Averages
Teams. R. H. SH. SB. PC
Cleveland ...579 1285 173 160 .276
New York 571 1215 171 180 .27.2.
St. Louis 484 1221 148.210 .251
Athletics 620 1129 159 lf.S .251
Boston 444 1107 129 100 .244
Detroit 438 1014 175 180 .243
Washington ...474 1070 136 107 .241
Chicago J..60Q 1033 179 20« .237
ST. LOUIS NATIONALB WIN
By Aisuclated Press.
ST. LOUIS. Oct. 14.-St. Louis Na
tionals rniorud their llrst victory over
the Americana In the pout aeries by
winning the opening game of the final
double-header today 1 to 0. The second
game was a five Inning tie. The record
for the aeries stands:
Americana won 14; Nationals won 1.
Tied 3.
A feature of the match foot race be*
tween NUea of the Americans and
Burch of the Nationals, won by the
former. Scores :
First game:
Americana — 0, hits 5, errors 0.
Nationals — 1, hits 4, errors 2.
Powell and O'Conner, MoGlynn and
Marshall.
Second game:
Americans — 0, hits 2, errors 0.
Nationals — 0, hits 3, errors 2.
Batteries — Felayand Spencer, Iloel
eketter and Marshall.
Look fur Hie DuliriVK
FRESNO WINS
DOUBLE HEADER
TAKES BOTH GAMES FROM
PORTLAND
First Contest Is Shutout for the Raisin
Pickers— Daehwood Score*
Winning Run In the
Fifth
■- ' - .. x
By Associated Tress.
tfJIESNO. Oct. 14.— Fresno won both
Kames In today's double header with
Portland. The first rhuir wan a shut
out for the ItaUln Uater*. McGregor
for Fresno pitched good ball and was
supported by phenomenal fielding,
which kept the Webfeet from crossing
the pan, although they found him for
six Hits. Gum wns on the slab for j
Portland nnd was found for only four
hits. Fresno scored the winning run
in the fifth Inning. Dashwood walked
and scored on Casey's two-bagger.
First Game
PORTLAND.
ABRBH BUPO A X
Sweeney, us 3 0 ( 0 0 2 2 0
McHalfl, cf 4 0 3 3 0 0 0<
SchlmplY, rf 4 0 A it :i o o ,
McCreedlc, If 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hinlth. 3b 4 0 0 0 2 1 0,
Warner, 2b .....3 0 0 0 2 1 ol
Carson c '. 3 0 1 0530J
Lister, lb 3 0 0 0 9 0 0>
dum, p 3 0 2.0120
Totals 30 0 G 3 24 9 0
FRMSNO.
AB 11 811 SB PO A X
Casey, 2b 3 0 1 0 » B 0
Doyle, cf 8 0 0 0 0 0 0
Wolters, rf 3,0 1 0 0 0 0
McLaughlln, If 2 6 1 0 10 0
KaKan. 3b 3 0 0 0 1 2 li
Delmas, fa 3 0 0 0360J
Dashwood, c 2 11 0 S 1 0
Cartwrlght, lb 1 0 0 0 10 1 0
Hogan, lb 1 0 0 0 4 0 0
McGregor, p 3 0 0 0 0 2 1
Totals 14 "I ~4 0 27 19 2
SCORE BY INNINGS.
Portland '..".. ..0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0-0
Baso hits 1 0200111 0-6
Fresno 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 x— l
. Baso hits 0 0 0 11110 x— 4
SUMMARY.
Sacrifice lilts — Sweeney, McLaughlin,
Cartwrlght. Two base hits— Casey, Dash
wood. First base on balls— Off McGregor
1, oft Gum 4. Struck out— By McGregor
4, by Gum 2. Left on bases — Portland 5,
Fresno B. Doublo plays— Casey unassist
ed, Casey to Oelmas to Hogan. Time of
game— l:33. Umpire— Perrlne.
Second Game
PORTLAND.
AB R BH SB PO A E
Sweeney, ss ' 2 0 O 1 0 2. 0
McHale. "cf .....2 1 1 f 0 4 0 0
ScnlmpfT. If 2 12 0 10 0
McCreedle, p 2 0 0 0 0 3 0
Smith, 3b 1 0 0 0 1 0 0
Warner, 2b 1 0 O 0 10 0
Carson, c 1 0 0 0 0 1 0
Lister, lb 1 0 O 0 6 1 0
Gum, rf 2 0 ( 0 0 0 1 0
Totals ...'. .....14 3 3 1 12 8 0
FRESNO.
A ABRBIISBPOAK
Casey. 2b 2 110 4 3 0
Doyle, cf 10 1 0 2 0. 0
Wolters, rf & p 2 1 2 0 1.0-0
McLaugr. .n, If 2 11- 1 0 1 0
Eagan, 3b 2 0 0 0 1 0, 0
Uelmas, ps 2 12 0 10 1
Dashwood,, lb & rf..2 0 10 1 10
Hogan, c 2 0. 0 0 2, 4 0
Bobbins, p 0 0-. 0 0. 0 1 0
Traeger, rf 0 0 0 00 0 1
Cartwright, lb 2 0 0 0 3 0 .0
T0ta15'...... 17 4 8' i 13 10 2
,-'... SCORE BY INNINGS.
Portland*:"". ..2 0 o' o o—2
Base hits 2 0 10 0-t3
Fre--- 0 1 3 0 x— 4
Bp hits ' 3 2 4 0 X— S
SUMMARY.
Sacrifice hits— Lister, Doyle. Two bago
hit— Wolters. Three baso hit— McHale.
First base on balls— Oft Bobbins 1, Wol
ters 2. Struck out— By Wolters 1. In
nings pitched — By Bobbins 1, by WoltPrs
4. Wild pitch— Robblns. Hit by pitcher-
Carson, by Wolters. Time of game— so
minutes. Umpire— Perrlric.
ANGELS ARE WEAK
WITH THE STICK
Following are the batting and field
ing; averages of the Los Angeles and
Seattle baseball teams for the past
six games: . .
LOS ANGELES.
ABRH STSCBTPD
Bernard 22 1 4 1 1 .182 .957'
Qochnauer 15 0 2 0 1 '.133 .875
Cravath 17 2 10 2 .117 1.000
Brashear 20 0 3 0 1 .150 1.000
Dillon 19 14 0 o .210 .mi:
Carlisle 18 1 4 0 0 .210 1.000
Toman 20 0 2 11 .100 .941
Buckley 6 0 0 0 0 „000 1.000
Eager 13 1 2 0 1 .154 .961
Randolph (i 0 10 0 .166 1.000
Nagle 11 0 2 0 0 .181 - .923 !
Bergeman 3 0 0 0 0 .000 1.000
Burns 7 0 2 0 0 .286 .889
SEATTLE.
ABRHEC ST BT FD
Kane 26 2 6 0 4 .240 .935
Van Buren 21 5 7 11 .333 I.ooo '
Blankenshlp 24 2 9 0 4 .375 .979 ,
Householder- 25 5 5 0 1 .200 1.000
Croll 23 1 8 0 0 .348 1.000
Streib 24 0 6 0 0 .208 1.000 1
Mott 23 2 6 0 0 .260 .933
McKune 21 2 6 11 .238 .935 ,
Garvln 6 0 2 0 0 .333 1.000!
Jones 7 0 0 0 0 .000 .833;
Vickers 8 0 0 0 0 .000 .SOO
STOCKTON WINS FROM OAKLAND
By Associated Press
STOCKTON Oct. 14.— Stockton won
today's game from Oakland, making
three runs in the llrst Inning. Stanages'
home run was the feature of an other
wise dull game. Henderson, the Port
land pitcher, was on the slab for Stock
ton and waa in fine form.
. Score: • .'.•'.".*.!,':'■!';■
Stockton — 5, hits 9, errors 2.
Oakland— l, hits 6, errors 0.
Butterlen-r-Hemlerson and Donohue;
Pierce and Volquardsrn.
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Proper Maturity
Absol ute Pu r Ity and
Perfect Bouquet. ™1l
JESSE MOORE WHISKEY W \
has all these good qualities. <4jjft H
LAGOMARSINO COMPANY, Dlatributers, [j
128-130 North Spring St. ' (j
SPORTING GOSSIP
AND COMMENT
Itoy Hitt is practicing with tho Seals.
The great southpaw Is coming around
nicety and will b« flble to get back In
the game In a. couple of days.
Farko Wilson hfls signed a , player
who bears up under the nani« of John
Qulncy Adams Andrew Big Fnir. One
more namo would have broken tha lino
type. ' . /
Tilff Joe Nenlon, who mode good with
Plttsburg this »'oh son and who was a
populftr Idol with the fan* of the east,
la to piny with Danny Bhay'e Stockton
team. Nealon is on old friend of Khiiy's
nnd will get In the gamn to help out
Dan. Ho should make 11 great drawing
card.
President Hert is lo bo ronßnitulated
in snaring Mich n good umpire ns In
this fellow Derrick. Ho seems to be the
Koods. lln has a volco that would do
Jufttlco to an Italian bans singer nnd
gets around tho field lit excellent fnfch>
lon, Ho Is a man patterned much Bfter
the fnnhlnn of .Silk O'Loughlln, and If
lie lins the n«?rve of that Rentlemnn he
will make his mark In hit) chosen mis
fortune.
The Scaln have Rlgnori two now
catchers, comely lade, both of them.
Ono Is Brown, who caught around
Maripoea, and tho other In Kclhl, who
played around tho s«nd pyramids of
Ouklnnd. Tho boys urn nattle luokera
and should be of much assistance to the
regular kid backstops, who are now
overburdened with tho arduous tusk of
catching.
Said the resident of Chicago to the
visitor: ;">..<
"What impresses you moat concern
ing our city?"
Said the visitor:
"I don't care to ' talk baseball. I've
come on serious business."
Though Matty Baldwin beat Chester
Goodwin nil the way In their fifteen
round bout at Boston last week, Ref
eree Flaherty called It a draw. In the
opinion of many of the spectators this
was one of tho worst decisions that
has ever been given In the cast, and he
has handed out many.
Fancier Wotr of Manhattan has re
cently bought in England the blood
hound Ripple Hector. The dog has been
highly successful on the English bench,
adding many laurels to the collection
of his late owner, Handley Splcer.
At the first exhibition of the moving
pictures In Chicago of the battlefield at
Goldfield between Joe Gans and Bat
tling Nelson . so great a crowd flooded
into the New York theater that many
had to be turned away. The pictures
were, remarkably clear and showed
every punch distinctly. The crowd be
came very enthusiastic as the fight was
rolled oft and cheered repeatedly.
On account of the many assertions by
Nolan that he had been robbed of the
fight, particular attention was paid to
the pictures of the last round. There
was some difference of opinion as to
whether the punch which ended the
fight was foul. Terry McGovern, who
wus on hand, said that it ■\yas a very
doubtful foul at best, and that even If
It had been a foul It looked quite unin
tentional.
BASEBALL ON
THE SQUARE
"I TOLD YOU SO" CHORUS HAS
NO CHANCE
Had White Sox Thrown Yesterday's
Game Big League Clubs Could
Have Cleaned Up Over
$2p,OOOMore
The wise acres.'of which there were a
goodly number, are . wondering today
why the Chicago National and Ameri
can league clubs let slip an opportunity
of adding at least (20,000 to their sate
receipts. , •
Had the White Sox thrown yester
day's game, which could hay« been
done easily enough, a record breaking
crowd would surely have assembled for
the deciding diamond battle. Over $20,
000 was taken In yesterday and a larger
amount would surely have been forth
coming had another game been in order.
That baseball is conducted along
lln«s of highest sportsmanship was
thoroughly demonstrated in the out
come of the post seaßon series which
closed yesterday. Absolutely no grounds
exist for claiming: that other than pure
love of the sport animated Chicago's
great exhibitions.
So far as baseball Is concerned it was
perhaps better that the White Sox won
yesterday's game, as from many quar
ters would have come an Immediate
"I told you so" chorus. .
As President Murphy of the Cubs
said after the last man went out: "The
best team won."
With Buch men at the head of base
ball the grand old game will surely con
tinue as the American national pastime.
Here's a hand to Sox and Cubs, Both
could not ' win, but what a gallant
struggle resulted when the mighty nines
clashed. '■■ •-' . ■ ■ ■ !
The White Sox's race throughout the
league season was an unparrulleled one
and that . they ' should end v glorious
session - by ' defeating: Chances's Cubs
forms one of the most remarkable rec
ords In the annals of baseball.
SAN DIEGO CLUB WINS
SAN DIEGO, Oct. 14.— The San Diego
baseball team beat the Keystones of
Los Angeles today. 7 to 4.
_
TWO CASES
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