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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, November 17, 1906, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1906-11-17/ed-1/seq-2/

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PRESIDENT VIEWS
PANAMA CANAL
EVERY BRANCH OF THE WORK
INSPECTED
Nation* Chief Executive Becomes
Thoroughly Interested as Varl.
out Details Are Explained
to Him
By Associated Press.
"PANAMA, Nov. 16.— President Roose
velt, who stopped at the Tlvoll hotel
last night, started at 7 o'clock this
morning with Mrs. Roosevelt and the
other members of his party to make
nr. examination of the Culebra cut.
The weather was overcast, threaten
ing rain. At half past eight the presi
dential train arrived at Pedro Miguel,
where steam shovels were at work.
The president had his trnln stopped
for the purpose of making a persona!
examination. At this point in the cut
the peculiar soil conditions have re
sulted In more or less frequent |,mil
slides, and this fact was brought to the
presidents attention.
■ President Roosevelt descended from
his train and climbed upon one of the
steam shovels, taking a seat alongside
Ejtiglneer Gray, whom he subjected to
v searching fire of questions regarding
the work.
During his conversation Engineer
Gray took the opportunity on behalf
of himself and the other engineers to
declare that, unlike the railroad en
gineers, they were not paid for over
time.
The president promised to look into
this. H« stayed on the steam shovel
about twenty minutes. By this time
it was raining hard.
Wanted to See It All
President Roosevelt told chief en
gineer Stevens that he wanted to see
all the works in connection with the
excavation, even to the temporary lay
ing of tracks. With this in view he
bearded a work train near Pedro Miguel
and went on to the next point where
steam shovels were at work. Here
there was no danger of landslides.
The presidential train continued on
the regular line toward Panama. The
work of the second steam shovel was
observed and the president made a de
tour to examine the side of the Pedro
Miguel lock.
He shook hands with all the Ameri
cans he met while walking over the
ground. At about twenty-five minutes
past nine the president entered the
deep portion of Culebra cut, his train
going slowly in order that he might
observe the workings of the drill
machines and shovels. One shovel was
decorated with a sign reading "We will
do our best to help you build it."
Thn president spent some time In the
deepest portion of the cut where last
Sunday 22 tons of explosives were used
to throw down 35,000 cubic yards of
material.
The rain was now coming down in
torrents, and the \vat?r poured in riv
ulets down the funnel-shaped sides, of
the famous cut. Several charges of
dynamite were exploded In order that
the president might see the effect, after
which he went back to his own train.
PROMOTION COMMITTEE
ISSUES SPECIAL" CALL
By Associated Press.
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 16.— Senator
George C. Perkins, chairman of the Cal
ifornia congressional delegation, has is
sued a call at the request of the Califor
nia promotion committee for a meeting
of the delegation at California building.
Union square, San Francisco, for Wed
nesday, November 21, at 2 o'clock in
the afternoon.
This meeting has been called for the
purpose, of discussing such affairs as
are of interest for the development of
the state, and all commercial organiza
tions In all parts of the state have been
invited to send representatives who are
conversant with the needs of their lo
calities.
All others who desire to present any
question to the delegation before its
departure for Washington will be given
an opportunity at this meeting, which
■will be public.
Believe Crisis Is Impending
By Associated Press.
MADRID, Nov. 16.— King Alfonso
has been hastily recalled to this city
from his hunting expedition. It is be
lieved that a cabinet crisis is impend
ing. War Minister De L,uque is resist
ing the pretensions of Generals Weyler
and Polovieja to the fleld-marshalship, I
vacant owing to the death of Count
de Cheste. I
* i^^^k All the Music I
! WvHy Any Time |
[% \j 2a*frtnWfc&?fs&'' Everybody loves piano music, yet not &]
HqJgßSjtt&f) l^ one home in a thousand has a talented £*
r » musician, a home without talent need «]
£J not be a home without music.
The Pianola Piano '&
Q>f makes It possible for every homo to hear the finest piano music, and 5^3
" furthermore It makes It possible for everyone In your home to play „
Nt 'he music perfectly. It combines In one Instrument a high grade pi- «fl
O '!'" and the means to play it. We have three styles of the pianola' (S 1
o piano, BTECK, WHEELOCK, STUYVEBANT. Prices are extremely Cl,
[» favorable and easy terms for payment arranged. gJ
& Our Talking Machine Parlors (^m) &
*"2^ offer comfort to the record purchaser. 2j
_O . Quiet parlors are provided away from \ \ CJ.
Lq the noise of cars, etc. Our stock of \ A £yJ
; Edison Zon-o-Phone Victor ifl^^Esigg
Machines and Records .^^fe^^F^- $
iH immense. Every .size and style of Kj^J^^^y^ 53 KlLa
« machine, and 175,000 records. Our fa- 1 "^SaUSjy W/7^ Si
O ditties for rurliiK for mall orders aro MaUW"\^m ;Jf CJ
complete. Prompt attention Is given and satisfaction in teed. Si
We ai« jobbers of the Edison and Zon-O-Phone. The VICTOR VIC- CT
r ; rKOLA and AUXETOPIiONB are demonstrated dally. r->
I Southern California Music Co. %
4 2 332-334 South Broadway, Los Angeles' &
SCORES WOMEN WHO
WEAR BIRDS AND FURS
By Annotated Press
CHICAGO. Nov. 16.— Tears
and hysterical denials on the
part of women delegates who
have heard themselves called
"barbarians and murderesses"
marked the close of the Amer
ican Humane association con
vention last night.
The women for half an hour
had listened patiently while a
speaker denounced the wear
ing of furs and bird carcasses
for adornment. Unable to
listen further two women fin
ally left the convention hall.
Another burst into tears,
while a husband of a fourth
arose to his feet in defense of
the women who wore furs.
It was the address of J. How
ard Moore on "The Cost of a
Skin" that caused the stir-up.
Nobody but a barbarian would
adorn her head with the carcass
of a bird and the heads of grin
ning weasels, said Mr. Moore.
"Such things appeal only to the
vulgarian.
"Such a woman is about as
attractive as if adorned with a
string of skulls, for she excites
pity and is a murderess. Furs
are the most costly of luxuries
because to secure them men
must be the most conscience
less and inhumane.
"When I think that in this
day of advanced action and
supposed refinement, brutali
ties such as are necessary to
secure the furs of these little
animals are practiced, I am
heartily ashamed of the race to
which I belong."
Dr. W. O. Stillman was
elected president, Miss May
Lovell of Pennsylvania, secre
tary, and James M. Brown of
Toledo, vice president.
TEMPORARY INJUNCTION
GRANTED BY COURT
By Associated Press.
BOSTON, l.ov. 16.— A temporary in
junction prohibiting the American
Fire Insurance company from transact
ing business in the state of Massachu
setts was issued by Judge Morton in
the supreme court today.
The injunction was Issued as a result
of a bill of information filed by Attor
ney Dan Malone. who state.d that later
he would ask that the Injunction be
made permanent and that a receiver
be appointed on the ground that the
company Is Insolvent.
The American Fire Insurance com
pany, is one of the oldest fire insur
ance companies in America. It suf
fered heavily as a result of the fire In
San Francisco.
The report of State Insurance Com
missioner Frederick L. Cutting shows
the assets of the company are $334,225,
that its liabilities are $369,863 and that
its capital stock Is $300,000.
LUMBER DEALERS WANT
TESTING LABORATORY
By Associated Press.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 16.— At a meet
ing here of representatives of the lum
ber manufacturers and wood users'
associations resolutions were unani
mously adopted advocating the estab
lishment by the government of a com
pletely equipped lumber testing labora
tory.
The interests represented also re
solved to use their influence to obtain
from congress an appropriation of
$200,000 for that purpose.
The function of the laboratory would
be to standardize as to strength and
durability every American wood, that
manufacturers might rely on getting
definite results from the use of various
forms of wood for desired purposes.
Finds New Alfalfa
By Associated Press.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 16.— After twice
risking his life and once nearly losing
It in the Interests of agricultural
science, Prof. Hansen, of the South
Dakota experiment station of the de
partment of agriculture, has found In
Northern Siberia an alfalfa suited to
the arid lands of the north, where the
winters are bitter cold. The alfajfa
Prof. Hansen has discovered has a yel
lr w flower instead of blue.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: SATURDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 17, 1908.
JEWS WILL NOT
SHARE EQUALLY
RUSSIAN LANDS CANNOT BE
ACQUIRED
Premier Stolypln's Newspaper Pub.
lahes a Long Article to Prepare
the Way for Promulgation
of Reforms
By Associated Press
ST. PBTBRSBURO, Nov. IB.—Pre
mier Btoljrpln'a organ, the Rosela, today
published a long article apparently
Intended lo prepare the u-i\ foi thi
promulgation of the reforms' In the con
dition of the Jewi .is outlined In these
dispatches November 18, The paper
stated th.it « itii the view of allaying
the antli Ipated storm of protest on the
part or the reactionists, tha pi
Jewish reforms will not u-ivc the .lews
full equality, nor permission for then
to spread through the country and
acquire the lands Of the peasants, but
they will have the right to live every
where Inside tli. pale, In the country.
as well :is in the cities.
The restriction Imposed on Jewish
merchant! and artisans will be re
vised. Including gr. -.ting them permis
sion to dwell outside tile pale. The
article reviews the Jewish problem
since It wns acquired, with Poland, 130
years ago.
It declares that Hit forcible concen
tration within the pale of five million
Jews, lU4 per cent of the population,
has proved a failure ami has nol pre
vented the most dangerous elements,
the Jewish Intelligoncls. and pIUtOCTB y
from penetrating it to Russia over tllO
golden bridge, v. hiie poverty has
stricken the rosKaie. The article con
tinues:
"A full equalization of the Jews with
the Russian population, however, is Im
possible at present, because the Jew
masses within the pale are in ji Ptnto,
of revolutionary white heat and would
carry the torch of sedition through
the whole of the interior.
"It must await the final solution of
the agrarian questions which would
prevent the Jews through the money
power from acquiring the land of the
Impoverished peasantry and restoring
the state of servitude.
"But without waiting for the convo
cation of parliament, the Jews must
be granted the right to live everywhere
within the pale and the regulations
governing the residence and privileges
of the Jews In the interior provfnees
must be revised.
"Too long has the problem been
bandied about from commission to
commission until it has assumed its
present acute Inflammatory character,
which is finding expression on the one
side with bomb of the Jewish anar
chist and on the other side by anti-
Jewish excesses."
PRINCE WILL FIGHT
TO RETAIN HIS WIFE
By Associated Press.
NEW YORK, Nov. 16.— "1 shall fight
for my rights to the last," said Prince
Robert de Broglie yesterday in reply
to the cablegram from Paris that his
father, Prince Amedee de Brogll, had
fijed a demand in Paris for the an
nulment of his son's Chicago marriage
to Miss Estelle Alexander of California.
The prince said:
"We shall fight to the bitter end.
It is true that my father and his
family have rank, money and influence,
but that does not frighten me. We are
not to be intimidated. Our love for
one another and our child makes us
brave. If they force me to it I shall
take out naturalization papers and be
come an American citizen.
"In regard to lawsuits, I have also
begun action and have retained an
eminent French lawyer, M. Friederlch
Allaln of Paris, to attend to my affairs.
I shall sue for my rights and for my
share In the family fortune. I am
confident that justice will win in the
end."
ROOSEVELT'S LETTERS
ARE SOLD AT AUCTION
By Associated Press.
NEW YORK, Nov. 16.— Two letters
of President Roosevelt were among the
interesting autographs at the sale yes
terday of the collection of the late
George M. Elwood of Rochester, N. Y.
One of President Roosevelt's letters
refers to hit, book, "The Winning of the
West," as it was written on June 19,
1891, when Mr. Roosevelt was a civil
service commissioner, to Benjamin W,
Austin, secretary of the Trinity His
torical society, Dallas, Texas. Among
other things he wrote:
"You may have possibly seen a book
of mine called 'The Winning of the
West.' I wish, as soon as I can get
out of my present position, to continue
that work and to take it on through
the period of the struggle for Texan
Independence."
Mr. Roosevelt's public work has
never given him time to carry out this
expressed purpose, The letter, which
was typewritten, was sold for $3.28.
The other letter, also typewritten,
fetched $1.40.
GIVEN UP FOR LOST,
VESSEL REACHES PORT
By Associated Press.
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 16.— After a
voyage of 207 days from the Hawaiian
Islands, during which the vessel was
given up for lo.st, the five-masted steel
schooner Klneo tied up at a wharf
here today.
The schooner is commanded by Cap
tain Patten and carries a crew of (If
teen men. The captain's log shows a
tale of hardship, the Vessel during the
voyage sustaining many accidents.
The steam gear by which the nails
were raised and anchors handled was
out «r order several times, and all
! hands, Including the wife of Captain
Patten, were compelled to take their
turn at the pumps.
Although sixty days overdue, the
crew did not lack food during the
trip.
Penny Brings Large Sum
By Aaaoelated Pi aai
NEW YORK, Nov. 16.— A specimen
of the Ural cent struck In the United
Btatea mint of 1793, with 13 links In a
circle on the reverse, was sold tor !82
yesterday al the and of a two days'
»i. if of coins held at the Hotel Bar
tholdi.
Crew Narrowly Escapes
By A»»oclHte<l Pre»».
HUSTON, Nov. 16. A false aplt or a
sunken ledge near Boston light caused
111.' wreck of the schooner Mary K.
Newton last night, the crew of the
schooner »aviivK their lives only by
tackling themselves to the mast «tumps
uiitllheln Hi-rived at daylight.
WILL BUILD HOUSE
WITHOUT A CHIMNEY
Special to The Ifprnlrt
NEW YORK, Nov. 16.—
Some time ago a book was
published in which the writer
gave the reader peeps into the
world a hundred years hence.
One of the most attractive fea
tures was the reform in homes,
which were to be entirely
smokeless, dustless and conse
quently germless.
This ideal will be reached
by the home which Henry W.
Hillman of the General Elec
tric company is building at
Schenectady, N. Y.
It will be a house without a
chimney, for electricity will
take the place of coal and gas.
There will be electric stoves
in the kitchen and electric
heaters in the other rooms.
The doors will open and close
by the pressure of an electric
button, while the laundry in
the basement 'will be operated
entirely by electricity. Even
the lawn mowers will be
driven by dynamos.
Electricity will likewise pro
vide some ingenious burglar
alarms. The house and stables
are so wired that warning
lights are turned on if any per
son approaches either building
after the family has retired to
bed.
The electric power to run
this scientific home will be
supplied by the local company.
DECLARE ID
TO THE EID
(Condnurd from I'nsr Onr.>
Inee for the council from the Eighth
ward, will discuss non-partlsnnship In
local affairs from an ethical stand
point.
At a meeting last night at the resi
dence of W. C. Banks, 1271 Kensington
road, Angeleno Heights, a club was
formed In the Interest of the non-parti
san city party mid especially to promote
the candidacy of A. S. Vandegrlft, nom
inee for council from the Second ward.
Committees were appointed to arrange
for meetings and to thoroughly organ
ize the waid. W. F. Fuller presided at
the meeting.
REPUBLICANS DINE
AND SAY NICE THINGS
ABOUT ONE ANOTHER
Chairman D. C. McGarvin of the Re
publican city executive committee gave
a dinner to precinct chairmen, ward
workers and candidates at Al Levy's
laht night.
From a Republican standpoint the
affair was a decided success. About
two hundred guests were present and
nearly every seat at two long rows of
tables in the banquet hall on the third
floor was filled.
Dr. Lindley arrived while the guests
were discussing the generous menu and
he was greeted by a vigorous clapping
of hands.
Following the dinner, Chairman Mc-
Gnrvin made a brief speech, compli
menting the work of the precinct eom
mitteemen, and then he introduced as
the toastmaster District Attorney Fred
ericks. The captain told how wrong
It was to bo a non-partisan, but he
made no attack upon any Republican
who received a non-partisan indorse
ment. Capt. Fredericks made compli
mentary allusions to the various Re
publican nominees. He spoke in un
usually high praise of the accomplish
ments and deeds of Dr. Lindley, and as
a result the nominee for mayor was
overcome with emotion, and for sev
eral minutes he was unable to proceed
with his speech after being introduced.
Afterward the doctor made a vigorous
address.
E. A. Meserve heaped so many
eromlums of praise upon George Beebe
that the latter was compelled to re
spond in a speech of thankß.
A. P. Fleming juggled into a mean
ingless mess President Roosevelt's
hearty Indorsement of non-partisan
action in civic affairs, and every one
present shouted an approval.
Nearly every candidate present was
called upon for brief remarks, and if
predlotiona of victory could be made
positive assurance, there would be no
good excuse for the other five tickets
to remain In the field.
l' lore the party broke up Chairman
McOarvln wan given a vote of thanks : b
the host of the occasion.
NON-PARTISANS TO ASK
FOR BALLOT RECOUNT
OF COUNTY ELECTION
As soon as the board of Supervisors
has completed Ita oanvau of the votes
cast in the recent county election the
non-partisan county committee will de
in.mil an official count.
It Is possible that SUOh a count will
result In showing- that several non
partisans who on I'" 1 (ace of the re
turns wire defeated by small plurali
ties, really were elected. Chanel of
fraud are made by the non-partisans.
Demand for the recounl will be made
In behalf of Dr. J. P. Booth, candidate
for coroner; J. B. Millsird, candidate
(or county superintendent of achoola;
Frank (!. Henderson, Murshall BtlrOSOn
and John Toiiham, candldatfß for the
assembly.
It is expected that the canvuss will
not be completed until Saturday, No
vember -4- The canvass thus far hits
ted the plurality of PLaroe, Re
publican, f«r the assembly from the
Seventy-second district, over Hender
son from 14 to 34 votes.
Coal Is Scarce
By Aesoclatud fress.
ODBNi I'tah, Nov. 18.-OwlnK to
(allure Of the railroads and real COHI
to deliver aufflolent coal i" meet
. ,i. manda tht fuel situation
i,,., ■ ii ,: become serloua. Tkx
: in ..f tin- city was paralysed
for lack «'f coal to generate
power and tbe proapeol in that theru
will in- mi coal tomorrow.
AMLISEMENTS _
SKATE AT DREAMLAND Twelfth m 4
roi'll.llt I'lllCKS, morning and afternoon adiulmilva Free, evening ml-
niisKhm 10 vent*, except Tlmisilay ove'ilng (Koiiuly light) ttdmUalon H
rents. Nkulea ul nil ».»«(ou« 20 frnla. Open Sun. lay afternoon ..ad i-vuiilug.
League t'ulu Uauiea Monday and Frliiuy nights. No vxtra charge.
.r ■ -
PLAN WATERWAY
TO THE GULF
ASSOCIATION NOW BECOMES
A FACT
Direct Connection Between Chicago
and New Orleans by Water Is
Among Possibilities of
Near Future
By As!»nrlntrri Trrsd.
ST. LOUIS, Nov. 16.— Tho Lakea-to
the-Qulf deep waterways association
became ■ fact today when the plan for
permanent organization and the report
of the nominating committee were
adopted at the final session Of the con
vention of the provisional association,
organized by Congressman William
Lorlmer of Chicago and several of his
congressional associates, who have
been In session at the Odeon for the
last two days. The statement to the
public Issued by the convention says:
"Tin' proposed deep waterway Ir to
extend from the Chicago dial mine canal
through the valleys of the Deiplalnea
and Illinois rivers to the Mississippi
river it Qrafton, til., and thence down
11. Mississippi to St. Louis and Is to
have a minimum depth of 14 feet
throughout. We recommend that for
the purpose of meeting the probable
future needs of navigation the minimum
depth over thp sills in the locks should
In- L'l feet In the Initial construction.
"The excessive cost of the project,
as shown by the engineers' estimates,
Was due mainly to the existence of the
prominent harrier between the great
lakes and the Mississippi valley. This
chief obstacle to the prosecution of the
project has been removed by the
drainage canal.
"According to the estimates based on
recent surveys by the United States
engineers, the work remaining to be
done in order to complete the deep
waterway channel to St. Louis will cost
$31,000,000.
"Pending the Inauguration of this
work It seems important that the United
States should exercise such control over
the Desplaines and Illinois rivers as to
prevent private persons, companies or
corporations from erecting any dams or
other structures that might present ob
stacles to the prosecution of the work
as contemplated by the committees of
the United States.
"In conjunction with the deep water
enterprise from St. Louis northward it
becomes at once a matter of great Im
portance that provisions should be
made by congress for the application
of work of such substantial character
to the lower river as to give fixedness
to the channel and stability to the cav
ing banks, accomplishment of which
Is the necessary basis of any plan for
permanent establishment and deepen
ing of that part of the river."
YOUTHFUL HIGHWAYMEN
ADMIT THEIR GUILT
By Associated Press.
SAN FRONCISCO, Nov. 16.— The
young men charged with killing Fred
Mulllnix on the ocean beach surprised
Judge Dunn today by pleading guilty,
with the exception of Franklin D.
McAuliffe, who will be brought to
trial next Wednesday.
Frederick A. J. Peterson pleaded
guilty to both the robbery and mur
der charges, while Walter Westwood
and William Mears confessed to the
robbery charged against them.
In the latter two cases the murder
charge had been placed on the reserve
calendar, so that the boys will be
sentenced only for their part in the
robbery. Punishment will be meted
upon the three pleading guilty on next
Friday.
PRICE OF MIRRORS
TO BE ADVANCED
By Associated Press.
CHICAGO, Nov. 16.— The price on all
kinds of mirrors will be advanced from
20 to 30 per cent after January 1, ac
cording to an announcement made at
a meeting of the Western Mirror Man
ufacturers held here yesterday.
W. B. Jackson, a member of the ex
ecutive committee, appeared before the
twenty-five delegates and said that the
Increase in the price of raw material
and the scarcity of mercury is respon
sible for the necessary advance in the
cost of the finished products.
He said the new rate law has ad
vanced freight rates to such an ex
tent that raw material has advanced
100 per cent.
GOVERNOR HONORS
REQUISITION PAPERS
By Associated Press
SACRAMENTO, Nov. 16— Governor
Pardco today honored one requisition
and issued another. James McKinney,
who was arrested in Los Angeles a few
days ago, is wanted in North Caro
lina on a murder charge and papers
for his return were honored by the
governor.
Sheriff Veale of Contra Costa county
was given a requisition for the return
Sam Fukuchl, thb Japanese who is
alleged to have seduced and ran away
with Florence Williams of Kumona,
Contra Costa county.
The Japanese is held In Portland,
Ore.
SENATOR PLATT WILL
RESIGN FROM SENATE
By Associated Press.
NEW YORK Nov. 16.— The Evening
Post today published the following:
"Thomas ('. Platt'H resignation from
the I nited States somite is said to be
ready (or filing with Governor HigKlna.
Senator Platt, it \h reported, has de
cided to retire altogether from public
life.
"Recent dlaoloauree concerning the
Senator's domestic troubles, added to
his Increasing age, are declared to have
forced him to the decision to relinquish
his office."
Emperor Refuses Request
iy Aaeoelati S
MKIU.IN, Nov. 16.— The i .rsiinal ap
peal Bent tv HUnperor William by Man
ager Btablewaakl, archbiahop of Poaen,
in the mailer of the Polish school
strike, iii which the archbishop aaks
that the Polish ehlldien In- given their
tviigiouH instruction lv their mother
icinKue, Has been refused.
AMUSEMENTS
ORPHEUM THEATER "^p^h^tTn^rtiriTnd^idC
« Both Phones 1447.
c^WODERN VAUDEVILLE
Special Engagsment HICK * f'AHV One Wook Only
foiiini A Hurt, "Two Strong M<-n ; \n K n*tn nion«>, Minlrnt Mo'nolof Mm
M lllli.fi, Violinist: Vrnncf* l»-\roj-. Boprano; nnrton * lirook"* In a new Art-
llflimoit A lVfl.ni., the Mirthful Maids; Motion l'lc<are*| th« Olhi»eV«««ta, Aero-
Matlnees dnlly except Monday. Kvrnln(t« 100, 280, SOc, 75c.
QRAND OPERA house JfeßtlStt \MriJ* Asm
THFI PAMIt.Y TIIBATER.
TILLY OLSON
Mftttnces Sunday, Tuesday nnd Saturday 10a and 280. Evenings, 10c 2Be 800.
Next "PWCMO JOSH •K,nKl\«l." '
TWTORLEY'S GRAND AYE. RINK For Nice People
Announcement of
1 POPULAR PRICES
Afternoon Admission Free Evening Admission 10c
Saturday and Holiday c7VTorning§ Admission Free
Skates at All Sessions 20c. No Higher
Open Sunday afternoon and evening. Music at all sessions
T 7ENICE AUDITORIUM
Jack O'Brien Boxing
Sec The Premier Boxer in Training Every Afternoon
Tuesday Evening, November 20th, Boxing Benefit
Jack O'Brien Boxes 2 Men
4— OTHER GOOD EXHIBITIONS— 4
Vovlng Picture* — Good Munlr.
Cars from 4th and Hill at. station via Los Angeles-Paclflc.
BELASCO THEATER BeUsco, Mayer A Co Props
• Phones: Main 8380, Home 267.
-*-' Tonight— Matinee Today ,
The Bolasro Theater Stock Company presents the stirring romantic play,
a sequel to "The Prisoner of Zenda,"
RUPERT OF HENTZAU
Next Week's cTVlonster Offering
The Belasco company will give for the first time by any stock company Wil-
ton Lackaye's great success,
THE PIT
SEATS FOR "THE PIT" NOW ON SALE. REGULAR PRICES. ■
nHHE AUDITORIUM « ri "2 t "M B n" Iltlful £
I Sparks M. Berry, Manager.
Lambardi Grand Opera Company
Matinee Today LA BOHEME •
Tonight RIGOLETTO
NEXT WEEK
FAUST— IL TROVATORE
Seats now selling:. Prices— soc, 75c, $1.00, $1.50 and $2.00. Phone 2367.
. "The Auditorium Is absolutely fireproof." ■ ••-".•-;■->
M ABON OPERA HOUSE &£ oe WW a T n«ana .
' BARGAIN" MATINEE TODAY AT — I.A9T TIME TONIGHT ■ *
LOUIS JAMES VV ;
NELLIE McHENRY, NORMAN HACKKTT, Aphie James and an exceptionally
capable company, of players, presenting Shakespeare's delightful comedy,
"THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR." Production complete to the most
minute details — scenery, costumes, accessories, music, chorus.
PRICES — 7Bc, $1.00, $1.50. MATINEE 2Sc. 50c, 75c, $1.00. ; ':'
MASON OPERA HOUSE Ss^e^""^
WEEK COMMENCING MONDAY, NOV. 19, ARTHUR DEAQON In Geo.
Ade's Musical Satire —
PEGGY FROM PARIS
Same Great Laughing Show. Only Better. " •
Seat sale now on. Prices 50r, 75c, $1.00. $1.50. Both Phones.
OROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER Ke^^o^"
MATINEE PERFORMANCE TONIGHT— TIMES OF "THE
Woek T"r\fnK U^roTf fiSunday) afternoon MISS MARY VAN BUREN, sup-
ported by complete cast In the funniest comedy since "A Texas Steer.'
NANCY C& CO
Wm. Desmond as "Mr.' Brashf-ar." ■ ,
HOTCHKISS THEATER %££%&*. MBB
QTLHKIba iHaAmK Near Fourt h. Ega! |pgp
™ C. F. Hamilton, Manager. KH WsIA '
THIS WEEK "THE FATAL SCAB.." Commencing Sunday E9ngß^nM|Hß
afternoon we go back to comedy and will present the Bh^Ll- .IWt
roaring Carce comedy, ffßl
OTHER PEOPLE'S MONEY Mhl g
lien H. Howard ut Ills l>o»t. ?^ 55
CHUTES PARK Jfi*^ -TSSSS?
1 907. Wi have~added to our Saturday athletic events commencing Nov
17. Bloycla races, bicycle races, goal kicking, goal , kl S k '"*. Suitable
prizes for all events; no entrance fee; free to all. Sunday's free attractions
loon ascension (orders for five Silvorwood hats to be distributed from bal
l oon) Last week each of the following were lucky winners of a Slverwooa
hut M. L. Johnson. 330*4 South Flgueroa St.; A. 3. Boreham, 1618 South Grand
S^ry?m A C rt^
and evening. Free vaudeville, free theater, free skating, free merry-go-rouna,
free miniature railway, free chutes. __
EOPLE'S THEATER . - Bas8 ' M " v "*
PEOPLE'S THEATER
~^^^^^^X^ V f^l O on^ Prog^c-hM 1 «!
Admission 10c, lf>c. 25c. Matinees 10c and 15c. _
ANGELUS SKATING RINK nnrt^i.'^
"Most Poplar T,nk-.n-the-c.ty. v - =BB T PRICES. KBEg
mornings and afternoons. -^Yfi" "imim Children's matinee
T a-^rdf y 4 iner / n A oon A^PENXn^ i A^"RNO^
Saturday's Attractions
f||jiP Trolley Trippers
The Great Mount Lowe Trip Can Be Made for $2.00
Cars at 8, 9, and 10 a. m. and 1 and 3:30 p. m.
The Famous Old War Junk at San Pedro
Boxing Exhibitions by Tommy Burns at Long Beach -
Dance Under the Auspices of Royal Italian Band at Long
Beach in the Evening r : . J
Take a Spanish Dinner at Casa Verdugo
The Pacific Electric Railway Company^

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