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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, September 24, 1907, Image 4

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LOS ANGELES HERALD
BY TUB HERALD COMPANY
¦„ OLDEST ' MORNING ; PAPER ¦ IN , LOB -
ANOELES.
•. Poand«« Oct.' 2. 1873. Thirty-fourth year
&STCg Chamber of Commerce Dnlldlng.
TKLEPHONES-Sunset, Press ' 11: Home,
.'¦lie. Herald. ¦¦¦ '. -( - ' '' "
¦-'¦ The only | Democratto newspaper In Southern
: California ; receiving full Associated Frees re
i; ports. •¦¦.!•¦ ¦}.¦¦¦¦: ¦¦!.¦ ¦ ¦.. ¦ ¦ . ¦¦-• ¦ ¦ - '' .'
is NEWS SERVICE— Member of the Associated
I Frets, receiving Its tali report, avi-raclns 28.00 D
£ words a day. ¦¦: " • ¦ ' - -¦¦..'-¦'
4t( EASTERN : AGENT— P. McKlnney, M 4
Cambridge building. ¦ New York; 111 Bojrce
i building. Chicago. - ' ___— —
I RATES OF SUBSCRIPTION WITH SUNDAT
"'¦¦'., , ':,<¦¦. '':¦'•'¦"• MAOAZINK: :•¦!-'¦ . : . ¦•••
Dally, by carrier, per month.. I •<•
Dally, by mall, three months..... • I.*
Dally, by mall, six months.... S- 90
Dally, by mall, one year •••• <•*"
Sunday Herald, by mall, one year 8.50
Weekly Herald, by mall, ' one, year 1-00
Entered at postofflc*. Los Angeles, as _ sec
ond claw matter. ¦-¦¦¦- . ..- .;
THE i HERALD IN. SAN FRANCISCO AND
' OAKLAND— Lo» Angeles and Southern Call.
fornia visitors to San Francisco and Oakland
will find , The Herald on sale at the news
I ?lands | In the < San ¦ Francisco ferry bulletin*;
¦ and on the streets In Oakland >by Wheatley
j and by Amos News Co.
Population of Log Angeles 300.000
READJUSTMENT
ONLY tho day before his death by
assassination, and In the course of
his last public utterance, Presi
dent McKinley warned the country that
Immediate consideration should be
griven to our economic relations with
other peoples If we would avert a seri
ous blow to our foreign commerce,
which appeared to him to be uncom
fortably Imminent. Both he, his suc
cessor and all unbiased students of the
tariff situation for several years have
been convinced that the economic posi
tion of the United States in the family
of nations In that connection Is illogical,
unlntelllgently narrow and selfish, and
untenable, If reasonable and profitable
exchanges with the states of Europe
are to be maintained In the future.
The attitude of the persons and In
fluences who and which have controlled
and still control our policy in this
regard, in the past, has been as defiant
of foreign opinion and just complaint
as It has been contemptuous of native
rebellion against the tariff-bred monop
olies of the trusts. The third section
of the Dingley bill permitted the execu
tive to negotiate reciprocity treaties on
one side for sufficient concessions from
the other, extending advantages not ex
ceeding a reduction of 20 per cent under
the full tariff rates. Although this
amounted to a mere sop- to Cerberus,
Mr. McKlnley was able under Its author
ity to arrange eleven reciprocity agree
ments with various governments, not
ably a most desirable one with
France— unfortunately, and it may be
suspected, with no sincere desire to see
the section made operative, It was pro
vided that any and all such conventions
should require congressional ratifica
tion. After all the trouble of negotia
tion the executive branch of the gov
ernment had the mortification to find
that it could not secure ratification for
any one of the agreements, and after
several trials in connection with that
with France and- a few others the effort
¦was dropped. Naturally this sort of
conduct on the part of our law makers
was not as well liked abroad as it was
among the protected Interests which
were responsible forht, and the increas
ing pressure of the latter upon Euro
pean markets, rendered possible by the
"differential" advantages they possess
under the Dingley act, has not tended
materially to clarify the situation.
It has been sufficiently plain for some
time that, unless we can reach some
reciprocal basis of exchange with
Europe, satisfactory to or at least toler
able by France, Germany, Austria and
others, there will be retaliation upon
our great agricultural and pastoral
products as well as our manufactures
that will invoke the disaster President
McKinley had in mind when he made
his Buffalo speech. Perhaps considera
tions of even such Import would be in
sufficient to jolt the trusts and their
agents In congress assembled out of
their smug indifference to the needs or
demands of the country-rthat is, if the
matter were entirely in their own hands
without prospect or danger of inter
ference. Therefore It is well that pub
lic opinion is, and for quite a while has
been, at work on this and other prob
lems presented by the tariff situation,
and that results will be apt to show
their heads in Washington before the
next session of the congress shall be
far advanced.
As early as the spring of 1905 a repre
sentative convention of those engaged
In the live stock and agricultural in
dustries of the central and western
central regions of the United States
met in Denver and passed resolutions
demanding such a change in the tariff
policy of the government as would
relieve our farming and pastoral in
terests of the menace of partial or total
tariff exclusion from Europe. A still
more encouraging feature of the ngita
tion for reasonable revision is to be
found in connection with the meeting of
the National Association of Manufac
turers, held in New York in May of
this year. One would rather expect
conservatism, hesitation and possibly
unfriendliness in such an aggregation
of people, engaged in pursuits generally
favored by and identified with the sys
tem of protection. Their attitude, as
developed at the meeting, Is the best
*vMence that honest friends and advo
cates of just and reasonable protection
to American producers and manufac
turers are not necessarily afraid to
advocate the pruning down of the Ding
le tnift tariff to near a point where
true protection ends and prohibition
and monopoly opportunities begin. Out
of 1800 members of the association 65
per cent -vere found in favor oil revision,
and most of them in favor of radical
revision. Only 20 per cent were opposed
altogether. Out of 1884 members ex
pressing their views on the subject 1221
declared for a tariff commission with
"ojrer and terminer" powers and 153
were opposed to such a tribunal. Taken
by Industries seventy-six were favor
able and only one opposed. Evidently
the sentiment for sensible, scientific re
vision and readjustment is growing
apace even where least to be expected.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: TUESDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 24, 1907
MANAGERS RESPONSIBLE
A REPORT coming from railroad
men who have worked trains on
the grade at Cajon pass lays the
btan\e for the fearful wreck at Devore
on Saturday morning to the lack of
sufficient brakemen to handle the train,
claiming that six men should have been
on the train In place of three who were
there. These men claim that the train
could have been stopped by the hand
brakes had the crew been sufficient to
work the brakes.
But the worst feature of this report
is the statement that the grade Itself
is In excess of the pitch allowed by law,
and therefore Is and always has been
a standing menace to the lives of all
who pass over It. It is currently re
ported that one locomotive engineer for
the Salt Lake line refused to take his
train down this grade unless the ton
nage of the train was reduced from
that first offered to him to take, and if
this Is true there should be an imme
diate Indictment of the management
responsible for these things, and such
management should be held responsible
for the lives sacrificed to this murder
ous greed.
That the road should maintain a
grade In excess of that allowed by law,
and for so many years, and that so
many deaths should have resulted in
consequence of the steep grade and no
•one in authority be held responsible or
made in any way to answer, is almost
past belief.
This report puts the matter squarely
up to the district attorney of San Ber
nardino county; that he shall take Im
mediate steps to ascertain the percent
age of this grade and free the road
from pressing condemnation, or, finding
the charge true, take the case to the
next grand Jury and seek Indictment
and fmmediate trial.
It Is monstrous to take thousands of
helpless men and women over a grade
that is in excess of the lawful limit
and that Is known to be dangerous by
the score of fatal accidents that have
occurred there. The Herald is of record
as in favor of placing responsibility for
such accidents on the management
rather than the employes, and In this
case, if it Is true that the grade of the
Cajon pass is in excess of that allowed
by law and has ever been so the man
agement is clearly responsible and
should be summarily punished.
LOSING FAITH
MANY eastern publications of all
political persuasions are com
menting on the reluctance of
Republican'leaders to even make defi
nite promises regarding a revision of
the tariff. Most of these express doubts
about any hope of readjustment
through that party.
There is a widespread and growing
feeling that real tariff revision, of the
brand that will really curb the power of
such piratical institutions as the steel
trust must come through the Demo
cratic party. The evident Intention of
the Republican campaign managers to
fry the fat from the protected trusts
during the next campaign is not par
ticularly edifying to many members of
that party.
Among the far-sighted journals of the
east the Buffalo Courier is one which
does not believe the Republican party
will ever overhaul the tariff. It says:
"Why put off for three or more years
what should have been done long ago,
and what could be done by the new
congress that will assemble In Decem
ber for its first session? The only ex
cuse made is purely partisan. The Re
publican leaders candidly admit that
they are afraid to touch the tariff in
the face of the next presidential cam
paign because of a possibly injurious
effect on their party. They indulged In
the same assumption in 1903, two years
after President McKlnley made his
liberal speech advocating tariff read
justment."
JUSTICE WITH MERCY
ATTORNEY GENERAL BONA
PARTE Is a man unquestionably
well versed in the law and Is held
to be In the front rank of that pro
fession, therefore his opinions on pun
ishment for crime wilt have weight.
In an address before the national
prison congress in the Chicago univer
sity Tuesday last, he advocated mak
ing a capital crime of an attempt to
commit a capital crime, though the at
tempt were a failure, and'that a crim
inal found guilty of a major offense
for the fourth time should be held to
be a capital offender and be punished
as such. The efficacy of these or other
means to prevent crime must be judged
"by their effect on the community in
diminution of crime, totally ignoring
those convicted," he said.
While this sort of thing may be good
law it would be a travesty on true
justice, and in reality is but a repe
tition of the old Judaic law of "an eye
for an eye," etc, decked out In modern
phraseology. If there be a saving
grace at all in our present Jury sys
tem It is that the men stand between
the accused and the cruelty of implac
able law, and to eliminate tho element
of mercy from the administration of
criminal law would be to revert
to semi-barbarism, and undo the work
of the Christian gospel in the past
2000 years. Our present level of civ
ilization is due as much to the New
Testament as to Blackstone, and in
lands where the law of God, which Is
mercy, is made complemental to the
law of men, which is justice, the very
highest civilization has resulted.
Lawyers disagree as well as doqfnrs
do, as was proved at a recent session
of a medical jurisprudence society in
Philadelphia, where the question of the
amenability of a confirmed Inebriate
to the law for his acts while intoxi
cated, found all the doctors on the
side of disease in the man, and there
fore no culpability, while all the law
yers decided for the extreme penalty
of the laws broken, and took no cog
nizance of contributory causes.
Our Jury system Is faulty In the de
tail of its work, but it serves the pur
pose of an intervenor for mercy to the
accused, and while we have packed
juries and bought Juries and Juries who
return remarkable verdicts not at all
In consonance with law or evidence,
still they fill the civilized demand for
some bar between the rigid execution
of law and the exercise of mercy
founded on the accompanying circum
stances of the crime,, and the consen
sus of enlightened opinion will cling to
the Jury in some form as a guard
against the very proposition advanced
by Mr. Bonaparte. Granted that he
seeks to put these provisions in the
law, and the same objections stand.
In proof of this the case of Judge
Lindsay's Juvenile court In Denver is
cited. This wise and good man leans to
,tho side of mercy and wins for the
community useful and manly lives that
would under the methods of Mr. Bona
parte be lost for time and eternity,
and In doing such work Judge Lindsay
gives form to the beliefs of good men
everywhere that Justice should be tem
pered with mercy and that many crim
inals are more sinned against than
sinning.
COMMON HONESTY
THE crying need of the'world today
19 not so much the questionable
attainment of spiritual heights in
dally life as the possession and appli
cation of plain everyday common
honesty in dealings with others. Tho
lack of this primitive virtue Is at the
base of all wrong, individual and na
tional, and though circumstances alter
cases in details the same Impelling
force Is certain to be In evidence.
In the cases of Ruef and Schmltz the
results have been disastrous for the
men Involved, but if the example of
their dishonest lives Is carefully studied
by young men generally It will have
served a good purpose. Some men of
dishonest proclivities, In bar of judg
ment, claim drunkenness as an excuse
for dishonesty, forgetting that thou
sands of men indulge In drink who
never feel a dishonest motive In their
lives. If dishonesty Is not present It
cannot show Itself. Ruef nor Schmitz
used intoxicating drink, and both were
clean in private life, as that phrase is
understood, and both were mentally
equipped to control men and amass
wealth by honorable means, but they
were also Infected with ' dishonesty,
begun In contact with the rabble, for
preferment, and developed as the curse
of greed grew on them.
There are scores of young men in
positions of trust who filch an hour in
time on some flimsy pretext from their
employers and think nothing wrong is
in the act, but opportunity is all neces
sary to make of such men the dishonest
element which eventually finds its way
into the courts and Jails.
A sane man will not knowingly wrong
himself, and yet scores of men do that
very thing in everyday life by wronging
other men, on the ground that "what
the eye does not see the heart cannot
grieve for." This is not a Sunday
school "chestnut" and has no reference
to the all-seeing eye of that cult, but
to the eye of conscience In the man who
does the wrong. That eye sees and re
tains the picture of the wrong, and
such wrongs finally kill or sear It and
the man is dead to honest motives
though the physical life may be excel
lent. Ruef began with $100 "retainers"
and grew by what he fed on to $100,000
extortions, and now sees the error as
plainly as he might have seen it had
he cultivated honesty of purpose- in
daily life.
Scholars tell us the times are filled
with temptations unknown to our fore
fathers and that great care is necessary
to withstand them, but the history of
past and present criminal life develops
the fact that the one great deterrent
for crime in all places of trust is the
possession of plain everyday common
honesty, and to be safe a man should
develop this virtue as carefully as he
would any gift nature may have en-_
dowed him with. No earthquake could
possibly hurt San Francisco so much
as the lack of plain, everyday common
honesty in the lives of the men who
controlled her has done.
When the Ministers' association isn't
proof against the seductive wiles of a
circus parade the wisdom of the school
board in cutting down the "unavoidable
sickness" list through a voluntary vaca
tion today becomes more apparent.
And Lord love the kids, but didn't they
enjoy it, though!
A group of English scientists have
produced a remarkable growth and
variety of barley and wheat. They are
also said to have carried out wonderful
experiments upon animals. Has some
one really discovered H. G. Wells'
"Food of the Gods"?
Those streaks of gold paint on the
walls of the mines at Goldfleld probably
didn't Jar the press humorists much.
No group of men who have visited that
district care less for mere gold than
those same poets, writers and dreamers.
What more potent argument for the
divorcing of saloons and cafes could
there be than a "drunk" list of seventy
five on Monday morning? They all
"got it" at "restaurants," and of course
they had a warm meal with each drink;
Who says that Chicago isn't be'com
lng moral when even the chorus girls
have the idea to such an extent that
they organize an "Anti-Johnnie league"
and aslr police protection against the
mashers?
The smoke < ordinance will come up
before a council committee on Satur
day. Will the solons please consider
the nuisance who puffs at the bit of
rope on the rear of the street car?
And now the royal keeper of the
canines Is accused of grafting, and the
"demnition bow-wows" will be the sub
ject of a rigid investigation by the
council.
Amelia Bingham's new play Is called
"Lady Gogiva." If there's anything In
a name the piece probably is. a "take
off." i
Rescind those two shanty saloon
licenses, Messrs. Supervisors, and start
the big aqueduct without a handicap!
COUNCIL CUTS
SOME WAGES
BAVEB WORBT REDUCTIONS FOR
BEBBION THIB AFTERNOON
FINANCE COMMITTEE'S REPORT
IS ACCEPTED
Hundreds of Dollars Saved Monthly
for. City for Remainder of Year
:^ 7.; Through Passage of Re.
. , vised Schedule
The city council waded Into the sal
ary rolls yesterday, fixing the pay rolls
for a dozen . departments In less than
an hour, of actual debate.
Action of the police, fire engineer's
health departments was deferred, as
more talk is expected when these come
up than regard to the other depart
ments at an adjourned session this
afternoon. :
Beginning with a cut of over $1300
In the supplies for the receiving hos
pital, but leaving the pay rolls stand,
the council adopted ' the report of the
finance committee seriatim.
. ' . Save Grant's Scalp ¦ --¦
. Sealer of Weights ¦¦ and Measures
Grant had a close shave, as Councilman
Wren 'showed a statement that so far
the cost of the office' had exceeded the
income by ' over $200. ' Mr. . Wren said
that the Job was created solely- be
cause, It was promised a self support-
Ing, proposition...' '. ; ;
It developed that | in September a
large gain In collections had been made
and besides GVnnt had at the instance
of the ¦> mayor devoted most -of' this
month to getting evidence against the
short weight ice drivers. .. ,; ; .
Hard: fights 1 were made by Assessor
Mallard and by Deputy Mahon, who
does Collector Johnson's .; lobbying.
Both these departments had •to stand
a cut and their chiefs protested. ••'
There were minor cuts in salary in
the ¦' civil service, building inspector's
and boiler. Inspector's office.
Following are the , department rolls
as adopted: '' :.¦-...:
. . The Payrolls
' CITY ASSESSOR. :'..;. ':
Cut on salaries. »1005; on supplies, *:0. •
1 assessor .TV .....; ; ?J™
1 chief deputy-... \f_
1 map man 1«
1 cashier- '.. • ••• }JJ
7 deputies • *??
4 deputies", not over sseven months 100
39 deputies, noi over 4 months.;.... ..; 90
: .CITY CLERK. .7 . '.
Salary account 119.000
Steel ca5e5. ..."..'.. "••• 36003 ' 600
Supplies I- 300
¦1 •¦ '.:'¦: OIL INSPECTOR. ¦ ¦ .-.:¦•
Increase 12 in suplles. . ... , '¦•'
1 oll.inspectbr.... ¦•• I 1"?
2 deputy oil Inspectors 75
1 deputy 85
¦ " BOILER INSPECTOR. '
1 boiler Inspector ::.. >1M
1 assistant boiler inspector 123
1 assistant 120
3 members of board • • " 5
CITY TREASURER.
1 treasurer 200
1 chief deputy ....... 175
1 cashier ......:.... IJS
1 treasurer's clerk ". 12S
2 street bond clerks • 126
. "CITY COUNCIL.
Cut on supplies,. $65; addition to salary, $60.
9 councilman .' N OO
1 supply commltt«>i! clerk.... 150
1 assistant supply committee clerk 00
. DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS.
Cut on salary, $2040; on supplies, $2160.' '
1 chief Inspector of buildings ........1200
1 Inspector of plumbing and gasfltting 150
6 assistant inspectors of plumbing and gas-
. fitting v 120
1 assistant inspector of bulVllngs 125
4 assistant inspectors of buildings „.. 120
1 Inspector reinforced c0ncrete........'.......'. 150
2 fire 1n5pect0r5. ...........,...¦..,.....'... 117
1 clerk .'. 100
1 clerk 90
1 clerk- Si)
1 clerk and stenographer..'...;./..'...;;.^..'.. 80
. : •¦ 'I TAX CODfcECTOR. :¦ • ; ¦ .'•
. Cut on salary, $10,080; advance on supplies,
$1660. , V : ¦¦ . . ' ¦
1 chief ; deputy i. .:..:.::. i..;.;.5i50
1 cashier '. '..........¦l5O
3 deputies ....."....... 125
2 deputies ...'...........;.. •..<:...';.¦..;....'..;<.' 100
1 deputy ;f....... ...,....:......; 110
20 deputies, not over four m0nth5......;.:, 90
IS deputies, not ever three m0nth5.. ......;. 90
12 deputies,' not over 2 months...' ...90
17 deputies, ' nnt over 1 m0nth.'. .......'.'.. ii'.. ¦ 90
SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.
1 sealer >-.....:...... ;....»150
—v A • CIVIL j SERVICE ¦ COMMISSION. : : ' •
1 secretary .......SIBO
1 examiner .:,...........,.,'..'. 125
1 stenographer and clerk 85
r w
6~H A- Pleasure
VSBJR to Everyone
in the- ¦
I V \ ¦ySX'V i An Emerson-Angelus is not only
I \^ \. V\r a pleasure to yourself, but to your
j^asjf^rar^sjafa^^^^Nv \JL..i^.^__ family and friends. No need to
nrnnTisssi^j^i bbs know a note or key, but the bet-
'"^er'you appreciate good music the : better you can execute -
it, for the Emerson-Angelus provides the most artistic pos-
sibilities, that can be read into the music. '. "- . ' .
' The Allen plan makes it easy for you to be the owner.
A small sum down and then a small amount for a few months ,
v; is all that is necessary. V . ( .- ,¦ '' , . ¦ '
¦;. 'i"l6-"^18 South Broadway \ './ : ' : [ \ ''..
¦.Mol[C|S;;4Hffl../jISC2L!Ltt KCSIMiS !
SANTA CATALINA ISLAND
STEAMER CABRILLO CAPACITY 900 ;
STEAMER HERMOSA . . . . . ...I. CAPACITY : 475
The only line operating steamers between the mainland and Catallna Island.
¦ We do not operate Gasoline Boat*. : ' ¦;;,/".; .•/. . ¦ ,: .- ...; _ .¦
Wonderful Marine Gardens Greatest Fishing Known
• HOTEL MEfßOPOLß' opens January 1 next. : Good ¦ restaurants and hotels on the Island.
"For furnished and unfurnished cottages see Manager- Van Landing-ham, Santa ' Catallna
•J Island. Co.'s General Office,' Bumner Aye.. A valon. .-. '. , . „
¦i Daily I steamer i service, i extra ) boat s Saturday t evening. Full . particulars, \ Man-
¦ ning Co., 591 Pacific Electric ; Eld». J: Main 86, H F8036. ..¦;. ;..', ... ¦> .;;. r
HARNESS 3i3N.if-. C AS.s,r,« SADDLERY
PREBBYTERY OF LOB
ANGELES MEETS TONIGHT
The !Los Angeles presbytery wiil open
its fall session in Santa Ana tonight at
the Presbyterian church in that city.
It is expected that Rev. Will A. Jack
son, pastor of the Euclid Heights Pres
byterian church, 'Lou Angeles, will recelvo
a call to the Orange church.
Admissions will be made from the
Santa Barbara nnrt Topeka presbyteries
of Revs. Joseph Overton and Dr. Hand
ley, respectively.
Rev. \V. 13. Qantz, the new pastor of
the Highland Park Presbyterian ehurrh,
cannot be present to conform to the rulss
In being received Into the pTe" h y ter y'
and a postpnneemnt to the next meeting
of the presbytery will be necessary.
«i>
IN FEAR, SEEKS PROTECTION
FROM THREAT OF TONG
Louis Gar Bing Seeks Aid of District
Attorney to Thwart Blackmail
Plan Attributed to Hop
Sing
"If I am found dead I want you to
know who killed me." said Louis Gar
Blng tr. Deputy District Attorney Guv
Eddy yesterday ai.ernoon. Gnr Blng
sought the prosecuting attorneys yester
day aftcrnaen 'n a tremble of fear and
excitement. He Is the Chinese who took
a letter to Capt. Auble last week in
which the leaders of the Hop Sirg tong
threatened him with death If he did not
furnish them with twenty 6acks of rice
for their soldiers, as they call their hired
assatslns.
Louts belonged to the .^op Sing tong.
but lost his membership because he failed
to observe a religious rite. The letter
received by Louis, which has been trans
lated for the police, says he will be killed.
Louis Is one of the few Chinese who have
appealed to the police for protection.
Attorney Eddy asked him If he wanted
a complaint against Su Hu Hong, Charlie
Hong, and Gee Hay, the leaders of the
Hop Sings, who signed the note of warn
ing. Extortion was the ground upon
which' the attorney could issue the com
plaint. Loula studied over the mater
come time and then rejected the offer.
When asked why he did not leave town
Louis salu he could not leave his storo.
Charlie Hong Is the leader of the Hop
Sings. Hong denies having written the
letter.
Many Chinese who live away from
Chinatown refused to translate the letter
for the police, anil It was with difficulty
that a translation could be secured.
An officer has been placed at Louis
Gar Blng's etore to guard him, but still
he fears. He says he will not give the
twenty eacks of rice required, which
would assure him the protection of three
tong soldiers in his store, according to
the letter.
LOADED CIGAR MAY
LEAD TO PROSECUTIONS
Victim, Burned and Bandaged, Asks
District Attorney to Move Against
Companions He Acucses of
Practical Joke
With his face bruised, his eyelashes
and eyebrows gone and both hands in
bandages, Will Powers of 841 East Fourth
street appeared at the police station, the
victim 6( practical jokers who gave him a
cigar loaded with powder.
He says he will prosecute the two com
panions who perpetrated the trick that
nearly cost his life.
The affair occurred at 2 o'clock yester
day afternoon at the corner of Bay street
and Santa Fe avenue, where Powers and
other haekmen were waiting for a fune
ral. There came near being a second
funeral. Powers says the cigar was
loaded by Dalhy Asgart and was given to
him by Jack Fax. ,
The attorneys could find no point on the
law covering such a case. The matter
was postponed until today to give time
for research.
Found Dead In Bed.
John Franciß Murphy of 409 Kast Fifth
street was found dead in his bed yester
day afternoon.
Murphy was 60 years of age. He had
been living for some time at the Parker
house on East Fifth street. ,
The proprietor of the house, missing
him, the door of his room was forced.
-;__;,; ¦:¦¦¦¦¦. ¦ /,v-^.^/":A!IIIUSEMENT3^;.v : --..-:::.i:.,;v ,^XU{.
BELASCO THEATER ; A .' home of tub onlt high class
&L<ftat/V Jimnion. , ,BTOCK COMPANY IN THIS CXTT. ,-¦,¦'
: i A crowded i house laughs itself tired. -"-^
¦ ' '';"'\lV YOU'RE LOOKING FOR SOMETHING SERIOUS ; FIOHT . SHY OF THH
BEL.ASCO THEATER THIS WEEK, BUT IF YOU'RE LOOKING FOR WHAT
IS POSITIVELY THE FUNNIEST FARCK THAT WAS EVER WRITTEN AND
PLAYED IN PERFECT FASHION, VISIT THE BELASCO. IF .YOU DON'T
LAUGH UNTIL YOUR SIDES FAIRLY ACHE THERE'S SOMETHING WRONG
WITH YOU. NOTHING SO DOWNRIGHT FUNNY HAS EVER BEEN GIVEN '
ON THE BELABCO STAGE AS THIS WEEK'S • PRESENTATION OF THAT
SCREAMINGLY FUNNY FARCE,' '-•¦, ..-' • . ¦ \> -
| The Man From Mexico [
Every member of the big: Belaseo company Is In the cast and every one is
happily cast. The performance goes with a rush that is irresistible. There is
no let up In the laughter; one peal of merriment follows another In quick suc-
cession. "The Man from Mexico" In short Is Just the best, the funniest, the
' best played farce you can imagine. ;, ¦•_.. • .•
REGULAR BELASCO PRICES: EVERY NIGHT 25c to 78c; MATINEES
THURSDAY AND SATURDAY, 26c TO 60c. , ; » I
NEXT WEEK'S IMPORTANT OFFERING ,
The Belasco company will present Henry Miller's notable hit,''
THE ONLY WAY
THIS IS GOING TO BE ONE OF THE MOST MASSIVE PRODUCTIONS OF
THE ENTIRE SEASON. EVERY MEMBER OF THE BELASCO COMPANY IN
THE CAST AS WELL AS ,140 AUXILIARY PLAYERS IN THE BIG' SCENES.
SEATS FOR "THE ONLY WAY" ARE NOW ON SALE. | , '
MASON OPERA HOUSE j h. a wtatt.
lyl ; 1 - . ; •'.. Lessee and Mansgar.
¦"¦* -~ 'Tonight and balance of week. Matinee tomorrow and Saturday, ¦ • •
Joseph Grismer and Wm. A Brady present ',-'¦. • '•„<•.;.'
, THE MAN OP THE HOUR
By GEORGE BROADHURST. \
Prices: B ,c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50 and $2.00
¦ .' • ¦•' '¦¦•¦„'•— i NEXT .WEEK -^ ... ¦. ' ' ''<|if§|
First engagement In Los Angeles since her triumphant . season In Paris last June at th»
Theater Sarah Earnhardt of the distinguished English artiste, v •';:¦' ''¦¦"."¦'¦... ¦ ' ; ' , ; _.
Olga Nethersole
;:^. ' Supported by Her London Company, Including frank mills. ':'
MONDAY AND FRIDAY EVENINGS AND ¦ " WEDNESDAY EVENING ' '
•:;--> '¦ SATURDAY MATINEE ¦'. , . -•¦ , -V. ¦¦ ¦'¦ • . .-'
THE AWAKENING THE LABYRINTH V,
' ...-'- ' ' ¦ (NEW). . v ¦ . '• : -„.4 1' I
.' " i '^ H Sg r. THURSDAY EVBNINC g
;- - SAPHO 'pj; : : / CARMEN V
SEATS ON SALE THURSDAY MORNING. We do not advertise In the Express.
ORPHEUM THEATER Bprto « «••, «><*• "won* and Third.
. _— , Both Phones IMT. • •'<
Vf ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Houdlnt— The Ruppelts— and Mueller— Guyer . ' and Crlspl—
Taylor Trio— Chris* Richard*— Fred's Monkey ''Actors— Orpheara Motion Pic-
tures— nay A Co. ¦ ¦ • "- r t ' • .-. -..;
v " Matinee* Dally Except Monday.
i ThU theater does) not advertise In the Lo« ¦ Angeles Exprea . .
RAND OPERA HOUSE * • mw«i st bet m and 2d. •
I*JT_ > Main 1967 — Phones — Home A 5137.
The Family Theater. '. v
' ' THE m.IUCH STOCK COMPANY ; / . /! .
' Presenting: Dion ' •';•• /'¦ \\ _ : *\ f\ 1 '"- J_
area! To'u^rn ' Brama, 1 DC \ OCIOrOOII
Great Southern Drama, X llv/ V/VIUI VJVJIX
Matinees Sunday, Tuesday, Saturday. Next week «A Millionaire's . nevenge."
. .' Tills theater does not advertise In the Evening Express. ' ¦>' "
LOS' ANGELES THEATER ;? v _„ ¦«• s. spring at.
_ ¦- . . i . ... Phones Main 6129. A6I2X
*«^ NORTHWESTERN THEATRICAL ASSOCIAriON, LESSEES AND MANAGERS, .
Another Superb Success by The San Francisco Opera Company.
„ ¦;¦ ,' Balfe's Charming and Ever-Popular Ballad Opera, /
The Bohemian Girl
With the best cast and most beautiful - costuming and scenic effects ever
given In this city."" ''•'¦ -' " ' ; ' ' ." ''C_.." ': ' * ;"' ';>¦¦£.
Tonight and all week. Matinees Wednesday and Saturday. .
Evening Psicesi 2oc, 60c, 75c, $1.08. Mallnrrn: 25c, 60c, 75c. Next Sunday
Night, the Merry, Melodious Mingling, "THE STROLLERS." ;\ ¦'
Thin theater does not advertise In the Los Angeles Ezpresa.' .< ¦ -.".
TODAY AND EVERY DAY—SEPT.' 23 TO 25
CIRCUS— TODAY AND EVERY DAY— SEPT. 23 TO 25
V^ 1 Two, Performances Pally at a and Bp.m. • Showground 1 , Pratter Park
Ririgliiig Bros; j^^^H^
World's Greatest Shews ISO^Bi^^
The Biggest Circus ever • organized and .i-\fi''
highest expression of the circus idea. . V^SB^KSrMBtSBLaKa*^.
Ho large that its tents cover three ' jip ' IQBwWp^J f ¦ Ak.
times more ground than any other show. ' £j AX -AT AT «4LV\ .JBg
' , /AH the 'World Contributes to .Tubs. Traveling City, of Splendors '¦> ' .-,.
Admission tickets and numbered reserved seats on sale now at the store of the Bartlett Muslo
| Co. (opposite 'city hall) at same price charged on the. show (rounds. -— ¦ < v¦•
60 acrobat* and the 12 Mlno-Oolems,' 60 aerlallsts. and the 10 Jordans. 60 riders, the Bedinls
' and Daisy Hodglnl. 375 circus artl si v Patty, the man who walks on his head, Rlccobono's
• "Good Night", horse, and 200 European celebrities ' new to America. One 50c ticket admits
to everything. Children under 12 years : half price. •-¦' ¦ t ¦¦'-'- ¦-:--.. ¦¦-."¦''¦
MQROSCO'S BURBANK theater BMt *'»<* company in
f%#j — . . town nt any price. *
">¦— Tonight, all week, matinee Saturday, Robert Louis ' Stevenson's fascinat-
ing romance,
PRINCE- OTTO
Everybody" in cast. Superb scenery. Augmented cast. Best show in town. .
Next week, "All the Comforts of Home.'' , Souvenir night Monday,; when .
every lady In audience will receive a handsome picture of Byron Beasley.
' ¦ ¦: Note— This theater does not advertise In ' the ;. Evening I Express. .' .
VENICE OF AMERICA /: : ¦' :\:- .^.Z : V : *£«* ZX%& '**¦'¦"¦
\f EVERYTHING PERSONALLY ¦ CONDUCTED. "'-¦ Bath ,' houses (surf arid inclosed).
. " miniature railway, ¦ midway. . Grand concerts daily. ' Dancing every evening.? Wlnd-
ward hotel always open. Villas and bungalows at reduced rates. ¦ •¦•¦'¦ ¦¦ " . '- ¦ >.' ¦
EMPIRE THEATER ™ l i <l atr * et > between Main and Los Angeles.
Two shows nightly. Matinees Tuesday and Sundays. Ladles' souvenir matinee Saturn
day. High class refined vaudeville, moving pictures. Illustrated songs. , ¦ Catering to
v omen and children. • ¦' . -. : • :->.., .'».,, . ,'-•¦¦:<¦¦¦, :">--¦. ¦-•¦:;¦ » ' ¦ ¦>•»:.,-
BIMINI HOT SPRINGS BATH AND PLUNGE
Special attractions Friday evening. High , diving and swimming
<„;.- races. Take car . on Broadway ,to • door. ', ¦ *„',"., *,<¦¦"- • /..'¦- ¦
L" OS ANGELES OSTRICH FARM - 5c Fara g^^L
J— **FIVB ACRES OF GIGANTIC BIRDS. ' Downtown Salesroom*
OPPO- TTACU-pT AVT7 X3A~DV m - Broadway. "Kg
SITE ' iiitX O 1 L*tt\]\.Ej IrJ\K.l\. . Magnificent D:splay. '
«TPTjriM . TTV The grandest show In the world, 100,000 birds, eating «>«¦•• 'a. 1 " °* .
T3IGEON CITY grain daily. . Take Unlventty-aarv»ns» car going north on Sprina
* Ptroet to farm.''.; B-oej>t fare. . . :. ¦ ' > ¦-^•¦- .¦-¦¦;'-¦ .¦ '¦ ¦¦ ¦'¦
. jy For particulars regarding stock address
National Sugar Co. m ££*,?%** >»«^j^.-
jnACIFIC MAIL S. S. CO. For Honolulu, Japan
MANILA, : INDIA AND AROUND THE WORLD
Steamers ManchuAa. Korea, Siberia and China now "• r . v ' ( £ |*nsulu. "
est vessels sailing from, the United States for the orient via a ° ° iv IBf M .
Sailing, from San Francisco September 24, Oct. a. 9. 16, 84, 30, Nov. 8, 16, *i
For Ute^tur* apply to Dec. 10, IT, 9*. 81. . nT^r
For literature apply to T. A. GRAHAM, agent. 600 South Spring .treet.
Sixth. Also agent for all Transatlantic steamship lines.
it 'EVV'S CAFE • ' - - > <'''' ¦¦ ¦. '
JU ;; P,of. Bt-rck. returned from the White City, will resume leader.hlp of
¦ orchestra at LEVY'S CAFE, corner Third and Main. -
'TTxiltffZT(%t'''"'CAPP'"* : ' : '"' ' '' ¦' *' ' ¦ '" " ' '¦' ' ' '' ¦¦"'
B RI vJ9^o £J£?CA«. The o«on.r you din. at this cafe' t %*™**™* ,;
a ~ tf of coming here grows on you. Some places tire you, but the B««
,: basement H. W. Hellman building. Fourth and Spring streets. ¦ ,
Little p <a 1 netn ct Restaurant
EA STLAKE tttJW?%^«s£2& jMs£®
M-tsTIKJ M JL*S*lA*.ILi ney avenu* or Pasadena Short Line cars. One fare.
fir.^Brmc Watch ". for ; special 1. bargains iln I Friday* ¦' paper. QrOCCrieS
urocenes . - f. a. vallq, «a s. Main.; vji vv* ; 1 l r a

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