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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, March 19, 1908, Image 1

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All the News
VOL. XXXV.
MM II Kit 169
PRICE: P^^o^l?/? 40 CENTS
EVANS WIRES MAYOR HARPER DATE OF HIS ARRIVAL
COURT WOULD
SAVE ORCHARD
FROM NOOSE
RUMOR OF IMMUNITY PLEDGE
STRENGTHENED
MANY TIMES ASSASSIN MAY YET
ESCAPE GALLOWS
Prosecutors Who Clamored for Lives
of Federation Men.Seek to Save '
the Murderer of Steun. *
enberg
Sp-clal to The lleralel.
CALDWELL, Idaho, March 18.—Ful
filling the prediction of the defense in.
the Haywood and Pettlbone trials that
Harry Orchard would not be hanged
for his many murders, Judge Wood to
day asked the state board of pardons'
to commute Orchard's sentence to Im
prisonment. It is believed the board
will comply with Judge Wood's request.
' It has been asserted repeatedly that
Orchard had been promised partial im
munity in return for his testimony,
never corroborated, against Pettlbone
and Haywood.
< me of the attorneys for the defense
In the recent trials of the Federation
men said when he learned of Judge
Wood's action: "To the general pub
lic It may seem strange that the men
who a short time ago clamored for the
lives of Mover, Haywood and Pettlbone,
against whom there was virtually no
evidence, now clamor for the life of
Orchard, a self-confessed assassin, a
murderer of many. Truly this Is a re
markable enlightenment."
In sentencing Orchard and •recom
mending the commutation of his sen
tence Judge Wood reviewed the case
from the time of the killing of Frank
Steunenberg to the present, including
the arrest of Orchard, his confession,
the arrest of Charles A. Moyer, presi
dent of the Western Federation of Min
ors, and George A. Pettlbone; the tri
als of Haywood and Pettlbone, and the
plea of guilty entered by Orchard to
the charge of murder in the first de
gree, the punishment for which under
the Idaho statutes Is death.
Believes His Story ,
In regard to the part of Orchard in
the trials, Judge Wood said:
"I am more than satisfied that the
defendant now at the bar of this court
awaiting final sentence has not' only
acted in good faith in making the dis
closures that he did. but that he also
testified fully and fairly to the whole
truth, withholding nothing that was
material and declaring nothing - which
had not actually taken place." ■■•■.".** ■' ■*
» Judge Wood, after reading his -rul
ing, formally sentenced Orchard and
fixed May 15 as the date for his exe
cution. Orchard asked permission to
speak and It was granted. He thanked
the court for the review of the case
given and for the kindly remarks In
regard to htm. He repeated that he
had told the whole truth, and that
no promise of immunity or of mercy
had ever been made to him. ■ ..."■' • ■
Before he had concluded, tears were
streaming from , his eyes and he all
but broke down as' he again, in a
broken voice, thanked Judge Wood for
his recommendation to the board of
pardons. .'*-y.;, , .'--'-'.
Ernest Mills, acting secretary of the
Western Federation of Miners, said
today that the federation would re
main passive 'in regard to the dispo
sition to be made of Orchard's case.
Promised Immunity
"If Judge Wood made the statement
credited to him." said Mr. Mills, "there
Is little doubt that he Is paving
the way for freedom for Orchard. It
has been claimed all along that Or
chard had been promised freedom by
Governor Gooding of Idaho for mak
ing the confessions he made at the
trials. That ; the political ring back
of It * has promised to. go down the
line for Orchard Is also a well known
fact.''
Secretary Mills announced his inten
tion to place In the hands of the post
office Inspectors anonymous letters
which he said had been received by
George A. Pettlbone and his wife since
his acquittal of complicity In (_ the
Steunenberg murder, threataenlng
them with death. -, *
President Moyer of the federation
recently left Denver for San Diego,
Cal., to visit Pettibone, who Is sick
at. a hospital there.
DENVER, March 18.—"I know noth
ing about what will be done with Or
chard,", said James McParland, the
detective who secured , the confession
of Orchard; today. ' '*
"He was never promised, Immunity,
and never asked any. I do not know
whether his sentence will be commuted
or not. •. ~ ■■'■"■ ■• V •'••■
"He is guilty, and he has confessed
his guilt. He has told all he knew
about those who caused him to com
mit his crimes. The fact that they
were cleared by Juries makes no differ
ence to him." ' '*•'"•';v'~.','..ii.'
. T " « ' * — •
Italians Are Deported I
By Associated Press. ['•,_ / ,
NEW WESTMINSTER, 8.C., March
18.—Five Italian laborers were arrest
ed this morning under the Dominion or
der in council. *: They had * purchased
tickets for Seattle, but.got off the train
at ■ New Westminster, < where, as they
did not come from the land of their
birth or citizenship, they were held..
". #-.-» —
>!• Boy Testifies Against Father
By Associated Press.
FRESNO,': March ,18.—Little.' 9-year
old Johnny i Martin this afternoon ': at
the preliminary: examination of. his
father, J." W. Martin, I arrested for bur
glary, told a pathetic tale of how his
parent on many . different * occasions
forced him to assist in robbing houses
and barns. „ '
♦*-•
French Sailors Captured .
Hy Associated Press. ;• -
PARIS, March 18.— government
today announced that the crew of a
French fishing vessel, the Balelne, had
been captured recently by : Moroccans
after Imprudently landing - near . Cape
Juby/ An attempt was made to rescue
the men. _
LOS ANGELES HERALD
UNIVERSITY
IN UPROAR;
MAY DROP 246
STUDENTS ASK REINSTATE
MENT OF SUSPENDED MEN
\ i —————
ANTI.LIQUOR RULE CAUSES BIG
Ml 7 DEMONSTRATION
. Y.Y rY-— . '
Committee Refuses to Reconsider and
Intimation It Made That Hun.
dreds Are In Danger ' >'<
of Dismissal
- y " . . , y
Dy Associated Press.
; STANFORD UNIVERSITY.. March
18.—The faculty ' student affairs com
mittee today refused to reconsider its
action In dismissing twelve students for
participating in the parade of Thurs
day night. At a mass meeting of the
student body last evening petitions
signed by 246 men who were in the
parade and stating that they were
equally culpable with those dismissed
and should receive the same treatment
and asking that the twelve be rein
stated were presented and a committee
was appointed to present this and try
to secure reinstatement.
Chairman dark refused to reconsider
the matter and said he would give his
answer on the petition by tomorrow
noon. From his attitude It Is expected
that he may dismiss all the signers.* V
Another petition signed by over 100
students will be presented tomorrow
asking for immediate reinstatement of
.those dismissed on the ground that the
sentence was too severe. Clark Issued
a statement today saying that an un
avoidable injustice was done the twelve
dismissed when the others did not re
ceive jj the some treatment, but ' that
there was not sufficient ground for re
consideration. .
POLICE CONTINUE WAR
ON ANN ARBOR STUDENTS
By Associated Press.
• ANN . ARBOR, Mich., \ March 18.—
Friction between * the University of
Michigan students and the 'city police
has continued "since" Monday night's
riot. Two students were arrested last
night, charged with stealing a cuspidor
from the ; Cook hotel. ,»-r:v'"y:
. The '„ hotel management, refused to
enter a complaint against, the boys for
larceny, but the students were brought
Into court, nevertheless, charged with
being drunk and disorderly, pleaded
guilty,' and were each fined $10 and
$5.20 costs. - ' '-- -" . .
SUMMARY OF THE NEWS
FORECAST
For Los Angeles and Vicinity:
Cloudy Thursday, brisk. north wind.
Maximum temperature - yesterday,
59 degrees; minimum, 63 degrees.
LOCAL
■ President • Morton of Equitable Life
Assurance society announces It will
Invest $2,000,000 in Southern California.
One newspaper or magazine corre
spondent from each vessel of Admiral
Evans' fleet will be guest at Ad club
banquet.
Former insurance agent is placed in
city ; Jail, charged with fraud.
t Board of „ public . works rejects all
bids for transportation of - freight for
Los Angeles-Owens river aqueduct.
Conspiracy to bribe voters is charged
in suit against El Centro banker.
Apologies are made to Judge Well
born by two men charged with con
tempt of court. . ':BIOQfQmWOmW-mWUm\
New move is made by government
attorneys in land fraud cases.
Electrician.begins suit for $20,000 as
damt-jes for alleged personal Injuries.
EASTKHN '-y.\y
, Labor leaders assemble in Washing
ton to plan amendment of Sherman law
and attack on injunctions. . >
Grover Cleveland celebrates his sev
enty-first birthday anniversary; for
mer president in good health.
Big steamers collide In New York
harbor, liner rammed by smaller ves
sel.. ," -
. Republicans of lowa declare for Taft
and revision of tariff. v .* " '
Roosevelt's crusade against Standard
Oil trust aids Independent refiners.
I Republican party accused by Demo
cratic congressmen of being "drunk
with power." r •:
COAST
Judge sentences Harry Orchard to
death . for Steunenberg murder, and
then asks ' state - board of pardons to
commute his sentence to Imprisonment.
- Hundreds of - students may be; dis
missed from Stanford university as re
sult of anti-liquor crusade. .
San Francisco reports good progress
In war on plague infected rats. . . ■
Secretary of- Navy Metcalf will study
problem of armor plate when fleet an
chors in San Francisco.
Admiral Evans- sends word 'to Ad
miral McCalla that fleet will make stop
of three days at Santa Barbara. ;y * *
... FOREIGN ,
Russian generals 'I fight a , duel >, and
Smirnoff,*is fatally wounded by Fock.
Affair result of criticism of defense of
Port Arthur. J v-'.-.**. ■<. ."•.. *
Hart McKee, who is being sued for
divorce !by \ his ' wife |in j Paris, charges
her with misconduct, naming an Eng
lish lord and an Italian marquis.
, v Australians desire to entertain Presi
dent , Roosevelt and fleet ." at : the same
time. ■' • b - ...-"v., *./ .',-:. ■
Belligerent attitude of Haytian gov
ernment is abandoned when foreign
warships off Port au Prince.
• Congo ■•' annexation treaty. passed by
Belgian deputies. ' ;-■,•/
THURSDAY MORNING, MARCH 19, 1908.
... Pathfinder Squadron in San Pedro Harbor
MT ' ;|
_,_^_^_i-^^^^^^ sf*A&ft'&'W&** A^ &^^^^L\mmmmm. V^ r
/2Ss-r,*'^S^SH!l'=9»«aS ■ . - n .—_-t*r di % la;* ■. = *>>>>.*>> .'"■■:; ■:■■v"*^'-*''*'-- ■ we^^-:-^--^--—-^.v.-.^■.....■■.■MH-uy "vT ...
■ . -- --..-.. . , .- - . ....■.....,"■- ...
- " - - TOP— HANDLING GUNCOTTON ON BOARD THE TENNESSEE. ONE
TOP—THE BAND OF THE WASHINGTON. THE BAND PLAY'S ALL DAY SMALL BOX, LEPROPPED, WOULD DO THINGS IN THAT IMMEDI.
WHEW THE CREW IS COALING SHIP ATE VICINITY , -.
• . ; ■• - -— BOTTOM—A BUSY MOMENT ON BOARD THE WASHINGTON. PHOTO
850.POUND BASKETS OF COAL COMING ABOARD THE WAS MADE WHILE CREW WAS HANDLING 350 TONS PER HOUR,
WASHINGTON /^i JV ;'-', X THE RECORD 1 - 'Vv'^b
.?.,..,:.■ - * - —Pictures taken by Staff Photographer Thompson at San Pedro yesterday.
M'KEE SAYS
WIFE LED GAY
LIFE ABROAD
THE DIVORCE SUIT BRINGS OUT
SHOCKING CHARGES
Lord Roslyn and an Italian Marquis
,ji Named as Co.Respondents
by American Multi.
Millionaire
Ey Associated Press.
PARIS, March 18.—Maltre Laborl to
day presented to the court the side of
the husband in the divorce suit brought
in this city by Mrs. A. Hart McKee
against Mr. McKee.
The ' flrst: hearing of the case took
place . March 4, when , Mrs. McKee,
through counsel, | described alleged In
dignities to which she had been sub
jected, by her husband.
Today Maltre Laborl made counter
charges of a most scandalous character
against the wife, and * declared that if
the court granted a divorce it should
pronounce in favor of the defendant
and not In favor of the wife.,
Mrs. McKee is a daughter of George
W. Baxter of Tennessee. She was the
widow of Hugh Tevls at the time of her
marriage to Mr. McKee In Philadelphia
In January, 1905. Maltre Labor! de
clared , Mr. McKee married Mrs. Tevls
to save her honor. He mentioned also
an Italian marquis as a co-respondent.
Maltre Laborl at the outset com
plained bitterly of the flood of accusa
tions against his client with which he
said the American.press had been filled.
Accuses Woman .
.The allegations of Mr. McKee's cru
elty to his wife and child and the fla
grant , wrongdoing . were | denied, and
then In support of the contention that
Mr.—and. not Mrs.—McKee should re
ceive the decree of divorce Maltre La
borl proceeded to describe Mrs. McKee's
alleged career while she was still Mrs.
Tevls. :- y'„ ■ '"','•■-' - >'■ -
.'■'• He coupled her name with that* of
Lord Roslyn, and declared that she and
McKee were living together at a hotel
two days after they met. :■« -.
- Continuing counsel for the husband
declared that his client had paid Mrs.
McKee's- bills, amounting; to $16,000,
while she was in the south of Europe,
and to disprove the charge •of r parsi
mony against him he declared that dur
ing a single night McKee had spent $320
on flowers for his wife. ' ,
. Maltre Laborl made charges, but he
offered no proof, of Mrs. McKee's mis
conduct with Lord Roslyn. His allega
tion was. based on the fact that Mrs.
McKee, when she was Mrs. Tevls, and
Lord Rosyln stopped at the same hotel
in Folkstone. ' •_ ,-■.-..
.In the case of the Italian marquis no
other proof was submitted except that
Mr. McKee saw his wife and the mar
quis emerge from a garden together.
b Maltre ' Laborl did not' conclude his
presentation of the case, and the hear
ing will be continued March 25. ;*;
SHIP SINKING,
WOMAN SENDS
FOR A BIBLE
STEAMER PASSENGERS TELL
OF RESCUE
Captain and Crew of 111 Fated Pomona
Praised for Their Courage
and Skill in Hour
of Terror
By Associated Press. \
SAN FRANCISCO, March 18.—The
passengers of the 111 fated steamer Po
mona of the Pacific Coast Steamship
line, which was wrecked on a sub
merged reef off Fort Ross yesterday
evening, arrived here today.
Sixteen of the passengers, all men,
went overland from the point of land
ing to Cazadero and there took the
North vShore train which arrived here
at 10:35 this morning. Some of them
covered the distance of fifteen miles on
foot, walking the greater part of the
night, while a number of them waited
for teams which had been sent In re
sponse to telephone messages from Fort
Ross.
According to the stories of the re
turning passengers the Pomona struck
a glancing blow on a submerged rock
when about two miles oft shore. The
vessel shivered from stem to stern but
did not stop, immediately sliding off the
rock. Proceeding under a slow bell,
with the water in the hold rapidly get
ting deeper, the steamer fifteen min
utes after striking the flrst rock struck
again.
Six boats were lowered, - each, one
making two or three trips, and by 7:30
all the passengers and crew had landed.
At 8:15 the water ■in the vessel had
reached the dynamos, located between
decks, and the lights went out on the
Pomona. A little later, only the top of
the cabins on the after deck were visi
ble, and a 'gentle swell began to break
over the steamer. -
L. G. Puter, a prominent attorney of
Eureka, related the following expert
-6nC6,.
Passengers at Dinner
"I had just sat down to dinner when
I felt the steamer shiver all over and
heard the hull grating on a rock. The
speed of the vessel seemed to be tem
porarily checked, but the steamer was
not fast, sliding off , immediately and
continuing on its way. We all realized
what had happened but there was no
confusion or excitement either among
the crew or passengers. -.-.■■■■
"The sea was smooth as glass. There
was little or no wind, and it was Just
beginning to get dark.v Off to the right
the shore line could be seen. Captain
Swanson turned the bow of the Pomo
na toward the shore and proceeded un
der a slow bell, the pasengers ln the
meantime putting on ■> life-preservers
and gathering their hand baggage.
When perhaps 300 or 400 yards off shore
the steamer struck again and remained
fast. Captain Swanson immediately or-
(Continued on Fags Two)
EAST RIVER
SPANNED BY
HUGE BRIDGE
GREAT STRUCTURE IN NEW
YORK IS OPENED

Alderman Sullivan, Representing the
Mayor, Leads Delegation Across. :
Cost of Work Twenty. (
Five Millions ,
_
By Associated Press.
NEW YORK, March 18.—The great
cantilever structure over East river,
known as Blackwell's Island bridge,
which was constructed at a cost of
nearly $25,000,000, was traversed its en
tire length by pedestrians today for the
first time. -'/>;". :.'v,'-.-?."".' r'i
Alderman Timothy Sullivan, as lie
personal representative of Mayor Mc-
Clellan, headed a delegation across the
narrow footbridge built on top of the
single steel girder which now links the
New York and Long Island ends of the
bridge. This girder,, weighing twenty
tons, was fitted in place today In the
presence of the delegation. ,
-Midway on the footbridge Alderman
Sullivan broke a bottle of champagne
over the rail, an American flag was un
furled and the whistles on the river
craft tooted a salute.
Work on the bridge was begun in
1901, and has been carried on con
stantly since then. There have been
many , fatalities among the workmen
employed on the great highway. When
completed the bridge will be the largest
cantilever structure in the world. It
will be double decked and 8449 feet ln
length. The length of the main span Is
1182 feet between the towers.
In the middle of the upper deck, be
tween the trusses, there are to be two
elevated railroad tracks and two prom
enades, each eleven feet wide. The six
tracks across the bridge are estimated
to have a capacity of 150,000,000 passen
gers a year under ordinary conditions
of traffic.
-_ a-*
Duke Living In Seclusion
By Associated Press. .
WASHINGTON, March 18.—Beyond
seeing a few personal friends during
the day and joining a small dinner
party at the Italian embassy last even
ing, the duke of Abruzzi spent the sec
ond day of his stay in Washington in
seclusion. He declined to give audi
ence to members of the press, and in
formation as to his movements Is de
nied at the embassy.
» . »
' - Plague increasing in Ecuador
By Associated Press.
GUAYAQUIL, Ecuador, March 18.—
The bubonic plague here Is increasing
and the sanitary condition of this and
other towns is causing great alarm.
There are fifty-one cases of plague In
the lazaretto, beside several cases of
smallpox and yellow fever
■«» FM i I •JV PnPni '?' DAILY, 2o| sunday. 3fl
Oll>ljrXjJil V>*V^l±X_ks. ON TRAINS. 5 CENTS
WASHINGTON
BOYS BREAK
COAL RECORD
TAKE ON FUEL WITH ONE BIG
' RUSH
Is Dirty Work and Sailormen Hustle
Some to Get It Done Ten-»
nesse Will Coal
Today
Just to please a Herald reporter and
let him get a good action picture the
boys on board the Washington coaled
ship at the rate of 350 tons an hour
for a while yesterday and broke the
record.
The collier Justin lay alongside and
from the hold came forth in endless
succession huge wicker baskets and
canvas buckets filled to the brim with
black, grimy coal that filled lungs with
Its dust and made a white cruiser look
like It had been neglected for untold
months. ' - .:>,
Down in the hold of the collier scores
of grimy men shoveled the coal Into
the receptacles that were lowered
through the enormous hatches, while
several crews manned the electric
winches that swung high and across
from collier to ship the twin loads that
weighed nearly a ton.
As the hook was fastened in the han
dle of the big buckets they were
caught up, and as they reached the
deck the crew on the cruiser started
Its windlass and pulled the swinging
load to the deck of the ship, where
other crews placed the loads on little
four-wheeled trucks and hauled them
across decks to the coal chutes, where
they were dumped into the yawning
bunkers below.
Ensign Some Different
One dapper ensign who the day be
fore was officer of the deck and Im
periously turned his back on all who
were not his superiors .in rank, ap
peared yesterday in charge of another
part of the deck and his natty uniform
of blue was replaced by faded blue
jumper and overalls. A grimy smudge
of soft coal from a dirty hand was
rubbed on the sweaty cheek that only
a day before was of a color to set the
heart of a young girl dancing. A closer
scrutiny of some of the men in blue
overalls disclosed that most of them
were ensigns or midshipmen who the
day before had walked the quarter deck
in a proud assumption of dignity.
The sailors as a rule wore white duck
or what had been white duck once.
After a few minutes' coaling there is
little white left and with some mem
bers, of the crow there was a marked
shortage of duck.
Every one kept busy and what spoke
eloquently for * the willingness of the
men was the fact that not a sharp com
mand or a harsh word came from the
officers superintending the work.
The boys seemed to enter into the
thing with the spirit of play, and
(Continued on Page Two)
CENTS
ADMIRAL
SETS DATE
APRIL 18
WILL CONSULT THE PEOPLE'S
WISHES ON DIVISION
JACKIES ON SHORE LEAVE HAVE
GOOD TIME
Great Piles of Grub Required for the
Sailors' Meals Handling Gun.
cotton Makes Visitors .
Cautious
*
V. S. S. CONNECTICUT AT SEA. March
*'•A. C. Harper, Los Angelea, Cat: Fleet
will stay not less than four'days at San
I Pedro and other ports contiguous to I,oa
! Angeles, probably longer, and after arrival
will be divided to suit the wishes of the
people of these porta 'Cannot give exact -
j date of arrival at this time, but It will be
i not earlier than April 18. <■ EVANS.
This wireless message was received
by Mayor Harper this morning, hav
ing come from the flagship via San
Diego. Another telegram from Admiral
Evans addressed to Gen. Adna R.
Chaffee was practically the same.
The committee on entertainment will
proceed with Its arrangements, count
ing on the fleet's arriving April 18. . '
The stay of four days as the mini
mum will in all probability be pro
longed to ten days, as in an aerogram
from Admiral Evans to Rear Admiral
McCalla, retired, who is at Santa Bar
bara, the date of arrival at that port
is set for not earlier than April 28.
It would seem probable that the en
tire time betweer, the two dates would
be spent here, which will afford ample
opportunity for the successful carrying'
out of the program. of entertainment as .
planned and give every one who wishes
the chance to visit the fleet without
undue crowding. .
As the admiral has expressed his in
tention of deferring to the wishes -of
the people in regard to dividing the
fleet upon its arrival, the parade of the.
warships along the coast from . San
Pedro to Santa Monica is practically,
assured and will afford a spectacle long
to be remembered.
Jackies on Shore Leave
The officers and men of Admiral Se
bree's squadron are 'enjoying shore,
liberty | and special arrangements for
their entertainment have been made. ■
Quite a party visited Pasadena yes-'
terday as the guests of that city, and
were treated .to an automobile * ride
about the city. Besides the officers
from the cruisers there were several
officials of the San Pedro chamber of
commerce. *,
The party went to the Crown City
in a special car conducted by H. S.
Kneedler and upon its arrival was ten
dered a luncheon at the Hotel Mary
land.
Mayor Thomas Earley presided as
host at the luncheon and a board of
trade committee had charge of the en
tertainment of the distinguished guests.
Those in the party from the squadron
were' Captain • Thomas Howard, com
mander of Admiral Sebree's flagship,
the Tennessee; Lieutenant J. P. Lan
non. Surgeon E. G. Parker; G. E. Ven
able, paymaster of the Tennessee;
Captain John Hamilton, W. F. Blcken
bach, Edwin H. Beutzer, L. Kelly, C.
D. Ingram and several other officers.
Sam Storer, president of the San Pe
dro chamber -of commerce;-. Frank
Burns and W. C. Melton were among
the San Pedro delegation who accom
panied the naval officers. Friday Ad
miral Sebree and another party of of
ficers will be afforded the same man
ner of entertainment at Pasadena.
The number of visitors who took ad
vantage of the opportunity to visit the
cruisers now in the harbor was con
siderably In excess of the number who
.went aboard Tuesday. Most of the
visitors went aboard the flagship, the
Tennessee, as the California was clean
ing ship after the coaling of the day
before and the Washington was not
open to visitors, as Its crew was busily
engaged In putting aboard 1700 tons of
Visitors Well Treated
On board the Tennessee Lieut. Staf
ford received the numerous visitors and
courteously assigned a Jackie to each
party to show them the ship. Everyone
was taken from stem to stern and all
of the mechanism of the guns was
carefully, described by the willing
sailors. The little three, and six
pounders seemed to attract the most
attention, probably for the reason that
they were the more easily seen as a
whole and were not quite so forbidding
as the big ten-inch tubes that poke,
their grim muzzles out through the tur
rets so threateningly.
A rather amusing incident took place
while the jackles were putting some
guncotton aboard. Coming up the
companionway with the visitors were
eight or ten sailors, making frequent
trips from a cutter that lay alongside,
and in the arms of each man was a
small box. At first glance It looked as
though the sailor boys were either very
lazy or else wanted to make the Job
last as the boxes seemed light and
seldom did one man carry two.
A question to one of the men and the
reason was plain. The small boxes,
only about eighteen inches long and
six Inches square, contained primers
for the big guns, and to have dropped
one would have meant oblivion for the
carriers and all others in that Imme
diate vicinity. The larger cases, which
were about the size and shape of a five
gallon oil can, were filled with guncot
ton for the torpedoes.
Afraid of Guncotton
The cases lay on deck, making quite
a pile, and the crowd of sightseers
stood all around them, oblivious of their
deadly power until one or two inquisi
tive ones read the labels, and from then
on th.-.t part of the deck was the least
favored part of the ship, and the Jackles
carried their burdens without having
to push between the people that had
crowded ; them only a few minutes be
fore.
, One of the places on board that ex
cited as much comment and fewer ques
tions than any was where the food for
the men "was prepared. It made one,
wonder If they were doing the cooking
for the whole squadron on one boat, but
(Continued on Page Two).

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