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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, November 08, 1908, Image 51

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1908-11-08/ed-1/seq-51/

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NOVEMBER 8, 1908
SEARCHLIGHT AS A BEACON
A PROPOSED use of a vertically di
f~. retted searchlight as a beacon, to
replace the usual form of light house
apparatus, Is described In Energy
(Leipslc, Germany). While light houses
render eminent service In securing the
passage of vessels along the coast, and
the constantly Improved technical
equipments enable them to keep pace
with the demands of modern day, an
increase of the projection distance,
without being the cause of augmented
Installation and operation expenses,
says that Journal, would be hailed in
all parts of the world. Retired Captain
Arenhold recently explained to the
Nautical society of Kiel, his Idea of a
new form of vertical beacon light,
which would not only be more effective
than the present light houses, but
would also offer economy In service,
and the Imperial ministry of naval af
fairs is contemplating extensive prac
tical tests at Frledrichsort. Its advan
tages are sketched thus:
"The idea of the new signal fire was
suggested by the fact that searchlights
on vessels can transmit their signals to
distances of forty to fifty nautical
miles, probably because In contrast to
the horizontal light cast by light
houses, they project the light obliquely
Into the air.
"It la believed, therefore, that light
emitted vertically into the air can be
seen to a distance of at least eighty
nautical miles, this being possible with
out consuming as much energy as does
the light house. The cost of in
stalling light houses would thus be
saved.
"The same means could be employed
for distinguishing the various signals
as used by light houses—colors and pe
riodical obscuration. It will require
thorough practical tests to establish
the distance in unfavorable weather,
fog or rain. As a military appliance
it possesses the notable advantage that,
when the light is extinguished in the
daytime, the enemy has not the same
means of ascertaining their own Im
mediate locality."
i *9 m m* ,
ETYMOLOGICAL
When one sits lonely on a log
And talks, 'tis called a monologue.
If there were two folks by a log
They'd call their talk a dialogue;
Yet no one's known
To call a phone.
As It should be, a wlrelogue
Nor In a feline spatologue
Referred to as a catalogue.
The sailors when they check a log
Ne'er call the thing a deckalogue.
Wherefore be it my Ipllogue
To finish up this dippy login*.
And say our etymology
Is no more certain than a flea
—Horace Dodd Gastlt in Harper's Weekly.
OLD CALIFORNIA MISSIONS
,|, „.N
BB___> - «b^^tß ____^j«EM_______k '^vtj^ET'-
San Gabriel Mission Is probably best known to Angelenos and tourists because of its nearness and its
accessibility. A fund has recently been raised to completely restore the historic place.
LOS ANGELES HERALD SUNDAY MAGAZINE
THE BRIDE OF THE WEEK
J_^_\ W^^X*- ____\ B_k.
_____ _______L
#aßßs»____ _____p^ ; tbl('
.$-*/s___ M— '•-_!/s_x^v^______l .JBFF*.. >^Bk __B ' \ -__B
BBBBBBBBB_B__BB_____BBBB_BB__B_BB_BBB__BBBBBBBB_^^
MISS MARY HUBBELL, DAUGHTER OF JUDGE AND MRS. HUBBELL OF ARAPAHOE STREET. SHE
WILL BECOME THE BRIDE OF WILLIAM L. GRAVES JR. NEXT TUESDAY
—Photo by Steckel.
NOW IS THE TIME
WHEN the New York Herald
equipped its Brooklyn office
with typewriters a few years ago
the gentlemen of the staff began
with great haste and lncesant industry
to practice at the machines. They wrote
and rewrote again and again that old
reliable war-cry: "Now Is the time for
all good men to come to the aid of
the party"a fine sentence for high
speeding, but not very useful for per
sons desiring to familiarize themselves
with the whole keyboard. Moreover, It
had the fault of breaking over the end
of the line, which was annoying.
A genius in the office invented, and
the men thereafter used, this sentence:
"The quick brown fox Jumps over the
lazy dog." This not only fitted snugly
in one line, but contained all of the
letters of the alphabet with very few
repetitions. It Is the pet sentence now
adays among learners and speedy oper
ators, and It is exceedingly likely that
not one out of ten thousand of them
ever heard of Arthur F. Curtis, the in
ventor of the combination.
m-^m
AT LONG BEACH
Teacher—Well, Bobby?
Bobby— does a flea look before it
leaps?
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