OCR Interpretation


Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, January 03, 1910, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-01-03/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

[2 PAGES
PRICE: 40 CENTS KfttM?
VOL. XXXVII.
M HBEB D 4.
HERALD RESCUE PARTY SNATCHES FOUR LIVES FROM
HUNGRY MAW OF SAN GABRIEL'S SWOLLEN WATERS
INDEX OF
HERALD'S NEWS
TODAY
FORECAST
For Los Angeles and vicinity—Fair
Monday: killing frost In morning;
light north wind. Maximum tempera
ture yesterday 51 degrees, minimum
39 degrees.
LOCAL
l'>rris Hart man Opera company appears in
"San Toy." PAGE 6
Ufesavers from Venire make heroic rescue
after battle of hours against San Gabriel
flood. PAGE 1
All who went to San Gabriel valley to 'aid
persons In distress worked heroically.
PAGE 8
Slashed by knife, San Gabriel man dies
naked in ditch; G. A. Stone and wife are
arrested and taken to county Jail on sus
picion. . PAGE 1
Wednescday to be big day of Aviation
club, and many plan to go to lit. I-nvve.
PAGE 6
Spirit of patriots rules bis mass meeting
held at Temple auditorium. PAGE 5
Death of Edward Fox In bathtub by heart
disease first thought to be suicide. PAGE 5
Theodore E. Clarke asks wife to forgive
him for mistrusting her, then commits
suicide. PAGE 12
Mrs. Emily Slonaker Is wounded by bul
let Intended for dog. PAGE 12
Preacher defines society's curse; says dou
ble standard of virtue Is grave menace.
PAGE 10
Extra shifts of men are employed by rail
roads to lift blockade. PAGE 2
Editorial and Letter Box. PAGE. 4
Mining and mining. PAGE 9
Classified advertising. PAGES 10-11
City brevities. ■ PAGE 5
Automobiles. PAGE 7
Churches. PAGE 5
Theaters. PAGE 6
Society and clubs. ye • PAGE 8
Music. PAGE 8
j SOUTH CALIFORNIA
Tournament of Roses parade leaves Pasa
dena with a financial problem to face.
PAGE 10
Edgar Burke of Sierra Madre meets
leath by falling 700 feet oft Mount
Wilson trail. PAGE 10
Monrovia may hold an election on sewer
bonds. PAGE 10
Janltorshlp at Ocean Park becomes ob
ject of political bickering. PAGE 10
Drop in mercury at San Bernardino brings
abundant fall of snow. PAGE 5
| EASTERN j
Murae leaves N«w lock to serve neii
tence at Atlanta, and before he de
parts loaves statement In which h.
denounces the courts in bitter words.
PAGE 2
Congress to convene Tuesday and work
enough la mapped out already to keep
lawmakers busy for two months.
I'AQE 12
Mayor Gaynor of New York makes ap
poSntments and declares Tammany
leader Murphy, did not try to Influ
ence him. PAGE 12
Expect year 1910 In stock market specula
tion will be active and industrial records
• for 1909 will be eclipsed. PAGE 13
Chief of bureau of animal Industry says
half of the meat eaten in the United
States Is uninspected. >J PAGE 12
Hailroad presidents to confer with Taft
at White House, as latter desires to
give all Interests an opportunity to
present their views before he sends in
his message dealing with interstate
commerce. PAGE 1
1 FOREIGN
China refuses to arbitrate boundary line
of Waco and send note to Portugal
stating that only the latter and' her
self An make settlement of trouble.
» PAGE 12
1 MINING AND OIL |
Board approves list of candidates and
chamber of mines prepares for elec
tion. PAGE 9
Camp Bird people buy Gertrude mine,
near Monterey. PAGE 9
Party of Lob Angeles capitalists secure
control of Golden Cross mine. PAGE 9
Lucey company changes'name and re
organizes with capital of $500,000.
PAGE 3
Ore in Manhattan lease averages $100 a
ton. PAGE 9
{ SPORTS* |
Jack Johnson tries to jump contract
and theater manager attaches his
trunks. • PAGE 6
Tom Jones calls oft negotiations with
Sid Hester for Nelson-Wolgast battle
In Frisco. PAGE 6
Merrily and Uttle Mischief II divide
honors of dory races oft Ban Pedro.
PAGE 6
Pajaorlta steps five furlongs in .1-5
seconds over Juarez track in feature
event. PAGE 6
Few amateur basebajl games were
Dlayed owing to unfavorable weather.
.. U.- PAGE 6
Wolgast and Memslo work out for Fri
day night's engagement at Naud
Junction. •«; PAGE I
INJURED MOTORMAN FOUND
TO HAVE ASSUMED NAME
INDIANAPOLIS, Jan. 2.-^t was
learned today that a motorman known
as Edward B. Russell, who was fatally
injured in a collision between his car
and another Interurban car in the fog
last night, was in reality Jesse T.
Precht of Summers, Mont.
A woman who gave her name as
June Wood, said he had changed his
name because of what he called "a
St. Louis affair."
TOBACCO AND RAILROAD
CASES TO BE RESUMED
WASHINGTON, Jan. 2.—This week
will be marked by the resumption of
two federal actions against corpora
tions.
The hearing on the tobacco trust
caae will be taken up by the United
Slates supremo court Monday. For the
game d|tt« is fixed the resumption of
testimony designed to compel a dis
lointure of tho Union Pacific and the
Southern Pacific systems. The rail
road case will be heard in New York.
LOS ANGELES HERALD
SAYS PAPER
MILLS IN
SORT OF
TRUST
Herman Ridder Charges
Prices Dictated by the
A. P. & P. Concern
OUTPUT RESTRICTED
Newspaper Association Supplies
Data Concerning Com
bine of Plants
[Associated Press]
VTBW YORK. Jan. 2—Herman Rid
l\ der, president of the American
-1-' Newspaper Publishers' associa
tion, December 2 invited the attention
of Attorney General Wlckersham to
statements made r>t a banquet of paper
dealers in New York, In which it was
claimed by a representative of the In
ternational Paper company that the
president of the American Paper and
Pulp association, A. C. Hastings, was
advising paper mills what paper prices
should be.
The attorney general referred the
matter to District Attorney Wise of
New York, who asked for specifica
tions. As .i result of that request John
Norris, chairman of the committee on
papers of the publishers' association,
has submitted detailed data purporting
to cover the following matters:
1. Restriction of forty-six news print
paper mills in use of news print paper
—restrictions that make impossible
either open market or public quotation
of paper prices.
2. Action of news print paper mills
east of the Rocky mountains in refus
ing to sell f. o. fa. mill for spot cash
or in quoting excessive prices.
3. Refusal of many news print paper
mills to sell other than 32-pound paper.
4. Restrictions of contracts by many
mills to one year periods and inclusion
of wrappers on rolls in actual gross
weight to be paid for.
5. Collection by the American Paper
and Pulp association of daily reports
fi\ m paper mills, apparently for use
as a basis for concerted action in regu
lating prices.
6. "Trade customs" adopted by paper
makers and used by them as a basis
for concerted action In regulating
prices.
7. Meetings of papermokrrs to discuss
prices.
8. Reported agreement on news print
paper price by two largo papermaking
concerns.
9. Action that seems to be in con
tempt of court by former members of I
the General Paper company and of the
Fiber and Manila pool, through disre
gard of injunctions of prohibition.
RAILROAD HEADS TO
CONFER WITH TAFT
Chief Executive Desires to Give All
Interests Opportunity to State
Position Before Completing
Special Message
WASHINGTON, Jan. 2.—Six of the
great powers in the American railroad
world will be in Washington tomorrow
to define to President Taft the attitude
of railroads toward proposed amend
ments to the interstate commerce law.
The president has delayed his mes
sage pending this hearing, as he is said
to be desirous of giving all interests
an opportunity to state their position.
The special message dealing with the
interstate and antitrust law will be
ready for congress Wednesday noon.
The president last week received a re
quest for a hearing by the railroad
presidents and readily granted it. He
already has given a hearing to the
Shippers' association and to the inter
state commerce commission.
The conference will be held at the
White House tomorrow morning and
will be attended by President Mellen
of the New Haven, President McCrea
of the Pennsylvania, President Lovett
of the Harriman lines, President Baer
of the Reading, President Flnley,
Southern, and President Brown, New-
York Central. Attorney General Wick
ersham will be present.
FIND MAN'S BODY WITH
HANDS AND FEET BOUND
Real Estate Holder of New York Is
Believed to Have Been Killed.
His Partner Held
NEW YORK, Jan. 2.—Morris Nath
anson, a real estate holder and cloth-
Ing manufacturer, was found dead to
day In the loft of his factory, bound
hand and foot. The loft was filled with
escaping gas. There were no marks of
violence. The coroner does not believe
a man with only one free hand could
have tied the knots.
The. police detained Isaac H. Gold,
his partner, on the strength of what
the police say Is a disagreement be
tween his own story of his movements
last night and that told by his wife.
Gold was released on $1000 ball.
MONDAY MORNING, JANUARY 3, 1910.
Snapshots Taken by Herald Photographer as
Marooned Women Were Rescued from Flood
'■^Ny i^Twif IS' if- : 2. •
m ' ■■ !
It yit i MJk 4 . »
I
Upper picture shows Mrs. Effie Wells
being landed, supported by Deputy
Sheriffs Mathewson and Wright.
Middle picture shows rescuers
bringing the lifeboat to landing.
Botton cut shows on the left Lieut.
Adolph Toenjes and on the right
George McManus of the Venice
Volunteer lifesaving crew.
SLASHED BY KNIFE;
DIES IN A DITCH
BRUTAL MURDER COMMITTED
AT SAN GABRIEL
Naked Body Found by Roadside—G.
A., Stone and Wife, with Whom
Dead Man Lived, Are
s- , Arrested
■v.
Fatally wounded as the result of
what evidently was a desperate battle
for life, Morgan Shlveley, 28 years old,
a conductor employed by the Pacific
Electric Hallway company, leaped
through a' window at his home at San
Gabriel boulevard and Broadway, San
Gabriel, early yesterday morning,
naked as the day he was born, ran a
quarter of a mile through the pouring
rain, until ho fell dead in the rain
water in a ditch beside the road. ,
Investigation by the sheriff and his
deputies resulted in obtaining informa
tion which in their opinion Justified
the arrest of G. A. Stone and his wife.
with whom Shiveley made hi* home,
on suspicion of having near knowledge
of the crime.
The kitchen of the Stone home, where
the struggle that cost Shiveley his life
occurred, had the appearance of a
slaughter bouse. The Moor, walls, and
almost every piece of furniture, were
splattered with the life blood of the
unfortunate conductor. The two win
dows of the room were broken, and
chinaware and drinking glasses were
shattered and lying about the floor cov
ered with blood. The bedclothes on a
cot in the room Where Shiveley had
been sleeping for the last several days
also were soaked with blood.
Sink Torn Away
The Bill of one of the windows —the
one from which Shiveley had jumped
to escape from hln assailant — was
soaked'with blood, which Had trickled
down the outrr wall. The stationary
iron sink just under the window <m the
inside of the room was torn from it;<
fastenings, presumably by the- weight
of tlie wounded num. who stepped on
it and plunged headlong through the
glass.
Bhlv«ley wan employed on the north
ern division of the Pacific Electric
company and was conductor of iC San
Gabriel car. He was on the late run
and usually arrived at San Gabriel
about t o'clock hi the morning. Yes- j
terday morning Shiveley and the mo
torman of his car, Fred R. Donaldson.
arrived at San Gabriel on time. It j
was raining hard at the time, and they |
waited until it stopped, mounted their |
bicycles and started for their bonus
at about 2:15 o'clock. The men sepn-|
rated at San Gabriel boulevard and
Broadway. Bhiveley told Donaldson i
-nod night and went into his h»me.
That was the last time he was Been
alive by his friend. Donaldson con- ;
tinued down Broadway to his home,
several blocks away, and went to bed.
Trio Well Acquainted
Sliiveloy came to the coast from Lin
coln Neb., where he met Stone, and
the woman who later married Stone.
The two men became acquainted seven
years ago at that place and since that
time have been fast friends. Stone, it
seems, met his present wife at the
home of Shiveley. The three came
west some time ago and Stone and
the woman were married at Seattle
about a year and a half ago. Shive
ley also was in Seattle with the Stones
and later the trio went to San Fran
cisco and then came to Los Angeles.
While In Seattle Stone was engaged
in the, commission business with S. P.
McGhle. under the firm name of the
Seattle Commission company. Sin,ce
his arrival In Los Angeles he has beeu
employed by the Pacific Crushed Rock
company. Shiveley made his home
with the Stones, who up to about four
months ago lived in an apartment
bouse in the downtown district in Los
Angeles. After Shiveley was assigned
to the San Gabriel run the Stones
(CMtISIKd OU l'»«» !«•)
RESCUED IN NICK OF TIME
"One of our boys was the first to see the boat as it came down
the river," said Mrs. Clara Armstrong, as soon as she had reached
a place of warmth.
"On his cry we all jumped down into the water and mud from
the table on which we were sitting, and I, for one, could scarcely
realize that our frightful sufferings of the last two days were about
to be ended.
"Mr. Toenjes and Mr. McManus, the life guards who came to
our aid, knew just what to do. They saw that we were all too
weak to be of much service even to ourselves, and with perfect
judgment planned to take us across the wild torrent which inter
vened between us and safety. Then when we were in the midst of
our perils, Sheriff Hammel and his brave deputies aided the boys
and brought us to safety.
"While I thank those who actually rescued us from what ap
peared to be certain death, I know that we all owe The Herald a
debt of gratitude which can never be repaid. Theirs was the true
power behind the deed, and always will I remember that my life
was saved by that newspaper, the Venice volunteers and the shenh
and his aides."
FOUR DIE, THREE INJURED,
IN TENEMENT HOUSE FIRE
NEW YORK. Jan. 2.—Four lives
were lost and three persons were seri
ously hurt in a tenement house flre
in Jersey City today.
One man jumped from a fourth
story window and died soon afterward.
A woman was burned to a crisp, her
arms entwined about her baby. A
child was rescued by firemen, but had
inlialed flames and died.
Those injured will recover. The fire
is bellevod to have been of incendiary
origin.
SEATTLE-SAN FRANCISCO
THROUGH TRAIN DEPARTS
SEATTLE, Jan. 2.—The Hist regular
through passenger trnin that ever left
Seattle for San Francisco departed this
morning—the Southern Pacific's Sbaa
ta'i limited, which will cover the dis
tance between the two cities in thirty
four hours.
Union Paol'flo and Southern Pai'iflo
train service is now fully established,
giving Seattle through connection with
the cast over the Harrlman system.
The line between Tacoma and Portland
is beinc double-tracked. It will bo pos
sible within a year to shorten the time
between San Francisco and Pueet
Bound.
CTWr<T T? f^fWiV^m • DAII.T. *ci SCXDA.Y.B*
SlJMjiJLrj VsUrlr^r). ox tkains. c cents
LIFESAVERS MAKE HEROIC
RESCUE AFTER BATTLE
OF HOURS AGAINST
RAGING FLOOD
Two Widows and Their Two Sons Taken
from Fiooded Home in Exhausted
Condition After Struggle
VENICE MEN EARN SPECIAL HONORS
Sheriff Hammel and Deputies Also Lend Helping Hand
When Aged Women, Chilled to Bone After
Two Days and Nights in Flooded
House, Wade to Shore
FOUR persons were saved from what seemed to be certain death!
in the raging waters of the San Gabriel river near Rio Honda
station on the Pacific Electrics Whittier line by the Los Ange
les Herald rescue party early yesterday morning, after hours of
fighting against wind and rain and two hours and a half in the icyj
waters of the mountain stream.
The rescue was effected by the Venice volunteer life saving
crew, which was called from Venice by The Herald late Saturday,
night and hurried to the scene of the trouble on a special car sent
out at 1:30 o'clock yesterday morning through the courtesy of
Superintendent Thomas McCaffery of the Pacific Electric. Sheriff
W. A. Hammel and five of his deputies lent gallant assistance.
THE PERSONS RESCUED
Mrs. Effie Wells.
Floyd Wells, her son.
Mrs. Clara Armstrong.
Howard Armstrong, her son.
Every man who assisted in the rescue proved himself a hero,
but to Adolph Toehjes and George McManus belongs the greatest
credit, for these two young men braved the angry waves and re
mained in the, icy waters for two and a half hours until the boat in
which the endangered persons were seated had been brought safely,
to land.
Had it not been for Los Angeles Herald the rescue might not
have been effected. Certain it is that the two widows and their sons
would have been forced to spend hours longer in mortal terror for
their lives, and menaced every moment by the waves which beat
constantly upon the little frame house in which they were marooned.
HERALD HASTENS RESCUE
It was Los Angeles Herald that arranged to bring the life sav
ing crew from Venice in record time and it was Los Angeles Herald
that arranged for the special car over the Pacific Electric line to
Whittier upon which the life savers were taken to the scene.
Sheriff Hammel, assisted by five deputies and fifty or more
citizens of Downey and residents in the vicinity of the flood, were
ready and" anxious to assist, but their efforts were made a little too
late,'for Toenjes and McManus had been in the water an hour be
fore other aid than that given by The Herald arrived. At the last
relay of the rescue the sheriff's force and others rendered yeomen
service in pulling the boat to land. It was the expert knowledge of
the life saving crew which made the rescue possible, however, for
those young men are well trained in battling with angry waves and
saving lives.
It was Los Angeles Herald which made it possible for the life
savers to reach the scene. The crew of six was brought to Los An
geles shortly after midnight Saturday and rushed to Rio Honda sta
tion on the" Whittier line of the Pacific Electric in a special car,
through the agency of Los Angeles Herald.
SPECIAL CAR ON WAY
The car left the P. E. depot at 1:30 o'clock yesterday morning
in the midst of a storm. The life savers were equipped with life
belts and buoys and were prepared to make short work of the rescue.
Darkness prevented all work, however, and it was not until 6:40
Sunday morning that Toenjes and McManus put off in a small row
boat into the swollen stream.
Six representatives of Los Angeles Herald assisted in the pre
liminary preparations for the rescue and gave invaluable aid in the
rescue work.
It was a night of terror indeed for the marooned people. They
(!id not close their eyes and when the first streaks of dawn appeared'
and they saw The Herald relief expedition at hand they knew their
long vigil was soon to end.
WORK BEGUN IN DARKNESS
The Herald party reached Rio Honda station at 2:15 o'clock!
and began at once the work of locating the stranded sufferers. As
:i hard rain was falling and the night was one of inky darkness the
work was made difficult, but fears of additional flood waters kept the
workers busy. Through the courtesy of the crew working on the
Pacific Electric bridge across the San Gabriel river, a huge search
light was brought into play. This, however, did not prove effective
and small parties of Herald men and life savers started out on foot
for the scene. Several times the parties were mired and were forced
to tern back. At last one of the parties found the roadway leading
to the estate of former Governor Henry T. Gage, and after waking
Mrs. Gage was directed properly.
LED TO DANGER SCENE
Robert Foster, who owns the ranch next to the Gage place, got
up out of bed to lead the rescuers to the scene of action, a mile and
a half from Rio Honda, where The Herald special car was left. After
the first detachment of the rescue party had located the scene, in
formation af the fact was brought back to the others and the entire
party moved forward, ready for action.
It is about half a mile southeast of Governor Gage's country,
place where the marooned people were located. The little house in
which they were waterbound is located on the old Gridcr ranch not
far from what is known as Hunt's crossing.
For many years, the San Gabriel river has not flowed through
(Continued on I'm TbxM>
CENTS

xml | txt