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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, January 03, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-01-03/ed-1/seq-2/

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EXTRA SHIFTS
ARE LABORING
ON RAILROADS
EFFORTS BEING EMPLOYED TO
LIFT BLOCKADE
NO TRAINS TO EAST ARE SENT
FROM LOCAL DEPOTS
Possibility That Santa Fe Will Today
Dispatch Long Scheduled Over.
Land—More Damage
Reported
■ After having been isolated from all
'eastern railroad communication for al
most forty-eight hours. Los Angeles
again la in touch with the outer world.
s,. trains have reached the city since
feftTly Saturday, but the Southern Pa
cfflo company yesterday dispatched
trains Nos. 8 and 10 for the east via
V,l Paso. Both the Salt Lake and
Southern Pacific companies expect
trains from the cast, long overdue, to
reach Los Angeles either .this morning
or this afternoon, while the Santa Fe
holds out little hope of any of the
overlands arriving before Wednesday.
Bad as the washouts already were
in many places, yesterday morning's
downpour greatly increased the damage
done. The Southern Pacific's coast line
between Los Angeles and San Fran
kisco is the only route over which the
trains have run in anything which ap
proaches scheduled time. The majority
of the stations bear a deserted aspect,
for across the large blackboards which
schedule the time for trains leaving
and arriving are written the three
words "All trains annulled."
Wrecking engines and constructing
tangs were kept at work all day and
Ell night in an almost superhuman ef
fort to turn aside the great floods
Which undermined the roadbed and car
tied away bridges. Along every one
it the valley lines hundreds of men are
now working, and so successful have
been their efforts in many places that
pi! three roads probably will he run
ning local trains by this afternoon.
Work Night and Day
lien am toiling night and day at the
San Gabriel river, which in its mad
rush to the ocean lias carried away
bridges and tracks. At this point the
most serious washouts along every line
have occurred, and should the bridges
be repaired this morning traffic will be
resumed soon after.
Much concern has been expressed as
to the condition of the road east of
Aft on. where the Salt Ijikn route
■ 'sses the Mojave river. All wires are
down at Afton, and it is believed by
tlie railroad officials that some of the
most serious trouble yet encountered
"ill be met with the other side of the
Mojave. Salt Lake trains now are
stalled at Victorville, Barstow and Otis.
It js believed that none of these will
r< aeh Los Angeles before Wednesday
<t possibly Thursday.
Conditions are especially bad along
the Santa Fe lines, and in many places
tipw bridges must be built and new
roadbeds constructed. Both main lines
from San Bernardino are out of com
mission, and according to a. statement
made late last night there still Is se
rious trouble along nearly every
branch of the road. Several new
Washouts have been reported on the
line between San Bernardino and Bar-
How, none of which has yet been re
paired. Between Lob Angeles and San
Bernardino new track will have to be
laid in many places, as the officials
will take no chances with temporary
repairs. Early yesterday morning the
concrete bridge near Olive station set
tled, effectually placing that piece of
roadbed between San Bernardino and
Riverside out of commission for sev
eral days at the least.
Two more Santa Fe bridges were
rendered unsafe near Anaheim yes
lay morning, so that the San
t>lego line, the trains of which wen
lously four hours behind time, is
plow altogether unfit for travel Many
<>r tll • • Santa Fc overlandH hearing
thousands of tourists, are delayed
either in California or Just across the
border. The second section of the
Limited, due December 31. is now held
■ ijon station, while trains Nos. V
and 1. both due in Los Angeles Sat
urday, are stalled at Barstow. X".
* was last heard from al Xeedles, but
probably wiil not reach Los Angeles
before Wednesday afternoon, while
trains Nob. 7 and I. du^ yesterday",
have just passed Ash Fork.
Three Trains in One
The first overland train to Lo \il
giles sinel the rains started "ill be
train No. 81, which the Santa Fe will
li this morning. The train will
comprise two which were scheduled to
hHve left Saturday and on< Which
Khould have pulled out of the station
yesterday.
In contrast to the stations, where
Ih'' ticket sellers arc trying to keep
awake by reading novels, the tele
graph and business offices of the big
roads am bustle ami confusion. Tele
grams are being constantly senl and
rc< eivi'd :ll iil everything poßHlbli
toeing dune to relieve the badly con
gested traffic. Even those who stand
■ head of the :■ n_;< l railroad world
were hard at work yesterday in an
attempt to solve the knotty problems
which confront them.
Han Francisco also is more or less
■ I by the washouts and land
svhich have everywhere* oc
curred. A report received last right
Mated that the big bridge near Bar
stow was in trouble. This will cut off
S»n Francisco traffic along this route
'I days.
MAKES PERILOUS TRIP
THROUGH MAD FLOW OF
RUSHING STORM WATER
iim cf tli<' most perilous trips ac
ootnplished through the storm-driven
regions of Southern California ni
I hat of. .1. (Jarrlner Scott, who reached
Lns Angeles at 6 o'clock last night on
his journey from <'attle canyon.
Mr. Scott is interested in a mine at
Cattle canyon, and as his presence
was needed in the city, ha decided to
risk crossing the Han' Gabriel river.
This ho was unable to accomplish, and
making a wide detour he finally
leached the Stansfield trail, which led
him into ' li.ndor.'i. On the way over
from Cattle canyon Mr. Scott was
forced to ascend and descend a peak
3575 feet in height, and in crossing the
little ravines and gullies was often
in. water up to his waist.
According to Mr. Scott, the storm
water broke in the 'back reaches of
the San Bernardino country on
Wednesday. Thursday the clouds let
drop their moisture In Increased vol
ume, and Friday the storm was of a
whooping variety. Saturday torrents
of rain and sleet fell, and during the
night tho •itriinf? all over the range
were covered with Know to a consid
erable depth. The Big Dalton canyon
lust east of Glendora is a raging tor-
Man and Wife Arrested on
Suspicion After Murder
I
Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Stone
rent, and although but little damage
has been done In that vicinity Mr.
Scott states that one or two small
bridges are in imminent danger.
ROSES AND SNOWFLAKES
MINGLE IN GARDENS OF
LA CANADA RESIDENTS
Picking roses while the snowflakes
fell all around them and covered tho
ground to more than ati inch was the
novel recreation afforded the residents
of La Canada, La Crescenta and tho
upper end of the Verrlugo canyon
yesterday. While snow in the moun
tains less than half a mile away is
no rare, sight for those who live In
that vicinity, it was the first time In
many years that a fall of any ap
preciable amount was recorded on tho
mesa.
At La Canada many natives who had
never before partaken In the. sport of
building a snow mar. reveled to their
hearts' content. A figure six feet hish
was constructed by the youngsters.
and all afternoon they stood about
tossing soggy "balls" at the imaginary
person.
The average depth of snow upon the
mesa and lower reaches of the valleys
was slightly over an inch, but higher
up toward the mountains the fall was
twice as heavy. All the peaks back
of the Crescenta-Canada are mantled
In their unusual winter garb, ami the
canyons are overflowing their narrow
banks with storm water.
RAIN IN KERN COUNTY
BRINGS JOY INSTEAD
OF GRIEF TO FARMERS
HAKF.RSFIKLIX Jan. 3.— Rain worth
many times its weight in gold began
falling again last night and continued
uninterruptedly well into today. At
noon .83 of an Inch had fallen and
brought the total for the season up to
5.34 inches.
The storm throughout the county was
g-eneral. The wheat and fruit lands of
Delano, the great farming country to
the south, and the ranges in the moun
tains were all soaked, the rain coming
slowly and every drop going into the
ground.
Bounteous crops are assured to the
farmers and the ranges will soon have
an abundance of feed. It is goingl to
be the greatest year Kern county agri
culturists and stock raisers have
known since ISS3.
RIVERS AND STREAMS IN
CENTRAL ARIZONA FILLED
PHOENIX, Ariz., Jan. 2.—lt has
been raining in central Arizona Inter
mittently since Friday night. This
caused snow which has accumulated
in the mountains to melt, and the
streams are swelling rapidly. The nor
mal flow of Salt river is restrained by
the Roosevelt dam, but tributaries on
this side have contributed sufficient
volume to raise the river four feet,
which may be doubled In the next
few hours. The rain continues to fall
tonight in Phoenix.
WASHOUTS COMPEL SALT LAKE
TO SEND TRAINS OVER S. P.
SALT LAKE, Jan. 2.—The Lo \n
geles limited went west today over the
Southern Pacific:' and v ill be so routed
until tomorrow, as washouts on the
Salt. Lake road are being repaired. The
Sail Lake is selling tickets only to
Aroma, New, the eastern end of the
damaged track.
General Manager Wells Is at the
scene of the washout.
It is reported here that 1000 feet of
track and two bridges have been car
ried away, and that It may take a
week to restore the ro;id.
RECORDS COLDEST WEATHER
OF WINTER AT WASHINGTON
WALLA WALLA, Wash, Jan. ».—
The coldest weather of the winter is
being experienced throughout south
west Washington, and tonight it was
18 above zero in Walla Walla, with
prospects of zero before morning.
Three Inches of snow fell last night
and this morning. Stock is reported
to be suffering greatly.
Lumber Schooner Aground
SAN DIEQO, Jan. 2.--Thf> lumber
schooner Alice McDonald, which went
ashore, near the entrance of the harbor
Friday night, is still aground. The
crew was taken off today. Th<
is thought to tie in no danger, and It
is believed that when her lumber cargo
Is removed sho may be floated into
deep water.
Northern California Snow Covered
HEDDINO, Cul., Jan. 2.—Northern
California, as far south as Vina, is cov
ered with a blanket of fresh, dry snow
which fell last night. The average
depth is about two inches.
Half Inch of Rain Falls
HAN DIEGO. Jan 2.—Nearly half an
Inch of rain fell today, making 1.62 I".n
the storm and 7.2i> Inches for tbi
son.
T.OS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING, JANUARY 3. 1910.
MORSE BITTERLY
SCORES COURTS
ICE MAGNATE LEAVES FOR
ATLANTA PRISON
CONVICTED MAN PREPARES A
DRAMATIC STATEMENT
Declares He Was Found Guilty by
a Jury Which Drank and Which
Was Guarded by Private
Detectives
[ Associate!! Tress]
NEW YORK, Jan. With a su
preme effort to be cheerful, hut with
emotion occasionally getting the better
of him, Charles W. Morse left New
York today to begin a fifteen-years'
sentence In the federal prison at At
lanta, Ga., for violation of the national
banking laws.
Before leaving the Tombs, where he
had been confined for the greater part
of the last year, Morse received his
wife and two sons, and then the news
paper men. He was too affected to
say anything:, but ho handed out a
carefully prepared statement.
The general understanding was his
wife was to accompany him south, but
ii could not bo ascertained whether
■he was on the same train with him.
.Morse left Jersey City on the Bir
mingham flyer of the Southern railway
at 10:45 p. m., in custody of Deputy
United States marshals. The party oc
cupied a stateroom.
.Morse's statement is bitter and ilra
matlc.
"I am going to Atlanta to begin
penal servitude under the most brutal
i nee ever pronounced against a cit
izen in a. civilized country," in his
■ inning sentence.
Thought He Would Get New Trial
"I have hoped," the .statement con
tiruies, "with that hope which cornea
from a consciousness of my innocence,
that I will not have to close out forever
the light and liberty of this world
under such an Inhuman sentence. 1
have felt the fact I had paid a fine
of ?7,000,000 and served a year in prison
would satisfy the cry for a victim, and
I have steadily believed the courts
would be compelled to give me a new
trial.
"When I learned the private detec
tives of the prosecution were the keep
ers of the jury, that the jury drank
like men on a Jaunt or a holiday,
rather than citizens engaged in a se
rious service, and that as a result two
of them were rendered unfit. I natur
ally hoped I would be allowed another
trial by another Jury free of these
hostile influences.
"It seems, however, that thn courts'
intend to establish the practices which
make rum drinking a part of a Jury
■ervloe, and private detectives as the
custodians of a Jury a permanent in
stitution. By this sentence and judg
ment I may be brought to ruin; t.ut
the damage dona to me is not h;i!f
as important as thn injury to th" ad
ministration of Justice.
Record Will Remain
"I am now up in years, and niuft,
with the passing of time, pass also;
but the record of my conviction and
the way it was brought about will rc
jnain a lasting and dangerous example
of a government pone mad in search
of a victim.
"Whether T shall serve my full sen
tence I am Opt able to say, much de
pending on how the government at
Washington shall look on it. I have
Kreat faith that all right thinking men
and women who know of me and my
case and who realize the Inhumanity
of my sentence will nuikc known their
feelings to the president. Whatever
the future may hold in store—lll" it '
or imprisonment—l shall endeavor ;..
meet in the same, way I have strug
gled against tho misfortunes of tin
past two ywirs. "C, W. MORSE."
A few minutes before the train left
Harry and Benjamin Morse appeared
for another farewell to their father.
He embraced them and wept as they
left him.
Morse braced himself for 11k ivs ■
paper photographer* silently. The
tniin Is due in Atlanta at noon to
morrow.
Refuses to See Anyone
WASHINGTON, Jan, 2.—Charles w.
Morse New York convicted hanker,
on his way tr> Atlanta to begin a peni
tentiary sentence, was in Washing
ton fifteen minutes today, but he in
fused to sen anyone. No personal
friends of tho convicted banker were
at the station, but a large delegation
of nuwiipaper men met the train.
Tliojw who found the state room win
denied admittance.
Don't •Imply allow It to dla—that plan of
yours. Find a llttla capital through advartli
■ft
SLASHED BY KNIfE;
DIES IN A DITCH
BRUTAL MURDER COMMITTED
AT SAN GABRIEL
NAKED BODY OF DEAD CONDUC.
TOR FOUND BY ROADSIDE
G. A. Stone and Wife, with Whom
Dead Man Lived, Are Taken
to County Jail Cells on
Suspicion
(Oontlnnml from Far* One)
moved to San Gabriel In order that
they could live together as before.
The first Intimation of the murder
mis assault on Sliiveley . auic from
Stone. He hurried to the home of
Donaldson at' 4:4s o'clock yesterday
morning and after awaking him stated
that Shlveley had been attacked and
had fled from th« house. Donaldson
dressed hurriedly and ran to the home
of Stone. They looked into the Mood
spattered kitchen and then went to the
homo nf William Justice, who lives
about a block from the Stone home.
\fter rousing Justice and notifying
him what had happened they tele
phoned from his home and notified City
Marshal Ben Parker of Alhambra.
Rain Blots Out Trail
The officer arrived shortly after 6
o'clock and began Investigations. He
saw where Sliiveley had jumped
through the window. Parker was un
able, to find a trail because of the
heavy rain having obliterated all traces
of Mood and had effaced ilie footprints.
By that time quite a crowd hat! col
i. the news of the murderous at
tack on the conductor having been cir
culated throughout the usually quiet
town. Parker then divided the crowd
into searching parties and sent them in
different directions to search for the
missing and badly wounded man.
At 7 o'clock Frank Fowler, a claim
agent for the Pacific Electric company.
and Angel Navrey. a section hand,
found the body of Shlveley lying face
downward in a ditch at the side of thr
road. The rain had beaten down on
the naked body, and it was spattered
with mixed blood and mud. The dis
covery was- reported to City Marshal
Parker, who in turn notified the other
searchers.
Stone Becomes Hysterical
The body then was examined in the
presence of Stone, who accompanied
Parker to the scene. Stone became
hysterical at the sight of the dead
man and apparently was Incapable of
speaking intelligibly.
Parker found tlve cuts in the left
arm and shoulder of the unfortunate
man, and discovered that the victim
had grasped the keen blade wielded by
the assailant with the result that the
fingers of the left hand were almost
severed. The wound which evidently
caused death was a cut just inside the
bend of the elbow. This was a Klash
wound and severe.', a large hlood ves
sel. The other cuts were one on the
left breast near the upper arm and
shoulder and the others were on the
outside of the left arm. From the ap
pearance of the ruts they were inflicted
with a keen blade, probably that of a
heavy razor.
The body was removed t" the morgue
of the Alhambra Furniture and Under
taking company. The coroner was no
tified and ordered an autopsy per
formed Sheriff Hammel and several
deputies hurried to the scene as goon
as they received Information, which
was immediately on their return from
(.age where they assisted tho Herald
in rescuing four marooned persons from
;i dangerous position in the San Gabriel
flood.
Blood Marks on Bed
sheriff Haminei, City Marshal Parker
and several deputy sheriffs went to the
Stone home and began making thorough
Investigations. They found blood on
almost everything hi the kit. hen and
on the sheet of tlie bed occupied by the
Stones. In the bath room, opposite the
kitchen, the officers found the bowl of
the toilet tilled with bloody water and
also found the imprint of both a. man's
and a woman's foot on the bloody floor
of the kitchen.
,\ further Investigation by the of
flcers revealed the fact that the small
crip carried by Bhiveley had been
thrown through a window, as was B
bundle of ear tickets and other articles
belonging to the dead man.
on the floor of the room in which thp
Struggle occurred the officers found a
shaving brush and a Shaving mug on
the floor near the broken sink. The
razor could not be found.
On a shelf in the room was found $11
tied up in a package ready to lie turned
In to the company. It evidently had
been placed there by the unfortunate
man just before be retired. On tho
same shelf were found a hand bag, a
pair of gloves and several other articles
belonging to Mrs. Stone. The hand bag
.11 top of the package of money. At
the edge of the same shelf was a bloody
finger print. The officers also found
bloody finger marks on several dishes
and other articles, in an adjoining
room Marshal Parker found a woman's
slipper. He examined It and found
several pices of broken glass in it.
Mrs. Stone Arrested
The Stones were questioned apart,
and afterward Mrs. Stone was arrestfwi
and brought to l,os Angeles by Deputy
Sheriff. Martin Aguirre and locked up
In the woman's department of the
county Jail. Mrs. ritone denied any
knowledge (if the affair and, according
to the officers who conducted the Inter
rogation, Bhfl replied In a cold-blooded
manner and made no replies that threw
any light on the inurer.
Stone was taken to the morgue where
an autopsy was being performed. He
was shown the body which was lying
on the slab rut open. Ho pivf one
AMUSEMENTS, __...,._
THE AUDITORIUM " BEAUTIFUL." U * Manager.
~~ ~~J-riday and Saturday, Jan. 7-8. ....
* Performance*, Commencijig Friday Afternoon at 2:15.
VVM. MORniS, INC, announces the only appearance In this city of the Worlds fa
mous Bcotch Comedian, m
HARRY LAUDER
with a Company or Celebrated Auoelftta Entertainers and JI'IJAN r.I-TIN<.E. ana
the special I.auder Orchestra. Seat Sale today at 0 a. m. Lower *loor, $1.50 and
11.00. First Balcony, f 1.00 and 75c. Second Balcony. 60c. Gallery, 25c.
SIMPSON AUDITORIUM Soodmus"™ • '" **™?™*'
TOMORROW, TUESDAY KIGHT, JAN. 4, 8:15 O'CIX)CK.
A Fitting Musical Offering for the New Year Only one more chance to hear the
beat of all, } •
FRITZ KREISLER
Feats now on sale at Bartlett'i—Student rates'.
Prices7BC. $1.00. tI.SO, $2.00 and $2.80
T OS ANGELES THEATER %gS%g« IHn £^ TJJ^
B}SB-o"Z. &Ca- I Crimmins^Gore |SSar|. v6i4n(ifc
Popular Prices—lo, 20 and 30 Cents.
Or \riimTr* fpUT?ATT3IO Opposite Burbank Theater.
LYMPIC THhjALtUSI Phone*— Main 111.
• Alpliin-Fargo .Miulral Comedy Co. Present
"AUK YOU A.TOCRIST?".j ■.*
' Another Alphln Hit. Admission 100, !0o end Ssc.
Next week The return of lilort-oin Lesley in "The Belle of Boston."
glance at the form of Shlveley, placed
his hands to his face and screamed
hysterically. He vva.s led away and
questioned closely by tho sheriff. Stone
denied any knowledge of the affair
and declared he was Innocent, of hav
ing harmed the unfortunate conduc
tor. He was taken back to the house
and entered It with Sheriff Tlainim-1.
The house was examined room by
room and Stone was asked to point
out just where ho was when ho dis
covered thcro was something wiong.
Admits Firing Shot
Tho officers found a bullet hole
on the wall of the screened porch
adjoining the kitchen. Stone admitted
having fired this shot and declared
lie did so because ho was frightened
and did not know what rise to do.
According to his story to tho officers
he was awakened about 3:50 or 4
o'clock by Shivcley crying for help.
Stone told them he stopped to load his
revolver then hurried down the stairs
• and fired the revolver; then ran back
upstairs, grot a lamp and saw the dis
arranged and bloody appearance of
the kitchen. He saw that Shiveley was
gone, dressed hurriedly and ran to the
homo of Donaldson.
"I met Shivelcy back In Lincoln.
Neb., more than seven years ago," said
Stone, who is about 28 years old, of
medium size and dark complexion.
■■We came to the coast several years
ago and I was married in Seattle rtbout
a year and a half ago. Shlveley went
with my wife and myself to San Fran
cisco, where we remained ii short time
and then came to Los A-ngeles. We
were firm friends and never hail any
differences. I do not know who at
tacked him. The first time 1 knew any
thing was wrong was when I heard
him cry out twice: 'Help! Help! 1 I did
not hear any other noise and, despite
the fact that the windows are shat
tered and the dishes and other articles
were broken I did not hear the noise.
I .lumped out of bed, obtained my re
volver and loaded It. I then ran down
stairs and Bred the gun. I don
know why I fired it. I did not see any
one and I don't know where the bul
let struck, although I learned after
ward it struck the floor on the screened
porch and glanced and buried itself in
the wall."
Stone's Toe Cut
After the sheriff had made a second
examination of the house he made
Stone undress and take off his shoes.
It was then discovered that the left
great toe of Stone was cut on the top
and almost severed. The wound was
bandaged and Stone was questioned
about it. He said he had no idea how
he received the cut and said he did not
know his toe was cut until he removed
Hie shoe.
Marshal Parker, who was the first
officer to question the Stones and who
was first on the seen" to make exam
inations, stilted he found several dis
crepancies in the statement of Mrs.
Stone.
"■\Vhen T entered the house," said
Marshal Parker. "I began a search for
the underclothes nf the dead man. T
asked Mrs. Stone where they were and
she replied that Shiveley never slept
with anything on. 1 asked her how
she knew this and she answered that
she simply knew it to be a fact. I
then turned my attention to the wood
stove In the kitchen and asked her if
there had been a fire in It recently.
She said there had not been a. fire in
the stove since Saturday night. 1 then
examined the stove and found it quite
hot. There was a quantity of ashes in
it. and something else which lends me
to believe that the underclothes of the
murdered man were burned up."
Stone's Knife Missing
Parker said that Stone was known to
have a pearl-handled knife, hut this
could not be found by the officers -who
searched the place and who examined
the pockets of Stone. The razor which
usually was kept with the shaving
mug and brush that were found on the
floor of the kitchen where the terrific
struggle took place, could not be found.
Although the officers have not found
the weapon with which Shlveley was
Plashed, It is believed the instrument
used was a razor.
According to Motorman Donaldson,
who was a close'friend of the dead
man, the Stones boarded i* San Gabriel
car nt Los Angeles at 6:30 o'clock and
went home. About two hours later
Shivelev went to his room and ate sup
per with the Stones. yrorn the appear
ance of the table in the kitchen, there
was one dirty plate, a knife and a fork
on it and evidence that Shiveley had
eaten a light lunch shortly before re
tiring. **
Police Have Theory
The theory has been advanced that
Mrs Stone heard Shivelev come in,
went downstairs into the kitchen and
prepared a lunch for the street car
man Their conversation may have
awakened the husband and he became
jealous, wailed until Shivelev had re
tired and wa.i asleep, then hurried
downstairs in the Jarkness and at
tacked him. .
According to the officers. Bhiveley
formerly slept on the second floor and
occupied :i room adjoining that in
which the Slones slept. Recently,
however, he had been sleeping dow.n
stairs on a cot in the kitchen.
The house is an isolated one, the
nearest house being unoccupied and the
closest neighbor being more than a
block away. The persons living in the
houses In the neighborhood were ques
tioned but none admits having heard
and unusual sounds early yesterday
morning.
The sheriff ordered the house locked
nnd guarded, and instructed Marshal
Parker to take charge of all the bed
clothing and other articles In the
kitchen which will he examined under
a microscope for finger prints.
The sheriff scouts the theory of rob
bery and declares the attack on Shive
ley which resulted fatally was not
made for the pu.pose, of obtaining
money.
Isle of Wight Visited by Quake
LONDON, Jan. 3.— Prolonged earth
■■ ihocka extending <iver two liours wore
recorded on thn Isle of Wißht and at
! the observatory at Lalbaob on Satur
day They were i-stimatod to be about
MOO miles distant. The Wost Indian
Cablo company roports all wrll in the
i^ianrls.
AMUSEMENTS
Bnr AepA TWTTATTTI? Bclasco-Blackwood Co.. Props. A M&.-«.
_._ I_irr'__ Matinees Thursday, Saturday and Sunday.

. EVERYBODY is TRYING to see this great SUCCESS
Last week thousands of theatergoers were tamed away from the Bclaaco theater, un
able to get seats for the season's greatest success.—lt means something when a theater
Is not large enough to accommodate the crowd! that want to buy tickets —It means
even more when it Is necessary to tako out the orchestra to make more room, as was
done at tho Belasco last week after the third performance of LEWIS S. STONE and
the Belasoo company in OERTrtUDE NBLBON ANDREWS' big play of the San Fran
cisco earthquake,
THROUGH I
A WINDOW 1
This is a truly great play, and It Is acted in faultless style by THE BEST STOCK
COMPANY IN AMERICA. There Is nothing wishy-washy about "THROUOH A WIN
DOW"Ifs full of red blood and strikes right straight from the shoulder with telling
force—lt's easily the biggest sensational success the American stage has known this
year. Although It will cost you two dollars a seat to Ma "THROUGH A WINDOW" when
it is produced at the Liberty theater. New York. In March, you can see this great
success at the Belasco hero for tho regular prices 25c to 75c at night and 26c to
50c at the matinees.
I Second Week of This Big Success Starts Tonight - |
This means that again, this week, the Belasco theater is going to be
too small to accommodate the crowds that will want to
see the most stupendous success of the season.
Tour only chance to see "THROUGH A WINDOW" this week is to get
your seats at oncethere are still some good seats for this week's per
formances, but they're being sold as fast as the expert Belasco ticket
. sellers can rake In the money for them—Join the long line of ticket buyers
the very first thing this morning and be sure that you see WHAT 18 POS
ITIVELY THE BIGGEST THEATRICAL SUCCESS THlti CITY HAS .
KNOWN SINCE "THE DOLLAR MARK."
NEXT WEEK: N. C. GOODWIN'S notable cemody success, THE OEMCS. Seats on
sale' this morning.
GD~AMn /"IDT7T? A T-TfITTCTT MATINEES Tomorrow, Saturday, Sunday.
KAJMJJ UJJiKA MULJat. Phones—Main 1967; Home A 1567.
j~ The Greatest Triumph of the Hartman Company j
And positively the daintiest, most tuneful, snappiest, funniest and most picturesque
musical production ever presented on any stage In this or any other city at any price
was given yesterday at the Grand Opera House to two enthusiastically delighted au
diences by
FERRIS HARTMAN
and his big singing and dancing company In a gorgeous production of James T. Pow
ers' famously successful musical comedy,
SAN TOY
San Toy Is by all odds a great, big, genuine, happy New Tear music and fun show,
and Is surely going to pack the Grand Opera House at every performance this week.
If you want to see what Is unquestionably the most superlative production ever given
at popular prices, get In line this morning bright and early and get your seats or
yon are surely going to be disappointed.
SPECIAL BARGAIN MATINEE TOMORROW—in and 35 cents
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER £™« dM C.°,:
2D WEEK AND STILL JAMMED TO THE ROOF
Here's the Record. Can You Beat It?
■°S TURNED AWAY L?JZ£
THE GIRL OF THE
GOLDEN WEST
if vnn WANT SEATS, SECURE THEM TODAY. I OR WK WILL BE SOLD OUT AT
IvKRY PFRrORMVNCE THAT'S NOT BUNCOMBE NOR GUESS WORK. IT'S
m!tlt\TE\iTst OF FACT. EVERT NEWSPAPER IN LOS ANGELES PRAISEII
iiiw CR»'\T PRODUCTION OF A GREAT PLAY. WE ARE PROUD OF IT AMI
WE ARE NOT AFTIAID TO SAY IT Is THE BEST. WE'LL SAY JUST ONE THING
more. No stock performance ever given in the United
States equals the Burbank's performance of
"The Girl of the Golden West"
a vigorous end picturesque revival. The company Is exceedingly well cast.
£ Sill ot a run Miss Nordstrom Mis, Nordstrom rose to really splendid
Deserving of a run. « heights of dramatic ability.
18 a splendid Qlrl. _ Th(j Times _ Tho Examiner.
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER OLIVER MOROSCO,
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC PHONKS —Main 7005; FIIJ3.
- "" _ «,, „" PHONU9 —Main 700,".; FllJ-1.
MATINEE WEDNESDAY-MATINEE SATURDAY
AJ,L, bmh » COHAN & HARRIS PRESENT
GEO. M. COHAN'S
45 Minutes from
sopeopicgj*oa.ciw3.y^s^
THE GREATEST OF ALL MUSICAL TRIUMPHS
TRICES—2SC, 60c. 75c and »1. BARGAIN MATINEE WEDNESDAY. .
JOHN COBT presents a mammoth and new re IT SALE
WEEK production of the, OPENS
STARTING GREATEST OF ALL COMEDY OPERAS, THURSDAY T
sunday King Dodo rai £»l"
JAN- 9 WiHiam withKleanor Kent, B0 others. «■»•• Po/ Ula. r ma"'
J AIN< J; William Friend, Zo.i Harnett ai.,l BO others. ""> Wednesday.
_____________________—-_——-—_-—---————--«---_——
< ■ ■
ft\?X_!Q-~«\**•rWdt'C^VC\r\\ \# ff\" * Matinee Erery D« 7 .
—^ • r * Beginning Matinee Today
-.'•-vi,.« 1-artlcular At- I T T—L m-. J\ f^-w r\ 1 1 J-% I F''''sent'ne "'""""> '*>• I
tentlon to Entertaining \i JJ 1 iCIC V 1116 a best European and
t ."i°. and Children. | V C 4. l»l.V*V^ V ***V | American attractions. |
Fva Tavlor & Co. Wm- H- Thompson
in !°!, M smith-Care*." j 1 *Co in-'Pride of Regiment."
S^^ 1"!! Today "*ssftAjs_- r
Four Floods ___-_———— The wo Bobs
p2£-2°SU^-« motion pictures. *r 7; Fr\
Nights— t»r l 25c, 800, 75c. M.itliyeei. nally— 25e. .10e.
■■ ' '
MASON OPERA HOUSE ■ _«Me?Jd m£SSE
■ Three Nights Commencing; Tonight,
Edwin A. P.clkln Presents the. Celebrated Yiddish Players,
MISS ROSA KARP and MR. DAVID LEVENSON
«,,nnorted by nn excellent anil notm.le cast of popular Yiddish players In repertoire
Tonight "TUB HOI.DEN WBDDINO." Coming direct, from New York City, where
they have enjoyed long and uninterrupted rum. S«t. now on >..«..
Pdces" 250 to »1.00. B«t» now on sale.
WM. A. BRADY PRESENTS
s!^ Wright Lorimer v V
and over 100 people In ' "
Thunday, Shepherd King
Jan. 6th ■ __!_ prices so,- to $i.»o. " • * •■ • •
WALKER THEATER , TH The Le-Moyne Players. V^
"THE BELLE OF RICHMOND'
POPULAR PRICKS— lOr, It*, 300. MATINEES SATURDAY AND SUNDAY. Bo« o«ic»
phone* F66J4i Main 4400. . . _ , . .•

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