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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, January 05, 1910, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-01-05/ed-1/seq-2/

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Boston DryGooos Srnk
So Broadway 235-237-239 So. Hill St 234-244
If you are planning your spring gowns you will want
to see the new models in corsets.
The spring models in "Gossards," "Bon Tons" and
Royal Worcesters are ready.
(Main Floor, Rear)
New $25 to $50 $17.50
Street Suits . . . =* • —
On Sale Thursday
One of our Broadway windows shows a
i few of the many distinctively new styles
in women's tailored suits to be sold to
morrow at $17.50 —a hundred of which
we secured from a maker who over-esti
mated his outlet and had to unload at a loss.
Practically the entire range of fashion
able cloths and colorings and all splendid
ly tailored —the poorest of which are well
worth $25; many would be excellent
values at $50.
HUNDREDS MOURN
DEATH OF BANKER
MRS. WHITELAW REID SITS
ALONE WITH BODY
Rector at San Mateo Says Funeral
Arrangements Have Not Been
Made —Son Hurries Home
Through Nevada
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 4.—ln a
darkened room of the -winter home at
Mlllbrae, on the parklike grounds on
which he lavished great care and
thought in his declining years, the
■body of Darius Ogden Mills, banker,
philanthropist and a man of great af
fairs for more than sixty years, rest
ed today, with only his daughter, Mrs.
>Vhitelaw Reid, mourning beside it.
Out on the plains of Nevada Ogden
Mills, the son, is hastening westward
as fast as the railroad which his fa
ther helped to build can carry him,
Ills eastward Journey having been
stayed by a telegram which reached
him today over the company's wires
announcing the sudden death of the
financier.
- At the Mlllbrae house there was
little definite thought of the fu
ture today. Mrs. Reid remained se
cluded with her grief, giving attention
only to the hundreds of messages of
.sympathy which poured in from all
parts of the United States and from
cities across the Atlantic ocean.
Rev. Dr. N. D. W. Gallwey, rector
of St. Matthew's Episcopal church of
Han Mateo, where the financier wor
shiped during his sojourns at Mill
brae, represented the family to all
callers today. He said no plans for
the funeral had been made as yet, nor
■would be made until Ogden Mills ar
rived.
A simple service will be held at the
house before the body is shipped to
New York, where it probably will be
Interred. Dr. Gallwey will conduct
this service.
Through Dr. Gallwey Mrs. Reid an
nounced today that the names signed
to the messages of sympathy would
not be made public until after the ar
rival of her brother.
SERVE SENTENCES FOR
CONTEMPT OF COURT
Three Men Were Sent to Prison for
Failing to Prevent Lynching
cf Negro
WASHINGTON, Jan. 4. — Having
f rved the terms of sentence imposed
on them by the supreme court of the
1 ii Led States, Jeremiah Gib.son, Henry
J'adgett and William Mainse of Chat
tanooga, Term., wore released from the
United States jail this morning.
For contempt of court in failing to
prevent the lynching at Chattanooga of
y.<i Johnston, a negro, under sentence
t>r' dcutli, the United States supreme
i on November 15 sentenced
men to sixty days in prison. This time
ivas shortened by ten days for good be
faavior.
Former Sheriff Shipp, Luther 'Wil
liams and Nick Nolan, who are still In
lirison, will be released January 21.
TICKET AGENTS SWINDLE
MEXICAN GOVERNMENT
System Consisted In Reporting Sale
for Shorter Distance Than Really
Purchased For
T'.L PASO, Jan. 4.—The Mexican rov
(Tiiment has been swindled out of many
thousands of dollars by ticket agents
irko liad liepn carryinn' on a system of
orting tickets a;! sold t'nr a ahortar
ilistanco than they really were pur
i hase.l for, Tne agenta ut Queretaro,
lerla, San Luis Potoil and othor
,i arrested.
Jt is said the scheme was devised by
a discharged conductor, who sold the
Idea to the Mexican agents, but the fact
was overlooked that the conductors'
not check Up with the
agents' reports, and in thl.s way the
wad detected.
BANK TO BE MADE NATIONAL
KAN FKANCISCO, Jan. 4.—The Bank
ol California, one of tho oldest finan
cial Institutions in this city, will be
' onio a national bank in the near fu
accordiiif? to a resolution adopted
today ai a special meeting of stock
hoiden . The dlr i toi bat ■ madi
plication to the controller of the cur
rency alrearly and tho voto of the
meeting ratified this action.
Eat at tho Angelus sfill-
DEATH IS SENTENCE
FOR NEGRO FIENDS
FOUND GUILTY OF ASSAULT ON
WHITE WOMAN
Jury Out Five and a Half Minutes.
Threats of Lynching Made, but
Prisoners Are Closely
Guarded
KANSAS CITY, Jan. 4.—George Rey
nolds and John Williams, negroes, to
night were found guilty of assaulting
Mrs. AY. F. Jackson, and their sen
tences were fixed at death by hanging.
The verdict was returned on the first
ballot. The jury was out five and one-
I half minutes.
Two days were occupied in obtaining
a Jury, hearing the evidence and re
turning a verdict.
Both probably will be hanged tha
first week in February. Their attor
neys intimated tonight that they would |
not file application for an appeal, which
must be /June in four days, or the sen
tence will be carried out.
Every precaution has been taken tv!
protect the prisoners from violence.
The assault was of such a nature that
intense feeling was aroused. Threats
of lynching frequently were heard,
The public was not admitted to the
trial. Mrs. Jackson swooned when tes
tifying.
Prisoners in the county jail raised
bedlam when the verdict became
known. They had previously threat
ened to lynch the negroes in the exer
cise room of the jail. When the threat
reached the officers they removed the|
negroes to another part of the prison.
COURT DECIDES IN FAVOR
OF SANTA FE RAILROAD
Holds Charge of Violcting Service Act
in Hours Demanded of Em.
ployes Unsustained
CHICAGO. Jan. 4.—The United Stnte?
circuit court of appeals today reversed
the Judgment of the district court in
the case of the Atchison, Toptka and
Santa Fe railroad against the United
States.
The railroad is charged with viola
tion of the hours <<t service act. The
Judgment of the lower court Is re
versed and the case remanded with
Instructions to grant a now trial.
The suit was started by District At
torney Pirns, who charged the railroad
was keeping telegraph operators on
duty for a longer period than nine
hours allowed by the hours of service
act. In the lower court a judgment
of $100 was entered against the rail
road.
Attorneys for the railroad showed
operators appeared to have be n on
duty from 6:30 a. m. to 6:30 p, in.,
but that they had been relieved from
noon until 3 p. m. The court held as
1!:e men had had only nine hours of
actual time on duty it was no viola
tion of the hours of service set.
FAKE HOLDUP TALE WAS
ONLY REAL ESTATE JOB
San Jose Farmer Admits That Story
Was Concocted to Get Out
of Bad Deal
. SACRAMENTO, Jan. 4.—Frank Faria,
the San Jose farmer who claimed lie
had been held up and robbed of $90uU
In greenbacks here Monday night, con
fessed this afternoon to Chief of Police
Sullivan that the tale wan a myth.
lie unfolded a sensational story of :i
holdup in the heart of tho city, declar
ing ho had drawn his money from a
•San Juse bank. Word was received
that no bank in San Jose had issued
such an amount of currency. Faria
had paid JIOUU on a ranch and con
cocted the robbery story, hoping that
he might induce the owner to refund
the money and call off the deal.
AFRICAN HUNTING LOSES CHARM
CHICAGO, Jan. 4.—Africa has lost
its old-time fascination as a hunting
ground for W. D. Boyce of Chicago,
who gays it It Just as exciting now
adays to go out in the back yard and
shoot a couple of chickens, for game
is ho plentiful on the dark continent
that all the hunter has to do in to
ensconce himself In a favorable posi
tion and pop away. Mr. Boyce has re
turned to the city after a trip of a
couple of months through Africa and
lias brought buck 899fl or '.r-ora photo
graphs of wild animals in action and
•"cpoae
LOS ANGELES HERALD: WEDNESDAY MORNING, JANUARY 5, 1910.
TO WAGE WAR
ON INSURGENTS
TAFT'S OPPONENTS CUT OFF
FROM PATRONAGE
CANNON CLASSES ALL ENEMIES
WITH DEMOCRATS
Republican Reformers Who Object to
Administration's Tactics May Be
"Starved Out" by Various
Departments
(Continued from VHff Oatl
tram Of the house was hinted at in dis
closures today, it vu currently re
ported that "rebellious" Republican
members of congress soon were to feel
the hand of the national party organ
ization against them in their home dis
tricts. The plan, according to the
statement of one Insurgent, was for the
nisatlon at Washington to stimu
late opposition to renominatlon of those
congressmen by diverse local activities,
Rival Republican aspirants for their
places were to be encouraged, and if
the opposition were unsuccessful at the
primaries the light was to be carried
t" the polls.
Already in Feld
it was pointed out that in Congress
man Cooper's district, in Wisconsin, a
rival Republican candidate was already
in tile tield, although the primaries
there do not occur until September.
Large sums o£ money arc available for
the purpose, It is claimed, and much
lias been expended, in the district
resented by Mr. Norris ol Nebraska
Republican opposition has de
veloped, as -Mr. Norris acknowledges",
On the other hand, inquiries among
other congressmen generally classed us
insurgents, failed to disclose any ap
nt active antagonism to them 00
tip' part of any "lie. connected with
the administration. Representatives
Murdock and Madison of Kansas had
not suffered from "suspended anima
tion" in their patronage recommenda
tions.
When Mr. Madison was informed the
flKht apparently had been started he
said:
"Good. 1 am glad of It, Nothing
nults me better than a good, square
tight."
Congressman Hayes of California,
who presided over the only meeting of
the house Insurgents held this year,
declared he "wan in the light to stay."
"If no one will call a meeting of the
Insurgents to mark out a plan <>f battle
I Will do it," he said, "And if there are
others who arc backward In this battle
I will go it alone. 1 am an insurgent
until it is over."
Cannon's Views
Speaker Cannon remarked that if he
were to express hi* own views on the
subject they would sound "chestnutty."
He denied knowledge of any specific
determination to crush the Insurgents.
But he turned to a copy of a speech
he delivered In Kansas City December
7, and quoted from it the following
paragraph:
"VVhen Lincoln found an army march
ing cm the national capitol from the
south ami a body of sympathisers In
the north tiKuuraging that army ho
said it was difficult to determine which
! was the most threatening to the wel
fare of the nation.
"History repeats itself, and when
Senators Cummins, LaFollette, Brlstow
and their so-railed 'progressive' fol
lowing join hands with .Mr. Bryan in
waging war on the Republican mem
bers or congress who passed the tariff
bill and on President Taft, who signed
it. In that contest I know of hut one
way to treat them, and that is fisht
tin-in just as we tight Mr. Bryan and
his followers."
TAfT SCORED JUST
AS CHILDREN LEAVE
ADAIR SEVERELY ARRAIGNS
PRESIDENT
Chief Executive's Son and Daughter
Go from House Gallery in Time
to Avoid Hearing Bitter
Criticisms
WASHINGTON, Jan. 4. Had the
Ident's daughter and .son, Mis?
Helen nnd Itobert Tait, remained in
the house gallery a few minutes
longer today they would have heard
their father roundly criticised by K"p
ntatlve Adair .>r Indiana for al
leged extravagance of the executive
U' iiartment.
Mr. Adair said the president's salary
should not have been increased to $75,
--000 a year, adding that a president
"with practically no expense, who
could not save from an income of $50,
--000 a year a sufficient sum to live In
ease the balance of his life In my judg
in. mi does not have sufficient business
capacity to direct this great nation."
Attacking the president's allowance
of 188,000 for vehicles, stables, etc.,
Mr. Adair argued that this was $30,000
too much. He also asserted that one
third of the $9000 for the care of the
White House green houses would fur
nish the president with all the flowers
. he can possibly uye.
Without depriving the president of
any of the comforts or luxuries that
properly belong to the White House,
Mr. Adalr said the appropriations of
the executive department, $329,420 last
year, could be reduced at least $75,000
1 a, year.
! Mr. Adair declared that appropria
tions for all purposes could be reduced
' at least $100,000,000 a year without im
-1 pairing any part of the government
service.
Characterizing the government dc
' tective service as the "dumping ground
■ for those who had rendered political
' service," Mr. Adair said that outside
' of benefits derived from the work of
'• the meat and pure food inspectors the
' $7,726,000 appropriated for that service
: last year had been wasted.
ACCIDENT PROVES FATAL
SAN RAFAEL., Cal., Jan. 4.—James
McCue, a well known resident of Corte
Madeira, died today from injuries fuk
talned several weeks ago when he waa
thrown from his buggy in a collision
with another vehicle. McCue was the
chief witness against William Brad
bury, the millionaire who recently
was sent to Han Quentin for perjury.
SUICIDE ATTEMPT FATAL
LEADVIL.LK,, Colo.. Jan. 4. Dell
Hedges of Kansas City, who last night
ehot and kci»« soar amat*f in s.
boarding houue here and then shot
himself, died today.
WOULD REFORM
RAILROAD LAWS
CONGRESSMAN MANN OFFERS
SUBSTITUTE BILL
PLAN VITALLY AFFECTS INTER.
— BTATE COMMERCE
Representative from Illinois Presents
Measure in Conflict with Taft's
Program—Draft Proposes
Complaint Bureau
[Associated Press]
WASHINGTON. Jan. 4.—A bill mak
ing sweeping changes in the Interstate
commerce laws for the regulation of
railroads was Introduced today in the
house of representatives by James R.
Mann of Illinois, chairman of the com
mittee on interstate and foreign com
merce.
The bill is not in accord with tin
one prepared by the committee acting
under the direction of President Taft,
and known as • the "administration
railroad bill," but was prepared by
Chairman .Mann during tho summer
vacation of congress.
The measure does not provide for a
special court to hear interstate com
merce case.", as has been reported
would be the form of legislation on
this subject that President Taft would
recommend. It proposes, however, to
create in the department of commerce
and labor a bureau to be called "The
bureau of transportation," where a
Shipper may file complaint against a
railroad.
If. after investigation, the commis
sioner Of the bureau finds there, is jus
tice in the complaint he must report
the facts to the attorney general of
the United States, and if the attorney
general is satisfied that cause of action
exists he Is required to file a petition
with the interstate commerce commis
sion and prosecute the case at the ex
pense of the government.
Shipper's Alternative
The shipper may, if he prefers, still
file his complaint directly with the
commission and prosecute at his own
expense, as the present law provides.
The bill makes it the duty, of com
mon carriers to establish just and
reasonable classifications and regula
tions and authorizes the interstate
commerce commission to prescribe
what they shall be.
The long and short haul clause of
the Interstate commerce act would be
amended so as to provide that charge
for a short haul Shall in no case bo
greater than the charge for a longer
haul, and the charge for • a through
rate shall be no greater than the ag
gregate of the local rites.
False or padded claims for damages
by a shipper arc prohibited, as are re
bates.
PRESIDENT TAFT TO
COMBINE MESSAGES
WILL SUBMIT TWO DOCUMENTS
AT ONCE
Vie,ws on Interstate Commerce and
Anti.Trust Laws' Amendments
Will Be Embodied in
Single Treatise
WASHINGTON, Jan. 4 Late today
nfter a conference with Senators Al
drlch and Hoot and Attorney General
Wlckersham, President Taft decided
to revert to his original plan of com-
tiininp his view:- as to amendment! to
the Interstate commerce and anti
trust laws in our message, wblcb he
will send t" congress Thursday noon.
ThU decision on tlie part of the
president If said to be final. The
combined message will be about 8000
words.
The, president had been urged by
sunn"' senators to treat the two sub
jects in separate papers and announce
ment whs made yesterday that thin
would be done. The time that the
messages should g>> to congress has
been subject to frequent changes be
cause ol various consultations the
).resident desired to have.
These conferences have been com
pleted and so have the Hies: ■
which, combined In one document,
were sent to the government printing
office tonight.
At the conclusion of the conference
between the president and Senators
Aldrich and 800 l this afternoon it was
announced the president's prop
railroad legislation would be given th.j
right Of v. ay in senate and house.
Changes Assured
The further assurance was given
that the proposed changes in the rail
road laws would lie written in the
statute books during the session.
There will be some opposition to the
rather drastic legislation which the
president will recommend, but It Will
be overcome, ii is said.
Senators Root and Aldrlcb went to
the White House to discuss various
features of the legislative program for
the present session as well an tho
special messages,
That the discussion as to the rail
mad legislation should be given pre
cedence over all other administration
measures was the only definite con
clusion reached. As to the ship sub
sidy, postal savings banks, changes 111
conservation laws and the proposed
federal incorporation act, neither sen
ator would .say as to when they would
be given consideration.
The president will transmit to con
gress on Friday the report of the at
torney general, and all papers con
nected with the Glavls charges against
Secretary Ballinger, these papers hav
ing been called lor in a resolution of
fered by Senator Flint of California.
The special message on conservation
will go in the last of next week.
EVANGELIST SUGGESTS
EVERY CHURCH SHOULD
EMPLOY PRESS AGENT
CHICAGO, Jan.! 4.— A press agent
for every church and constant adver
tising? In newspapers as. a means of
creating Interest In religious affairs
■were parts of a plan advocated last
night in a lecture at the Doremua
Congregational church by K. H, Pack
ard of Boston, who culls himself a
"publicity evangelist."
The lecture was Illustrated liv lan
tern slides showing Just how the ad
vertisements should be worded and
the cuts and illustrations used.
"It is a fact which many minister.-;
inning to understand that • ■mi -
merclal methods i aji be applied i"
ri tlgioua work," In -'i I
SHIP SUBSIDY
BILL DROPPED
HUMPHREY SUBMITS PLANS
FAVORED BY TAFT
INCREASES PAY OF AMERICAN
MAIUCARRYING BOATS
Measure Proposes Raise in Tonnage
Tax —Author of Document Ex.
plains Several Features and
Gives Reasons
[Associated Press]
WASHINGTON, Jan. 4.—Represen
tative William G. Humphrey of Wash
ington today introduced in the house
a bill providing for ship subsidy by the
United States government.
The measure is understood to have
the approval of President Taft and
the administration, and to be one upon
which proponents of Ship subsidy will
concentrate their efforts.
Tho Humphrey bill provides an in
crease in pay to American ships for
carrying the mails to South America,
China, Japan, the Philippines and
Australasia, bringing it up to $4 per
mile tor an outward voyage of 4000
miles or more.
An increased tonnage tax on tho
transoceanic trade is provided, and
if is proposed to admit foreign built
ships to American register for the for
eign trade.
The author of the bill, in an expla
nation of its provisions, said the prop
osition to increase the pay for carry-
Ing the mails was the most important
feature of the measure. The postmas
ter general is authorized to pay second
class ships for carrying the mails the
name rate of $4 per mile that is now
paid to first class ships.
Already Have Subsidy
Mr. Humphrey points out thai op
ponents of ship subsidy seem not to
be aware that we already have the
subsidy for first class ships under a
law enacted in 1891. This law. he
claims, is "responsible tor every Amer
ican vessel on the Atlantic ocean and
if. repealed would cause the American
Has to disappear from the seas within
sixty days."
The law of 1891, says Mr. Humphrey,
defines a first class ship as one of
more thai) 8000 tons and of twenty
knots speed, which has been snob a
high requirement that vessels of that
class have not found ii profitable to
engage in South American and Pacific
oast trade.
Mr. Humphrey proposes in his bill
to give the same subsidy to vessels of
5000 tons, and of sixteen knots speed.
The bill lays many requirements for
ye '! J l.efore they can obtain the
subsidy.
The ships mud be built according
to plans approved by the secretary of
the navy, of iron or steel, and with
a view to their use in time of war,
and be able to carry four or more can
non of not less than six-inch caliber,
They must at all times be at the de
mand of the government. They mu«t
carry American hoys and train them
in seamanship and be officered by
American citizens and have crews com
posed of 50 per cent or Itiore of Amer
[can sailors.
The vessel* oannot bo sold without
the eon ;ent of the secretary of thl
navy.
TO ARM MARINE CORPS
WASHINGTON, Jan. 4.—Appropria
tion of $50.nun to equip the marine
corps with rilles to be purchased from
the army, is asked in an estimate the
navy department pent to tWb house
today.
TO SUMMON LOS ANGELES
PROSECUTOR TO SEATTLE
District Attorney Fredericks Wanted
to Tell Grand Jury About the
Leavitt Extortion Case
SAM ISAM |S{(), Jan. 4.—A warrant
charging IS. J. I,em lit, I.us Angeles anto
mobile 111:111. with giving a valueless
check for $500 during a poker game was
■worn out today by James Hardman of
this city. Hardman charges that !,<■. in
gave the. check to settle his losings in
the game, and that It was returned by
the bank as worthless. The check bore
the signature of Mary P. Leavitt.
SEATTLE, Jan. 4.—The King county
grand jury today instructed Special
Prosecutor W. C. White to ask Dis
trict Attorney J. I). Fredericks of Los
Angeles to come to Seattle and tell
the grand jury what he knows con
eernlng the alleged attempt of two
King county officer*, former si lal
Agent C. I! Peyton and Deputy l'ros
ecutor Frank Holy.heimer to extort
$1000 from Ralph J. Leavitt, an auto*
ue bile dealer of l,ns Angeles, as the.
'■ for dropping proceedings against
I him in a case of manslaughter.
I.eavitt was wanted in Srattle to
answer a charge of manslaughter,
growing out of the killing of a street
per by an automobile.
FOSTER FATHER'S DEATH
SOON FOLLOWS MURDER
BALTIMORE, Jan. I.—Col. Charles
K. Thompson, foster father of Mrs.
Edith Woodill, whose murder by "Lame
Bob" Eastman near McDaniel, Md., last
June, created a country-wide sensation,
died suddenly at his home near McDan
le] today. Mrs. Woodill was the wife
of Gilbert Woodill, a prominent auto
mobiie dealer of I*os Angeles.
Til,, murder of Mrs. Woodill, with tile
resulting mystery which silll is un
solved, Involving, as It did, persons of
high social standing in four cities, con
stitutes one of the most sensational
crimes in the annals of the country.
While the death of Colonel Thomp
son adds another shocking chapter to
the story, it is not believed, that it is
In any way connected with the unre
vealed mystery behind tin; Woodill
horror. It Is expected that the cor
oner's inquest which will be held today
will show that Colonel Thompson's
death was the result of his enfeebled
condition following the shock of his
foster daughter's murder. .
He was seated at Hie breakfast table
with two guests Just before his death,
having been in slightlj«*>etter health
than usual during the ?Tst few days,
Ho suddenly slid off his chair, and, be
fore any one could reach him, was
dead. Colonel Thompson was 78 years
old.
Gilbert Woodlll, husband of the mur
dored woman, is veil known in I "-
Angeles society, and, with his wife,
entertained frequently at their Ocean
Park home, which Mrs. Woodill left a
short tithe in-lore her death in Mary
land. ■ ■ -• <■":•*!■■ ?]-:'j>y'i'*:.' '■
AMUSEMENTS
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER SST^jSSSSSI.'.
Second and Positively Last Week—Matinee Saturday
The Girl £ Golden West
Regular Burbank Prices: 25c, 35c, 500. Matinees, :r>c. Gallery, 10c.
Next Week: "THE HEART OF MAHVI.AMI." Debut of Kthel Yon Waidron.
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER \ SffiK-"SS2!£S
"Broadnay. near Ninth. PHONES—Main 7005; F1133
AXL, WEEK—BARGAIN MATINEE TODAY—MATINEE SATURDAY
COHAN & HARRIS PRESENT OEO. M. COHAN'S
45 MINUTES FROM BROADWAY
PRICES— 25c, 60C, 750 and |1. BARGAIN MATINEE TODAT.
JOHN CORT presents a mammoth and new o™.^ ._«.*.
WEEK production of the BKAT SAUB
OPFNB
STARTING greatest OF AIL «>medy operas. tomorrow
sunday Kine: Dodo at»am
XXlllg Js-^V^VJIV-/ PRICES—2SO to
JAN. 9. ' -With Eleanor Kent, *!•'•• Popular matl
■Willlam Friend. Zoc Barnett an.l 50 others. neB Wednesday.
MASON OPERA HOUSE i.J'iuS SZ^l
Tonight
Edwin A. relkln rresents the Celebrated Yiddish Players,
MISS ROSA KARP and .MR. DAVID LEVENSON
Supported by an excellent and notable cast of popular Ylddlßh players In repertoire•
Tonight, "THE <IREKN WOMAN." Coming direct from New York City, where they have
enjoyed long and uninterrupted runs.
Prices: 25c to 11.00. Seats now on »ale.
o__.*. • Wm. A. Brady Presents
sale Wright Lorimer
TomOrrOW and over 100 people in
January 7256
9 5% Shepherd King .
y r\. XVI. Prices 50c to $1.50.
CcK\Ac^fVC\V\WW Matlne. ETery Day.
>^j^Wiw«3o|^^',^*^*^^xs' Bolh Phonet—l4*7.
ra>.riK t'ai'ilcular At |\7 n -m 1/ 4 £?*■*■ 71 11 J - I i'resi-ntlng always th« I
tentlon to Entertaining I \/ JJ 1 If lf~*\/ I I I f-" best European and I
I adlo.a and Children | » WsV W*.V* V/ V i~li.V | American attractions. |
Eva Taylor & Co. Wm. H. Thompson
in "Mrs Jones-Smtth-Carew." 1 & Co.. In "Prlda of Regiment"
aza^- Matinee I!K£S!S* i
Stella H. Morrisini a .. , Today Quinlan & Mack
and Leaping Siberian Hound.. * UU*»y .^. he Travelln , D e n ti.t"
Four Floods The Two Bobs
Acrobatic Merrymakers. „,„,.,,,„ "Bef°re th° Party-"
Olirnr-I-M MOTION PICTURES.
Nights—loc, 25c, SO.-, 75.-. Matinee. Dally—loc. 2B«, liOc.
T?T AOr-O TUI? ATTTT? Belasco-Blackwood Co.. Props, and Men.
ELASCO 1 xljl./* 1 H.IN Matinees Tomorrow, Saturday and Sunday
2D BIG WEEK OF THIS SENSATIONAL SUCCESS
lewis S Stone and the Belasco Theater Company present Gertrude Nelson Andrews"
enormously '"Ul play. THROUGH A WINDOW
«5 c ouncrdw a, nn.. th n .s i ß 'u gsrr s^c-r^i.^enlu^"^at a now on |
pRAND OPERA HOUSE MAT|,! n ?n EeS^, T a lnß^7 Y ; a Hno d m Se UAT 3 i7 r
vJT The Greatest Triumph of the Hartman Company
■ppp-DTDTO ( and his big company present a I SAN
■*• i-<A>-J-^--»-O ) gorgeous production of the. famous \ rryr m\'\T
XJ ATD VIVIAN 1 English uslcal comedy success, J TOY
NEXT WEEK—"HOOT MON." Ferris Hartman In "The Idol's Eye." Heats now on sal*.
AUDITORIUM £Fa!FtIJ&.- ! B' '™2
-*- SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMKNT-AN EXTRA PERFORMANCE THURSDAY NIGHT
THHEK NIGHTS BEOINNINO^^SDAY. 6-XWO MATINEES ONIY
Wm. Morris (Inc.) Presents the World's Famous Scotch Comedian
HARRY LAUDER
™ -lAN E.TINOE^ AND JfM* ORCHESTRAL,
CHUTES PARK Ad^bslon 10* Cents
' (Coder new management— liquor .old— danclnr)
Jan 567 8, Five Days of Midwinter Fiesta
-XV B^^l^iS^^rl^Ri^^fl
""•fe^MaH iiaa?"^.iaffigw.°«""
— ~~~~ "_. _„„ B|>HING ST MATINEE TODAY
LOS ANGELES THEATER SS«H * shows every night
. — . ~~~* I Billy Clark.
Max l.'uffek. - I mm ; f -i rtt) rinTC I Mile. Martha.
BRADL.EE Martin & Co. I <•«> VJUIG J B Mualcal veland!..
Tho Laugh-Q-gcope.^ r prlepa _ 20 an 30 Cents. |
OLYMPIC THEATER Phones— Fl4o2; Main llli '
~^^\TuTt^r» C°- rre"ent ■';■
£l°,th^T'h"e 'r".!^^^'^^ rsee,°e Cy ""^h. Belle of Boston."
X X TALKER THEATER ™» The Le-Moyne Players.
VV " ' T'THE BELLE OF RICHMOND"
,".AH PBIOB-lTe. «., Toe. MATINEES SATURDAY AND SUNDAY. Box ottic.
phones F5634: Main 4400; { __ ■
BAY CITY'S NEXT MAYOR
FAVORS WATER PROJECT
p. H. McCarthy Wants San Francisco
to Own the Hetch Hetchy
Plant
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 4.—Mayor
elect P. H. McCarthy has declared him
self emphatically In favor of a munici
pal water system for San Francisco,
but for the Hatch Hetchy project alone,
refusing to consider the plan to pur
chase the plans of the Spring Valley
Water company, which has been of
fered to the city for $35,000,000
McCarthy asserts ho will take the
stump against the latter proposition,
when it is made an issue at the polls.
His reason for opposing tin purchase of
the existing water company, McCarthy,
says, is that the city would become in
volved In endless litigation, while
through the development of the govern.
ment grant abundance of pure water
can be supplied the city.
The matter of bonding the city for a.
water supply will be submitted to the
voters in two propositions, the first for
the Hetch Hetchy, while the second in
cludes also the purchase of the Spring
Valley reservoirs and distributing sys
tem. \ _-^~ ■'
BOILER EXPLODES; ONE KILLED
PITTSBURGH Jan. 4.— One man was
killed and several were wounded as the
result Of B boiler explosion on a pump
ing boat of tho People's Coal company
at Industry, Pa., down the Ohio river.
The explosion was caused by a Hue
oollapdnff.
FOUR BURNED TO DEATH
FORT WILLIAMS, Ont., Jan. 4.—
Four persons were burned to death to
day in a Ore which destroyed ■ board-
Ink house. Five were Injured by Jump
ing, from windows. The temperature
was L'u below zero.
WIFE OF FORMER BANKER
• MORSE CALLS AT PRISON
Convicted Man Meets Spouse with a
Smile, but Shows Emotion
at Parting
ATLANTA, Ga., Jan. 4.— Mrs.
Charles W. Morse, wife .of the financier
now in the federal prison here, ar
rived today. She was met at the sta
tion by her husband's friend, W. 11.
Held.
The convicted banker met the pair
with a smile and talked over with
them the next steps to be taken in
his behalf. It was not until the timo
for parting came that he showed
emotion. Mrs. Morse will not be per
mitted to see him again for fifteen
days.
Reid, however, because of business
interests of his friend and the fact
others might suffer from neglect of
them, will be permitted to see tho
prisoner more often.
Morse has not been assigned to any
task.
SANTA FE TO DOUBLE TRACK
ALBUQUERQUE, N. M., Jan. 4.—
The Brit move in the Atehison, To
peka and Bunta Fe railroad's plan to
double track its road from Chicago
to Los Angeles ia said to have been
taken yo<trnl;iy, when a contract was
let ti> doublo track the section from
Ash Fork to Wlnslow, A. T.i a dis
tance of ninety mile*. It in reported
the next step will be the doublo
tracking of the section from Albu
querque to Gallup, 150 miles.
HANGED PROTESTING INNOCENCE
WEST CHESTER, Pa., Jan.' 4.—Pro
testing his innocence to the la.st, John
Choqwosky was hanged hero today for
the murder of Harry James and his
aged wife, who were found dead with
their skulls crushed.

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