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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, January 13, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-01-13/ed-1/seq-2/

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V-' Bosim Dw Goods Sjorz
So. Broadway 235-237-239 So. Hill St. 234-244
Five dollars for AN of our $10 to $15 Street Hats
See our ads In tomorrow's papers for the most startling
offerings In misses' suits and coats we have ever made.
$ 1.50 to $4 Corsets 95 C
$ I to $2 Corsets 55c "
(ON SALE FRIDAY)
Something over two hundred Bon Ton,
Royal Worcester, Kabo and C. B. Corsets
in models that are not to be re-ordered,
regularly Si. SO to $4, buyable tomorrow
at ninety-five cents each.
And seventeen dozen Si *asg*Sk
to $2 Corsets of various t^L^y
makes in discarded models y-^f •
at fifty-five cents. /Ilf \
All sizes up to 30 in each ~J /fffe^Ji
lot, but not all sizes in any |i(/VdkigS|r
certain model.
None sold until Friday. Wfwi\\
No telephone orders. '/[ I fSt^f*
None sent C. O. D. or mJmiM '
on approval. fTy gf)
(Main Floor, rear.)
Women's Suit Sale Today
As advertised yesterday, our novelty suits are on sale to- '
day at. quick-clearance prices, the 'reductions ranging as
follows: " °
$45.00 Suits $30.00 $85.00 Suits .... $5000
$50.00 Suits $35.00 $90.00 Suits $50 00
$75.00 Suits $37.50 $100.00 Suits .... $5000
$85.00 Suits $42.50 $115.00 Suits $65^00
i (Second Floor.)
LIVESTOCK MEN
PRAISE PINCHOT
CONVENTION WARMLY EXTOLS
DEPOSED FORESTER
CONTINUATION OF POLICIES IS
STRONGLY URGED
Interstate Commerce Court Attacked :
Delegate Cowan from Texas.
Would Break Loose from
Party Bonds
[Associated Press]
DENVER, Jan. 12.—"The liish
minded anil excellent 11 administration
of Oiffurd Plnchot was Indorsed In a
resolution presented before the Na
tional Livestock association today.
The resolution demands a continuation
of Pinchot policies and urces federal
control of public grazing lands.
Other resolutions introduced com
mend the work of the department of
agriculture, condemn the "un
fair discrimination of the Payne tar
iff bill and the oleniargarllie bill, urtre
the appointment of a non-partls&n
tariff commission and authorise a pe
tition to tiie Interstate commerce com
mission to i ■ luce terminal charges on
livestock at Chicago,
In an address on railroad rates S.
' H. Cowan >■■' Fort Worth, Texas, at
tacked the interstate commerce court
recommended by President Taft, de
claring thai the law would be emascu
lated by turning over to the depart
men i of just ice the defense of all cases
■brought >> gainst the decision of the
Interstate commerce commission.
James I'allun, president of the Texas!
Cattle .Kaisers' association, urgi d
stockmen to break loose from party
bonds and support candidates pledged
to the- interests of the livestock In
dustry.
. .M.mv governmental reforms are de
manded in resolutions presented to he
convention today.
itlon formed the
morning discussion. The
granting of power to the Interstate
to revlev
i annul changei in ■
tions and to Instltul ngs on
i. motion, i imended by
!■!■,■■-, d<-nt Taft, a but the
resolutions oppose the appointment of
.ii interstate commerce court.
MAN CRAZED WITH
DRINK SLAYS CHILD
Mother Flees with Victim While Con.
stable Overpowers the Intoxi
cated Father
. [Special to The Herald.]
MOJAVE, Jan. 13.—Charles Kuhn shot »nil
killed his J-year-old daughter this morning.
)1« was till violently drunk when arrested
by <;onstalj(e Hamilton and had to be
thrown und handcuffed.
ill- wife ran «creamlnfr down tlie street with
the bleeding child In her arms to Peterson's
drug store, whoro It died In a short time. Pub
■ ile feellnsr Is very strong against the slayer of
the child and threats of lynching air heard.
No one mini to know the parties and It waa
almost impossible to get the name, but It ap
pears-ho was employed as nlpiht engineer on
■ switch engine here. Two pistols were found
In the room and hn had a belt full of car
tridges on when arrested^
■ Don't »lmpl> allow it to ait -that plan o£
you??. Find <■• Ilttl. ca-"-' "roue" alv.rtl..
uur.
SUGAR COMBINE
DENIES SWINDLE
DIRECTORS DISCLAIM THEY
KNEW OF FRAUDS
j "HIGHER UPS" DECLARED TO BE
INNOCENT
Officers of American Refining Com.j
pany Make Answer to Charge
of "Doctoring" Dock Scales
at Williamsburg
' i»ocl»l«d prtii]
NEW YORK, Jan. 12.—"N0 attempt
whatever lias b«'<-n made to shield any
your board has no reason to
■ ■ ' lii v.. that any j
; utti' i tor ol this company had
any knowledge o> or participation in
Fraudulent underweighlng."
'i his was the answer made by the
of directo ■ ■ American .<u
kui- Refining company today to the
gee that som< one higher up in
co-called sugar trust wag responsi
ble for the use of 'tored" scales "n
Williamsburg dock bj which the
■' B( '■■ . was defrauded out of
more than i In duties,
Stockholders of the American Sugar
Refining company met I city
Ition with
■ ■ ugar underweighing was
la know n „: „ n porl of the board
■ irs.
Thi ■ the com
pany, the report states, it hold in Nev
ICngland. [n answer to the charge thai
, tha company exercises a monopoly in
■ trade, it was :-:u<l that no ]
: more than 4.", per cent of the .nur;h i on-
I sumed in tin? country ■ I by
tin American company,
The company has )< < ngroement, di
or implied, in regard to the fixing
1 i prli ea or 11 lor of produc
. ami the company meets with the
:t i ompetll lon, t ;;•■ i
DENIES COAL LANDS
WILL BE OPERATED
Claimant of Alaskan Fields Says Clar.
ence Cunningham Has Made
a Mistake
BEATTLE, Jan, 12, Discussing an
Interview in the Los Angelea Herald
v. iiii clarence Cunningham, the Alaska
coal l.niii locator, in which he
repn Ins . ...,i would
mined on the KatalTa claims « i
i jrear, Charles J. Bmlth, one of the
i i.i Imants, said toil ,y.
"Mr. Cunningham musi have been
misunderstood, in tim ih-m p
claimant! ao the lands In q v
nave no titlo to the property, in thi
■ 1.1, no arrangemi nl - are i" ndtng
or considered for tl penlDs of the
niinen. Absolutely nothing has been
done In this regard, especially as t.j
the financing of the property or any
set of '!aini.s, nor Is anything con
templated.
"The government has refused
to aha claims and it is idli
t:< iv "i mining i oal on thi ols Imi now
under examtnai Ion."
PlM>;s CI'RKD IN « TO 1* l»\l-i
PAZO OINTMENT la guaranteed to cur* any
cam of ItchlnK, Blind, Bleeding or Protruding
Piles In 6 to 14 days or money refunded. DOc.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: THURSDAY MOfcNING, JANUARY 13. 1010.
SAYS HERRMANN
COVETED HONOR
-WANTED TO BE SENATOR,"
• DECLARES HENEY
' i PROSECUTOR SCORES FORMER
I COMMISSIONER
_______
Trial of Once Prominent Federal Of.
ficlal at Portland Marked by
Dramatic Statements of
Graft Nemesis
[Associated Press]
PORTLAND, Ore., Jan. 12.—"We do
not expect to prove that Blnger Herr
mann got any school lands or other
wise profited financially by the crea
tion of this reserve; but we do expect
to show that .Mr. Herrmann was a
receptive candidate for United States
senator—Jie had his lightning rod out.
"We expect to show also- that Mays
was a state senator, that Jones and
{ Smith were members of the state as-
I sembly and that Herrmann wanted
| the support of these three prominent
i politicians in furtherance of his po
litical ambitions."
This, said Francis J. Heney, senior
counsel for the prosecution, during
his opening statement lay. was the
motive which the government would
attempt to prove induced Herrmann
to become a party to an alleged con
spiracy to defraud the government of
part of the public domain.
The Herrmann trial made rapid
strides today. The opening arguments
had been completed at noon and six
witnesses had been examined when
court adjourned.
Alleged Conspiracy
Mr. Heney said a conspiracy had
existed to form the Blue Mountain
reserve and that Herrmann partici
pated in It; that he aided and abetted
the alleged conspiracy, even giving out
advance information concerning it
and expediting the withdrawal of the
lands at the behest of Franklin Pierce
Mays, who already has been convicted
upon this indictment.
A. S. Worthlngton of Washington,
D C, for the defense, declared there
was nothing In Blnger Herrmann's
career as commissioner of the general
land office that could not bear the
strongest light, and his client had
■ ailed attention to the frauds that
wore being perpetrated under the lieu
law and taken every measure to pre
vent them. He said that in general,
so far as the creation of the Blue
] Mountain reserve was concerned,
Herrmann's acts were solely of a
routine nature.
The government began the introduc
tion of its testimony directly Col Wor
thington Had finished, the most impor
i taut witness of the day being Henry
I rum, former surveyor general of
j Oregon,
Several witnesses were Introduced to
show the character of the land em
■ braced in the reserves, and Henry Mel
-1 drum was called.
Objects to Meldrum
Objection was made to Meldrum tes
tifying because he had never been re
stored to citizenship after having |
served a term in prison in connection
with alleged irregularities in the ad
ministration of the office of surveyor
general.
A telegram from Washington was in
troduced showing that the president
was about to restore Meldrum to citi
zenship, and Meldrum was permitted
to testify.
Meldrum described the meeting be
tween Mays and Herrmann which oc
curred in his office in Portland in Sep
tember. 1901, when the government
charged the alleged conspiracy was
formed, and of a conversation which
witness testified he had with Herrmann
a few days later.
During this conversation Meldrum j
swore that Herrmann suggested to him
that he raise tho money and take up
some of the school lands within the
borders of the proposed reserve.
Capt, Salmon i:. Ormsby, a former
superintendent of forest reserves who
approved the location of the Blue
Mountain reserve, and who during the
trial of Franklin P. Mays and others
under this Indictment confessed that lie
received two sections of school land for
fixing the boundaries as desired by
Mays and his friends, was on the stand
when court adjourned.
JAPANESE BANKER HELD
ON CHARGE OF PERJURY
M. Takekawa Alleged to Have Testi.
fied Falsely in Regard
to Deposit
SANTA ANA, Jan. 12. M. Takekawa
of Los Angeles was brought hero today
to answer to a charge of perjury
brought against him by B. V. Moore of
Los Angeles. Takakawe is cashier of
the Japanese-American bank. Moore
alleges that on September 30 in the j
trial of a suit in which Takakawa was I
plaintiff and W. J. Hole dewendant,
Takekawa testified falsely in saying
that he had deposited $Ms(i.!>s in his
bank in Los Angeles to Hole's credit
as payment on a piece of land ■in La I
Habra. The suit went aga-inst Hole.
Takekawa pave a $.">OOO bond. His pre
liminary was Bel for January 'M.
UNDERWRITERS ELECT OFFICERS
BAN ITKANCIBCO, Jan. 13.—The
second day's session of the thirty-
Courth annual convention of the fire
underwriters 'if the Pacific wu held
today. The convention elected Frank
■ . Btanlford, president; T. J. A. Tled
man, virr president; Calveri Meade,
cretary and treasurer; J. P Moore,
a.-.s'siaiit secretary and librarian; ex
ecutive committee, Frank C, Btanlford,
Adam Ollllland, A. w. Tornton, Louis
Weinman, ltoiia V.
IMPLEMENT DEALERS MEET.
KANSAS CITY, Jan. Yi— Joseph G.
Baker, president of the National fed
eration, was the chief speaker here to
day on the program tor the second
day's session of the convention of the
Western Implement and Vehicle Deal
ere' association. Kxhlbltors at the
convention report unusually heavy
buying orders. The conference com
mittee and officials of the National fed
eration met today with a committee
representing the Carriage Manufac
turers' association concerning an of
ficial vehicle warranty.
TRANSPORT SHERIDAN ARRIVES
BAN FKANCISCQ, Jan. 12.—The
United States array transport Hherldan
arrived today from Maplla having on
board the Sixth cavalry under com
mand of Col. Alexander Rogers. 'C»«*!-'<'
troopers, whose term of service in the
Philippines li is expired, have been or
dered to Fort DM Moines, la.
FATHER WHO MURDERED
HIS BABY IS SENTENCED
Judge Dooms Infanticide to Life Im.
prisonment in Preference to
the Gallows
BELLEVILLE, 111.. .lan. l».— Judge
i;. .\. Crow of Hi.' circuit court of St.
ciair county today senti need James
Pullman, murderer of iiis l-month-oia
child, to live rather than die. so thai
he might suffer a lit. time haunted by
the wails ..f the dying infant.
"I will not sentence Pullman to thi
gallows," said the Judge, "but to the
penitentiary for life, it will be .pun
ishment more terrible than deatli lor
to hear daily the crl«S or his mur
■i. red child.
"His crime was the most atrocious l
have ever heard of, lie stamped the
ut of the child witii his heel."
«•»
YALE DIRECTOR
CHIEF FORESTER
TAFT APPOINTS FRIEND OF
GIFFORD PINCHOT
Two Men in Sympathy with Policy of
Deposed Official Will Sue.
ceed Him and
Price
[Associated rrcss]
WASHINGTON, Jan. U.—Henry P.
Craves, director of the tale forest
s.hooi. was appointed by President
Tafl today t" succeed Qlftord Pinchot
as chief forester. Albeit F. Potter, ai
present acting forester, was appointed
associate forester.
The neu- forester and bis a>s.>
are both known as Pinchot men. Both
have served under Mr. Pinchot ami
both an' in sympathy with his policy
of administration.
It was largely through Mr. Plnchot'S
efforts that the Yale forest school was
established and Mr. Graves went from
the post of assistant chief of the di
vision of forestry, under Pinchot, I"
become director of the school in 1900.
He si rved in the forestry division for
two years. Mr. Graves graduated from
Yale in 1893. He was trained in fos
estry in this country and in Europe,
and has had extensive experience in
the west, having made the survey of
the Black Hills in IX7!>. Mr. Graves
i will begin his duties as forester Feb
! vary 1.
Mr. Potter, new associate forester,
I who succeeds Overton ..'. Price, is a
native of California, and has spent
all his life in the west until he
came a member of the fore3try staff
nine years ago. '
He has had jurisdiction over all graz
ing- privilege* within the preserves.
He is well acquainted with western
i ondltlons and is thoroughly informed
.if all the policies and practices of the
forest service.
OFFICER WOUNDED BY
PANIC-STRICKEN BANDIT
Deputy Sheriff Successfully Frustrates
Robbery but May Die as Re.
suit of Injuries
OAKLAND, Jan. 12.—Deputy Sheriff
Lindcrest was perhaps fatally wounded
in an attempt to prevent the robbery of
tin- road house or A. Moore on Sai
Pablo avenue, near Albany, at 10:80
o'clock this evening. The place was
■ in. red by a lone bandit. An officer,
in company «ith the proprietor or thi
place, was preparing t" close it for the
nlsht.
Unaware of Lindcrest's presenci in
the saloon, the highwayman swung
open illl front doors, and presenting a
gun, commanded Moore t" bold up his
hands, He complied and the oncer,
leaping forward as thr tinur started to
ward the cash register, struck him a
terrific blow over the head with an
umbrella.
Panic.- stricken by the unexpected op
; position, the highwayman fired point
blank, the bullet entering Llndcrest's
Lshoulder. As he ran through the door
In' fired a si', ond shot, which took effect,
in the deputy sheriff's stomach, I.iinl
crest's recovery is doubtful, Nothing
was taken from the saloon.
MANY SIGN PETITION
FOR MORSE'S PARDON
Papers Asking Release of Convicted
Banker Posted in Foyers of
Big New York Hotels
NEW yohk, Jan. 12. Mrs. Charles
W. Morso's campaign for freeing hor
husband, now a convict In thi federal
prison at Atlanta, (ia.. lias stalled vig
, orously in Ni'iv York cltj
Petitions asking President Tafl to
' pardon the banker have been placed
in the foy< i- at most of the big hotels
ami in cither places. .Many of the peti
tions already nay« f;ain.-d inure than
100 signers. Scores ol othor petitions
arc being circulated privately. The.pe
tition ruuls:
"We pray Cor absolute pardon J'or
Charles W. Uone, recently convicted
of technical violation <>r the national
bunking act From our knowledge ot
the olroumitanceß we believe that Mr.
Morse did not Intend to wrong the Na
tional Hank of North America. AYe be
lieve that the jury trying the
largely Influenced by public clamor, and
that any further punishment would be
j unjust and oppressive."
EX-CONVICT ARRESTED
SAX JOBE, Jan. 12.— Joaquin 11 i
guera, an ex-convict, wo arrested
yesterday on ■ charge of robbery pre
ferred by George llillyer, a li.rkeley
contractor, who wasi waylaid, beaten.
Stabbed and robbed in I'lea.sant street,
in this city, Sunday night llillyer is
not fatally injured. Alter the rob
bery Hietiierii fled in a livery stable
rig'driven by Mabel Rodriguez, aged
IS, daughter of a friend. He was
captured at Evergreen.
GOVERNMENT AIDS EXPERIMENT
LONDON, Jan. 12.—The • earl of
Crowe, secretary of state for the col
onies, has notified the British Cotton
Growing association officially that the
government has decided to grant $50,
--000 annually for three years In aid of
11 experimental work In the industry.
SOUTHERN EDITOR DEAD
BIRMINGHAM, Ala.. Jan. Kufus
N. Rhodes, president and editor of the
Birmingham News and a director of
the Associated Press, died here today.
He was president of the Southern Pub
lishers' association.*^*.
KNOX HOPES TO
ADJUST TANGLE
POWERS INTERESTED IN PLAN
FOR MANCHURIA
STATE DEPARTMENT NOT WOR
RIED BY ALIEN PRESS
Chancellories of Japan, China and
Russia Known to Be Pondering
Neutralization Scheme.
Uchida Favors Policy
[Associated Press]
WASHINGTON, Jan. 12.—The state
department has not received any direct
official expression from the foreign gov
ernments Interested regarding Secreta
ry Knox's recent note suggesting neu
tralization of the Manchurian railroads.
and officials refuse to attach much Im
portance to the view of some of the
foreign newspapers unless favorable to
the proposition. <
In some instances papers known not
to be in the confidence of their govern
ments or to exercise any potent Influ
ence in shaping their policies, have
made comment. This is believed to be
true as to the Japanese press,
It is known at the state department
that Mr. Knox's suggestion Is receiv
ing most careful consideration in the
chancellories of the powers interested,
and because of the exceptional impor
tance of the matter, it is not thought
replies reasonably can be expected for
some time. , .
The department entertains no doubt
of the wisdom of taking the Man.lni
rian railroads out of eastern politics,
thus minimizing the danger of war. and
believes no country would profit ny
such a course more than Japan.
Baron Uehida, Japanese ambassador.
It is believed, expressed the views or
his government in an interview recent
ly published In Tokio, In the course of
which he is reported to have said: _
•'America's stand with regard to the
preservation Of peace anil the- Integrity
of China has been, and will be, exactly
identical with ours. We must under
stand that America's policy toward
Japan and the Orient as a whole has
always been of the same peaceful char-
This expression by Baron Uehida,
which has just become known here, is
highly satisfactory to the officials or
the state department.
« • ►
COAL MINERS WILL ASK
FOR INCREASE IN WAGES
Workers Give Advance in Cost of Liv.
ing as Reason for Demand
on Operators
CHICAGO, Jan. 12.—Coal miners of
the United States are preparing to re
open the question of wages after Janu
ary 20, ami a demand for increased pay
Is expected. It may cause a marked
advance in present prices of coal. The
stand taken by the miners that they
need higher wages lie. attse of the in"
creaaed cost "f living comas as a part
"I' the general movement of organised
labor begun by the switchmen and rail
road brotherhoods. The movement has
Iv spread to include practically all
branches of railroad labor.
"It is true that the mine workers
will take up the question of wages,"
siiid John Fitzpi'triek. president of the
Chicago Federation of Labor. "I do not
see tie ne lessity of higher priced coal
even if the miners net Increases. "When
coal which costs jr.r.oa ton in the Unit
ed Stall s can be bought for 53.50 a ton
in Canada, tin re is something more
than wages boosting the price."
Tin' coal men take n different view.
They cannot figure how 'lie miners can
he paid more money and coal remain at
Former prices.
WOMAN'S LIFE SAVED
BY TELEPHONE CALL
Communicetion Ceasing Suddenly Is
Sufficient Warning to Daugh.
ter of Impending Danger
PRINCETON, Did., .Tan. 12.—Mn.
'/.nay Finney was sitvrd from a hor
rible death yesterday In an unusual
manner-
She had called her daughter. Miss
Jennie Fiimey, over the telephone
when, without warning, the daughter
heard a clattering of the Instrument
and was unable to get licr mother
again. She hastily telephoned a neigh
bor to mv stigate and when the latter
ran into the Finney home, she found
Mis. Finney unconscious, with her
head almost In an open fireplace.
.Mrs Finney had been (tricked sud
denly with paralysis. Her condition is
still serloua.
HOT BATTLE BETWEEN
SLAVS AND GREEKS
Score Injured in Indiana City when
Native of Czar's Empire Ac.
cuses Hellene of Theft
HAMMOND, Ind., Jan. 18.—Bad
blood between Slav and Greek resi
dents In Hammond, and a stolen roost
er, caused a riot yesterday, A score
were Injured, many requiring medical
attention,
.Members of the two nationalities
fouglit like mad in their boarding
ill use. Tt was the last day of the
civk New Year celebration. The
Greeks were becoming boisterous and,
when moused by a Russian of steal
ing a rooster, they replied by hurling
beer bottles at him. Other Slavs
rushed in and knives were drawn and
used.
The ringleaders who were arrested
fought the police and had to be. roped
before they could be taken to jail. The
house was wrecked in the riot.
SARABIA ESCAPES DIAZ
SAN ANTONIO, Texas. Jan. 12.—
The federal grand jury falling to find
an indictment against him, Tboma*
Barabla, charged *'lth violating the
neutrality laws, lias been released
rroni jail under orders of the federal
court, Barabla »■»» arrested with
Jose AI. Rang*l. August 10, 1909, In a
raid made by deputy United States
marshals,
TO CHALLENGE ELECTION
BOSTON, Jan. ;■ I'--John F. Fitz
gerald's election to the mayoralty is
not to pass unchallenged. .' James J.
Storrow'H campaign managers say
they will Immediately ask for a re
count.
AMUSEMENTS
"A~VIATfON MEET-TODAY AND DAILY 1 SJJgSJ 1 "
FIRST IN AMERICA—JAN. 10 TO JAN. 20 (INCLUSIVE)
DAILY CONTESTS IN SPEED. DISTANCE AND ENDURANCE.
$80 000 00 IN PRIZES-WORLD'S BIGGEST BALLOONS
Seat Sale Now Open
AT HAMBURGER'S STORE, PACIFIC ELECTRIC STATION
AND BARTLETT MUSIC CO. (Opposite City Hall)
. Boxes *- £ ■» fOnlv $30
Reserved ) Inc , ul , in g Admission. S >"'J"lA_f - vp«_»V/
AT HAMBURGER'S. % |
Single Admission Unreserved, 50c; Reserved Grand Stand, 50c
Extra; Box Seats, Single $1.50, or $1.00 and Admission.
Autos Parked, Suitable Locations, $1 Per Passenger, Admission
30 FLYING MACHINES— EVERY 2 MINUTES
DIRECT TO MAIN ENTRANCE AVIATION CAMP
SUNDAY MEET— EMPLOYES' DAY—A BIG DAY
OROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER JS^SS?^:
— , ■ iv |.-|,-K— ~~ ~~ MATINEE SATURDAY.
ALL WEEK- A?;OTIIr ; Rll'l'lMl SUCCESS
THE HEART OF MARYLAND
DEBUT OF ETHEL YON WALDRON
HFOTT AH nURBANK PRICES—2Sc, 30c. uOc MATINEES. 25c. GALLERY, 10c.
s£°Svw"-?Be?aMo.and Me Milled great play, ".MEN AND WOMEN."
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER £™» a %™&£
Broadway near Ninth. Phones! Main TOOII I 1133.
AM- WEEK—MATINEE SATURDAY.
JOHN (OUT PRESENTS THE BEST OF ALL COMEDY OPERAS,
__.____, ——„-v——.y—v With ELEANOR KENT.
TCTTMfr DODO zoe BARUETT. will.
XVXi.NVjr _-/N^/J-/>— ' friend, and 50 Others.
PRICES—2Sc, 50c, He, |1 A Few l'r m Rows, 11.80. POPULAR MATINEE SATURDAY
Next Week AT THE COZY MAJESTIC Next Week
Wm. I". C'ullen'n Sumptuous Presentation of the New All-Laughter Musical Comedy.
SEAT Tl-I.Q SEAT
SALE . A AIC; SALE
OPENS All OPENS
today Alaskan °day
With Richard F. Carroll and Gus Weinburg
REVISED RETUNED RECONSTRUCTED
PRICES—2Sc, r>nc "Tic $1. A Few Front Hows. 51.."".
POPULAR .MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY.
P.vini fai-ncular Ai l\ 7-. ■• i-) A T Till - I Presenting always tn. I
lentlon to Entertaining \/ 1 |MC\/1 IC: beSt Euro l>eiln and
Indie, ana Children | V C*. d*-«-X^ V —,__V-' | American attractions. |
Klein Family ' "Wag__L-* °*
(■■•■rmflii rotn -oy ajrolint. Matinee '•~i°^""™--
Fay, 2 Coleys & Fay Matinee
Lncle Tom to Vaudeville. ~J ...
Four Readings ToHav Stella H. Mornsim
i<OUr KCaaingS AOady and Leaping Siberian Houndu
Sensational equilibrists. *: "_.,, . .
Carl Nobel i ox and Millerships
S—' ..ant^d.irtutt MOTION P.CXCKE, Artistic NonaenM. ,
lc . nd .n4v_ n »««looal._^ jiotiojj -jcraga
Nights—loc, 3flc. SOc. 7»r. Matinee. Dally— 25c, BOc.
B_, Adr>r\ titt-c ATtT-D Belaseo-Blackwood Co.. Proprs. and Mg-rs.
ELASCO THEATER MATINEES TODAY, Saturday, Sunday.
HERE'S THE BIGGEST LAUGHING SUCCESS OF THE SEASON.
LEWIS S STONE and the Belasco theater company present Nat C. Goodwin's notabl*
u0m.dy.w00.... « TH E GENIUS"
A famous laughing play with an abundance of ripping merriment and great comedy
NeirWeek-Fi'rHt'pru.lue'.l'm'c.n any stage of Porter Emerson Browne's new play,
"THE Si'eNDTIIIUFT." Scats for "The Spendthrift" are now on sale.
GRAND OPERA rroTTOP *MATTNEES Saturday and Sunday.
RAND OPERA HOUoi^ PHONES—Main 1957; Home A 1987.
THE FUNNIEST OF ALL MUSIC AND FUN SHOWS—
17C_T3T<: , and his bis singing company present a > "THE
l"_fKKl_ ( roar in production of the famously sue- <-—,—.,■ ,-. _„„„
HARTMAN ( OWM musical comedy, IJJUJL. HiXIZi
Next Week-Ob* Big Blue Ribbon $1000 Royalty Musical SUow, "WOODLAND." Seats
are now on sale.
__ , H. C. WYATT.
MASON OPERA HOUSE Lessee Hand Manager.
-TONIOIfT-ANU^O^El^^Tr^SA^nmA^
WRIGHT LORIMER
AND OVER 100 PEOPLE IN
THE SHEPHERD KING
pmCJBg too to $1.50. Seats now on .ale.
N»t > fll -Loul. Jame" In "lIF.XBV VIII." and MXX( HAXT OF VENICe,,
I~TTr-<T> THITATFR THIS Matinees Saturday and Sunday.
ALKER 1 rißiAl WEEK Trices 10c, «0c and SOc.
Phones—; Main 4400.
Chas. J. Lc Moync and Associate Players
In the great pastoral play.
... OUT OF THE FOLD
FISCHER'S THEATER *I™l I&Z?l.X2bmm. pro^^MgV.
SS'll f'OMMKN'CINU MONBW, JAN. 10—Hilly Onalow, Max Steinle, Esco Ives,
P,rcVyOWeln° Annie B'auman and Nan Halperin, "The Jolly ™ Soubrette." with
Son 100 and so" S?ch«tra reserved seats 26c. (Get that laugh out of the moth balls!
1 You'll need It as never before). ■ '
Ot ir»*riT/-i TUPATPU Opposite B'urhank Theater
LYMPIC THEAIHX . . Phones—Fl4o2; Main 121
TAlphin-Fargo Musical Comedy company, Week Jan. 10—Return of Mill Bios
' mm Heeley In "THE BELLE OF BOSTON," a musical absurdity. Next week,
"town TOPICS."
L_ o Al, ■ iLi'P „• Z SPRING ST., TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY.
OS Aivwt-. -. r,:. ■■ - 1-.A > -.X NKAH 4TII MATINEE TODAY
liustlcana Trio. CARLOTTA irom Liiitoh and His Jungle Girls
Yon Mitiel & Maynard hi her famous loop-the-loop W. <'. Hoeffler & Co.
The Laugli-O-Scope. on a bicycle. [Grace Everett.
I'prri.Aß PRICES— 10.-. 30c AND MX:
STEAM TRAINS
■ ; ' TO ■ - . ..
Aviation Camp
DOMINGUEZ—Main Entrance
THE SOUTHERN PACIFIC is the only steam railroad to the
grounds.
Special Trains Leave Los Angeles (Arcade Station, Fifth and
Central aye.) at 9:05 a. m., 10 a. m., 10:15 a. m., 11 and 11:30 a. m.,
12 noon and 12:15 p. m. Returning after close of exhibition.
, PLENTY OF ROOMY CARS
ROlind Trip From Los Angeles
35 Cents
■ ■ ■ '•' i■-
Take Your Lunch and Start Early
Southern Pacific
600 SOUTH SPRING ST., CORNER SIXTH
ARCADE STATION, FIFTH AND CENTRAL AYE.

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