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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, January 21, 1910, Image 11

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-01-21/ed-1/seq-11/

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WINTER BASEBALL
THE lot of the baseball manager is
hard. Now comes Manager White
of the Trilbys with a tale of wne
about Scotty Allen having taken away
his lease of Mace park, which leaves
th« colored team out in the cold as to
grounds. "I never done him nothing,"
said White yesterday when relating
the sad news. "He just Hew off mad
because I had agfeed with Orendorff
that one. of our series with the Angel
boys was to be played at Chutes park.
It seems that Mista Allen wanted them
all to be played at his Mace grounds,
on which I had a contract. Under
stand me, sah, Ah hail a contract, as
Ah have received notification to the
effect that that contract is no mo'—
done given up de key to those grounds."
When the colored magnate had finished
his story his under lip was hanging
unusually low and his eyes had a
troubled look. As he turned away and
his bulky disappearing form was sil
houetted in Jim McCormick's doorway,
he was heard to heave a sigh and mur
mur: "And the Trilbys have no mo'
back yard to play In."
Houlsby recently returned from Up
land, where he has been pitching, and
lie is now back on the twirling staff of
the Turfs-Lyon team. While at Up
land he made a good record, winning
three games and tieing one out of five
pitched.
The Trilbys have withdrawn from
the Trolley league and that organiza
tion is looking for a strong team to
take their place, the Santa Paula club
preferred. The league officials will
hold a meetlntr to elect a president,
OXY FRESHIES
WIN CLASS MEET
BEAT SENIORS BY MARGIN OF
TWO POINTS
CAPT. THOMSON PROVES TO BE
STAR OF CONTESTS
Wins Every Event In Which He Is
Entered and Scores Nearly Every
Point Credited to His Side
In Events
The interclass meet at Occidental col
lege yesterday resulted in a victory for
the freshmen, with the seniors a close
Becond. Not until the last event on the
program was finished was the final re
sult a certainty, as Fred Thomson's
work for the senior class, which easily
was the feature of the day, gave the
near-graduates an equal chance for the
honors. Thomson, who is this sea
son's track captain, won the seven
eventa in which he was entered and
scored very nearly all the points for
. the seniors. Following are the final
scors:
Freshmen, 511-2, Seniors, 49 1-2; Jun
iors, 19; Sophomores, 16.
The 100-yard daah was won by Bird In
the fast time of 10 3-5 seconds, with Brad
beer second and Kellog third.
Mile run—Richardson first, Douglas sec
ond, McGee third; time 4:59 minutes.
Hammer throw—Thomson first, Brad
beer second, Colllna third; distance 116 feet.
High hurdlr-s—Thomson first, Wicman sec
end, Gould third; time 17 1-5.
440 dash—Bird first. Schooner second,
Trask third; time 54 3-5 seconds.
220-yard dash—EPradbeer first, Kellog sec
ond. Horton third; time 23 2-5 seconds.
Discus throw—Thomson first, Smart sec
ond, Johnson third; distance 111 feet and
11 inches, which establishes a now South
ern California record in this event.
High Jump—Thomson first. Wioman sec
ond ; Blee third; height 5 feet 7 Inches.
Two-mile race—Percival first, Hellory sec
ond, Pellegrln third; time 11 minutes 46 2-5
seconds.
Shot-put—Thomson first, Wieman second.
Johnson third; distance 4014 feet.
X^)w hurdles —Thomson first, Wieman sec
ond Gould third; time 'JS 4-5 seconds.
SSO-yard dash—Robertson first, Richard
son second, Angus third.
Broad Jump—Thomson first, W. Thom
son second, Johnson third; distance 20 feet
*Yj Inches.
MAY HOLD CONFERENCE
TO SETTLE FIGHT LOCATION
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 20.—Unless
the controversy between Tex Rickard
and Jack Gleason over the naming of
a place for the Jeffries-Johnson fight
is settled by February 10, when Jef
fries will arrive in San Francisco, it is
probable a conference will be held in
the east by those directly interested,
at which a place for the fight will be
definitely agreed upon. Gleason stat
ed tonight that he probably would ac
company Sam Berger east to confer
with Johnson and his manager soon
after the arrival here of the Jeffriea
party, unless the matter is settled in
the meantime.
HIS LAST INTERVIEW
John C. Waters, an attorney popular
among the young set, but well up in
the forties, is one of the oldest of To
peka's colony of old bachelors, says
the Kansas City Journal. Recently a
reporter for one of the Topeka news
papers asked Waters for an interview.
"Not on your life," he replied; "noth
ing 1 to say. I was interviewed once and
it will take the balance of my natural
life to live it down. In talking about
the relation of the lawyers to the peo
ple, I told a reporter that I thought a
lawyer should keep his hand 'on the
public pulse. When the printer and
proofreader got through with my state
ment it said that I thought a lawyer
should keep his hand on the public
purse. That was several years ago,
and I find that a good many people
believe that that is a lawyer's princi
pal business. No more interviews from
me on the 'public pulse' question. If I
succeed in Hying this thing down I
will keep out of the newspapers."
COACH GORTON TO r.ESIGN
AND RETIRE TO BUSINESS
Frank Gorton, coach at Occidental col
lege, at the close of the baseball season,
will hand in bis resignation as coach of
athletics at that institutions and will
deport for Connecticut, where he intends
to enter the business Held. The loss of
the coach u'ill be a severe blow to ath
letics in Southern California, as well as
at Oxy, as Gorton's career, while con
nected with Hint institution has been a
very successful one, and his place will
be hard to fill. That the couch is going
to leave is not a fault of the faculty, as
that body hus requested him to sign an
other year's contract and is extremely
well snUslled with his services. It is
rumored that he has received a Halter
ing offer to coach at a college located
where he Intends to enter business.
which office was vacated recently by
Sinlly Allen's resignation, next Tues
day night. Place of meeting will ba
published later.
The Los Angeles Trilbys were enter
tained Wednesday evening by v. C.
i livens, proprietor of the Waldorf cafe,
corner <>f Fourth and Ruth. The real
sparkling joy water (lowed freely and
the members of the club sang many of
those old songs so well known to ball
players. The big new arrival, "Cy
clone Joe" Williams, aeied as toa^t
master, while Manager White officiated
as usher for his team.
Ed Crollc, treasurer of the Winter
league and manager of the Santa Ana
baseball team, rips Manager Palmer
of the Kan Diego team up the back
In a hot letter to the Herald. Follow
ing i 3 a portion of the missive:
"Palmer withdrew, not because he
wanted to, but because no manager
would take a team down there while
he controled the southern baseball
situation. Tho last time we were down
there we were ready to play, but he
said that the grounds were too wet
for play. Then, after wo had gone to
the station, he changed his tune and
demanded that wo play the game if we
had to wear rubber boots. We all re
gret that such a good ball town should
lie tied up by a manager of his type. I
will say for tho Santa Ana club that
we will never so there as long as that
gentleman holds the guiding reins In
baseball, and I think I am voicing the
sentiment of nearly every other man
ager that has had dealings with him."
That should hold Palmer for some
time. •
JOHNSON HAS NARROW
ESCAPE FROM BED IN CELL
♦ NTW YORK, Jan. £o.—Jack *
♦ Johnson, champion negro pugilist, ♦
♦ was arrested in Now York to- «$•
4* night charged with felonious as- 4"
♦ sault, and for a time the pros- 4*
+ poets were that lie would have to ♦
•5* remain in a cell at police head- ♦
•> quarters until morning. •{•
♦ Felony cases are not taken to ♦
•5* the night court, and his release •$*
♦ could be brought about only by ♦
♦ getting a police magistrate out *
♦of bed to accept bail. George Lit- •»♦
♦ tie, the negro's manager, scurried *
♦ away from police headquarters ♦$•
+ when Johnson was locked up. Na- •>
♦ than Pinrter, a negro friend of the ♦
4* lighter, is the accuser. He and •!•
♦ Johnson got into a light while sit- ♦
♦ ting In a cafe early yesterday. 4*
♦ Johnson, later tonight, was re- •£■
V leased under $1000 bail. «(•
MAN THOUGHT TO BE
DEAD RETURNS AND
IS MAD ABOUT IT
John Smith, Mourned For at Funeral
Services, Must Now Fnnt
Bills Amounting to
$100
NEW YORK, Jan. 20.—The return
of John Smith of 425 East Seventeenth
street after his wife and children
thought they had him decently interred
In Calvary cemetery leaves him and
his family happy over his reappear
ance but unhappy over the prospect of
paying $100 to an undertaker for bury
ing a stranger.
Most of the mourners who had gone
to the cemetery believing: they were ac
companying the body of their old
friend Smith learned when they road
the newspapers that they had followed
the body of a man in whom they were
not the least bit interested, and Mrs.
Smith is angry because she lost a
week's wages superintending the fune
ral and bought a new set of mourning
garments. •
Smith is out of sorts, too. The exag
gerated reports of his death, as Mark
Twain once said, have not been condu
cive to his peace of mind, and lie kept
remarking that he wasn't sure he was
all there.
"This is a shame," said Smith. "If it
hadn't been for the carelessness of the
doctors in tho city hospital on Black-
well's Island my appearance at home
would have aroused more affection than
excitement. I was taken sick on the
morning of December 2!) while looking
for work, and applied at Bellevue hos
pital. They told me to catch the boat
for Blackweli's Island, which I did. On
arriving there It was found that I was
suffering from pneumonia.
"I asked the doctors there to notify
my family. They promised to do so.
When I was discharged I started home.
A few doors from my house I ntet a
friend, who turned pale- when he saw
me, and assured me that I was regular
ly dead and burled. I assured him to
the contrary. He told me to break the
news gently to my family. I sent a boy
to the house to tell them that I was not
in Calvary cemetery, as was the popu
lar belief. Then I walked in."
Just before the funeral Mrs. Smith
took a $195 policy on her husband's life
to the insurance company. They were
prepared to pay the money, but Mrs.
Smith visited them and told them it
was all off.
C. D. O'Neill, assistant superintendent
of Bellevue hospital, derlared that that
institution was not to blame.
"We took his name," he, said, "and
then referred him to the hospital on
Blackweli's Island. Our responsibility
ceased there. It was up to tho city
hospital to flo the rest."
They very evidently, according: to
Smith's story, did nothing. No word
reached the Smith family during
Smith's term of sickness at the hospi
tal, and when his wife began a search
for him she identified the body of a
man in tho morgue who had died in
Gouverneut hospital under the name of
Smith as her missing husband.
"I don't know what to do about this
thing." said Smith. "Here we've got to
pay $100 for funeral expenses, and in
addition there's a man In our plot in
Calvary who doesn't belong there. I
wonder if we can make the charities
department pay the bill?"
HESTER POSTS FORFEIT
TO GUARANTEE BIG FIGHT
SAN FRANCISCO, Jim. 20.—That the
Nelson-Wolgast fight Is practically as
sured became apparent today when Sid
Heater pasted «2500 >\ilh John T. Clark
as a forfeit In case lie does not pull off
the battle. According to the gossip of
the wise ones, Hester has been assured
by the supervisors of Sao Mateo county
that he will be (ranted a permit. In
this event the mill will take place at
Colin a. where Hester will build an
arena to rival Jimmy Coffrotli'e. ■ In case
Hester Is turned down by the San Ma
teo board he lias his eye on Alameda,
where he may endeavcor to pull off the
scrap.
T.OS ANGELES HERALD: FRIDAY MORNING, JANUARY 21, 1910.
AUTO SHOW TO
BE BRILLIANT
DECORATION SCHEME WILL BE
HARMONIOUS
ILLUMINATION TO BE SUPPLIED
BY 3800 LIGHTS
Committee in Charge of Exhibition
Will Meet to Decide Individual
Beautifying and to Award
Some Contracts
The committee which has charge of
the automobile show to be held in the
Qtand avenut rink. February 7 to 13,
will meet this morning at Walter
Hempel'i office to decide on the rules
which will govern the show ;ind award
some of the contracts for the decorat
ing of the auditorium.
Hempen has passed a busy week
talking with decorators, considering
plans and looking at drawings. While
one general decoration scheme has bo"n
decided on, the best method of carrying
out the plans have not been deter
mined. In addition to the decorations
now in the building, which consist of
3800 electric lights, a large amount of
money will be spent in beautifying
booths and adding to the general ef
fect. The high dome lends Itself to a
scenic show and the committee desires
to take advantage of every opportu
nity. .
One of the important matters to be
taken up at the meeting today will bo
that of individual decorating Many
of the exhibitors have petitioned th^
committee for permission to do some
individual decorating. In all prob
ability this will not be permitted.
Wants All in Harmony
Manager Hompel is opposed to any
thing that will not harmonize with
the other decorations. If there Is
any individual decorating, it will ho
with flowers and greenery, and this
most likely will be restricted to soci
ety night.
A striking poster has been selected
for advertising the show, and these
will appear shortly. Out of a back
ground of purple is shown a girl at
the wheel of a car. These will be sent
broadcast throughout the. southern
part of the state.
It was the intention to cover the
floor with canvas and permit each ex
hibitor to carpet his own space. For
fear that the many co'ored rugs and
carpets might not harmonize with the
general color scheme of the decora
tions, Manager Hempel contracted for
20.000 square feet of green carpet yes
terday. Every space will be covered
without any extra expense to the ex
hibitors.
Many shipments of show cars are on
the way to the coast and from now on
carloads of new motor cars will be
arriving almost daily. Some of the
well known cars will make close con
nections, but it is expected every car
will be here in time for Ihe opening.
TAWNEY SCATHED AT
HARMONY MEETING
Capt. T. H. Kelly, Insurgent, Says He
Will Oppose Cannonlsm at
Next Election
ST. PAUL, Jan. 20.—Capt. Thomas H.
Kelly, for fifty years a prominent mer
chant and miller of Owatonna, Minn.,
and well known state politician, Eays
it is "about time to break up the com
bination between Aldrich, Cannon and
Tawney," and offers to run against
Representative Tawney at the next
election or stump the First Minnesota
congressional district for any candi
date the Roosevelt Republicans agree
to back.
Mr. Kelly has always been a Tawney
supporter. He made known his im
placable opposition to Mr. Tawney at a
party harmony feast at Owatonna,
Minn. Everything was going along
quietly with Governor Eberhart and
Mr. Tawney until a number of persons
in the hall called for Kelly. Mr. Kelly
was evidently loaded for the occasion,
as he pulled a typewritten alleged rec
ord of Mr. Tawney from his pocket and
ripped the whole harmony affair to
shreds. Mr. Tawney took the attack
in silent forbearance, with the excep
tion of rising at one time to correct, lie
said, .some of Mr. Kelly's figures. Mr.
Kelly referred to him during his .speech
as a traitor to the people of the First
district.
Mr. Kelly in St. Paul said that he
was preparing to make the race, that
since his explosion in the harmony
meeting he had received many encour
aging letters from all part of the First
district, and he knew it was the right
time to strike. He said he would wait
until August 1 and \*ould thon file his
petition !f no Roosevelt Republican had
yet done so. •
Mr. Kelly is a Civil War veteran and
has been to Washington several times
on public business.
CHILD DESCRIBES SKELETON
The superintendent was in the habit
of dropping in to the different class
rooms and demanding a recital of les
sons from the pupils. One day her ac
tive mind hit upon physiology as the
study for examination. But the little
girl to whom the tlrst question was put
so bewildered tho superintendent and
made her lose her patience that there
were no more questions of a similar
nature asked. "Tell me," said the su
perintendent, "what a skeleton is."
The little girl thought for a short
time. "A skeleton?" she asked. "A
skeleton? Why, a skeleton Is a man
with his insides out and his outsides
off."
NATIONAL LEAGUE
MAKES BIG TRADE
CIXCIXNATI, Jan. 20.—0n0 of the
bigge«t baseball tro^les of the winter was
closed today by the Cincinnati and
Philadelphia National league clubs. The
deal involves the trading of four pitch
ers, Philadelphia getting Hubert Kwlng
and James Brennan In return for Frank
C'orrldon and Harry CovaleMky.
NATIONAL
AUTOMOBILE CO.
Distributors, 1228-1228 So. Olive St.
LICENSED UNDER SKLDEN PATENTS
W. E. BCSII. So. OaL Agency,
Oarag* and Bepalrtns. i
lXll-t» kULIU tLtUX, . '
U.m. JTJMI, . , ji.l, MJ(L
TRAINLOAD OF BUICK CARS
SENT IN ONE CONSIGNMENT
Largest Shipment of Machines at One
Time Ever Made Consists
of 127 Automobiles
All the way from Flint, Mich., only
a short distance south of the Canadian
line, to Dallas, Texas, on the Gulf of
Mexico, a shipment of automobl.es
was made recently that is believed to
break all records in the matter of
numbers.
The shipper was the Buick Motor
company, and December 20 there went
forward from its plant a solid train
load of forty cars, consigned to the
Buick Automobile company.
This trainload was made up entirely
of Rock Island special forty-frot au
tomobile cars, and contained 127 Buick
automobiles, all being 1910 models. It
was the longest train, the greatest
number of cars, and the most valuable
shipment of automobiles ever made
anywhere by any factory. The Buick
people had reason to. feel proud.
The 127 automobiles making up this
shipment made an aggregate tonnage
of 459,200 pounds, while their to'al
valuation was $163,970. This mammoth
trainload, representing a fortune •in
money, a year's supply of merchandise
for the ordinary merchant, and a
maximum load for two of the largest
railroad engines, left the home factory
at Flint, Mich., December 10, and
made the trip in eight days, arriving
at Dallas December 28.
FIRESTONES IN LEAD AT
BIG NEW YORK SHOW
It Is a well known fact that the New
York shows always tell Just wnat the
tendencies for the next year as regards
tires, accessories and such are to be,
and leadership in tires at these shows
usually means at least twelve months
more of supremacy. For this reason
the trade anxiously awaits the count of
tires at the two New York shows,
which this year gives the Firestone
company a lead In pneumatic and solid
tires and an even larger lead in de
mountable rims.
In speaking of this indorsement of his
company at the two New York shows,
J. F. Singleton of the Firestone compa
ny said: "Perhaps no higher tribute to
Firestone quality could have been paid
than the great nation-wide tribute that
has been given our tires and demount
able rims by the 1 American car manu
facturing industry. The fact that our
tires were found on more cars than any
other make speaks volumes for the high
esteem in which they are held by the
men who know, as well as indicating
the desire of car manufacturers to con
sider quality above all else."
VISIT BUICK PLANT
One hundred and eighty dealers of
the Pence Automobile company of Min
neapolis, Minn., operating garages
throughout Minnesota, North and South
Dakota and Montana, paid a visit to
the plant of the Buick Motor company
at Flint, Mich., at the opening of the
new year. The trip was made in a solid
vostibuled train of nine Pullman cars,
chartered by the fence Automobile
company, and two days were spent by
the visitors in looking over the great
Buick works and in enjoying the open
handed hospitality of the Buick Motor
company.
ORDERS 3750 CARS
The Pence Automobile company of
Minneapolis, distributing agents for the
Buiek cars in the northwest, started
the new year by placing an order with
the Buick Motor company of Flint,
Mich., for 3760 cars for the season of
1910. This Is said to be the largest sin
gle order ever placed wyith an automo
bile concern, either in America or Eu
rope.
MOLINE STILL DOING STUNTS
After a flve-mllo spin on the motor
cycle tracq yesterday morning the
Moline car, driven by Harol Stone and
with the Herald automobile editor as a
passenger, tackled the Altadena hill
and found her way to the top with
perfect ease. This car will be in the
great hill climb when it is pulled off.
A_ „• „_. American Motor Car Agency,
American 1210-1212 south ouve
» . C«_ I Bekins-Corey Motor Car Co:,
American=o;mp!ex pi CO and Fi oW er
*|.f Bekins-Corey Motor Car Co.,
AT.aS Pico and Flowei
C \-f t\\-% California Automobile Co.,
L>ai JOrnla „ Tenth and Main
r\ • Bosbyshell-Carpenter Co.,
l/OrriS 1226-1228 South Olive
r\ Durocar Manufacturing Co.,
l/UrOOdr . 929 South Los Angeles
r • Munns Auto Co.,
LfTipir© 1351 South Main
r 1 Standard Automobile Co.,
ICrU Twelfth and Olive
Oreat Western 1130-1132 south on V e
11 |j J I + x Motor Car Import Co.,
nai.3(iay oisona sio south ouve
U I • Tri-State Motor Car Co.,
llUpilluDl.D 600-604 South Olive
Patpr«nn pico Carriase Co
lUl^lMMl Pico and Main
Patrol Williams Automobile Co.,
I Cll 15l 1806 South Mair
RamMpr w X Cowan>
IXcillllJltl 1140-1142 South Hope
A- N- J ung Motor Car Co-
Oltl Illiy 1213 South Main
Tmirict 1 California Automobile Co.,
I OUT IM Tenth and Main
1/uJj/v Standard Automobile Co.,
TUllv Twelfth and Olive
fnntinpntal Anselus Motor Car Co-
UUIIUIIUIIIUI 1242-1244 South Flower
Ri/W I AU/i<i Angelus Motor Car Co..
IMlJcl ■LcWlO 1242-1244 South Flower
AUTO PERFORMS
MARVELOUS FEAT
MACHINE MAKES GRAND AVE
NUE HILL IN 5 MINUTES
CLIMBS STEEP INCLINE UNDER
INTERMEDIATE GEAR
Car Goes Up Heavy Grade Apparently
as Easily as if on Level
Course at Speed of Fif.
teen Miles
Another car has been found capable
of the most extraordinary feats ever
performed on tho streets of the city
of Los Angeles, and if there is a per
son In the territory known as South
ern California who doubts an automo
bile can within five minutes make
('.rand avenue hill four or five times,
Stopping in the center of tl.e tremen
dously steep grade and proceed up
again under the Intermediate gear, and
having triads the top come right down
and Without stopping at all, turn on
the run on tho grade and go again to
the top on the intermediate, return
to the bottom and go to the top at a |
35-mile gait "on the high," just let !
them call at the garage of the Bosby-
shell-Carpenter company, which has
the agency for the Dorris cars, and
have them demonstrate these facts are
just as told.
And this was done with wour pas
sengers in tile car. In addition to tnis,
the car made the two steep grads on
the back side of Second street on the
high, making the top with the car go
ing at a speed of fifteen miles an hour
and v/ith no more effort than had she
been on Olive street, which is level.
These stunts were done yesterday
afternoon with William Bosbyshell at
the wheel, Richard Harsen, George
Thorpe and The Herald automobile
man in the cur. and the manner in
which the machine did the trick in
dicates there is nothing on four wheels
around this section of the country that
can lead the Dorris on the hill climbs.
An easy, beautiful riding car, hand
somely designed and constructed, the
Dorris invites the attention of the most
critical, while the performances of the
machine in capacity will more than
favorably compare with cars ot twice
the cost of the little Doris.
BUYS THIRD DORRIS
J. H. Zitt, president of the San Diego !
Brewing company, has just purchased |
another Dorris touring car. making the
third Dorris he has bought within a
year. It is the intention of Mr. Zitt to
take one of the cars to San Diego for
use there, retaining the new car for
use In this city and the roadster for
general runabout service; but whatever
else happens, he will have nothing but
the Dorris. Bosbyshell-Carpenter com- I
pany are more than pleased with the |
letters they are receiving from pur- ]
chasers of the Dorris, as to what they
are doing and the service they are
rendering to their owners.
RACING DRIVERS REWARDED
At a banquet given at the Hotel |
Dresden. Flint. Mich.. New Year's eve, !
Louis Chevrolet and Robert Burman,
who constitute the Buick racing team, :
were presented with their respective
shares in a $10,000 award voted to the .
team by the Buick Motor company, :
for winning the Cobe trophy at the
Crown Point track, and other trophies
in the big automobile racing events of
the past season. This is the largest
bonus ever given to a racing team by .
an automobile concern in America or
Europe.
BUYS FINE TAXICAB
The Dorris Motor Car agency doliv
ered'to Robert Levy of this city within
the past week, one of the hindsomest i
taxicab cars ever brought to the Pa
cific coast. It is fitted with every con
venience and luxury that can add to
the comfort of the owner or occupants.
"■Feb'y 19-26"«
Is the Date of the
r —GREAT —I
AUTO SHOW
_____ of
Licensed Cars
Built and PROTECTED
Under the Selden Patent
These cars, representing the strength of the Automobile
Industry, wiii be exhibited at the Licensed Show, and at
NO OTHER Show in Los Angeles.
Licensed Motor Car Dealers'
Association of Los Angeles
Here Is the List —It Speaks for Itself
Apperson Matheson
LEON T. SIIETTLEB, REN'TON MOTOR CAR CO,
633 South Grand avenue. 1230 South Main street.
Babcock Electric Moon
ELMORE MOTOR CAR CO.. c . c . SLAUGHTER MOTOR CAB '
742 South Olive street. • CO-> 1026 Sout h olive.
Baker-Electric Oldsmobile
.STODDARD-DAYTON MOTOR CAR V/IUSIIIUUIIC
CO., Tenth and Olive. WOOLWINK MOTOR CAB CO.,
____________________ 1124-26-28 South Olive.
HOWARD ATTO CO* Ovprland ~
howard Atrro co« V/VCllCulll
1144 South Olive street. RENTON MOTOR CAR CO..
■ ————————— 1230 South Main street.
Cadillac r— —"
LEE MOTOR CAR CO.. Packard
ISIB South Main street. *■ CIV/IYai U
——————— ——— WESTERN MOTOR CAB CO.,
_« _ v . 727 South Olive street.
Chalmers-Detroit
ss To rnrh xoreT^e c tAB co- Palmer-Singer
"~—^ GOLDEN STATE GARAGE,
_ I - , . 2122 West Pico street.
Columbia ■ —
BIHELEY * YOCNO, D/i/1-.f/lciO
X 231 South Main street. 1 CCIICSS
1 H. O. HARRISON CO.. .-» K.
Corbin 1214 South Main street.
Corbin :
CORBIN MOTOR CAB CO., TV •
849 South Broadway. TICrCC-ArrOW
W. E. BCSH.
I fliiriPr 1227-29 South Main street.
STODDARD-DAYTON MOTOR CAR _ It . ,
CO.. Tenth and Olive. Pope-Hartford
—„ WM. R. RCESS AUTOMOBILE CO.,
r IfTinrp 1028 s°utn Main *"■"■'■
ELMORE MOTOR CAR CO.,
________________ Premier
EH* 17 H'JfW SCHWAEBE-ATKINSON MOTOR
jyi. r. «3U CO., Adams and Main streets.
LORD MOTOR CAR CO.. ________________
1032 South Olive street. Pullman
Pullman
Flanders "20"- MILLER & WTT.LIAMS.
rlanders zu «*» s*»"h °u^ •*««*•
LORD MOTOR CAR CO.. * ■
1032 South Olive street: n a
Regal
ITranlrfin big 4 AUTOMOBILE CO., I
II till Ell 1203-5 South Main street.
R. C. lIAMLIN. .
Twelfth and Olive streets.
Reo
/-H|»J Bdwy. 1931.
IwllflP nome FMJI LEON T. SHETTLER,
VJIIUV 633 ou th Grand avenue.
SHAFER-GOODE MOTOR CO., ____________________
N. W. cor. Tenth and Olive sts.
Selden
Haynes «° harmson co..
iiuj iivi7 12U South Mato street.
H. T. BROWN MOTOR CO., ______________________________
1136 South Main street.
; Simplex
FT J ■
rlilnQOn GOLDEN STATE garage,
11UUJU11 gl»g west Pico street.
WESTERN MOTOR CAB CO., _____________________
717 South Olive street.
—; Steams
Jackson C- C SLAIGHTER MOTOR CAR
uuviiuvu co 103fl South ol|ve Btreet
CHARLES H. THOMPSON, __!. ■
1012-1014 South Main street. __————-———-__________,
: ~ t Stevens Duryea
LOCOmOblle eastern motor car co.,
LOS ANGELES MOTOR CAR CO., 825" 82' SoUth OUve '«""'•
Pico and Hill streets. ■ ■ ■-■■■ ■■——■ " i ■■—
7~r~ Stoddard-Dayton M
\j\jLV\Zl STODDARD-DAYTON MOTOR CO.,
NASH & FENIMORE, Tenth and Olive.
Tenth and Olive street*. ______________________
Maxwell Studebaker
ITIUAYVCU LORD MOTOR CAR CO.
M.WWELI.-BRISCOE-LOS ANOE- 1032 South Olive street '
LES CO., 1321 South Main street. •
Mercer Thomas ,
ares = jsrs^jssrssr"-
Mitchell Winton
1.11 l Il; KOUIIINS CO., W. D. HOWARD MOTOR CAB CO.. '
1301 South Main street. Twelfth and Main streets.
Moline Woods Electric
WILSON A BITFFINfITON. ■ LEON T. SHETTLER. ■
(42 South OUv* street. , 633 South Grand avenue. '
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