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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, January 21, 1910, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-01-21/ed-1/seq-3/

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CONSERVATIVES
SCORE HEAVILY
BRITISH RURAL VOTE STRONG
FOR UNIONISTS
TORIES GAIN ONE BOTH IN SCOT.
LAND AND WALES
Tariff Reform and Promise to "Clean
Up" House of Lords Exert Influ.
ence at Country Polling
Places
[Associated Press]
LONDON, Jan. 20.—The status of the
parties, according to returns received
up to date in the general elections, fol
lows:
Unionists, 163; Liberals, 137; Labor
ites, 29; Natianalists, 53.
Gains: Unionists, 71; liberals, 10;
Laborites, 1.
Ucturns received today from 68 spats,
of which 56 were polled Wednesday,
and 12 Thursday, show the- following
results:
Unionists, 34; Liberals, 18; Laborites,
7; Nationalists, 9. Gains: Unionists,
15.
Thirteen of the Unionists' pains were
In county seats, ono in Scotland and
one in Wales. If the Unionists gain
22 of the 168 remaining scats the gov
ernment will be dependent on tha
votes of the Nationalists to legislate.
The old-fashioned English country
people, with their rock-ribbed conser
vatism, their reverence for the nobility
and their prejudices against the new
fashioned Socialism, were heard from
today, and they gave a decided boom
to the conservative .stock.
Tonight the Unionists everywhere
have taken cheer. The liberal govern
ment will return to power with a less
convincing mandate for its policies
from the country than It counted on,
if the present tendency prevails among
the rest of the voters the next few
days.
Irish Party Stronger
Its allies, the Laborites and Nation
alists, practically will hold the balance
of power and the Irish party particu
larly will be In a position to dictate
legislation.
The proposal to reform the house of
lords counted strongly among the
country people perhaps more strong
ly than did tariff reform.
Respect for the old institutions Is
more deeply rooted there than in the
cities, with their labor unions follow
ing socialistic innovations, which are
regarded with suspicion in the rural
districts. Scotland and Wales, where
non-conformists abound, stand by the
liberal party.
The results of the polling for 58 seats
yesterday were announced today, and
47 more scats were contested today,
but returns from less than half of the
latter have been reported tonight. Lon
don's last borough gave its verdict In
favor of a Unionist. Westminister re
electing W. Li. A. Burdett-Coutts, with
his majority nearly doubled.
London's Showing
The metropolis has 34 Unionists, 26
Laborltes, whereas In 1906, 38 Liberals
were elected in London, 21 Unionists
and 3 Laborites.
The popular vote in 1906 was: Union
ist, 268,267; Liberal, 258,810; Laborite,
25,472..
The popular vote this year In Lon
don is: Unionist, 338,773; Liberal, 251,
--261; Laborite, 30,046.
J. Hanniker Heaton, "father of pen
ny postage," retained his Canterbury
seat by only twenty-one votes, having
an independent-Unionist competitor.
Capt. H. Spencer Clay, Unionist,
•whose wife is a daughter of William
Waldorf Astor, defeated the late Lib
eral member, A. P. Hodges.
The Rt. Hon. A. Ure, attorney gen
eral, was indorsed by his Linlithgow-
Bhire constituents. Leif Jones, Liberal
leader of the extreme temperance par
ty and largely responsible for the re
cent licensing bill, was defeated In the
Appleby division of Westmoreland,
and the "trade" rejoices.
Chancellor Confident
"I am quite confident of the result,"
said Chancellor Lloyd-George at Ban
gor tonight.
Premier Asquith, at Flfeshlre, de
clared that one thing was certain, the
great industrial centers would not give
to the new parliament any candidate
to interfere with the system of free
trade.
The secretary of the Tariff Reform
league issued a proclamation tonight
saying:
"Today's Unionist victories conclu
sively prove that free trade is losing
its hold on the country."
Exciting scenes followed the declara
tion of the poll at Buckingham, where
the liberal candidate, F. W. Verney,
son of Lord Verney, won by a narrow
margin.
The enraged Unionists chased sev
eral prominent Liberals, who took
refuge in nearby houses.
INDIAN BURIAL EXPERTS
UNRAVEL TRUNK MYSTERY
Coffin Used by Aborigines as Last
Resting Place of Girl Arouses
Suspicions of Murder
SEATTLE, Jan. 20.—Experts on In
diiin burial unraveled the Magnolia
trunk mystery today. As soon as they
.saw the covering of bark over the trunk
and the manner in which the body was
placed therein they said the Skeleton
was that of a northern Indian girl
which had been buried in tl"> usual
way of Alaska and Queen Charlotte
Indians.
When Indians como down from
Alaska each fall to pick hops many of
them carry back with them all the
cheap trunks their canoes will hold, to
be used as coffins. The girl probably
died on the voyage and was buried after
the Indian fashion.
STAGE COACH UPSETS
REDDING, Cal., Jan. 20.—The stage
coach from Weavervlllo went over the
grade last night a mile this side of
Shasta, turning a complete somersault
and lodging against the one oak tree
on the steep mountainside. There were
three passengers, all of whom escaped
Injury. The driver, George Wolford,
was pinned to the ground beneath the
stage for over an hour, but was not
seriously hurt.
WOMAN FATALLY BURNED
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 20—Mrs.
Conrad Gemmler was fatally burned in
her home here at an early hour today
by the explosion of a lighted lamp. She
wan carrying the lamp when she stum
bled and fell, cruising it-to explode.
Policeman Bailey, hearing/the noise of
the explosion as he passed the house,
rushed in and wrapped the.; wopian In
blankets, but too late to save her, death
occurring within a few hours.
Storms and Blizzards Add to Woes
of Residents of the Chilly East
YXLECT&tC :*\ W ' . 1
XstfowpLowy I -I
I—. J. — , —.. -
SNOW PLOWS AND
SWEEPERS ARE BUSY
Storm That Swept East Leaves Mantle
of White Over Land—Com.
munication Hindered In
Many Sections
CHICAGO, Jan. 20.—The east and
the middle west are slowly recovering
from the effects of the snowstorm that
swept over many states.
The big blizzard which started in the
southwest and swept in a northeaster
ly direction toward New York and New
England affected a large section of the
country, tying up traffic in many lo
calities and bringing widespread suf
fering, especially to the poor of the
larger cities.
Many places were snowbound for
days, causing scarcity of coal and fuel.
The blizzard, one of the heaviest of
recent years, passed out to sea on the
northeastern coast of the United States.
In many places the heavy downfall of
snow was added to the remaining
snow of the Christmas blizzard, and its
removal entailed great activity and
long hours of work on the authorities.
In New York and elsewhere thou
sands of men were pressed into service
In efforts to remove from the streets
the burden which impeded traffic and
caused numerous accidents to pedes
trians and teams.
Outside of the cities the railroads,
both steam and electric, had their
work cut out for them to remove the
snow from their track 9.
MAY DIVIDE EPISCOPAL
DIOCESE OF CALIFORNIA
Plan to Be Discussed at Convention
of Churchmen to Be Held at
San Francisco
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 20.—Advance
sheets were issued today containing a
report of the committee recently ap
pointed to devise a plan for the division
of the Episcopal diocese of California.
The plan suggested for the consider
ation of the convention of Episcopal
churchmen which meets hero next week
is one calling for the establishment of
a local diocesß, to be known as the San
Francisco diocese, and another to be
composed of fourteen counties and to
be known as the missionary diocese of
the San Joaquin valley. At present
there are twenty-four counties in the
diocese of California.
The counties to comprise the now
missionary diocese are San Joaquin,
Calaveraa, Alpine, Stanislaus, Tuolum
ne, Merced, Mariposa, Fresno, Madera,
Kings, Tulare, Kern, Mono and Inyo.
LACE CURTAINS TO REMAIN
IN MRS. IRISHMAN'S HOME
French Court Says Wife of American
Ambassador to Italy Should
Have Been Protected
PARIS, Jan. 20.—The court today
dismissed the case growing uut of the
attempted seizure of lace curtains fur
nished for the residence in the Avenue
Dv Bois De Cologne of Mrs. John G.
A Lelihman, wife of the American am
bassador to Italy. The Judge ruled
that it was simply a question of a dis
puted bill and that the standing of
Mrs. Lelshman should have protected
her against seizure.
Mrs. Leishman was not in the city
when a tradesman sought to take from
her home goods which he valued at
$1800 and for which he had not been
paid. In the absence of Mrs. Leish
man, the correctness of the bill was
questioned and the seizure resisted.
PLEADS SELF DEFENSE
RENO, Ney., Jan. 20.—Mrs. Mac E.
Talbot, the young woman who was ar
rested on a charge of murdering her
husband, Al Talbot, October 28. in the
law office of W. D. Jones, today was
placed on trinl for her life in Judge
Pike's court. The entire day was passed
In examining Jurors and in all prob
ability at least one more venire will
bo necessary before a Jury is secured.
Justifiable homiciile in defense of her
person and insanity caused by Mrs.
Talbot'l alleged delicate condition will
fie the defense.
THE results from Hysto—the marvelous
nerve food—are always positive and axe per
manent.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: FRIDAY MORNING, JANUARY 21, 1910.
WELLESLEY STUDENTS TO
AID SHIRTWAIST STRIKERS
Girls Raise $1000 and Place Order for
Enough Garments to Start Co
operative Factory
NEW YORK, Jan. 20.—The striking
shirstwaist girls today received the
best piece of news that has come to
them In several days. From Welles
ley, Mass., came the announcement
that Wellesley college girls have raised
$1000 to help the cause of the strikers,
and have also given an order for 1000
shirtwaists to be made at the proposed
girls' co-operative factory.
This order, It Is said, insures Im
mediate starting of the proposed fac
tory which, according to the announce
ment today. Is to be built, equipped
and financed by Miss Anne Morgan,
daughter of J. Pierpont Morgan.
Miss Morgan, It is announced, of
fered to provide the money for the en
terprise as soon as an order for 1000
waists was obtained.
GARMENT WORKERS' STRIKE
NEW YORK, Jan. 20.—A new strike
of garment workers has started in New
York. Four thousand knee breeches
makers quit work in 150 shops yester
day, and 1000 more followed them to
day. According to the strikers their
wages of from $10 to $16 a week are
Inadequate.
FREIGHT TRAIN RUNS
AWAY; 3 MEN KILLED
Engine and Cars on Moffat Road Jump
Track and Are Hurled Down
Steep Declivity
DENVER, Jan. 20.—Tearing down
the mountain at the rate of nearly
seventy miles an hour, a flight train
on the Moffat road jumped the track
at a point between Jenny Lake and
Antelope, the summit of the range,
early this morning and the entire train
plunged down the hill.
The engine was hurled 300 feet from
the track. Three men were killed and
two fatally injured. The dead:
ENGINEER GRAY. Denver.
FIREMAN HOOSICK, Denver.
A. FETIG, brakeman, Denver, miss
ing-.
Conductor T. P. Chapcott and Brako
man Buringer are sported fatally in
jured.
Berrlnger was hurled far from his
train into the deep snow.
The train was bound for Denver. It
was drawn by a big compound engine,
one of the largest in use on the steep
mountain grades.
SNOW BLOCKS MAIL DELIVERY
TRUCKEE, Cal., Jan. 20.—Snow Is
from eight to twelve feet deep between
this city and Lake Tahoe, and it is
impossible to get the mail between the
two places, The snow has piled up to
a height of eight feet here, and the
rotary plows are being worked over
time "to kep the road clear.
POLICE DOGS ON DUTY ,
IN BROOKLYN BECOME
ADDICTED TO LIQUORS
mDW YORK, Jan. 30.—There Is i> new
■caudal in the Brooklyn police depart
ment. It has been discovered that six
of the police dogs, which were added to
the force a year ago, have become ad
dicted <o the u»e of Intoxicants.
Three limes they have been found
under the Influence of liquor while an
duty.
The does, It Is said, made | friends
Home time ago with a bartender In the
district which they patrol. He offered
them liquor and they soon acquired an
appetite for It. Various suggestions for
disciplining the canine guardian* of the
pence are under condlderatlon.
AMBASSADOR OF BRAZIL
GIVEN STATE FUNERAL
President, Diplomatic Corps, Senators
and Representatives Present
at Impressive Service
WASHINGTON, Jan. 20.—With all
the Impresslveness and solemnity at
tending the joint participation' of the
state, the military and the church, the
funeral of Joaquin Nabuco, late Bra
zilian ambassador to this capital, was
conducted today at St. Matthew's Ro
man Catholic church. The body was
escorted to the church by cavalry, ar
tillery and a battalion of engineers.
The honorary pall bearers were Sec
retary Knox, the Italian, Austro-Hun
garlan and French ambassadors, the
Portuguese and Chilian ministers,
Senator Root, Senator Cullom, Asso
ciate Justice Holmes, Representative
Perkins, Admiral Schley and John
Barrett.
The services at the church were
conducted by Mgr. Falconio, the papal
delegate, assisted by Mgr. Lee of St.
Matthew's. President Taft, the mem
bers of his cabinet, nearly all of the
diplomatic body in Washington, mem
bers of the supreme court of the United
States and a number of senators and
representatives and officials of high
degree attended the services.
RALPH LEAVITT ARRIVES
IN SEATTLE FOR TRIAL
Auto Dealer of Los Angeles Said to
Have Expended $16,000
Avoiding Court
SEATTLE, Jan. 20.—Ralph J. Leavitt,
the Los Angeles automobile dealer ac
cused of manslaughter because an au
tomobile which he was demonstrating
killed a street sweeper in this city
eighteen months ago, came to Seattle
today and furnished $3000 bail for ap
pearance In court to stand trial
March 9.
Leavitt's efforts to escape trial arc
said to have cost him $16,000. The other
two men who were in the car at the
time of the accident will not be In
town during the trial.
Leavltt went before the grand jury
today and made a full statement con
cerning the alleged holdup in Los An
geles by which two employes of the
Seat.le" prosecuting attorney's office
are said to have squeezed $1000 out of
Leavitt for not extraditing him.
FINDS ENORMOUSLY RICH
GOLD IN ALASKAN MINE
Pans Show as High as $400 Each from
Cleanups Made in Koyokuk
District
FAIRBANKS, Alaska, Jan. 20.—Re
ports received here today from the
Koyokuk district, east of Norton bay.
Indicate an unusually rich gold strike
there.
Several big cleanups have already
been made, some pans running $400
each having been washed
The reports, which confirm rumors
received last fall that the Koyokuk
district was showing rich prospects,
caused great excitement here, and a
stampede to the new diggings is prob
able.
COHEN'S BAIL FIXED
PHILADELPHIA, Jan. 20.—Counsel
for Ferdinand Cohon, the waiter who is
accused of kldnaptne Roberta De
Janon, the 17-year-old heiress, appeared
before Judge Staake in the cilminal
court here today In habeas corpus pro
ceedings and after an argument of
nearly two hours succeeded In having
ball lixed in the sum of $2000.
The Ange. a grill mis excellent serv
ice and better food. Fourth and Spring.
Did You Know Your Coat $$>o§k, JssjL
Can Be Bought for Half Its Real Worth W§^^^^%
Every Ticket Plainly Marked l&^stsl^S^^^&^'F*^
mKKfr One-Half Price 1W I (i™y|
" _-^^QL^IC^ A LWAYR headquarters for clever coats. "The 1 WjM I lli,|v\Wifi
Y^^j&Z*&lh^^tos* ■**• Style Shop" has this season entirely eclipsed I :<|u' 1 ■;! \jitL *' rl^tt^.
'(^//W^Hn all previous records In the quantity, variety and LjU|| I Bj; Uhfnp. / *VJI
r^/l f/¥tyiL vl 'fiV\ quality of the (.'Onts sold. Rolling coats in such Im- j jkj.i 1 blTs"to4i llfl "^^
\\|lbl|||K |V\ prices are cut square in two for Immediate !ly •> 1 I^4utf \•'/] |W
/■III ' i I' b *l \\ Hn \\ft •"! • * TV 7
''TOJ^-lirtlLrS^iW *7?TV> i^VrtfVw^K J^rtvrsfU** facing 0 of brisht red which is
337-9 South Broadway £4.75, 55. 75, $6. 75
t • '____ i I
1 30 Minutes from Los Angeles
Lj^ E Venice Villas
IL'* XICIL Fnll ' p«rni *he<* for Housekeeping
"Th* Winter Resort" Rent $7 50 to $15 Per month ' including- light,
The Winterßesort | water and hou3C lauodry. Gas extra as wed.
Newly Furnished. Hot Sea-Salt Water Baths with Rooms. Daily
Concerts by CHIAFFARELLI'S WONDERFUL CONCERT BAND
I . All the Great Amusements at Venice Are Open
Every Day in the Year
SWITCHMEN WILL
ARBITRATE STRIKE
Railroads and Yardmen Finally Agree
to Mediate Differences in Chi
cago—Long Conference
Is Successful
WASHINGTON, Jan. 20.—Arbitra
tion is to bo the solution of the con
troversy between the Chicago railways
and their switchmen.
This was decided today, announce
ment being made by the mediat rs that
both sides had agreed to arbitrate.
The iirst meeting of* the arbitrators
will be held In Chicago, January 24.
The conclusion was reached after a
week of conferences between Chair
man Knapp of the interstate com
merce commission, and Dr. Nelll, com-
missioner of labor, with representa
tives of the railroads and Switchmen's
union.
It was determined that the matters
In dispute should be referred to arbi
trators anil tin agreement was signed
naming tf. E. Hebe ding, first vice, pres
ident of the Switchmen's union, as
arbitrator for the .switchmen, and V.
B. Gray, vice president of the St.
Louis & San Francisco railroad, for
the railroad.
When these two arbitrators meet
in Chicago next Monday they will en
deavor to agrei upon a third arbitrator.
TWO MINERS DEAD AND
OVER SCORE ENTOMBED
Explosion Near Richmond, Mo., Re.
suits in Imprisonment and In.
jury of Workmen
RICHMOND, Mo., Jan. 20.—Two
mlneri were killed and several others
were Injured, one fatally, when thirty
men were Imprisoned in mine No. 6,
owned by Pence & Calnen, one mile
from here, today as the result of an
explosion.
Among the injured was James
Pence, a brother of one of the proprie
tors.
The other miners were rescued after
being imprisoned three hours.
With one or two exceptions their in
juries were slight.
CHURCH BUILT FOR YAQUIS
EL PASO, Jan. "o.— The latest act of
the treaty of peace between Mexico and
the Yaqul Indians of Bonora was ful
filled Sunday by the (.Indication of a
church built by the government in the
village of Pitahaya. Governor Torres
and other high officials participated.
Yaquis from all parts of the state
were present and held a great festival
in honor of the first anniversary of the
signing of the treaty.
TO START "DRY" CAMPAIGN
REDDING, Cal., Jan. 20.—The state
anti-saloon league has sent word here
that it intends Immediately to start ■
vlforoui campaign to put Shasta and
Tehama counties on the dry list. It is
the general opinion hart Unit Shasta
will bo dry.
DENIES RIGHT TO SEND
FORESTERS TO COLLEGE
Comptroller of Treasury Says Govern.
ment Cannot Legally Pay
Tuition of Rangers
WASHINGTON, Jan. 20.—Comp
troller of the Treasury Tracewell de
clared today that there was nothing in
the law or appropriation bill for the
forest service giving the secretary of
agriculture power to send forest rang
ers to college at government expense
and to pay their traveling expenses.
When Solicitor McCabe of the de
partment of agriculture took charge of
the forestry bureau following the dis
missal of Gifford Pinchot he found
there were about 200 of these forest
rangers attending universities and col
leges in the west for short courses in
forestry, costing the government be
tween $15,000 and $20,000 per month,
being assured their government sala
ries and traveling expenses meanwhile
would be paid.
Mr. McCabe referred the matter to
Secretary Wilson, who In turn tub
mitted it to the comptroller.
TO PLOW BY WHOLESALE
FALLKIVER MILLS, Cal., Jan. 20.—
A monster traction engine weighing
sixteen tons and costing $7000 will be
used to plow .SOOO acres of tule land
just east of this town, which has been
reclaimed. The tires on the engine
wheels are ten feet across, thus enab
ling the monster engine to plow where
horses would mire. The engine will
pull twenty plows in a string, turning
nine inches of sod twenty feet wide at
a rate of two and a halt miles an hour.
SEIZE DECAYED FISH
OAKLAND, Jan. 20.—The city au
thorities, backed up by the police,
have confiscated twenty-two tons of
decayed fish which have been landed at
the city wharf for delivery In the vari
ous retail markets. Investigation
prove! the condemned fish to be the
■left-overs" from the San Francisco
markets, which yere overstocked last
Friday.
HYSTO literally makes a new man or
woman of you.
It'sTimefor Entertainment
Now for the family Card Games before the open grate, or
for hotly contested Chess Matches under the big lamp.
There's every necessity and requisite for good fun here.
Chess Men, Checker Boardss Playing Cards, Bridge and
Five Hundred Scores, Cribbage Boards, Dominoes, etc.
Lots of Suggestions for Favors and Prizes, too, and
many unusual schemes for Party Decorations.
Sanborn, Vail & Company
735 S. Broadway Between 7th and Bth Streets
DOCTORS SAY LOGAN
ADMITS 3 MURDERS
Man on Trial in Colville, Wash., for
Slaying Woman Confesses to Kill
ing Her and Two Other
Persons
SPOKANE, Jan. 20.—According to
statements made by Dr. L. B. Har
vey of Colvllle, Wash., and Dr. M. E.
Setters of Mpokanj, the man known as
James F. Logan, but whose real name
is believed to be Frederick Jahns, and.
who has been on trial at Colville the
last ten days for the murder of Mrs.
Agnes Jansen, has confessed not only;
to that crime, but to two other mur
ders.
The doctors were closeted with the
accused man several hours, as experts,
examining his mental condition and.
they have added a decidedly sensa
tional feature to the case by making
public his verbal confession.
They state he told them that In the
heat of anger he killed Mrs. Jansen,
by breaking her neck, and then burned
her body in the fire; that he struch,
her with his fist and did not shoot her.
He said, report the doctors, he mur
dered K. R. Shively In Spokane, and
shipped the body north in a trunk and
burned It on his farm.
He also confessed he killed the real
James Logan In Maple Falls, What
com county, Wash., and hid the body
under a bridge at Maple Falls.
Also, that he oashed a draft for $85,
--000 on a national bank In New Or
leans after he had returned from the
Boer war In South Africa, and that the
bank records will show the draft was
cashed.
ACQUITTED OF ARSON
KINGSTON, N. V., Jan. 28.—"Bill"
Monroe! wlf-confessed desperado,
Whom officers sought for fifteen,
months before he was captured in
California early in December last, ha.H
been acquitted of arson in the county
court here. He Is yet to b*> tried,
however, for assaulting a party of
New Yorkers on a farm near here. To
these charges, his lawyers say, Mon
roe will plead guilty.
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