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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, January 24, 1910, Image 10

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Latest News from Neighboring Cities
OCEAN PARK
Circulation, Trolleymiv. bet. Pier aye.
and Marine si. Home 4711.
Correspondent—Homo 4381; Sunset 701.
VETERAN TIRES
OF LIFE'S TRIALS
JOHN L. V. FONCK JUMPS INTO
OCEAN
HE IS ALSO BELIEVED TO HAVE
TAKEN POISON
Member of Soldiers' Home, Early
Day Patrolman in Los An.
geles, Pens Farewell Note
Before He Dies
[Special to The Herald.]
OCEAN PARK, Jan. 23.— Finally tir
ing of life after a trial of more than
four score years, John L. V. Fonck. a
member of the National Soldiers' home
at Sawtelle, deliberately committed sui
cide this morning by jumping Into the
ocean from Bristol pier. It is thought
he also swallowed some powerful poi
son before his fatal leap was made,
but this has not been definitely ascer
tained. This theory is supported by
the fact that the body was found float
ing on the surface of the water by per
sons pleasure ashing on the pier. The
body is at the Kirkelie undertaking
establishment awaiting action by Coro
ner Hartwell.
Proof conclusive that the suicide of
Fonck was premeditated is contained
in a memorandum found in nis coat,
which Jie removed before entering the
water. On a lent' of a little book was
written the address of his granddaugh
ter, Mrs. Mary ililhc.m, lib? Indiana
avenue, station JL. Los Angeles. A
number of postal cards, self-addressed
by the granddaughter, were in the old
man's pocket, un one of these Fonck
had written:
Pens Farewell Message
"Goodbye, dear Mary, and all."
So fur as is known, no one saw
Fonck commit his rash act. G. Giese,
who resides near the Bristol pier, was
the first to discover the body floating
among the piling of the pier about 10
o'clock this morning. He fastened his
(ishhooks in the clothing and called for
help. Although there were no signs of
life evident, the body was yet slightly
warm when removed from the water,
where it had been perhaps an hour. M.
J. Clark and F.ddle Averill, young men
residing near by, got the body into a
boat and brought it to shore.
Fonck belonged to Company L. at the
Soldiers' home, hut had been on a long
furlough. He returned to the home
last night, entering the hospital. He
was treated for a throat affection, his
throat and chest being carefully ban
daged.
Kept Plans to Himself
According to the surgeon in charge,
Fonck left the hospital about 8 o'clock
this morning:. No inkling of his inten
tion to take his life was given any of
his comrades. As the time elapsing
between his departure from the homo
and the finding of the body in the surf
was comparatively short, it is thought
he had made up his mind to do away
■with himself before he started. In the
opinion of the police, Fonck must have
sat upon the railing of the pier and ta
ken poison, thought to have been chlo
roform, from the effects manifested,
and when the drug got in its work he
Ball to iii-: d< ath.
Mrs. Mllhean was called by Under
taker Kirkelie on the telephone as soon
as her address was discovered in the
dead man's effects, and informed of the
suicide.
In early days Fonck was a member
of the L,os Angeles police force. He
whs once captain of a company of state
militia and served through the war
with Company H, Second California
cavalry.
RABBIT FOUND IN OCEAN
PARK COUNCIL CHAMBER
OCEAN PARK, Jan. 23.—Ocean Park
officials are puzzled tonight over the
finding of ;t small jack rabbit In the
trustees' room at the city hall. The
hare, which is scarcely more than a
month old, was found by Janitor Stod
dard when he made the rounds of the
buildine. It. required the united ef
forts of City Clerk <!. C. Watt. City
Kngineer Lewis and the janitor to sur
round and capture the intruder.
The trustees' sanctuary la on the
second floor of the building, and is ap
proached by a flight of steps of tnf
usual height. That the animal was
able to mount the stairs and make its
way to the council chamber alone is
considered impracticable by several of
the city officials, who declare that a
joke has been played upon Janitor
Stoddard. As la well known to visit
ors to this city, the city hall stands
In the eastern end of Ocean Park In
a sparsely populated district, but
where the number of jack rabbits Is
unlimited, according to owners of gar
dens.
RIVERSIDE
Corner Eighth mnd Main «t».
Phone* Main 287, Home 1441.
WOMAN DESPONDENT OVER
LOSS BECOMES INSANE
Mrs. Domencia Moisio Comes from
Italy Expecting Fine Home
Provided
RIVERSIDE, Jan. 23.—Mrs. Domen
cia Molslo, who has been here from
Italy for the past three months, was
yesterday committee to the Highland
asylum by Judge Densmore.
The woman expected to find that her
husband had provided a handsome
home for her. but. when she arrived,
I that he had squandered the
40,000 francs which he had when he
left home on dry land that is practi
cally worthless. The loss weighed M
on her mind that she threw herself in
front of a moving Santa Fe train on
Thursday In a vain effort to commit
suicide.
SAN PEDRO
Correspondent—Sunset 26!6j Home i.
Circulation—ll7 W. Sixth ntreet. Sun
net 2900; Home 38.
NORWEGIAN CONSUL
IN fISTIC ENCOUNTER
GEORGE H. PECK AND JOHN
ANDERSON CLASH
Affair Result of Attempt to Have
Official Removed as Nor.
way's Representative at
San Pedro
[Special to The Herald.]
SAN PEDRO, Jan. 23.—Efforts of
prominent Norwegians to have George
H. Peck removed as Norwegian con
sul ut San Pedro resulted in a fight
encounter last night in front of a local
theater between Peck and John A.
Anderson.
Peck was coming out of the theater
and accosted Anderson. Soon the two
were struggling to get at each other,
with Officer Sparks, the huskiest man
on the force, bumping their heads
against the wall of the theater lobby.
The men wore taken to the station,
each with a bloody lace, but no
charges were preferred.
Peck, wlio is not a Norwegian, has
been consul of Norway for several
years. For the past year Anderson
and some of the other Norwegians
here have been endeavoring to have
him removed. Recently charges have
been preferred against Peck, support
ed by affidavits and court documents,
to show that property which he owns
had been rented for immoral pur
poses.
Norwegian societies in Los Angeles
and elsewhere have taken up the fight
and there has been considerable agita
tion over the matter in several of the
Norwegian papers.
SAN BERNARDINO
Ofrilce 384 E Street
Ph«Mi Home 16*. Sunset Mate lto.
TRAFFIC MEN TO MEET WITH
SAN BERNARDINO MERCHANTS
Conference Is Result of Campaign in
Behalf of Better Freight
Rates
SAN BERNARDINO, Jan. 23.—T0
endeavor to arrange freight rates to
the satisfaction of the merchants of
San Bernardino, who have been con
ducting a systematic campaign for a
number of months against alleged dis
crimination in the rates on freight to
and from San Bernardino, the heads of
the traffic departments of the three
railroads will be in this city February
1, to confer with the committee which
has been conducting the fight.
The traffic men coming are: W. Cr.
Barnwell, general freight agent of the
Santa Fe; F. A. Warm, general traffic
manager of the Salt Lake; and T. A.
Graham, assistant general freight
agent Of the Southern Pacific.
The Southern Pacific has already
made numerous adjustments desired by
the merchants, principally to the Im
perial Valley, and other points. The
Santa Fe is preparing a new rate
schedule and it has been intimated that
company is now ready to take the
same steps as the Southern Pacific.
The state railroad commission will
meet here tomorrow, but such a
marked degree of success has been at
tained by the merchants' committee
that it is probable that no complaints
will be laid before this body.
COMMITTEE CHOSEN FOR
CHARTER REVISION WORK
Judge Oster Announces Names of Cit
izens to Draft San Bernar.
dino Document
SAN BERNARDINO, Jan. 23.—
Judge F. F. Oater, chairman of the
g< neral committee of sixty-one citi
zens appointed by the mayor to revise
the charter, has announced his selec
tion of the men who are to serve on
ilm subcommittee which Is to have
charge of the revision work.
The men who will serve as members
of the subcommittee, with Judge Oster
as chairman, are Judge B. F. Bledsoe,
George M. Cooley, J. W. Curtis, F. B.
Daley, B. S. Draper, H. Ooodcell, C. C.
Haskell, J. J. Hanford, Joseph Inger
soll, B, E. Katz, W. F. lemon, W. A.
Manson, W. M. Parker, N. A. Rich
ardson and M. B. Shaw.
NO TYPHUS IN CITY WATER
SAN BERNARDINO, ' Jan. 23.—1t
has been conclusively demonstrated
that the city water .has been in no
degree responsible for the typhoid
eases that developed here a few weeks
ago. Tests were conducted by the
Santa Fe railroad company, which
uses large quantities of water from
the city mains, and it is announced
that the report of the chief surgeon of
the Santa Fe hospital at Los Angeles
shows no typhoid germs in the sam
ples of water secured by the com
pany's physician here.
TO INSPECT AUTO ENGINES
SAN BERNARDINO, Jan. 23.—The
fire committee of the city council, con
sisting of J. C. Cole and Thomas
Holmes, will visit Los Angeles and
other cities this week Inspecting au
tomobile fire engines. It is the inten
tion of the council to purchase au
tomobile equipment for the downtown
station, moving the present wagon to
the Pennsylvania avenue station, In
the northwest portion of the city,
which is at present without fire pro
tection.
PETITION FOR MACADAM
SAN BERNARDINO, Jan. 23.—The
property owners of H street have
signed a petition to the city council re
questing the macadamizing of that
thoroughfare from Second to Eighth
street under the Vrooman act. This
adds six blocks of improved streets to
i In- ninny mtles now under way or
ted.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORJONG, JANUARY 24, 1910.
PASADENA
Office a: South Fnlr Onks Avenue.
Home 48; Sunset 400.
Circulation Dept. Home 1842 J Sunset 2740
BOND OPPOSITION
ISSUES ALLEGATIONS
QUESTIONS PUT TO ADMINIS-
TRATION FACTION
Pro.Bond Party Insists That Several
of Them Have Already Been
Answered —Campaign Be.
comes Interesting
[Special to Thi- Herald.]
PASADENA, Jan. 23.—1n a startling
series of questions and allegations the
anti-water committee this evening
challenged the pro-water or adminis
tration faction to battle in the tew
short days before the election on a
million and a quarter bonds with
which to purchase the ciiy water
plants. The election will be held next
Wednesday. The question! are as fol
lows:
"We do not oppose municipal own
ership, but we must not cripple our
credit by wasting $1,200,000 to oh Ige
stockholders who have placed false
values on stock that belongs to land.
"Will you believe that these water
companies are great revenue producers
when they are continually in debt and
making assessments?
"Was the Lake Vineyard company
ever in financial condition to pay divi
dends When it immediately asked the
stockholders to pay it back the assess
men of $5 per Share to build a reser
voir? They had planned this improve
ment before they paid the dividend.
"The mayor has said he would not
agree to pay this price if the rebates
were not legal. During his three years
in office why has he not taken this
matter to the supreme court and set
tled it? Answer —The water companies
will not permit It.
Impugns Council's Purpose
"What do you think of a report fixed
up by the coucil to suit their wicked
purpose?
"How do you like paying for this
report and its postage out of the pub
lic treasury?
"Why buy $284,600 of land and get
no more water?
"On July 16, 1906, the Pasadena Lake
Vineyard Land and Water company
under oath swore that the corporation
was a corporation not for profit and
that no value should be placed on its
water or water rights. -That the total
market value of all its stock was
$254,077.
"Don't forget South Pasadena. She
must receive forever her legal share
of water. She fixes the price, which Is
less than we pay. She will receive her
share of the plunder and will never
have to pay a cent of the bonds or In
terest. Moreover, she can tax the plant
and the franchise. You cannot vote for
such a scheme.
"No matter what these plants may
be worth they have been built with
the money paid by you and all water
users, and belong to the land. Why
should you mortgage your home to
buy these plants?
"Why did the mayor figure the In
come of one company during the years
innT-S-9 and the income of the other
company during the years 1906-7-8?"
Several Questions Answered
The city administration, represent
ing the pro-bond faction, has answered
a number of these questions b<" re
they were asked. In a communication
to voters issued several days ago the
statement was made that the valuation
of the water properties as appraised by
experts and committees was a million
and a half, f"r which the city will pay,
at the option price it holds, one million
dollars, gaining $'>00,000 in the deal.
That the water companies are con
tinually making assessments and are
continually in debt is denied by the is
suance recently of dividends on the
water stock of two of the companies
and the issuance of dividends at stated
intervals on all water stock in the
city. Figures will lie Issued later show
ing the absolute income of the water
plants. Already it has been shown
that under dividend management the
companies have been making enough
to pay all the running expenses of the
water plants and provide for payment
of interest on the bonds and of depre
ciation and extension of the plants.
"The list of questions is aimed at
our motives," declared a municipal of
ficial this afternoon. "The anti-water
people seek to impugn our motives
and misrepresent our stand in the mat
ter of municipal ownership. It amounts
to nothing less than passing the lie
direct. Why do they not come out and
pass the lie around personally so that
we may individually answer?"
HOME DOES NOT CHANGE
WITH THE COSTUMES
Dr. Daniel F. Fox Says It Stands for
Love and Purity and Is Im.
mune to Time
PASADENA, Jan. 23.—Dr. Daniel F.
Fox this evening preached on the
twentieth century home. He divided
his subject so as t( include affinities,
divorce and marria;. ±.
"There is no difference essentially
between the home of the twentieth
century and the home of any other
century," he said. "A home is a
home, whether in a Chicago fiat, a
dugout or a California bungalow. The
spelling of 'home' is not h-o-u-s-e.
Love, loyalty and piety constitute the
home. Marriage Hhould not be con
stituted because of money, convenience
or title. The home must be based on
love. And If parties are not contented
in love there is no home.
"The three lovely expressions of
home are from the three great English
writers, Longfellow, Whlttler and
Burns. 'Snow Bound,' by Whittier;
'The Hanging of the Crane,' by Long
fellow, and the 'Cotters' Saturday
Night,' by Burna, are the three great
word pictures of *lOME.
"They enforce and amplify the word
home. They stand for love and purity.
There are more happy homes in Amer
ica than in any other country, but if
we do not observe the principles of
home, love, piety and purity, we will
soon be on the rocks of scandal, a
shipwrecked race."
BOY FALLS FROM SWING
PASADENA, Jan. 23.—Willie BfiO«
field, 256 Camden street, fell from a
swing at Central park this afterno in,
contracted several severe contusions
on the forehead and was unconaoioui
for an hour from temporary concus-
Rlon of tho brain. While swinging
high the la.l. who is 13 years of age,
fell backward over tho board, land
iiiK on his head and shoulder. Ho
was taken to the emergency hospital,
where his wo,, .ds were treated by tho
poiico surgeons. He was afterward
removed to his home, where his in
juries wore pronounced not serious.
FRIENDS HOLD ANNUAL MEETING
PABADENA, Jan. 23.— The Friends
of Southern California hold their an
nual meeting at Pasadena tiiis after;
noon and evening. Three hundred at
tended. The sermon of the day was
that of Prof. \v. P. Pinkham of the
Huntingdon Park seminary of Los An
ii "Qod Forbid Thai r Glory in
Any Praise but of Him." A luncheon
was served by tho women of the
church ami following the luncheon
hour this afternoon was given up to a
discussion '»f the affairs of the church
by the delegates assembled from the
various meeting houses.
EIGHT CHARGED WITH GAMBLING
PABADBJJJA, Jan. 23.—i. ColMns
ami eight cithers were arrested early
this morning at 39 North Fair Oaks
for gambling. The raid was led by
Lieut. Copping of the Pasadena police.
The men were arraigned and lot out
on ball to be tried Monday. The raid
was cunningly planned on inside In
formation ami proved successful.
Make Shoes at Venice
VENICE, Jan. 23.—The Mintor-Bll
lings Shoe Manufacturing company
will be.gin to make shoes at Venice
next Monday, employing twenty-five
hands. The factory, situated along
the line of the Los Angeles-Pacific
railway in tho eastern part of the city,
was formerly owned by tho » Venice
Shoe company, which had a short life.
1 The local concern is one of the very
, few shoe factories in the west.
VENICE
Circulation—Home 4711; Sunset 5361.
Correspondent—Honie. 4381, Kunaet 791 j
BATHER DEPARTS FROM
VENICE PLUNGE LEAVING
SET OF FALSE TEETH
Owner in Order to Regain Thsm Will
Be Compelled to Show the
Management That They
Fit
VENICE, Jan. 23.—"Found—Set of
false teeth which were left at Venice
salt water plunge yesterday among
'valuables.' Owner may have same by
applying personally and proving prop
erty to the satisfaction of the manage
ment."
The above isn't exactly a classified
advertisement, but something like it
may be expected to appear in the
newspapers soon unless the "valuables"
are claimed by their owner. Consid
erable amusement was furnished the
young woman in charge of the ticket
office and check room at the bath house
by the discovery of the teeth today in
one of the little drawers used to store
valuable* while their owners are pad
dling in the tank.
The unusually warm weather yester
day brought a large number of people
to Venice, many of whom enjoyed
swimming in the plunge. Just who the
teeth belong to is not known. The
teeth, brand new and forming an upper
plate, were hidden beneath a piece of
paper in the drawer. The owner, prob
ably unused to their adornment, is
thought to have removed his other
valuables from the drawer and de
parted, unaware that he had left be
hind a most important adjunct to his
digestive system.
The teeth belong to a man. Least
ways, th;it's the opinion of the girl at
the ticket window.
"Do you suppose a woman would for
get her teeth?" she asked today when
urged to give a reason for her opinion
Sho continued:
"When valuables are left here by
patrons of the bathhouse, the rules re
quire us to have the owner identify his
property satisfactorily before we turn
it over to him. Whoever owns these
teeth may have them if he can show us
that they belong to him. He must try
them on here. A man whom I told
about the teeth this afternoon wanted
me to give them to him as a souvenir
of his visit to Venice, but when I asked
him to see if they fitted him he appar
ently loßt all desire to collect dental
Bouvenlrs*"
RIVERSIDE NEWS NOTES
KIVEKSIDK, Jan. 23.—Harry F.
Shedd has been re-elected secretary of
the Riverside Business Men's associa
tion. Tlie directors at the conclusion of
their meeting partook of an oysler sup
per as the guests of F. P. Younglove,
newly elected president of the associa
tion.
T. Brennenstuhl has begun a suit for
divorce against his ■wife, Mrs. Ellen
Brennenstuhl, and asks for the custody
of an 18-month-old baby girl which he
alleges the mother has left to his entire
care the past year.
MAN WITH BROKEN FINGERS
HALTS HORSES, SAVES GIRL
Hero Ignores Pain and Grasps Bridle
of Runaway Horses Drag.
glng Young Woman
GREENWICH, Conn., Jan. 23.—With
his fingers broken and suffering acute
pain, Joseph Martin, a liveryman in
the employ of F. A. Mosher, saved the
life of Miss Jessie Benedict, a wealthy
New York woman, who had been
thrown from her sleigh and, her feet
entangled in the reins, was being
dragged along Oreenwich avenue, the
main thoroughfare here.
BUM Benedict is a guest at the coun
try home of J. Robinson Beard, her
brother, and she was driving in his
sleigh to the village. The runners be
riimr caught in the car tracks and the
sleigh was overturned, throwing Miss
Benedict and the coachman to the
ground. Miss Benedict's feet were
caught and the horses ran away.
Martin, whose fingers were broken a
■hort time before while he was ciank
lng an automobile, ran out and grasped
the bridles. He was dragged sonic dis
tance, and the pain from lilh broken
ftngeri wan intense, but he stopped ths
horiee. He was rewarded by Miss
Met.
No Monopoly
"I want a license to marry the best
eir! In the world," said the young man.
"Sure," commented the clerk, "that
makes thirteen hundred licenses for
that girl this season."—Christmas
Puck.
JAIL BREAK PLOT
FOILED BY CONVICT
CONFESSION OF PRISONER IN
SING SING HEEDED
Inadequate Quarters at New York
State Penal Institution Are
Feared by Warden to
Be Insecure
NBW YORK, Jan. 23.—0n1y the con
fession of a fear stricken convict pre
vented an attempt Of 300 prisoners In
Sing Sine; prison from making a break
for liberty New Year's night, and even
then their plans were frustrated only
by desperate and quick action on the
part of the prison authorities. Since
the word of the contemplated outbreak
was first received tin- prison guard has
been doubled.
Owing to the inadequate and crowded
conditions prevalent at Sing Sing 300
convicts are housed in an improvised
dormitory removed from the main
buildings and before the proposed out
break they were insufficiently guarded
and a plan to overpower the six guards
in charge of them was temptingly feas
ible.
Probably never before in the history
of penal Institutions has such a great
number of prisoners entered info a plot
to gain liberty.
Unlike those In the main cell houses,
the prisoners confined in the impro
vised" dormitory have privileges which
Permit of their being together several
hours after they quit work and they
are allowed to converse among them
selves long after the convicts in the
main buildings are put away in solitary
confinement.
New Year's Day Chosen . -
This condition was responsible for the
breeding of the plot for a wholesale
delivery. Xew Year's night was select
ed according to the convict who weak
ened and told the story, because the
men did not have to work that day
and naturally they expected a lenient
and holiday spirit would be manifested,
extending to the guards.
When the guards were apprised of
the situation they were overwhelmed
with fear until steps were taken to
prevent the outbreak and reinforce
ments came to their aid. It is said
that several men were immediately
mustered in and rushed to the tin shop
dormitory, where they remained
throughout the night. The convicts
were told that their plans were known
and any attempt to obtain freedom
would provo disastrous. The word
pissed among them that the first man
making a suspicious move would be
shot dissipated all hopes of a concerted
attack.
Warden Jesse D. Frost, on being un
able to obtain sufficient men on such
short notice for the task, heavily
armed himself and acted aa guard
throughout the night of terror which
followed. When the hour appointed for
the outbreak had passed there was
deep feeling of relief among all the
guards on duly.
The building where the three hun
dred convicts are domiciled every night
stands some distance from the other
buildings, and in all likelihood the six
guards on duty could have been over
powered and tiie large number of pris
oners get away over the wall without
attracting the attention of the guards
or officials in the main buildings.
The large room where the convicts
sleep is adequately barred at the win
dows and doors, but an ordinary
wooden floor Is the only obstacle the
men would have to face once there was
no resistance or interference from the
guards. The building is a two-story
structure.
Prison Overcrowded
The crowded condition of the prtson
is a source of terror to the officials,
and they fear that unless relief comes
soon a successful outbreak is immi
nent. For the 1903 prisoners confined
there there are 1200 cells. Last sum
mer it became necessary to remove the
hospital above the. mess hall, and pro
vision was made for housing sixty
three convicts in the old hospital build
ing. The Protestant chapel was dis
placed and prisoners of that faith now
worship tn the old Catholic chapel.
Two hundred convicts were then
placed in the Protestant chapel. The
dormitory where the New Year's plot
was hatched was pressed into service
last October, the tin working machines
being crowded into the wagon fac
tory below.
Relief from the congested condition
is being sought in several directions.
C. V. Collins,' superintendent of pris
ons, has asked the present legislature
for a big appropriation to carry on
the work of erecting ample prison
buildings on the site purchased last
year in Washington county, north of
Saratoga.
The prison site commission pur
chased another 600-acre tract last year
on th! west shore of the Hudson river,
at Bear Mounain, between Fort Mont
gomery and lona is'and, which is six
teen miles north of Sing Sing. The
preliminary work of clearing this land
has begun, 100 convicts quartered in a
stockade being at work, but since the
land is included in the site of the pro
posed state park, which is to be cre
ated from "and donated from Mrs.
Edward H. Harriman and other
wealthy persons, some of the prison
authorities believe the work will be
stopped and the site abandoned.
COMIC SONG AVERTS
PANIC IN PLAYHOUSE
"Has Any One Hear Seen Kelly?" Re.
assures Timid Ones When
Fire Starts
NEW YORK, Jan. 23.—During the
first act of a comedy at the Broadway
theater the insulation of the wires
leading to the music stand of one of
the men in the orchestra became
broken, and the wire began spitting
sparks into the gloom of the orchestra
pit.
There was quite a display of fire
works. Some of the occupants of the
first two rows of the orchestra circle
became uneasy and stood up. Their
example was followed by several per
sons in the boxes. All the material for
panic was ready.
Jack Norworth and two other mem
bers of the company came to the foot
lights and assured the audience that
there was no danger. The uneasy ones,
however, seemed difficult to reassure.
Nora Bayes, who had just finished
singing, "Has Any One Here Seen
Kelly?" and had retired to the wings,
then returned to tho stage. She came
down to the conductor's desk and
asked smilingly. "Has any one here
seen Kelly?"
Everybody laughed, the frightened
persons, who had stood up ready to
make a rush for the doors, joined in
the merriment and sat down. Misa
Bayea ni applauded, the performance
proceeded and an incident filled with
ugly possibilities was at an end.
CLEtaCEAU IS NOW
AFTER THE PRESIDENCY
French Political Circles See in Resig.
nation from Radical Party Move
Toward Higher Nomination
I'ARis, Jan. 22.— M. Clemenceau'i
resignation from the Radical party has
mused considerable sensation in po
litical circles. The novel position and
remarkable prsstlffe retained by M.
Clemencaau after lil sfiill from power
gives considerable importance to his
resolution, especially in View of the
approaching flections, for the former
premier lias the reputation of being a
master of electoral tactics. It is not
surprising the executive committee of
the Radical and Radical-Socialist
party has decision, and is sending to
him the papers connect— with the mu
nicipal elections of Toulon, in order
to show that if It supported the uni
fied Socialist "list" in that town, it
was simply because there was no
choice, as the opposing list contained
a number of reactionary candidates as
well as Progressives and Radicals.
M. Berenger treats M. Clemenceau's
action as a counterblast to the mani
festo of M. Combes at the banquet
held recently in defense of the pres
ent electoral system. M. Combes on
that occasion called in the Unified So
cialists to desert the cause of elec
toral reform and to reconstitute the
old "Bloc," offering them a number
of concessions which it seems highly
Improbable the mass of the Radical
party would bo disposed to grant. On
this view H. Clemenccau has retorted
by a declaration of hostility to the
Unified Socialists which his support
ers can hardly fail to understand.
Letter Causes Comment
The letter in which M. Clemeneeau
tendered his resignation to M. Valle,
president of the Radical and Radical-
Socialist party, has not been published,
but it is generally reported to cm
tain a sentence in which the Unified
Socialists are described as "les enne
mls les plus caracterlses" of the Rad
ical-Socialist party. These words are
the object of comment, since they ap
pear to be directed at the policy of M.
Combes, and explicitly replace the
dogma of "No enemies on the left" by
that of "neither reaction nor revolu
tion." Whether M. Clemeneeau main
tains his resignation or not, it Is clear
his action Is an important move in
the political same which will find its
issue in the next elections.
The Journal dcs Debats remarks:
"Henceforth one may say the Radical
party has been cut asunder as the na
ture of things and the exigencies of
political life required. The Radical-
Socialists are reduced to seeking for
someone to save them, but by the
irony of fate their chief of yesterday,
M. Clemeneeau, is a Radical who re
fuses to be a Socialist, and their mas
ter of today, L. Briand, is in another
sense a Socialist who refuses to be a
Radical. The supposition is that M.
Clemeneeau is making a strong play
for the presidency.
A COOL HAND
Two interesting stories are told by Sir
Henry Drummond Wolff in his book of
"Rambling Recollections." of how .i
debtor evaded arrest when debtors
were liable to imprisonment.
On one occasion the sheriff's officers
waited the whole night in pursuit of a
certain gentleman of good family In
London who was constantly in debt.
They saw him enter Vauxhall gardens.
Not wishing for a public exposure, they
plactl members of their body at each
door to as to arrest him when leaving.
But they stayed all night. The gar
dens were shut and he never appeared.
It turned out that his powers of per
suasion were so great that ho had in
duced the aeronaut to take him up in
the balloon, which was one of the at
tractions of Vauxhall, to drop him
some miles from London on the way to
Dover and to lend him sufficient money
to go to the continent.
On another occasion this same gen
tleman, who was the son of a well
know r: member of parliament, celebrat
ed for his collection of antiquities and
old furniture, was traced by the sher
iff's officers into his father's house.
They knocked at the door and found
the father just going out. He said that
his son was not In the house, but that
they were quite at liberty to search it.
Till':, they did, but in vain. Some days
afterward they found their prey, with
whom they were always on good terms,
und asked him how he escaped from
his father's house, as they had traced'
him in at the door and waited, and had
ateG searched the house. To this he re
ptled: "Well, I saw you," and then ex
plained that in order to escape them
he had dressed himself in al old suit
of knight's armor that stood in the hall
and while they were searching the
house he had glared at them, holding
the sword In his hand.
It's as easy to secure a barrain In a used
automobile, through want advertising, v II
■■ed to be—and still U—to secure a horas
and carriage.
ATTORNEYS.AT-LAW
BECKER LAW AND COLLECTION AGEN
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10-7-tt
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bid*, 841 S. Bdway. 16081; Main 3816.
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THE WEATHER
LOS ANGELES, Jan. 23, 1910.
Time |Barom.|Ther.|Hum.| Wind |Vlc.|Weathef
5 a.ra.l 29.89 69 [ 4S I NE • I 9 I PtTCldy
5 p.m. I 29.95 161165 ) S 110 | Cldy
"Maximum temperature* 70.
Minimum temperature, E>s.
Weather Conditions
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 23.—Rainfall data:
Stations— Past 24 Seasonal Normal
■» hours to date to date
Eureka 22.60
Red Blurt 0.26 10.43 13.02
Sacramento 0.12 8.12 9.73
Mt. Tamalpals 0.17 16. 11.53
San Francisco 0.29 12.37 11.
San Jose 0.16 9.89 7.13
Fresno t 10.14 4.80
Independence 0.00 6.42 4.74
San Luis Oblspo 0.23 15. 8.37
Los Angeles 0.00 10.34 7.14
San Diego 0.00 , 8.17 4.69
Forecast
San Francisco and vicinity—Unsettled weather
with occasional rain Monday; moderate south
west wind.
Santa Clara valley— Monday, followed
by fair; brisk southwest wind, moderating.
gacrameno valley—Showers, warmer Monday;
brisk south wind.
San Joaquln valley— Monday; brisk
south wind.
Los Angeles and vicinity—Monday rain; brisk
south wind. ■
■ FUNERAL NOTICE
MILLER—Bean D. Miller' died January 22.
Will be burled January 24, 10:30 a. m. at
Evergreen cemetery. 1-24-1
SWEETZER—M. A. Sweetzer died January 22.
Will be cremated January 24, 3 p. m. at
Evergreen cemetery. 1-24-1
===============================
CEMETERIES
~ INGL^WOOD^^ARir"
CEMETERY
Two miles outside the city limits on the Los
Angeles and Redondo Ry. ; 200 acres of per
fect land with Improvements outclassing
any cemetery on the coast. -
207 S. Broadway. Room 202. Phones F3303,
Main 4659. Supt. 'phone. A 9693. 4-1-Uma
EVERGREEN CEMETERY
The Los Angeles Cemetery Association.
Boyle Heights near city limits. Operated un
der perpetual charter from Los Angeles city*
Modern chapel and crematory.
Office, 339 Bradbury building. j
Phones —Main 88%; AM 08.
Cemetery—Homo IH083) Boyle 9.
I Illllt
ROSEDALE CEMETERY
An endowed Memorial Park noted for its nat
ural beauty: endowment fund for perpetual
care, over $25<>,000; modern receiving vault,
chapel, crematory and columbarium; acces
sible: city office, SUITE 302-304 EXCHANGE
BLDG., N. E. corner Third and Hill sta.
Phones, Main 909; A 36?". Cemetery office. 1831
W. Washington et; phones 72858; West 80.
6-2-l?mo
CHURCH NOTICES
Ciristiaa Science Services
Second Church of Christ, Scientist
at the church edifice. West Adams street,
near Hoover. Services Sunday 11 a. in. and
8 p. m. ; sermon from the Christian Science
Quarterly subject: "Love." Sunday school
11 a. m. ; Wednesday evening meeting 8
o'clock. Reading rooms, 704 Herman W.
Hellman Bldg., Spring and Fourth streets,
open daily, Sundays excepted, from 9 a. m.
to 0 p. m. 1-24-8
NOTICE TO CHURCHES-COPY FOR ALL
church notices for the Saturday and Sun
day morning Issues Is requested to be
turned In at The Herald office by Friday
noon. If possible. This will assure proper
classification and publication. • 2-11-tf
PHYSICIANS
BrTlSickokl -~-«--~ DR. HICK
SPECIALIST FOR WOMEN.
Treats all diseases of women under a pos
itive guarantee. Ladles mho have formerly
paid for each treatment, whether benefited
or not, will appreciate the difference. Fay
only for satisfactory results. Charges mod
erate.
DR. HICKOK gives modern antisoptlo
treatment and patients are in no danger
of blood poison or Infection, Everything U
sterilized before use.
DR. .HICKOK provides a private home, with
nursing, for women in confinement. Expert
care and home comforts at reasonable rates.
Confinements by modern methods are safe
and free from pain.
DR. HICKOK gives personal attention to
every case. Consultation Is free and confi
dential In all troubles. Any woman not sat
isfied with her condition is Invited to call
for free consultation and free examination.
DR. HICKOK carefully examines every case
and gives an honest opinion and reliable ad
vice free. X-ray examination made when
necessary. If a case Is accepted for treat
ment a cure is guaranteed. Moderate charges
for satisfactory results. Terms can bo al
ways arranged. Hours 10 to 4; Sundays 10
te 1. 'Phone FB2SI for appointment at
other times. • „ ■
DR. HICKOK MS W Sixth it. ralt^W^
SKIN DISEASES, WEEPING ECZEMA,
scald head, chafing, ulcerated nipples,
sexual rawness and sores, cancerous
moles and warts, excrescences: also foot
ailments. SKIN CLINIC. 107 W. *"lrs^
' i ■ ; DR. CROCKER. •
Specialist for Women.
Hamburger's Majestic Theater Building.
Absolute privacy. Hours 10 to 4.
CONSULT FREE, -i
12-28-12 m
PILES—AH, KINDS. I CURE THEM WITH
■ out pain, cutting or detention from busi
ness. Moderate charges. Free consulta
tion. DR. HICKOK. .81 W. Sixth 1 J t M * tt
DR INEZ DECKER, 702 SO. SPRING ST.
Obstetrics. Hours 11 to 4. Room *»j g _ tf -
DR. PRITCHARD, RECTAL. FEMALE AUDI
cbronlo diseases. 717-28 QKOSSK BU).^
DR. TAYLOR. 817 Vi S. MAIN ST. DISEASES
of women. 12-2-tr
BUSINESS PERSONALS
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012 Ban Pedro st. l-9-S#

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