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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, January 24, 1910, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-01-24/ed-1/seq-8/

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8
DE ROSIER SAYS
HE IS WRONGED
MOTORCYCLE CHAMPION DIS
CUSSES SUSPENSION
KNOWS OF NO REASON FOR
TREATMENT
Promises to Shed Further Light on
Matter, But Asks That Judg.
merit of Friends Be
Withheld
Common report during the past week
stated that Jal«e Dc Hosier, the world's
champion motorcycle rider, had been
suspended. One report made the sus
pension three months, another that I
the punishment was for a year. It Is
understood that such an action was
contemplated some time ago, and it
will be recalled that the suggestion
"Was made in this paper that it would
be an unwise move.
Whether this conclusion was justified
in the interest of good sports will de
velop later, but yesterday De Rosier :
in a communication to The . Herald
gives his signed statement concerning
the matter, which is submitted to the
public, which has been interested so
largely in the events at the Coliseum.
Following is De Hosier's statement:
"Automobile Editor Los Angeles
Herald: 1 have been suspended by
the chairman of the national racing;
board 01 the Federation of American
Motorcyclists without having- had any
reason assigned for the suspension. I
was not suspended for the reasons
published In a Sunday morning paper,
and it is evident that paper has been
made the victim of a false statement
on the part of some one connected
with the management of the Coliseum
motorcycle track.
•'The statement referred to sets forth
that I had been suspended because I
had demanded $150 wrongfully from
the Coliseum management prior to the
last race in which I appeared on that
track, in which I won the 100-mile
race two weeks ago. This is absolute
ly and positively not true. A protest
was made by the local management
against my action in demanding this
money in advance, which I had a per
fect right to do, but this protest has
not resulted in my suspension, or at
least this is not the reason given for
my three months' suspension by Chair
man Thornley of the national racing
board.
"The real reason for my suspension,
however, I have not been told. I do
know that a telegram, and, in fact,
two have been received in this city
the past week, one by Walter Hempel
of Ascot park and the other by Ref
eree Kettles from Chairman Thornley,
in which it is stated I have been sus
pended for a race at Ascot park and
not at the Coliseum.
"These races were held about five
i weeks ' ago. I was entered against
Paul Derkum in two races—a ten-mile
and a five-mile event. I won the first
race, and a protest was immediately
lodged against me on the ground I had
used my brakes during the race. I
was leading in the second race when
my wheel skidded and I was thrown
and badly shaken up. Derkum also
fell, but if he protested the race 1 was
never Informed of it. If such a protest
was filed, the only grounds for pro
test . could have been that I fell—and
no reasonable or right thinking per
son will believe I fell just in order to
make Derkum fall, too, or, in other
words, risk my life in order to injure
■ a competitor.
No Opportunity to Defend
"The messages received the past
week from Chairman Thornley state
that I have been suspended on account
of that second race. Why, 1 do not
know, but I mean to find out, as it is
apparent that some one is doing some
underhand work by filing charges
against me and judgment being
passed on me without my being given
a. fair or honorable opportunity to de
fend myself. The statement which
was worked off in the paper yesterday
morning, and of which the paper was
made an innocent victim, to the effect
I had bean suspended because of my
having demanded my money in ad
vance of the 100-mile race, shows on
the face of it that falsehoods are being
made against me by my enemies, and
that they will not stop at anything to
injure me.
"The reason why I demanded my
money was because I had no written
contract with the Coliseum manage
ment covering the 100-mile race, and
if I had waited until after the race
I had a good chance of not getting
the full $150 which had been previous
ly agreed upon as the amount I should
receive. in the absence of such a
contract I considered it best to demand
the cash in advance to avoid any fu
ture controversy, which I had a per
fect right to do. The Coliseum man
agement has never been free from
debt and owes money now, and I do
not believe that the riders who make
up the drawing cards for their races
should be asked to take any chances
on getting their money. At least, I
did not Intend to take those chances,
and the management is evidently mov
ing heaven and earth to get me 'in
bad' both with the public and with
the newspapers and the national racing
board to punish me.
Proved Leading Card
. "I have always been at the tape to
ride and have always ridden my very
best. If the management had not
had me as one of Its leading cards—
and I believe the public will agree that
I have been the leading card at the
Coliseum track ever since it opened—
then the management never would
have been able to get a crowd out of
which to pay for their track. So long
as I have no financial interest in the
success of the track and only have my
earning power to depend on, I believe
I have a right to protect myself in
the way I did.
. "I do not believe the national racing
board will allow the riders to suffer at
the behest of the Coliseum manage
ment when they realize all the condi
• tions out here, and I certainly intend
to make it my business, now that the
fight has been started against me, to
let them know all the facts. When I
say all the facts, I mean all of them,
broken promises and all, and I will be
very much surprised if the Coliseum
management does not lose its racing
franchise for Illegal conduct in pro
moting race meets in violation of many
of the federation rules.
"Meanwhile I ask my friends to
withhold their judgment and their
verdict.
.s '•[ am" leaving for a health .trip to
recover from the slinking- up I got In
I:he Ascot park accident, but will re-
I urn to 1.,0s Angeles later. I believe I
lava many friends in this city who
■ .vill help to see that justice is finally
'lone me, and prevent a little coterie
if schemers who have not been able
, :o twist me around their thumb from
loin? me an outright injury. I appre
ciate t the confidence that my friends
lave shown in me, and I shall always
* endeavor to justify them In showing
■ up this same «■-•'"iTcnoo In ' the fu
,ure." •
AUTOMOBILE RECORDS
-• • - ■■'-'• i
The Herald lias been requested through several sources to rc
publish the American Automobile Records on track.and road. It
is suggested that this be cut out and pasted up or carried for fu
ture reference, as there will be much racing this year all over the
country and it will be found convenient for comparison.
SPEEDWAY
Miles. Time Driver. H.P. Machine. Meet. Year
1 kilo 26.20 OUlfleld ....120 >"'"l'- % Indianapolis 1909
[ "'" SJ.7O ....Straus '-" F1at........ Atlanta 1909
2 1.21.51 Stranjr 1™ ...... .Fiat Atlanta 1909
4" 2.47.03 Strong 1-" Fiat Atlanta.... 1909
-, "17-0 Straus . 1-"' Flat Indianapolis 19H9
10.'.'.".... -.fn;M""!..':Btrang ISO Flat Atlanta 18M
SO .... IT, 31.80 Robertson BO Flat Atlanta 1909
..-, "1 "1 70 Oltlneld 130 B»n» Indianapolis I*l9
30"!!.!. h'.M.ll Robertson ... .60 Flat Atlanta 1909
40 .. 31.'«.'86 Robertson 60 Flat Atlanta 190!)
50 10.14.08 Robertson 80 , Fiat Atlanta IMS
100 1.22.35.35 Robertson 60 Flat Atlanta 1909
jji) 2.05.00.63 , Robertson 60 Flat Atlanta V.mO
9i)o •> 46 47 Chevrolet SO .. Rulck Atlanta , MAS
250!"..... 4.35.57.40 Burmnn 80 Bulck Indianapolis ... I'-*®
TRACK
DM. Time. Driver. H.P, Machine. Meet. , Tear.
1 ... SOSO De Palms « Flat Minneapolis lwa
I .... 8.39.90 He l'iilraa i« Flat St. Paul Moil
5 .... 1 26.00 Dc Palma 15 .. Flat Grand Rapids.... I9CB
1,) 8.49.60 ....De Palma t. . Flat Minneapolis IMS
115 .... 13.42.00 Oldneld 120 Benz I.os Angeles 1909
20 IS 30 SO De Palma 4.". Flat Brand Rapids 1909
2.->" .... 22.59.00 De Palma 16 Flat Grand Rapids.... 1909
til .. 45.1020 Oldfleld 80 Peerless Fresno, Cal l'.«M
loo"!.... 1.41.25.00 Barman 30 .. Butt* Dallas, Tex 1909
300 3 39.47.00 Fletcher 10.... oldsmobile Cheyenne 1903
300 ....5.58.53.00 Vaujfhan 40 DecaUVllle Empire City 1906
4oo" '.. 5.50.09.00 VaUßhan 40 Decauvllle Empire City i' •
500 10.24.42.00 Vaughan 40 , Decauvllle Empire City . VM>
SOU. 12.49.07.00 Vaughan 10 ..Decauvllle Empire City '■'■■
700 15.10.29.60 Clemens-Merz 0 ... National Indianapolis I""-.
Roo' 17 17 20 Clemens-Merz SO . National Indianapolis 905
90( i l'l 44 4S 20 Clemens-Merz 30 National Indianapolis 1905
looo"" 21.58.00.80 Clemens-Mem '■■ National Indianapolis 1905
1196]].'....24.00.00.00 Mulford-Pats'ke ... 62 I Her Brighton Beach.. 1909
STRAIGHTAWAY
GASOLINE
Dlst. Time. ' Driver. H.P. Machine. MeeK Year
1 kilo pi 4.1 Chevrolet 200 „ Darracq Ormond, Fla 1906
1 mile... (U0.80.W.... Chevrolet 200 Darracq Ormond, Fla ...... 1906
■> „ 0 58.40 Demogeot 200 Darracq Ormond, tla 1906
s 2 34 00 Hemery 200 Darracq Ormond,, Fla 1908
jo' '.'.... 6.14.40.V. Brown 120 Benz Ormond, Fla 1909
15 . 10.00.00 . Lancia 110 Fiat Ormond, Fla 19C«
"0 "03700 .Thomas 90 :. Mercedes Ormond. F1a..., 19l)»
50 '".'.'. iisoi.oo Fletcher 80 *De Dietrich Ormond. Fla 1905
100]..]... 1.12.56.60 Burman 60 Renault Ormond, Fla 1908
150 '403300 Bens....*. Ormond, Ha IWB
m£ :itSS« oedrino Flat .....Ormond, F1a..., 1908
300 ' •■: ! i,in Cedrino' Fiat Ormond, Fla 1908
Dl=t Time. . Driver. H.P. Machine. Meet. Lear
1 kilo .... 0.18.40 Marriott Stanley Ormond, Fla 1906
I mile.... 0.88.20 Marriott Stanley Ormond, Fla IMi
TWENTY-FOUR-HOtR RECORDS
\tn»« Drivers '">' Machine. Meet. Year.
Hit" .'....Mulford-Patschke. « Coaler Brighton Beach... 1909
,;::.; Kobertson-Lescaulet 6 Simple* Brighton Beach... 1908
WORLD'S RECORD
Miles Driven.. Cyl. Machine. Meet. rear.
15S1 . *]....S. F. Edge 6 Napier Brooklands, Eng. 1907
ROAD
VANDERBILT CUP RACE
Miles. Time. Driver. . Machine. Meet Year
278 OS ...4.25.42 Grant, U. S Alco Long Island 1909
2,-,8]60 4.00.48 Robertson. U. B Locomobile Long Island 1908
297.10. ' L50.1V......Wagner, France Darracq Long Island 1908
"S3 DO V I 18.08.. Hemery, France Darraeq Long Island 1905
".,,., -, "6 45 Heath, France Panhard Long Island 1904
FAIRMONT PARK RACE
Miles Time Driver. Machine. Meet. Year.
200.' 33858 Robertson Simple* Philadelphia 1909
200]].... 4.02.30 Robertson „' Locomobile Philadelphia 1901
MERRIMACK VALLEY RACES
MERRIMACK, YORICK CLUB, VESPER CLUB, LOWELL TROPHIES
Miles. Time. Driver. H.P. • Machine. Meet. Tear.
y,- „' ' ■> yj 43 Knipper 80 (.'halm.-Detroit..Lowell 1909
iso:o;:]::::2:s6.'i7::::::chcvroiet so mum Lowell im
„,,,1 34908 Burman SO Bale* Lowell 1909
31i'0"!!!!]5.52.0l Robertson M Simplex Lowell !'"'l
" GARDEN CITY, L. 1.
MASSAPEQUA CUP, WHEATLEY HILLS' TROPHY
Miles Time Driver. ' HP- Machine. Meet. Year.
•'.'4 « 2 09 s"' ....Matson .'.30 Chalm.-Dctroit.Garten City 1909
Jj 9 ' 6 3 io/jl! '.','.'.Harroun 20 Marmon Garden City 1909
RIVERHEAD, L. I.
Miles Time Driver. H.P. Machine Meet. Year.
MM 1 ii ■'■ See ' 22 Maxwell Rlverhead 1909
,;..'--,"■ iVis" Chevrolet 30 Huick Riverhead 1909
„;;•-,;, ■.■,„,„■/. ....Sharp '0 Sh.Arrow Rlverhmd. 1 1909
W.K't££|£» De Talma 45 Flat Riverhead 1909
CROWN POINT, IND.
INDIANA TROPHY, CODE CUP • -
Mile. Time Driver.- ■ H.P. Machine Meet. Year,
■'•■■'-" 4 31"! Matson 30 Chal-Detroit ...Crown Point 1809
gilj^;;;;;;;^!^ Chevrolet SO Buick Crown Point 1909
STRAIGHTAWAY ONE-MILE ROAD TRIAL
Flvlng . 39.9 Oldfleld 120 Benz ....Lowell 1909
Standing--. 51.2 OldflMd ..... 120 Benz Lowell 1809
GASOLINE ECONOMY RECORD
«,,,„. Driver H.P. Machine Meet. Year.
J,l Averill IS Fl*nklin Buffalo 1908
AUTOMOBILE CLUB OF WASHINGTON RELIABILITY RUN
class car. Driver. Point. H.P. Year.
. " Matheson W. B. Mcßurney 4.0 50 1909
—■" Buick •). A. Muehleisen 1.0 30 1909
f. Ford C. E. Miller 14.0 20 190»
Sweepstakes...Buick J. A. Muehleisen 2.0 30 1909
MUNSEY RELIBILITY RUN «
r , „ car Driver. Point. H.P. Tear,
1 Ford C. E. Miller 6.0 20 1909
„■" ' Maxwell T. E. Lambert 29.0 22 1909
J Pullman N. Gallatln *...... 62.3 40 1009
J"' Elmore F. Uardart 0.0 36 1909
I Amer.-Simplex W. A. Wood :... 0.9.... 1909
S Renault 1* H. Shaab 0.4 60 1901
Sweepstakes....Elmore F. Uardart 0.0 36 1909
HOSTILITY BREEDS
MANY AUTO LAWS
MUCH BASED NEITHER ON
SENSE NOR REASON
Officials Often Recognize Inconsisten.
cies and Are Lenient with
Drivers of Auto.
mobiles
When the automobile made its ap
pearance upon the highways of the
country every law-making body recog
nized in it a menace to life and prop
erty and forthwith proceeded to enact
stringent laws for its regulation and
use. Not only did the state legislatures
have their automobile acts, but every
township and borough had its pet or
dinance or rule for the regulation and
use cf the motor car, together with
severe penalties for the unhappy mo
torist who either carelessly or inno
cently violated the same. These aug
ust bodies of lawmakers did not take
in consideration the safety and ease
with which a car could be operated.
rJttle credence was given to argument
that a motor ear driven at the rate of
twenty miles an hour could be per
fectly controlled and stopped within a
few feet; or that it was more easily
handled than a horse and carriage.
The solons only knew that it wag a
menacenot because they had advised
themselves, but because their constit
uent:; who did not own a motor car
hated it and desired to see it legislated
off the roads.
The result was that throughout the
United States a lot of acts, ordinances
and rules were written upon the law
books which were not only inconsistent
with each other, but were based neith
er upon reason nor logic, but upon
hostility.
New Jersey, with her inviting roads
and magnificent boulevards, has an In
adequate law. Yet the enforcement of
that law by the commissioner of mo
tor vehicles mid his inspectors has
been so liberal, logical and reasonable
that only those who have Justly de
served it have felt the sting of Jersey
justice. Nor could any user of the au
tomobile ask any fairer treatment than
he receives of the authorities in Phila
delphia. And even in some of the rural
parts of Pennsylvania, where the letter
of the law has been enforced most
strictly, the officials are now giving the
motorist fair play. .
• Ask these officials why they are ro
liberal with the motorists, and they will
all say because the laws are too harsh.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING. JANUARY 24, 1810.
inconsistent and not sufficiently flexi
ble. All will agree with the statements
that it is inconsistent to require lamps
upon motor cars and not upon horse
drawn vehicles. That it is Inconsistent
to prohibit chains on wheels when roads
are in a slippery condition, and yet re
quire the highest degree of carefulness?.
That it is inconsistent to allow a man
twelve miles an hour in dangerous
places, and yet restrict him on the open
road, whore there is, nothing in sight,
and to legislate his speed down to
twenty-four miles an hour. That it is
inconsistent to register cars and license
chauffeurs, and then require each mem
ber of a family outside of the owner to
wear a chauffeur's badge. That it is
inconsistent to classify certain persons
or arms as dealers and manufacturers,
and then stamp them as chauffeurs.
That it is inconsistent with reason and
justice to fix a minimum fine or penal
ty. That it is inconsistent in a law
making body to provide severe penal
lifs for infringement of the law, and
not to direct how it shall be enforced,
but. to leave it to perhaps a hostile offi
cial. That it is inconsistent to define
the meaning of a motor vehicle, and
not a chauffeur.
OWNER OF BENZ MACHINE
CHALLENGES FIAT RACER
Jesse Proehlich, managing director of
the Bronx Auto Import Company of
America, lias issued a challenge to E.
W. C. Arnold to race at Ormond
Beach, Florida, for a purse of $10,000,
the contest to be three heats of five
miles each. Mr. Arnold is the owner of
the Fiat which has been the only car
in America to defeat Mr. Froehlich's
Beni, better known as '"Hennery's
Bens," last autumn at the Grand prize
race at Savannah. Mr. Froehllch re
cently brought to America a new
eighty-nine horse power Benz racing
car, built for tremendous speed. Da
vid 1... Bruce-Brown lust year at Or
mond Beach made three consecutive
miles at three different trials in less
than 31 seconds each, and ten miles
in 5 minutes 14 2-5 seconds, or at the
speed of more than 117 miles per hour,
while George Robertson at the same
time drove the Benz five miles in 2
minutes 45 2-5 seconds. .
Some who have seen this car driven
at Brooklands, England, believe it will
show marvelous speed on the wonder
ful Ormond-Daytona Beach course.
Th ■ Fiat car owned by Mr. Arnold
made its fastest time at Brooklands,
England, traveling at the rate of 121
miles per hour, while the Benz car on
the same course attained a speed of
p 127.8 miles per hour. • ■ .
if this challenge is accepted by Mr,
Arnold and all detailed arrangements
can successfully bo made, the public
will see the greatest ra.^ known in the
history of automobiling. -
LONGER STROKE
IMPROVES MOTOR
E.R.THOMAS DISCUSSES NEW
AUTO DESIGNS
CLAIMS AMERICAN CARS ARE
BETTER THAN FOREIGN
Manufacturer of New York to Paris
Race Winner XeHls of Develop.
ment in Up to Date
Product
E. R. THOMAS
The advent of the automobile was
made possible only by tin" development
of gas englneg of extreme lightness.
An automobile engine usually weighs
some Qfteen to eighteen pounds per
"A. L. A. M." (or conservatively rated)
horse power, as compared with about
pounds r<'f horse power in the old
stationary type of gas engines.
The trend of present day automobile
I engine design is toward the long stroke,
I and toward! quietness and higher ofß
ciency.
The modern long stroke tendency
started largely on account of the won
derful speeds attained by cars with
long stroke motors in the European
"four" races. The principal reason for
this new development is t,i secure
longer lived motors, since the longer
the stroke the slower the motor can
run and still deliver its full power.
During the past five years the iiuto
mnbile has undergone gn-iit develop
ment, and at an unprecedented speed,
a phase which every new mechanic
is obliged to pass through. It has
been improved in quality and cheap
ened by the natural method of elimina
tion of the more unfit constructions.
This process Is still going on, biU at a
slower pace than formerly.
The motor has been quieted by atten
tion to the valve-operatir^g mechanism,
to the carburetor and to the exhaust,
line. It has been^ given remarkable
flexibility by improvements principally
in the carburetor and valve setting,
and the magneto has come into Its own
4l> the most reliable source of ignition
current. The radiators have been
Strengthened and increased in cooling
efficiency. The cylinder jacketing and
lubrication have been cared for in such
a way that there is no longer any ex
cuse for an overheated motor.
Transmission Is Perfected
In the transmitting system the old
cone clutch has been greatly improved,
and the new disc types have been de
veloped almost to perfection, our own
patented three-disc clutch, I believe,
being about as perfect as a dWJc can be.
Through the use of special material
and 1 of special toothed forms, together
with the annular type of ball bearings,
gear boxes have been reduced In fize
and silenced. The sliding gear has
practically eliminated all other forms
of transmission. The live rear axle
with entirely inclosed driving mech
anism has been developed from a most
uncertain mechanism to one of the
most positive and reliable units in the
car.
As regards the running gear, the
pressed steel frame came into being
but little more than five years ago,
and was seen only on one or two cars
for several seasons. It is now univer
sal, its advantages from the standpoint
of strength, lightness and cheapness
being now thoroughly understood.
For front axles the one-piece drop
forging and I-beam section has taken
the place of the old built up tube, or
hand-forged rectangular section.
The springs, especially in the rear,
have been lengthened, flattened and
made of better material, with corre
sponding increase in comfort, especial
ly at high speeds.
The wheels, apart from the hubs
and tires, have undergone less change
than any other important element, but
considered as a whole the adoption of
drawn metal hubs, roller and ball bear
ings, together with detachable rims,
have modified this unit very appre
ciably.
In this T|ay it may be said that every
Amarirsn American Motor Car Agency,
/illlCl Itdll 1210-1212 South Olive
American=Simplex BeknsCoreyMpp a c n a d rFiowe,
Ax! Bekins-Corey Motor Car Co.,
Alido Pico and Flowei
tTal fnrnia California Automobile Co.,
IJdli I i)\ Ilia Tenth and Main
rinrfK Bosbyshell-Carpenter Co.,
""I ' 1^ 1226-1228 South Olive
filirnrar Durocar Manufacturing Co.,
l/UI Utai 929 South Los Angeles
Fmr.irA Munns Auto Co"
LII'P'I " 1351 South Main
C J Standard Automobile Co.,
rOIU Twelfth and Olive
urcdt Western 1130-1132 s»uth ouve
H ilirj/l v/ Icntta Motor Car Import Co
naiiadayMSoua B io s OU th oii Ve
HimmnhilA Tri"State Motor Car Co>
llUpillUUliv 600-604 South Olive
Patorcnn Pico Carriage Co.,
raierson Pico and Main
PpITP. Williams Automobile Co.,
■ CU Cl 1806 South Mair
RimkLW w X Cowan>
llUlllUlvl 1140-1142 South Hope
Stcrlin/i A- N- June Motor Car Co-
OlCl liny 1213 South Main
Fmirict California Automobile Co.,
I UUI IM Tenth and Main
l/ a |{ 0 Standard Automobile Co.,
TvJIIC Twelfth and Olive
finnHf.Pnf;il Angelus Motor Car Co.,
lAHlllllUlllal 1242-1244 South Flower
Pi/lur I oii/ie Angelus Motor Car Co.,
mlier-LcWIS 1242-1244 South Flower
portion of the automobile has been
ImprWved by men who have made this
type of part a Study for years before,
the advent of the automobile, and who
thus were peculiarly well pla i'd to
help the. automobile engineer in his
work.
To the large automobile manufa i
turer belongs the credit of having the
foresight and daring to invest large
sums of money In a new industry re
plete with pitfalls, thus providing the
engineer with tho means of working
out his problems. That the American
is able to compete with and even beat
the foreigner was most conclusively
shown when a Thomas stock car beat
the i" si that Europa could produce m
the Now York to Paris race.
SECRET SERVICE MAN
CONDUCTS AUTO COURSE
From secret service operative to
manager of a speedy automobile is per
a far cry, but one which Asa
Candler Jr. did not hesitate to ask J.
M. Xye of Uncle Barn's force of coun
terfeit suppressors to make, and one
which Nye did not hesitate to take,
influenced by a tempting salary and a
long contract.
For seventeen years Nye has been In
government employ in capacities which
are not mentioned by the press agent,
and while he was at Atlanta, Ga.. some
years ago ("andler met him and'de
cided he was the man needed to take
charge of the speedway of t lie .Atlanta
Automobile Race Course association, a
position in which the Jovial "Bill" has
at last been placed.
Nye leaves the government service
at the close of duty January 88 and
with his wife starts for Atlanta to as
sume his new duties. Regretting his
departure from San Francisco he finds
balm in a reerretful wire from Chief
Wilkie, a larger salary than tho chief
himself commands, and the thought
that h? is going to the city which, next
to San Francisco, he would choose for
a home.
BUYS MILES OF TIRES
Something new In the tire usage!
problem has been introduced 4> Ameri
cans recently by a foreign ti^e making
concern. The innovation consists of a
mileage system, in which the tire user
pays to the tire seller a gradually re
duced amount per mile for the use of
the tire's shoe, the inner tube not in
cluded, the payment depending on the
size of the shoe. The purchaser Is re
quired to pay each month for the
amount of usage the tires have given,
and that a record may be kept he is
required to equip his automobile with a
standard make of odometer. A deposit
is made on each shoe supplied, and the
charges nan according to size at a fixed
pri*e up to 3000 mile's..
HTSTO renews your lease on life.
» n «•
Anybody who would be able to ana an
address In .the directory would be able to
gpd your CLASSIFIED »3.
TOURIST AUTOMOBILES
Eventually
WHY NOT NOW?
Auto Vehicle Contpaay
NATIONAL
AUTOMOBILE CO.
Distributors, 1226-1228 So. Olfvo St. '
LICENSED UNDER BELDEN PATENTS
WPTOI.T i js2 B isdJffSLifrsi
A»f? JLUUBL %*t JO^
W. B. BESII, So. OsJ. A«oer,
tuift and BepaJrtng.
MZI-U BOOTS UAISi.
U»m» TON. Main Ml
--Feb'y 19-26"*
Is the Date of the
I —GREAT —r
AUTO SHOW
Licensed Cars
Built and PROTECTED
Under the Selden Patent
Many of these cars, representing the strength of the Auto
mobile Industry, will be exhibited at the Licensed Show,
and at NO OTHER Show in Los Angeles.
Licensed Motor Car Dealers'
Association of Los Angeles
Here Is the List —It Speaks for Itself
Apperson
LEON T. BHEm.fR,
li-l.: South Grand avenue.
Babcock Electric
KLMORE MOTOR CAR CO..
74S South Olive street.
Baker-Electric
STOI>I>AHI»-I>AYTON MOTOR CAR
CO., Tenth and Olive.
Buick
HOWARD AlTO CO..
1144 South Olive street.
Cadillac
LSD MOTOR CAR CO..
1218 South Main street.
Chalmers-Detroit
WESTERN MOTOR CAR CO.,
727 South Olive street.
Columbia
BIRELEV * VOINT.,
IMI South Main street.
Corbin
i'OKBIN MOTOR CAR CO..
849 South Broadway.
Courier
STODHARD-IJAYTON MOTOR CAR
CO.. Tenth and Olltie.
Elmore
EI.MORK MOTOR CAR CO.,
742 South Olive street.
E. M. F. "30"
LORI) MOTOB CAR CO..
10M South Olive street.
Flanders "20"
LORI* MOTOR CAR CO..
1032 South Olive street.
Franklin
B. C. HAM LIN.
Twelfth and Olive streetn.
/^f i Uilwy. 1931.
Glide Honie F2s;s
SIIAIKR-GOOIJE MOTOR CO..
N. W. cor. Tenth and Olive sts.
Haynes
H. T. BROWN MOTOR CO.,
1136 South Main street.
Hudson
WESTERN MOTOR CAR CO.,
7;t South Olive street.
Jackson
CHARLES H. THOMPSON,
1012-1014 South Main street.
Locomobile
LOS ANGELES MOTOR CAR CO.,
Pico and Hill streets.
Lozier
NASH & 1-ENIMORE. .
Tenth and Olive streets.
Maxwell
MAXWELL-BRISCOE-LOS ANGK-
Ij;s CO., IStl South Main street.
Mercer
HKBOKB AITO CO.,
318 West Tenth street.
Mitchell
GREER-ROBBINS CO..
1301 South Main street.
Moline
« lI.SON .V HI ri'INGTON,
842 South Olive street.
Matheson - .•;■
RENTON MOTOR CAR CO.,
MM South Main street.
Moon
EI.MORE MOTOR CAR CO.,
142 S. Olive at,
Oldsmobile ,
WOOI.WISIE MOTOR CAR CO.,
, 1134-36-38 South Olive.
Overland
RENTON MOTOR CAR CO.,
1330 South Main street. .
Packard r
WESTERN MOTOR CAR CO..
727 South Olive street.
■ ■ ■
Palmer-Singer
GOLDEN STATE GARAGE,
2122 West,riio street.
Peerless
II O. HARRISON CO. .. ..
1214 South Main street.
Pierce-Arrow
W. E. BUSH.
1227-29 South Maul street.
Pope-Hartford
WM. R. RUESS AUTOMOBILE CO.,
1038. South Main street.
Premier
SCHWAEBE-ATKINSON MOTOB
CO., Adams and Main street*.
Pullman
MILLER & WILLIAMS,
■ ' 1140 South Olive street. '.
Regal
BIG 4 AUTOMOBILE CO.,
1203-5 South Main street. i
Reo
I.EON T. SHETTXER.
633 South Grand avenue.
Selden
H. O. HARRISON CO..
1214 South Main street.
Simplex , .
GOLDEN STATE GARAGE,
, 2122 West Pico street.
Steams
ELMORE MOTOR CAB CO., «' ; '
742 S. Olive St. , ■ '
—.—
Stevens Duryea v
EASTERN MOTOR CAR CO., ;
•835-827 South Olive street. . '
Stoddard-Dayton
STODDARD-OAYTON MOTOR CO.,
Tenth and Olive. * '.-/.■■■
Studebaker
■ LORD MOTOR CAR CO.,
1032 South Olive street. . :
Thomas °
WILSON ft BUFFINGTON,
842 South Olive street. > j
Wintori "
> W. 1). HOWARD MOTOR CAB CO.,
,; Twelfth and • Main streets. „ -
Woods Electric
I.EON T. SHKTn.KR,
' v OH3 South Urand avenue.

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