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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, January 25, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-01-25/ed-1/seq-2/

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So. Broadway 235-237-239 So. Hill St 234-244
Street hats In styles unmistakably new. Styles to please the
faddish as wall as tho ultra-conservative dressers
(Second Floor.)
New Wool Fabrics
A word today of some of the inexpensive stuffs
which are to be immensely popular for Spring wear.
Epingles, armures. serges, herringbones, imperials,
Panamas, Prunellas, clay serges, granite cloths and
basket weaves in plain and self-striped effects. Black,
navy blues, grays and all the correct shades.
These non-crushable, dust shedding fabrics are
particularly desirable for street wear in this climate. 44
to 54 inches wide. 75c to $1.75 a yard.
Splendid assortment of navy blue serges at 75c,
85c, $1, $1.25 and $1.50 a yard.
$22.50 AND $25 SUIT PATTERNS $15—Twenty
French Pattern Suits in Diagonal, Cheviots, French
Twill and Serge weaves. No two alike. Exclusive
ness assured.
Feather Boas at Half
And that includes everything in the line
except the black ones, a tremendous va
riety, regularly priced $7.50 to $175, to be
closed out this week at $3.75 to $87.50.
(Main Floor, Left Aisle.)
Automobile Baskets
Marked for Quick Clearance
These reductions will make it possible
for automobilists of very modest means
to own fitted lunch baskets.
$ 9.50 Baskets $4.75 $25.00 Baskets $12.50
$12.50 Baskets $6.25 $50.00 Baskets $25.00
$15.00 Baskets $7.50 $75.00 Baskets $37.50
$150 Baskets $75.00
Fitted for two, four and six people
(Faring Main Kntrance.)
MAY EXTEND DATE FOR
CORPORATION TAX LAW
Failure to Obtain U. S. Supreme Court
Decision Before March 1
Will Require Delay
WASHINGTON, Jan. 24.—1n the
event of the failure or tho attempt to
obtain a decision from the supreme
tourt of the United States as to the
constitutionality of tho corporation
tax provisions of the Payne tariff act
before March 1, the date by which the
return of income of corporations must
be filed, congress may be asked to
extend the date for the law becoming
operative.
The suit in which the pnint arises,
that of Stella P. Flint, as general
guardian of tho property of Samuel N.
HtoiH'. jr., a minor, against the Stone-
Tracy company of ""Vindsor, Vt., V/ 8.8
decided in the lower court last. Thurs
day. Much time probably will b' 1 re
quired by attorneys to prepare their
briefs and arguments, and if the su
preme court takes its usual recess of
three weeks in February a decision
before March I is regarded as improb
able.
Sollcttor General Bowers today asked
the supreme court (or permission for
the government <o suDmit oral argu
ments and briefs.
AMERICAN EXPRESS WILL
SUCCEED PACIFIC ON U. P.
Change In Companies Means Estab=
llshment of 1000 Offices—Old
Concern Goes to New Road
NEW YORK, Jan 24.—From the- of
of the American Express company
the annouuo ment today that on
April 1 that company will supersede
the Paciflo Express company on the
I'nion Pacific railroad.
This change means the establishment
of about 1000 offices by the American
«md the intension of the buplnrss to the
He i oast. Wi tim I: Ldqu ■
•will he established at Salt Lake City,
mill an assistant general manager will
)ip stationed at Portland to Rive special
attention to, Pacific coast business.
Thi 1 Pacific Express company, it was
jai.i ay, loat its privileges on
the Union Pacific because of a contract
with the new Western I'ariiic railroad,
a competing line.
t in VENICR VIT.I.AB and BUNGA
LOWS. Completely furnished. Kent reuon
\dv.
GAS FUEL
A great many people do not realize the value of Gas Fuel
when used in a
GAS FURNACE
It is the ONE BEST WAY of heating your house. The
old ways of heating were all right in their time, but it is past.
Any dealer will demonstrate the many advantages of a
Gas Furnace.
Los Angeles Gas & Electric Corporation
645 South Hill Street.
Phones: Sunset, Main 8920. Home, 10003.
CORK OAK TREES TO BE
PLANTED IN CALIFORNIA
Two Thousand Seedlings in Nursery
at Chieo Will Be Placed in Re.
serves Along the Coast
WASHINGTON, Jan. 24.—Cork oak,
which prows to a large extent in
Spain, ia to be tried in tho national
forests of this country.
Two thousand one-year seedlings
now in the nursery at Chico, Cal., will
be used for experimental planting by
the forest service. Some will be placed
in the Santa Barbara national forest
and others will be planted in the Mon
terey national forest in Southern Cal
ifornia.
Seedlings also will be made the sub
ject of experimentation at the forest
school at Point Lonia, Cal.
In addition to planting seedlings,
cork oak acorns will be obtained from
Catalonia. Bpain, for experimental pur
poses. Borne cork oaks have been
raised in California, and the forest
service, thinks they can be raised sne
y in that state as well as in
Florida.
MAN ACCUSED OF SENDING
BOMBS BY MAIL IS HELD
Noted Swedish Scientist to Be Extra.
dited to Sweden on SerU
ous Charge
LONDON, Jan. 24.—Professor Martin
Eekenburg, tlif Swedish scientist,
who after arrest in London last
fall charged -will complicitiy in several
bomb OUtragei in Sweden became tem
pararlly insane, uns committed today
for extradition to Sweden.
Professor Eckenburg is a resi<l< n1 ot
London, but was in Sweden last Octo
ber when I<m Hammer, director of the
Swedish Kxport association at Stock
holm, was Injured by a bomb received
in his mail, and when a similar attempt
was made mi the life of a manufac
turer of Gothenberg, who was reputed
t.i Ik unfriendly to the young Socialists.
On his return to London Eckenburg
became the object of luapidon, ami
knowledge of the fact so distressed
liim that hi' broke down mentally and
was removed to an asylum. Later
♦.he professor appeared to have recov
ered possession of his mental, faculties
and was removed to Brixton jail
Live at Windward Hotel, Venice—Adv.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: TUESDAY MORNING, JANUARY 25, 1910.
IMMIGRATION
COMMISSION
ENDANGERED
CONGRESS DECLINES TO GIVE
IT MORE FUNDS
POLICY DENOUNCED, AND BODY
MAY BE DISSOLVED
Extinction by Starvation Threatens
Federal Committee Founded Under
the Roosevelt Adminis.
tration
[Associated Press]
WASHINGTON, Jan. 24.—8y cut
ling oft a deficiency appropria
tion of $125,000 for the national
Immigration commission the house to
day lent its support to several mem
ben, led by Representative Macon of
Arkansas, who denounced the commis
sion and its work and threatened It
with Immediate extinction.
Unless 'friends of the commission
succeed in having the Item restored to
the urgent deficiency appropHHtinn hill
in the senate it will be compelled to
suspend for lack of funds.
The commission was created by an
act of congress February 20, 1907. It
has brought out a number of Inter
esting reports dialing with conditions
in immigrant ships and lives of aliens
after their arrival in this country.
Several other r;ports are in course of
preparation.
Senator DlHingham of Vermont is
chairman of the commission, other
members being Senator Lodge, Rep
resentatives Howell of New Jersey,
Bennett of New York and Burnett of
Alabama, and Prof. J. W. Jenks of Cor
nell university, and William K.
Wheeler of San Francisco.
Mr. Macon made a point of order
against the appropriation on the
ground it was not a deficiency. Then
came a general assault against the
commission by several members, Mr.
Macon making a scathing attack on
the body. He charged that the com
mission had gone on a junketing ex
pedition abroad, had spent $657,993 and
had accomplished practically nothing.
Denounces Cornell
Mr. Maeon said that Prof. Janks
devoted the first part of each week to
his duties at Cornell, an Institution
which he characterized as . "playing
politics all the time." He said that
William K. Wheeler, who .was also
secretary of the Merchants Shippers
association of San Francisco, drawing
$10.00 a year from the association and
$7500 from the commission, regarded
the latter office as a political sinecure.
. "I am advised," paid Mr. Macon,
"that this commission went abroad in
the summer of 1907, it sailed May 18
and returned September 17, and thai
no report of the trip has ever been
published and, in my judgment, will
not, for It seems the trip was a plea
sure junket for most of the members,
rather than an information gathering
trip.
"The commission made no progress
until forced to do so by the late Sen
ator Latlmer of South Carolina, who
threatened to return homo on the next
steamer and inform the government on
the floor of the senate that the com
mission intended mearely to delay im
migration investigation.
"Messrs. Latimer, Burnett and How
ell, of the commission, were allowed
to go to work, while the chairman told
Mr. Wheeler to come with him and
enjoy himself, that the immigration
problem had been thoroughly investi
gated by the individual commissioners,
and that only he and another know the
real purpose of the commission.
"I cannot swear to these facts be
cause I was not present, but my in
formation has been received from a
reliable citizen. The members who
went abroad were Dillingham. T-siti
mer, Burnett, Howell and Wheeler,
and they were accompanied by their
families and two of the secretaries of
the commission, one of them, a Mr.
Crane, who, I am advised, is a nephew
of Senator Crane of Massachusetts,
and the other, Mr. Husband, Senator
DillinghanVs secretary.
Auditor Protests
"I have heard that the auditor for
the state department has entered a
protest against a certain member of
the commission for charging up as
part of his expense account the
amounts paid out by him for laundry,
hair cuts, shampoo, shines and auto
mobile rides for pleasure on the Ap
plan way.
"I understand that Mr. Bennett and
his secretary have been abroad sev
eral times at the expense of the com
mission. He is one of the three mem
bers of the steering committee."
Mr. Macon referred to Prof. Jenks'
work as influencing students "In the
political way the party in power would
have them walk."
He declared the commission's report
contained a mass of matter that could
be culled at any time from the police
courts. (
Chairman Tawncy of the appropria
tion committee condemned the prac
tice of creating commissions with
"permanent appropriations."
Instead of incurring expenses and
then asking congress for the money
to meet them, as the immigration
commission had done, he said such
work should be provided for by annual
appropriations.
Declaring that he believed the com
mission had delayed its final report to
prevent legislation restricting immi
gration because an election was at>
i proachlng, Representative Burnett \t
Alabama, a member of the commis
| lion, said he believed it should have
concluded its work before now.
SAVINGS BANK BILL READY
WASHINGTON, Jan. 24.—Senators
Lodge and Carter had conferences with
President Taft today on the postal pav
ings bank bill now in committee, it is
understood the bill will bo reported
out tomorrow. Senator Lodge said he
believed the bill would p;iss the senate
and that there would bff little oposttioti
in the house.
GIRL DROWNS HERSELF
STOCKTON. Jan. 24.—Haze! Wnr
n«r, .sometimes known as Hazel Woods,
lumped into Stockton channel early
this morning and was drowned. The
body is at the morgue. Her reason's
for suicide are not known.
MANY UNSOLVED MURDERS
NEW YOEK, Jan. 24.—Thirty-seven
unsolved murders in twelve months la
the record of New York for 1909. Seven
more have been added in the first throe
weeks of the new year, according to A
report just issued by the police depart
ment.
■ Live; In VENICE VILLAS ana BUNGA
IX)WS. Completely furnUJni. Rant reason
able-Ad*. .
RULER OF TRAMPS
NOW IN CONFERENCE
w ' v~- n 'la
fgESwßk i:
-
Bib
(|[DR BEN reitmAyffl
HOBO CONGRESS IN
SESSION AT CHICAGO
Men Who Toil Not Neither Spin Dis.
cuss Methods of Aiding
Those Men Who Are
"Out of Jobs''
C^HICAGO, Jan. 24.—Beginning today
I and continuing for a Week Chl
' cago is entertaining willingly or
unwillingly an assemblage of the men
who "toil not, neither do they Bfiin."
The occasion will be a •■national con
vention of 'hoboes,' 'casual laborers'
and 'unorganized -unemployed' " lump
ed together by the public, perhaps un
rjustly, us "hoboes."
Prominent among the men in charge
of the convention are Dr, Ben ileitman,
generally known as "the king of the ho
boes," and James Kads How, whose
name appears frequently in print ;is
thill of the "millionaire hobo." Both
of these men have had wide experience
with the unemployed. Their purpose,
they assert, is the uplifting of the man
put up a job, whether that condition is
brought about by his own fault or that
of economic conditions.
INTENDS TO GIVE
AWAY MILLIONS
NONOGENARIAN INTENDS TO
DIE PENNILESS
HAVING FUN DISPOSING OF HIS
WEALTH
Dr. D. K. Pearsons Is to Distribute All
He Owns to Struggling Col.
leges in Many Parts of
Country
latati J'i", bbj
CHICAGO, Jan. 24.—After having
>;tven iii,irc than four million dollars
1,, struggling colleges in many parts
of the country, Dr. D. K. Pearsons,
almost 90 years old, announced to
night that he intends to give away
every cent he possesses before he
(lies.
Dr. Pearsons is reputed to be worth
many millions.
•'1 am having more fun than any
other millionaire alive," he said. "Let
other rich men go in for automobiles
and steam yachts. I have discovered,
after endowing 47 colleges in 24 states,
that giving is the most exquisite or all
mundane delights. On my UOth birth
day on April 14 next, I am going to
have asquarlng up with all the small
colleges to which I have promised
money, and I serve notice now that
beginning then I am going on i w
ramp. mi' of giving. I intend to die
penniless. 1 am going t,i live ten
years longer and In that time I ex
pect to do nothing but give away
money.
Helped Twelve Colleges
"I have given money to twelve col
leges in the south. I don't think any
of my other itifts have given me quite
the same satisfaction that these tiave.
It's line to sit here and think thai the
south knows it is being made a better
south l>\ a blamed old abolitionist like
mi. It sweetens 'cm, I tell you. It
makes 'em feel better. Beres coll igo
in Kentucky Is my pet. I have watched
it grow with the utmost interest. It
Is lining great good among those Ken
tucky mountain hoys. This nation
nee,is those Kentucky mountaineers, it
was they who fought the. battle of
Kings mountain and helped Jacks/in
Whip I lie British at New Orleans.
Guilford Another Pet
"Another pel of mine is Guilford col
lege, in North Carolina. There's where
Speaker Cannon was educated. [I
Quaker institution, and 1 like it. 1
gave $f>o,uoo to the Montpiller seminary ,
in Vermont a little while ago because
that's where 1 went to school seventy
five years ago, and because its presi
dent came to me aijd said they were
nearly broke.
"I think lots of the little colleges In
the west, and I sliayy keep my e\ c that
way also. Not long ago the president
of Whitman college, in Washington,
told me he was much in need of $12,500.
1 don't think I ever felt better in my
life than when I wrote him out that
check.
"I don't »ay these thinss in a boast
ful spirit, but merely to suggest to
some otKer millionaire an eas) \\ ay to
tuning a giK)il_jlme."
GIVEN VERDICT OF $13,422
DENVBR, Jan. —Miss Jennie Ito
sen, a young woman of this city, whose
leg was broken and who received other
injuries when she was struck by a
Denver & Rio Grande train August 21,
1907, was today awarded a verdict of
$13,422 by a Jury in her lull for dam
ages against the railroad.
Venice "The Wilii -Adv.
USE OF PUBLIC
FUNDS PROBED
LAND OFFICE COMMISSIONER
DENIES CHARGES
IMMIGRATION BODY WILL GET NO
APPROPRIATION
Urgent Deficiency Bill, Carrying $5,
--000,000, Adopted with Reduc
tion —Lloyd's Successor
Appointed
[Associated Press]
i WASHINGTON. Jan. Refusing
to appropriate any money for the ex
pense of the immigration commission!
the house today passed the urgent de
ficiency bill, carrying, nearly $5,000,000.
This Is a reduction of more than
$1,000,000 under estimates submitted by
the treasury department.
Following the action taken by the
Democratic caucus, the house appoint
ed Mr. Graham of Illinois to succeed
Mr. Lloyd of Missouri as a member of
the Ballinger-Pinchot • Investigation
committee.
In the senate Mr. Tillman criticised
the administration far failing to pros
ecute suits against the Southern Pa
cific railroad for recovering public
lands granted to the railroad under
the condition that it should be sold In
tracts of 180 acres at not more than
$2.50 an acre.
Both houses will be in session to
morrow.
Condensation of the testimony before
the last hearing- of the committee as
reported In these dispatches led to the
omission of an important statement of
Commissioner Dennett of the general
land office, regarding the charge that
private telegrams were paid for out of
the funds of the department. ■' This is
what the commissioner said, as shown
by the stenographer's record:
Dennett's Reply
"I have no knowledge of "any such
telegrams being sent, with the excep
tion of two telegrams which were sent
to the commissioner of the . general
land office at a critical time, stating
certain remarks which were being
made in a paper. These telegrams,
after having been received, were taken
to the chief of field service and the
Western Union was notified that they
must not be charged to the public land
appropriation; that they related to
private matters; that no bill would be
authorized which was submitted for
those telegrams."
It appears from the record that this
statement was substantiated by Mr.
Newburgh, assistant chief of tho ac
counts division; the purport of the
testimony of both being that the tele
grams referred to as transmitting
newspaper articles were not paid for
by the department at all.
Examined by Mr. Hitchcock, Com
missioner Dennett agreed to furnish a
detailed statement of all expenditures
from the million-dollar fund around
which revolve charges of improper
use, and also to furnish a list of trans
fers of employes on the civil service
roll, "or Schwartz rolls.". Ho denied
that salaries were increased generally
when employes wero transferred to
■'Schwartz roll."
Mr. Hitchcock said he could not
agree to answer all questions because
of the naturally confidential character
of his sources of Information in the
interior department, and the punish
ment that would follow the exposure
of those sources.
Mr. Dennett said a little more than
$5000 worth of furniture, including
carpets and rugs, had been bought for
use in the general land office under
the $1,000,000 public domain protection
fund, but that it was all incidental to
the work under that appropriation,
and -was of .the cheapest kind of ma
terial and bought under the regular
contract system.
He said the $1,000,000 appropriation
had enabled the bureau to catch up
largely with the work of protecting
tho public domain.
DICKINSON PLANS
TRIP TO ISLANDS
Secretary of War Chosen by Taft for
Official Globe Trotter—Will Also
Visit Canal Region Fre
quently
NEW YORK, Jan. 24.—Secretary of
War Dickinson, who mtui-ned last
wci-lr' from an extended trip to Porto
llico and Cuba, a rently has been
chosen by President Taft to do the
oliicinl globe trotting for the present
administration.
His next trip, it was announced to
day, will take him to the Philippines,
and Hawaii.
"If a man is to serve properly as
secretary "' war, it is essential that
he be familiar with our Insular pos
sessions,' 1 Mid Mr. Dickinson. "The
president lias told me it is his desire
that 1 visit the Philippine! and Ha
waii. No plans have been made for
the trip, and I cannot say how soon
I shall leave."
The secretary of war expects also to
make frequent journeys to Panama
before the canal is completed. He
expressed confidence that the ditch
would be finished as promised, by
January 1, 1915.
Mr. Dickinson .said he had heard
rumors in Washington that Col.
Roosevelt, upon his return from Af
rica, is to take active charge of the,
construction of the canal.
MONTANANS PROTEST AT
DELAY OF PET PROJECTS
Uawmakers Head Delegation Which
Complains of Ballinger's Treat.
ment of Valuable Lands
WASHINGTON, Jan. 24.—A large
allegation of Montana people, headed
by Senator Carter and Representative
Pray, and accompanied by Louis W.
Hill, president of the Great Northern
railroad, talked to the president today
about the serious delay.ln carrying out
Hi Milk river and St. Mary's Irriga
tion projects in that state.
They also complained about the
great quantities of unsurveyed public
lands and the amount of lands includ
ed in the forest reserve. They said
that American-farmers were.fast going
to western Canada and' taking up
lands there,', to - the detriment' of the
United States, because of inability to
get surveyed lands. •..,.•.. , ■■•-•: .: .
■. ..The- specific complaint to,the presi-
AMUSEMENTS .
BTfr torn TtIT? ILTVT? Bela«eo-niackwood Co., Propr«. and Mgrs.
1 ibLAaLU lti.lJ4Al.Vjl\ . MATINEES Thursday, Saturday, Sunday.
1 THIS IS THE LAM' WEEK OF THIS 810 SENSATIONAL SUCCESS.
LEWIS S STONE and tho Belasco theater company present for the first time any
where PORTER EMERSON BROWN'S Immensely euccessful now play, .
THE SPENDTHRIFT
Only nine more performances of this great play remain. DON'T watch and wait.
ThiH is positively the last week and don't miss what Is tho reigning success of the,
season GET YOUR SEATS FOR "THE SPENDTHRIFT" NOW. Regular Belasco
prices. "■ '^'-'.
■NEXT WEEK'S GREATEST ATTRACTION
Comm.ncln* next Monday night LEWIS B. STONE and the Belaico Hieater company
will "™ for the first time by a stock company anywhere George Broadhurst» great
'"" ''" "THE MAN OF THE 1IOCH."
Seats for "THE MAN OF THE HOUR" are bow on sale at the regular Belasco price*.
Gtiaxtt-v rktJTT-DA TJ/^TTQIT MATINEES TODAY. Saturday, Sunday.
RAND OPERA HUUori Phones—Main 1907; Home A 1967.
SECOND AND LAST CROWDED WEEK OF THIS MUSICAL MMI.
CPRRTS and hl* euporb company Presont \A7r»r\HlanH
riI«K.KIO Henry W. Savage's original production VVUUUIdIIU.
HARTMAN of tho famous musical forest fantasy, 35
SPECIAL BARGAIN MATINEE TODAY. SEATS NOW ON SALE. ,
I7\.X-.C\ . CTO \ ■■ > Matinee ETery Da»<
' BothPhones-U*,.
The Orpheum Road Show
Alice Lloyd Ida O'Day & Co.
ramous Sndon comedienne. , L^TitCOmb* Ch°"ea'"
The McNaUghtOnS MarinPP The Singer on Horseback.
English Eccentrics. ITlailinCC Night ;in a Monkey .
Brothers Permane Today Music Hall
"Nightingales Making Love. • | Presented by Maud Roche*.
Hyiiian Meyer Melville & Kiggins
The Man at the Piano. "Just a Little Fun."
ORPnEUM MOTION rICTUBKS.
i Nights—loc, 2Sc, BOe, 75c. Matinees Dally— 10c, 85c, gOc.
OROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER Le"ee 15?nd M Z««:
All, WEEKMATINEE SATURDAY.
. ■ Winston Churchill's superb war-time play,
THE CRISIS
"BEST STOCK COMPANY AND BEST PLATS IN AMERICA."
REGULAR BURBANK PRICES— 25c, 35e. 50c. MATINEES, 25c. GALLERY, 10e. «
•Next Week—"ALL ON ACCOUNT OF ELIZA."
HAM3URGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER I^f^M^g. 0/.
Broadway near Ninth. Phones: Main 7005; 1-1133.
' ALL WEEK—MATINEE TOMORROW—MATINEE SATURDAY.
CHARLES B. HANFORD
In a modern comedy by George H. Broadhurst and C. T. Dazey.
THE AMERICAN LORD
PRICES —£BC| 60c, TBOi $1. A few front rows $1.50. Wednesday matinee, 250 to 75c.
Saturday matinee, 25c to $1. Next Week —"THE VIRGINIAN."
f I \HF ATIDTTDRTTIM "theater l. E. behymer,
THE AUDITORIUM BEAUTIFUL." E Manager.
JL FIVE EVENTS—NIGHTS, FEB. 2, 3, 4, 5. MATINEE FEB. S.
m TTT , TrTTtH/rOOO INTRODUCING OVER
I HE K.IK.M.ESS 3o° participants.
■**■*■*-» XVIIVIUJ^tJU SOCIETY'S EVENT.
1 Benefit of Assistance League and Los Angeles Orphans' Home
SEASON SEAT SALE X SINGLE SEAT SALE THURSDAY AT
AT BARTLETT'S MUSIC CO. AUDITORIUM AND BARTLETT'S.
MASON OPERA HOUSE Lesseeand S2JSSi
TONIGHT AND ALL WEEKMATINEE SATURDAY—Direction of Mrs.
Leslie Carter Co. (inc.
MRS. LESLIE CARTER «l£J5Sr Vasta Herne
MRS. LESLIE CARTER as VASTA HERNE.
Her new play of morals and emotions, by Edward Peple. author of "The Prince Chap,**
"The Play That's Different." Prices HOc to «2. SEATS NOW ON SALE.
—William H. Crane In "FATHER AND THE HOYS." Seat Bale Thursday.
Ldq ANIOFI F"% THPATPW spring ST. MATINEE today.
Ufa AWUJii^t-b lHii.Alii.K NEAR 4TH s SHOWS NIGHTLY.
Bohemian Sextet. I I Malvern Troupe.
Nellie Hurt. I DplmOft? & LPP (Cotton & Gasman and her
Nelll. Hurt. UfMmOrV tV I t>P Joßcphine Uassnian and her
Tho Laugh-O-Scope. | «-»CIIIIU1C ** •-*'*» pickaninnies.
■'■•■"■■■■■l-'.-n POPULAR PRICES— 1 Op, 20c AND SOo. /■ "
FTcr'U'ir'O'C T'UTTAT'Tro nrat St. near Snrlnir. Both phones.
ISCHERS THEATER Klnf| , r N Workman, Propr. and Slgr.
WEEK COMMENCING MONDAY, JAN. —Mr. Workman presents a musical
extravaganza in 3 acts, "THE OOLAll," by a capable company. Comical comedians,
capricious comediennes, captivating chorus. Matinee every day. Two allows every
night. Admission 10c and lOC. Reserved orchestra seats 26c
OLYMPIC THEATER Opposite Burbank Theater.
j^iair±^ innniaa , phones—Fl4o2; Main 121.
AI.PHIN-FARtiO MUSICAL /itTT? TV» PATAT TIM A
COMEDY CO. present \JC T I\J I J\L,IL\ A
A real pleasure trip, by Charles Alphin. Ten big ringing and dancing numbers. 10c,
:oc and 25c. Next Week —"A DAY IN VENICE." '
dent was that some years ago a large
number of farmers surrendered to the
government their private water rights
In the belief that the government
would quickly complete the Milk river
project and they would again have
water for their land. Little or noth
ing has been done, however.
Mr. Taft promised to take the mat
ter up.
FOR RECLAMATION WORK
WASHINGTON, Jan. 24.—As finally
reported today by the senate com
mittee, the administration bill provid
ing for a reclamation fund authorizes
the Issuance of $30,000,000 worth of cer
tificates of indebtedness to carry on
existing irrigation projects. The cer
tificates are to run for five years,
when half of the proceeds derived from
the sale of » >claimed lands are to be
set aside for their redemption.
URGE PACIFIC OCEAN BE
SUPPLIED WITH WARSHIPS
Senators Suggest Submarines Be Con.
structed for Use Off West,
em Coast States
WASHINGTON, Jan. 24.—A congros-
MniKil delegation from the Pacific
„i,i i, including Senators Piles and
Jones of Washington, Senator Flint of
California, Representative Hays of
California, and Representative Hump
grey of Washington,, had a conference
with President Taft today regarding
the construction of submarine boats
on the Pacific coast.
Secretary Myer was called into the
conference.
Senator Piles called attention to the
fact that the Pacific coast is without
battleships. Ho urged this lack should
bo made up in part at least by a for
midable force of submarines. Senator
Piles believed the little under-water
craft could be constructed at Pacific
shipyards it in a reasonable percen
tage "f the eosi In the cast.
The president promised to take up the
matter f'rther with the secretary of
the navy.
BEGIN NEW RAILROAD
FIIKBNO, Jan. 24.—1n the presence
of about 150 people F. S. Granger, pro
moter and general manager of the
Fresno-Hanford interurban railroad,
turned the first shovelful of dirt on
that road, about a mile and a half
north of Selma, this afternoon. Ac
tual work starts tomorrow. The new
road will pass through Fowler, Selma,
Klngsburg, Laton and Hanford.
TO DIG OUT STALLED TRAIN
CHBYBNNE, Wyo., Jan. 24.—A spe
cial (ruin left Caspar at noon today
with 160 business mtn and high school
Student! nn board. They an' armed
with shovels and win dig out a Chi
cago & Northwestern train which left
per yesterday and became stalled
snowdrift The blockade at Cas
per bus existed for ten cluys.
IO Cl'BK A <<>l.l> IN (INK I)AV
Tako LAXATIVH UHOMO Quinine Tablets.
Drugglata Mfund money if ft faiN to cure.
E.W. DROVE'S signature la on each box. 25c.
KNOX DIRECTOR OF GREAT
FINANCIAL CORPORATION
Secretary Included with Other Mil.
lionaires on Board Whose Wealth
Aggregates $309^)00,000
[Fjjeoinl to The Herald.]
PITTSBURG, Jan. 24.—Secretary of
State Philander C. Knox has just been
elected a momber of the board of di
rectors of a great financial corpora
tion whose stock, at the last quotation
Mv.-ial v, his ago was worth $3500 a
.share. The corporation is tho Union
Trust company of Pittsburgh which
includes many men specially interest
ed in the doings of the high govern
ment officials.
Tho secretary's name heads the list
of millionaire directors whose aggre
gated wealth exceeds $800,000,000.
The board Include! D. B. Park of tho
Crucible Steel company of America, W.
N. Frew, many times a millionaire; C.
]■.'. Shaw, capitalist with many Inter
est*; Henry C. Frick, tho reputed
largest stockholder in the Pennsyl
vania railroad and Frick Coal ami
Coke company; B. F. Jones of tho
Jones & Laughlin Iron and Steel com
pany; H. C. McEldowney, presldant of
the Union Trust company; J. B. Fin
ley, capitalist; H. C. Fornes, capitalist;
Henry C, Phipps, millionaire philan
thropist; Tomas Lynch of the H. C.
Frick Coal company; J. M. Lockhart,
Standard Oil company; L. O. Converse
of tho Bankers' Trust company, New
York; William H. Schiller, president
National Tube company and subsidi
ary corporation of the United States
Steel corporation; Thomas Morrison,
former partner of Andrew Carnegio
and president of the International
Smelt Ins company; J. M. Schoonmaker
of tho New York Central and A. W.
and R. B. Mellon of tho Mellon bank
ing, real estate and oil and gas in
terests.
The par value of Union Trust stock
is $1 per share, but the last quotation
for the salo of it was $3500 several
years ago.
SETTLEMENT CONFIRMED
PAhIS, Jan. 24. —The settlement of
the financial side of the Hankow Szo
Chuen railroad loan of $30,000,000 is
now confirmed here. The English and
French „ oups have adjusted their dif
ferences and the four groups, which
include the United States and Gel
many, will share alike in the con
tracts for material.
U. OF C. SELECTS DEBATERS
BERKELEY. Jan. 24.—The University
of California tryouts for the CJarnot
debate team, which Is to meet the rep
resentativcH of Stanford university ill
this city February 4, were held last
night, and resulted In the choice of N.
B Drury Charles Ka»ch and F. M.
Shipper, with J. (5. Sweet alternate.
CALIFORNIAN ARRESTED
MKMI'HIH. Term., Jan. 24.—f.. \\.
Hayes, former hanker of San Francis
co was placed under arrest tonight at
the request of the California authori
ties charged with having violutad the
banking laws of that state.

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