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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, January 28, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-01-28/ed-1/seq-2/

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Bqsjvn Dry Goods Sjore
So. Broadway 235-237-239 So. HillSt 234-244
Many decidedly clever creations in Street Hats for
; ,7, Spring wear have arrived.
Misses's2o to $35 CIA
Suits, Coats and Dresses . t|Jl V
Nothing misleading a&out that statement
—the garments are NEW, and their du
plicates have proven ready sellers at
$20 to $35.
Today's price—slo—shows our de
termination to get rid of them while
they ARE new.
Suits and one-piece dresses in 12 to
18-year sizes. And a splendid assort
ment of three-quarter and full-length
coats.
(Main Floor, rear.)
Lace Coat Clearance
; Five dollars for lace coats formerly priced $i?to!
: $2%. Little question about THAT price effecting aj:
; quick clean-up.. . j:
(Main Floor, rear.) j
Oriental Art Wares
Priced Absurdly Low
Decisive reductions on several dozen
quaint pieces, including porcelain and
metal vases, brass and bronze fern dishes,
lacquered trays and post card albums,
Chinese shoes and pipes, carved wood
tabourettes, etc.
Values up to $5.00 for $2.50
Values up to $12.50 for $5.00
Values up to $17.50 for $7.50
Values up to $25 for $10.00 *
si*;i (Second Floor.)
DEMOCRATIC LEAGUE
TO BOOM NO PERSON
New Organization In New York Will
Work for Success of Party as
Whole and Not Fop Can
didacies
ALBANY, N. V., Jan. 27.—Greeting
with applause the. statement of its new
chairman that it was not proposed to
boom any candidate for governor or for
any other office, the general committee
of the Democratic league of the state
of New York was organized today by
the election of Thomas M. Osborne of
Auburn as chairman.
Kvery assembly district in the state
has a representative In the committee,
in the membership of which are Alton
B. Parker, Edwin M. Pheppard, Au
gustus Van Wyck, Morgan J. O'Brien,
Herman Xlidder, D. Cady Horrick, Wil
liam T. Jerome und other well known
Democrats.
The league adopted a report present
ed by a special committee headed by
V Cady Horrick, outlining the league's
position with respect to election and
primary legislation, and authorized the
introduction of bills into the legisla
ture embodying these views.
BOY AND GIRL ARE SUICIDES
DES MOINBSS, la.. Jan. 27.—Vernon
Harr, aged 16, and Miss Lina Ammer,
iised 14, were found sitting upright in
youn~ Barr's buggy at the Barr farm
iouth of Monroe, la., early today,
both dead. A tin cup in which there
remained a mixture of strychnine and
water, was close by. It is thought de
spondency over opposition to their
unirriage because of their age caused
them to committ suicide.
"MOTHER EARTH" BARRED
NEW YORK. Jan. 27.—The circu
lation of "Mother Earth" has been
stopped by the New York postal au
thorities at the request of Anthony
Comstock, the vice crusader. "Mother
Karth" is a monthly publication de
voted to the cause of anarchism. An
article by Emma Goldman concerning
the white slave traffic is said to have
lieen responsible for this action by the
iiuthorities.
WAGE WAR ON CRANEB
RED BLUFF, Cal., Jan. 27.—Sand
hill cranes are so numerous along the
Sacramento river below thia city that
the farmers have banded and employed
:i small army of men to herd the birds
oft the grain fields.
Just think of the time wasted with a coal or wood fire—pre
paring the kindling, getting in the fuel, starting it and watch
ing it. But not so with a
Gas Furnace
After the gas is turned on it is only a matter of how much
heat is required. It is possible to get just the amount you
want.
Ask dealers for prices on Gas Furnaces.
Los Angeles Gas and Electric Corporation
645 SOUTH HILL STREET
Phones: Sunset, Main 8920. Home, 10003.
GLAVIS TESTIFIES
AGAINST BALLINGER
Accusers of Secretary of Interior Now
Offer Former Chief of Field Di.
vision to Lay Foundation
of His Case
WASHINGTON, Jan. 27.—The Bal
linger-Pinchot inquiry will be resumed
at 10 o'clock tomorrow morning with
Louis R. Glavis again on the stand.
Glavis has been offered as the flrst
witness by accusers of the secretary of
the interior, to lay the foundation of
their case.
At the initial session of the com
mittee he made little more than a
start on his testimony.
In beginning, however, Mr. Glavis
made the additional charge against
Secretary Ballinger that, before enter
ing the govemme- service, he had
acted as counsel in the Wilson Coal
company cases in the state of Wash
ington, by drawing up an escrow agree
ment and deeds for alleged fraudulent
claimants.
Glavis laid emphasis on the fact that
Mr. Ballinger's name had been omit
ted from all records in the case and
that the claimants appeared only "by
attorney."
From the manner in which the com
mittee proceeded yesterday it is evi
dent that each member, when he wants
a particular point illuminated, will
not wait for tin opportunity to cross
examine, but will interrupt witness to
bring out additional evidence, or to
call attention to discrepancies.
No one is willing to hazard a grupss
as to the length of time that will be
consumed by the committee. Already
it has appeared necessary that wit
nesses shall be called from Seattle and
other points in the west, and that of
fice records may have to be obtained
from Juneau, Alaska.
One commttteeman declared today
that at the rate of progress set at the
first session it will take nineteen years
to complete the inquiry.
WORKING FOR BIG FAIR
NEW YORK, Jan. 27.—That plans
for a New York world's fair in 1913
are well under way was indicated
today by the announcement that
Charles K. Koster has been appointed
a foreign representative for the enter
prise and has already left New York
on a trip around the world In the in
terest of the exposition.
Are you nervous? Try Hysto.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: KHIDVV SIOKJMJLNG, JAJNUAKX 28, lino.
POSTAL SAVINGS
PLAN PERFECTED
BILL INTRODUCED OUTLINES
FEDERAL SCHEME
MARRIED WOMEN CAN HAVE PRU
VATE ACCOUNTS
Measure Drafted by Carter Contains
Novel Provisions for Postoffice
Banking—All Deposits
Limited to $500
(Associated Tress]
WASHINGTON. Jan. 27.—The postal
savings bank bill, drafted by Senators
Carter, Dolliver and Owens, a sub
committee of the committee on post
offices anil post ronds, was perfected
today and was introduced in the senate
by Mr. Carter. It was referred to the
postofflce committee and probably will
be reported back to the senate tomor
row.
Tho bill provides that a system of
I postiil sn.vin^H depoiitorie* under the
supervision of a board of truatee« t"
consist of the secretary of the treasury.
i the postmaster general and the atlor
, ney general shall be established.
This board Is authorized to make all
: regulations governing custody of nion
: c> s deposited with the postal savings
bank.
All postofflces of a class authorized to
, is.-iu<' money orders anil such others as
I the postmaster general may designate
I are declared to be postal savings dspos
! itorles. They are to receive deposits
I from the public, and are to be kept
1 open for the transaction of builnega in
i the usual postofflce business hours of
i the town or locality where they are lo
cated.
Accounts may be opened by any per
son 10 years or more of age, and by
married women in thof own names and
free from Interference by their hus
bands. No person will be permitted to
have more than one account.
An account cannot bo opened for less
than $1, and not more than $100 can be
deposited in any one month.
Other Regulations
All deposits must be multiples 'of $1,
but, that smaller amounts may be ac
cumulated for deposits, savings cards
will be issued and 10-eent postal sav
ings stamps sold. When these cards
and attached stamps show an Invest
ment of $1 or multiples thereof they will
be received as deposits.
Deposits in postal savings banks will
draw 2 per cent Interest credited to thu
I books of depositors once a year.
I No person will be allowed to have a
i balance in excess of $500, exclusive of
accumulated interest.
Funds received by postal savings
banks are to be deposited in banks,
subject to public supervision, and as
1 nearly aa practicable in the neighbor
hood 'in -which the funds are received.
The banks are to pay for the funds
not less than 2Vi per cent interest.
The deposits are to be distributed
| amon? the local banks on the basis of
their capital and surplus, and the banks
may give Indemnity bonds to Insure
the safety and prompt payment of de
posits.
At its option any bank may deposit
collateral security subject to the ap
proval of the board. In event banks
1 refuse to receive postal deposits on the
i terms prescribed, the funds may be de
posited with the treasurer of the United
States.
Provision is made for the mainte
nance of a reserve fund not exceeding
10 per cent of the total funds deposited.
Interest and profits accruing from de
posits or investment of postal savings
are to be applied to the payment of ex
penses of administration, and any ex
cess is to be a part of postal revenues.
CORPORATION ACT IS
READY FOR CONGRESS
IDEAS OF PRESIDENT TAFT EM
BODIED IN MEASURE
If Passed. Combinations of Capital
Will Be Subjected to Three
Methods of Federal
Supervision
WASHINGTON, Jan. 27.—After
being subjected to the close scrutiny
of prominent lawyers and undergoing
repeated revision, the bill embodying
the ideas of President Talt for a fed
eral incorporation act is ready to be
introduced in congress.
Its preparation represents months of
work by Attorney General Wicker
shain and Secretary Nagel, who have
sought to draft a measure that will
stand the test of the courts and safe
guard public interests. Presumably in
its main features the bill is in accord
with the president's special mesKußi'
and with the preliminary draft pub
lished several weeks ago.
Corporations given a charter under
the bill will be held to a strict ac
countability for the observance of its
provisions, for no less than three dis
tinct methods are available to dispos
sess them of the privilege of doing
business. These are the right of con
gress to alter, amend or repeal a char
ter; the right of the commissioner of
corporations, who issues the charter,
to sue for a receivership in case of a
violation of any of its features or for
alleged insolvency, and the the right
of the attorney general to bring pro
ceedings for annulment for violations
of the anti-trust act.
Proceedings instituted by the com
missioner of corporations or by the
department of justice may be resisted
by Injunction or by other legal means.
Advocates of the bill believe it is
gaining some favor in congress. They
believe the measure will prove pop
ular and, while it will necessarily
compel a readjustment of business
methods by the corporate -interests,
this will not be harmful to the "good
trusts."
Monopolistic combinations, it is de
clared, will be prevented, but ample
provision is made for the organization
of business within legal lines.
MAY ADJUST STRIKE
MEXICO CITY, Jan. 27.—Prospects
for an agreement that will prevent a
walkout of engineers) and conductors
employed by the National Railways of
Mexico looked brighter tonight than
at any time since the employes first
submitted demands. Two conferences
were held today by the joint commit-
tee of engneers and conductors with
B. N. Brown, president of the railroad.
At the close of the second session It
was reported that both sides looked for
Ulement by Saturday.
llysto la a. nerve food.
LAND LOTTERY PLAN
OPPOSED IN SENATE
Measure Passed After Filibuster, but
Pine Ridge Bill Is Subjected
to Further Delay
WASHINGTON; Jan. That tUrn-
Is not unanimous ' approval of tno
present method of disposing of reser
vation public lands by lottery was
made evident in the senate today, when
Senators Gore of Oklahoma and Bur
kett of Nebraska, protested against
the adoption of this method in the
sale of unallotted lands in the Rose
bud Indian reservation in South Da-
The question was sprung by Mr.
Gore in consideration of the j}"*°;
bud land sale bill." Mr. Gore offered
an amendment permitting: applications
for the land to be made by registered
mail instead of requiring a personal
registration on the ground. In pre
senting the amendment Mr. Gore said
the present system was inconvenient
and expensive and had the effect of
cutting out people who should be per
mitted to enter the lands.
Mr. Burkett criticised the present
system in unmeasured terms. He told
of the crowding of the trains and the
insufficient accommodations in fron
tier towns on the occasion of recent
epanlnss ,vi,i,-h he said, had been
marked by much crime and bloodshed.
Senators Gamble and Crawford of
South Dakota defended the present
method as the best obtainable. Mr.
Gamble declared that Mr. Burkett had
drawn on his imagination when he
bad charged crime In connectoin with
recent openings.
After a mild filibuster the bill was
passed. The senate refused, however,
to proceed with tile Pine Ridge bill,
which will be considered tomorrow.
CHARGES FRAUD IN
INDIAN LAND BILL
SENATOR SAYS ATEMPT MADE
TO FOIST TRACT ON U.S.
Jeff Davis Claims Some "Powerful
Force" at Work to Compel Gov.
ernment to Buy Rosebud
Reservation
TYASHIXGTON, Jan. 27.—An ani
mated political debate with the tariff
as its chief feature entertained the
house of representatives today.
The agricultural appropriation Dill
was under consideration, and, speak
ing on it, Representative Boutell of
Illinois upheld the Payne-Aldrlch
tariff law as one that would be emi
nently satistactory io vie country and
especially to southern states.
The senate received the postal sav
ings bank bill, an administration meas
ure, and referred it to committee. It
probably will be reported out to
morrow.
A bill was passed providing for the
disposition by lottery of unallotted In
dian lands in South Dakota, but not
before Senators Gore and Burkett had
bitterly assailed.the system.
Senator Jeff Davis charged fraudulent
purpose in connection with the con
■lderatton by the senate of the bill
providing for the sale of the unallot
ted lands in the Rosebud Indian reser
vation in South Dakota.
He referred especially to the pro
vision authorizing payment for certain
sections of the land for school pur
poses. Declaring that much of the
land was arid and worthless, he as
serted there was some "powerful force"
behind the scheme to compel the gov
ernment to buy the land.
GERMAN TENOR GIVES UP
WIFE TO MAN SHE LOVES
Karl Jorn, in Statement Before Con.
sul, Makes Known Terms of
Separation
NEW YORK, Jan. 27.—1n a written
statement, witnessed by the German
consul here, Karl Jam, German tenor,
made public tonight terms of his
separation from his wife.
Like Iluskin, he surrendered his wife
to the man she loved.
"I have agreed," says Join, "that she
get a divorce so that she can marry
the man of her choice. Furthermore,
] have bound myself to pay her $86,900
in cash and $luoo a year until she is
married again. To our three children
I give $1000 a year for the rest oX
their lives. ] gave my wife all the
money I had before she Balled, and I
did not even have 50 cents to buy her
a bunch of violets at the pier."
Joro kissed his wife affectionately
before she sailed last week for Ger
many. He met her when he was a
young man .struggling for success and
their lives until recently had been
happy together.
MADRIZ LIKE ZELAYA
BLL'EFIELDS, Nicaragua, Jam 27. —
Private dispatches received today say
the imprisonment of members Of prom
inent families In Granada and Man
agua continues and that Madriz has
virtually re-established a reign of ter
ror, it is reported that General i.'ha
morro, with an army of 2000, after a
fifteen days' march, has reached La
Libertad, where the outposts of the
government's forces are stationed.
This is considered the quickest march
through a difficult trail ever made in
Central America.
QUICK WORK AVERTS WRECK
REDDING, Cal., Jan. 27.—The wreck
of a train on the Sacramento Valley
and Kastern railway by a landslide
six miles west of Bully late yesterday
was narrowly averted by the quick
action of Engineer Ivers, who was
warned by his fireman on rounding a
curve, and applied the emergency;
brake, stopping the cars Just as a
great mass of earth and rock crashed
across the track.
INJURED ON SAD ERRAND
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 27.—As he
was leaving the Central emergency
hospital this morning to Inform his
relatives that his brother lay dying
there, J. Paul McKenna, a prominent
contractor of this city, wa» struck
down by a footpad and so severely in
jured that ha was compelled to return
to the hospital, whore he was placed
on a cot beside his brother.
FOUND GUILTY OF MURDER
WILKESBAUIM-:. Pa., Jan. 27.—
rseorge L. Marion, the New York
theatrical agent accused of murdering
his common law WU« hire last August
was today found guilty of murder In
the first degree.
PAYNE'S TARIFF
LAW DEFENDED
BOUTELL COMES TO RESCUE
OF REGU.ARS
WANTS PEOPLE TO WAIT FOR
DISTANT RESULTS
Congressman Declares Common Sense
of Taft Will Be Proved Yet.
He Also Chastises Demo.
cratic Merrymakers
[Associated Press]
WASHINGTON. Jan. 27.—Admitting
that the Payne tariff law woutu have
to be justified by the results of its
practical operation, Representative
Boutell of Illinois, a member of the
committee which framed the measure,
made a vigorous defense of the new
law today In tho house.
President Tal't had been criticised, he
snid, because ho had declared tho
Payne tariff act the best law ever
n.'issoii hy rrmercss but. he added, the
result would justify that statement.
"The common sense and sagacity o[
President Taft will be recognized by
his re-election in 1812," continued Mr.
Boutell. "It la Bald the act gives
province to certain individuals and is
the cause of the present high prices.
It has In on claimed the tarilt' act lias
not brought prosperity and that it will
retard prosperity."
When the Democrats applauded and
then laughed in derision, Mr. Bou
tell sharply reproved them.
"Why Is it?" he asked, "that the
Democrat* always applaud any tale
of misfortune or prediction of adver
sity?"
It was then the turn of the Republi
cans to laugh and applaud. >
Replies to Bailey
Paying especial attention to criti
cisms by Senator Bailey of the Dlns
ley-AWlrich tariff laws. Mr. Boutell
produced a bundle of Texas newspa
pers of recent issues and read from
them predictions Of unusual prosper
ity for Texas in the new year.
"Texas." interposed Representative
Slayden of that state, "is prosperous,
but it is so in spite of, and not be
cause of, the Republican tariff, and
if the. government \s successful in its
criminal prosecutions of the distin
guished Republicans, the Big Four
trust, times will be much more pros
perous in Texas."
On being Interrupted by Representa
tive Henry of Texas, Mr. Boutell
asked that member whether he thought
prices were too high.
"Certainly, I think prices are too
high," replied Mr. Henry.
"Prices of what? Do you want
lower price of cotton?" asked Mr.
Boutell, and Mr. Henry's repiy was
drowned in the uproar of applause
from the Republicans.
Mr. Henry inquired whether the
Illinois member had heard that chil
dren of Chicago went to school with
out their breakfast.
"To that I simply give the reply of
Jane Addams, who says there Is no
truth in that statement," replied Mr.
Boutell.
Mr. Boutell then read of the in
crease of prices of articles upon which
the tariff had been reduced in the
Payne-Aldrich law.
"If a reduction of 75 cents a hun
dred on lumber puts the price up," ho
added, "I wonder how high it would
go if placed on the free list."
ROBBER ENGAGES IN
PISTOL FIGHT WITH POLICE
Unmasked Man First Beats San Fran.
Cisco Pawnbroker Into
Insensibility
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 27.—After
beating Isaac Chemnick, a pawn
broker, into insensibility in his store
tonight, an unmasked robber engaged
in a running pistol fight with a police
man, firing three shots at the officer,
and finally escaped in a dark alley.
The policeman sent five bullets after
the highwayman, none of which took
effect.
The thug entered Chemnick's place
and said he wanted to buy a revolver.
One was shown him. He loaded it
and then assaulted the storekeeper.
Chemnick's cries attracted the police
man.
FIND BODY OF MAN IN CABIN
BAKBRSFIELD, Jan. 27.—Tho body
of a man about 60 years old, supposed
to be that of Robert Wade of this city,
who disappeared last July, was dis
covered yesterday in a lone cabin near
Roses Station. The cause of death
has not yet been established, but cir
cumstances point to suicide. Wade's
wife is believed to live in Fresno.
BANK TREASURER ARRESTED
WEBSTER, Mass., Jan. 27.—After se
cluding himself for more than a week,
John A. Hall, treasurer of the South
Bridge Savings bank, who is charged
with the larceny of $21,000 of the
bank's funds, surrendered to the police
at Worcester today and was brought
here for a hearing in the district
court.
AGED ACTRESS RECOVERING
NEW YORK, Jan. 27.—Although Mrs.
Sol Smith, the actress, was still in a.
serious condition today as the result
of the injuries she sustained in an
automobile accident last night, mem-
bers of her family said that her re
covery was assured. Mrs. Smith is the
oldest actress on the American stage.
FARMER MADE RICH
UTICA, N. V., Jan. 27.—A fortune of
more than $60,000 is awaiting Welcome
Richardson, a Poolvllle farmer. Mr.
Richardson is a nephew and sole sur
viving relative of Jeremiah Moyneham,
a rag man who died in St. Louis Jan
uary 9 leaving the fortune in gold and
securities.
CONFESSES KILLED FATHER
MINOT, N. D., Jan. 27.—Charles Mo
line, 23 years old, confessed today that
he had murdered his father, Frank
Moline, last Friday. Me laid his
mother, who had been divorced from
Moline, believed Moline was about to
remarry and was afraid he would leave
his property to his second wife.
LODI PUTS BAN ON DAIRIES
LODI, Cal., Jan. 27.—At a meeting
of the town trustees last night, an
ordinance whs I passed banishing all
dairies from the town limits: The
dairyman are given until May 1 to
obey the new law. Exposure of In
sanitary conditions In certain, local
dairies led to prompt actloi
_ . AMUSEMENTS
BTTT aqpa THtTATPP Belaaco-Blarkwood Co., Proprs. and. Mgrs.
ilLflatU ikt&Al&K MATINEES TOMORROW, Sunday and Thursday.
LAST FIVK PERFORMANCES OF THIS 810 SENSATIONAL SUCCESS,
LEWIS S. STONE and the Bolasco theater company present for the first time any
where PORTER EMERSON BROWN'S Immensely successful new play,
THE SPENDTHRIFT
Onl> live more performances of this great play remain. DON'T watch and wait.
This la positively tho last week and don't miss what la the reigning auccess of the
season. GET YOUR SEATS FOR "THE SPENDTHRIFT" NOW. Regular Belaico
prices.
NEXT WEEK'S GREATEST ATTRACTION
Commencing next Monday night LEWIS B. STONE and the Bolasco theater company
will give for the first time by a stock company anywhere George Broadhurst's great
est play. »
"THE MAN OF THE HOUR."
Scats for "THE MAN OP THE HOUR" are now on sale at the regular Belasco prices.
GPAl\ir> r»I3T7T?A T-TOTTQTi' matinees TOMORROW AND SUNDAY.
KAND QPiI,KA HyU!sll Phones: Main 1967, Home A 1987.
ONLY 3 MORE PERFORSIANCES OF THIS TREMENDOUS MUSICAL HIT
t?PDDTO And liln bIC company present for (lie last »» J .11 j
Er o™* AM three lime" *»•"• w- ***■>«<•» original Woodland
HAKTMAN production of the famous forest fantasy .
Commencing Sunday Matinee—"THE WIZARD OF THE NILE." Seatg-now on sale.
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER e E"n,i M Manag.<
TONIGHT—MATINEE TOMORROW—TOMORROW NIGHT.
Winston Churchill's superb war-time play,
THE CRISIS
"BEST STOCK COMPANY AND BEST PLAYS IN AMERICA."
REGULAR BURBANK PRICES—2Sc, 36c/500. MATINEES, 250. GALLERY, 100.
Next Week— ON ACCOUNT OF ELIZA "
TT AM3URGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER SS ni «.dIM.22SJ:
r™3 Broadway near Ninth. ' ~~~~ P!!s=c:: Main 7»n»; FU«*
*■ ■*" TONIGHT— TOMORROW—TOMORROW NIGHT.
CHARLES B. HANFORD
In a modern comedy by George H. Hroadhurst and C. T. Dazey.
THE AMERICAN LORD
PRICES—2Sc. .'lOc, 76c, »1. A few front rows $1.60. MATINEE) TODAY, 25c to 76a
Saturday matinee, 25c to fl.
_ NEXT WEEK. AT THE COZY MAJESTIC. NEXT WEEK.
SCatS The Klrke La Shelle Company presents
°at s the The Virginian
By Owen Winter anil Klrke La Shelle
' BOX Office PRICES— BSo to 1. A few front rows, }1.50. Popular mat-
Ineea Wednesday and Saturday.
The Orphcum Road Show
Alice Lloyd - Ida O'Day & Co
Famous London Comedienne. , "A Bit of Old Chelsea,
The McNaUghtonS Matin The sin«™on Horseback. '
English Eccentrics. ITIUUnCG N j ht j n ft Monkey
Brothers Permane Today Music Hall
"Nightingales Making Love." | i Presented by Maud Roche*.
Hyman Meyer Melville & Higgins
The. Man at the Piano. "Just a Little Fun."
ORPHEUM MOTION PICTURES.
Nightsloc, ZSc, SOc, 75c. Matinee* Dallyloc, 25c, 800.
THE AUDITORIUM "theater l. c. behymer,
n.c* nuumjKiuivi BEAUTIFUL." Manager!
FIVE EVENTS— FIB. S. 3, 4, 8. MATINEE FEB. 5.
mTTT? T7TT3*/rt?CC introducing over
THE KIRMESS 300 participants.
* •*■•*■■*—» *«A*IUIJWU SOCIETY'S EVENT.
Benefit of Assistance League and Los Angeles Orphan*' Home
Seats now on sal« at the Auditorium Box nice. Trices 60c, Toe, $1.00, $1.50. *3.00.
MASON OPERA HOUSE Le.,.,Hand 22£5.
TONIGHT AND TOMORROW MATINEE TOMORROW — Direction
of Mrs. Leslie Carter Co." (Inc.)
MRS. LESLIE CARTER 0""^™ Vasta Hcrno
MRS. LESLIE CARTER as VASTA HERNE.
Her new play of morals and emotions, by Edward Peple, author of "The Prince Chap,"
"The Play That's Different." Trices .■>()<• to ft. SEATS NOW ON SALE.
Coming—William li Crane In "FATHER AND THE BOYS." Seats now on sale.
LDS A IV. „ ,f- I M TH'W ' SPRING ST. MATINEE TODAY.
Bohemian Sestet. I Malvern Troupe,
Nellie Hurt. ~> pjmQrg Of g» I Cotton Gasman an 4 h«
Nellie Hurt. f>lmOlV Cif IPP Josephine Gaesman and her
The Laugh-O-Scope. -CIHIUH6 «C LCt | pickaninnies.
POPULAR PRICES—IOc. gpc AND 30c. .
OLYMPIC THEATER ~^£j|=rT=.
USS^*<SS^SJSS^ OFF TO CATALINA
A real pleasure trip, by Charles Alphin Ten big ulnglng and dancing numbers. 10c,
20c and Itc Next Week—"A DAY IN VENICE."
/COLISEUM—Sixty-third and Main Streets
SUNDAY, JAN. 30, 2:30 P. M.
■ /
Great oAutomobile and oTWotorcycle Races
Al TJvingaon at the wheel of the Corbln; Harold Stone at the wheel of the Mollne;
30-minute free-for-all professional, in Which Paul Derkum will be the shining light.
All of the Btara will appear. General admission, 25c.
TWTcCAREY'S PAVILION tbmA^J^^S:
IYJ> Geo. Memsic vs. Frank Picato
* • TEN ROUNDS
Also Charlie Dalton vs. Al. Rogers, ten rounds; Paul Roman vs. Andy River*, six
rounds- Henry Caresse v». Chris Johnson, six rounds. ADMISSION $1. RESERVED
HEATS $»■ BOX SEATS *3, lor sole at A. B. GiCEENEWALD'S CIUAB slolili, 107 «.
Spring reel. '
PRESIDENT TAFT'S RECENT
ORDER IS CRITICISED
Mississippi Representative Says It
Will Interfere with Conduct.
ing the Investigations
WASHINGTON, Jan. 27.— Heading
the order of November 26 last, forbid
ding officials of the government from
giving information to members of con
gress except through the head of the
department, Representative Sisson of
Mississippi today pointed to the many
dangers that he said might arise from
such an order.
"If this order goes without challenge,
asked Mr. Sisson, "does it assume that
the president has a right to control any
information congressmen can get?"
The question arose, he said, whether
information was to be censored before
a congressman was to get it.
"Information," he added, "should be
had for the asking as a matter of right,
and not as a matter of favor."
OBSERVER SAYS COMET IS
A DOUBLE-TAILED AFFAIR
TUCSON, Ariz., Jan. 27.— According
to Prof A. B. Douglas, formerly in
charge of the Flagstaff observatory,
the vagrant comet now visible in the
western sky is a double-tailed celestial
phenomenon. .
Professor Douglas, who is now ob
server at the University of Arizona,
announced his discovery tonight. The
phenomenon was observed last night
when the second tail was seen branch
ing oft due south while the other ap
pendage was pointed straight upward.
Tonight the two tails forked at a
greater distance from the comet. Pro
fessor Douglas estimated the length of
the double taail at twenty-six degrees,
the longest since the comet of 1881.
ARREST NEGRO SUSPECT
LOUJSVILLE, Ky., Jan. 27.—George
B. Robertson, a negro, was arre3ted
here this afternoon, charged with the
murder of Mrs. Jennie Cleghorn, a
whits woman, whose dismembered
body, minus the heart and heart, was
found In ;i resort in Chicago on Janu
ary 20. Robertson left Chicago on
January -». The police searched a
trunk ut his home, finding therein a
bomb, a razor and undergarments
stained with blood.
REAR ADMIRAL DYER'S
LONG CAREER IS ENDED
Navy Man Who Served In Two War»
Dies at His Massachu
setts Home
SISiIiBOSB, Mass., Jan. 27.—Hear
Admiral Nehemiah Mayo Dyer, hon
ored for distinguished service in two
wars, died today following an attack
of acute indigestion.
He was rapidly promoted for hl3
meritorious conduct in the civil war
in the gulf campaign, ajid in tho
Spanish-American wur was second
only to Admiral Dewey in eminent
service at the battle of Manila bay,
for which ho was advanced seven num
bers in rank. He was 71 years of age.
The veteran nav.il tighter recently
went to Washington to learn the re
sult of a unique suit that he had
brought against the city of Melrose,
and that he had taken to the United
States court. It was an action to re
cover taxes paid under protest on the
admiral'! bank account, the funds of
which he declared constituted the sal
ary given him by the government. Tha
full bench, however, decided against
him.
DRINKS POISON; DIES
SUISUN, Cal., Jan. 27.—John C. Hin
drichsen, an aged German, committed
suicide at his home in Fairtleld last
night by drinking a solution containing
strychnine. A neighbor heard hia
groans and summoned physicians, but
to no avail. Despondency over money
losses is supposed to have caused the
suicide. _^^.
SUED FOR SHORT WEIGHT
NEW YORK. Jan. 27.—A crusado
against short weighing has been start
ed by the new city government here
and more than 300 suits have been
in against grocers, market men
.iiHl other retailers accused of usin^
false and defective scales and meas
ures.
WILL RECEIVE NEARLY MILLION
CHICAGO, Jan. 27.—The widow of
John Farson, broker, who died a week
ago, Mrs. Mamie A. Farson, will re
ceive in addition to the $650,000, his
personal estute, $260,000 of which is
the amount of hia life insurance among
various companies and fraternal orders.

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