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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, February 08, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-02-08/ed-1/seq-2/

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{80. Broadway 235-237-239 So. Hill St 234-244
Street hats in styles unmistakably new. Styles to please
the faddish as well as the ultra-conservative dressers.
(Second Floor.)
' -
Complete stocks of the famous Arnold
garments for infants.
• (Main Floor, Rear.) |
»
French Jewelry at Half
Dozens and dozens of dainty, artistic pieces
of French Jewelry buyable now at 25c to j
$3; every piece well worth double. j
(Facing Main Entrance.), i
$6 to $ 0 Silk Waists
$5.00
A hundred and twenty $6 to $10 Waists
of messaline and taffeta.
All NEW Waists—the samples from
which many of the best stores in America
choose their supplies for the present season.
No two of them alike, so you may be
sure the variety of styles and colorings
will please the most exacting shoppers.
(Second Floor.)
. . ' . . s ___
DETECTIVE KILLED;
POLICE BAFFLED
SHOT IN HEAD IN AGENCY CARD
ROOM
Detectives on Case Scout Story— Dead
Man Was Formerly a Resl.
dent of Los An
geles
PORTLAND, Ore.. Feb. 7.— T.
Barnes, an operative of a detective
agency- in this city and once of Los
Angeles, is dead as the result of a re
volver shot.
Charles Mapes, a fellow employe, is
detained without hail by the police on
the order of the district attorney, pend
ing an inquest by the coroner into the
circumstances surrounding the shoot
ing, which occurred late today in a
room used as a lounging place by em-»
ployes of the agency where Mapes and
Barnes had been playing cards.
The weapon which was the cause of
Barnes' death is an old-fashioned single
action revolver of large caliber. Ac
cording to the story told by Mapes to
the police, Barnes was twirling the
revolver by the trigger guard when it
suddenly discharged, the bullet striking
Barnes just below the nose and rang
ing upward into the brain.
The police detectives say they can
not see how It would be possible for a
single action revolver to become dis
charged in the manner described by
Mapes..
D. L. Clouse, manager of the detec
tive agency, stated to the police that
Barnes and his wife did not agree, and
expressed the opinion that the man
committed suicide.
Mrs. Barnes, when questioned by the
police, declared that she and her hus
band had never had any trouble. She
Bald that they were married four years
ago at Los Angeles and that their mar
lied life bad been a happy one. She
believed that her husband met death
by accident.
Detectives Carpenter and Price of
the police department say they are
convinced that it is a case of murder
or suicide. They place no credence in
the accident theory.
WRANGLE OVER RULES
WASHINGTON, Feb. 7.—Two and a
half hours were consumed by the house
today in the discussion of one of the
rules adopted upon the initiative of
Representative Fitzgerald of New York
to facilitate the business of the house.
The discussion developed in connection
■with the consideration of the "unani
mous calendar." After the vote there
■were no "party" or "insurgent lines,
The house decided that once a bill Is
■up for discussion it cannot be passed
over without prejudice, but must be
taken off that calendar, retaining its
place only on the other calendar upon
which it appeared.
NEW TRIAL IS DENIED
NEW YORK. Feb. 7— Judge Ray in
the United States circuit court denied
today the motion of Lieut. Charles T.
Wade, teacher of mathematics In the
Annapolis Naval academy, for a new
trial of his suit for $100,000 damages
against the International Magazine
company for an alleged libel published
in the Cosmopolitan Magazine.
NEXT TIME
You are all worn out from worrying and working over that
dirty coal or wood stove, stop and think of the easy time your
neighbor is having with a ■
; GAS STOVE
Now, does it seem worth while to waste your good nature on
an old-fashioned stove? Ask,any dealer for prices on Gas
Stoves, Heaters, Ranges, etc.
Los Angeles Gas and Electric Corporation
645 South Hill Street
—,-liiiisrt. Main 8930; Home 1000.1.
RAYNER FIGHTS
POSTAL BANKS
NO GROUNDS FOR MEASURE,
HIS CONTENTION
Maryland Senator Says Constitution
Is in State of Collapse; De
pend on Taft as
Check
WASHINGTON, Feb. Admitting I
that he had given no consideration to
merits of the postal savings bank bill,
and declaring that he was not influ
enced by the banking interests. Sen
ator Rayner today addressed the sen
ate In opposition to the measure on
purely constitutional reasons.
"I have not," lie said, "been able to
find any constitutional ground what
ever for this measure. No one who
• has read the Constitution of the Unit
ed States will contend for a moment
that it comes under any of the ex
press powers of that instrument..
"I have searched in vain for any
decision sustaining this contention. It
is not a law necessary and proper to
carry into execution the clause which
gives congress the power to borrow
money on the credit of the United
States, because this enactment does
not purport to be for any sun pur
pose."
Mr. Rayner took up a statement
made by Mr. Burkett that authority Is
found for the legislation under the
general welfare clause. He declared
there Is no general welfare clause In
the Constitution as an independent
grant*of power, that no text writer,
no commentor and no court lias ever
announced the proposition that Sen
ator Burkett contended for.
"I know the Constitution under the
last administration was in a state of
collapse," continued Mr. Rayner.
"Upon a number of occasions upon
this floor I attempted to show how it
received blow after blow until it was
almost staggering to its grave.
'We nave a president who Is thor
oughly familiar with the landmarks
of his power, who, with his judicial
temperament, not only will hold him
self in equilibrium, but proposes to
hold in proper poise and balance the
checks and safeguards of government
al power.
"He has never said in his message to
us under what grant of constitutional
power he has proposed this important
legislation. One tiling I feel sure of,
and that is that he will never regard
the general welfare clause of the con
stitution as an independent grant of
power. Such an interpretation of this
would convert us into a centralized
government of inherent and unlimited
functions, and would give congress tho
right to pass any legislation whatever,
that, in its arbitrary discretion or from
political motives it may determine
upon, and in my opinion destroying the
autonomy of the states'and obliterating
the Inviolable decision of the tenth
amendment; would make such a
gaping wound in the heart of the con
. stitution that the blood that gave it
, life would wither In Its veins."
Mr. Carter interpreted Air. Rayner's
speech as an acquiescence in the doc
trine that while the constitution does
not specifically warrant the establish
ment of a postal savings bank, it does
not specifically deny such right.
i LOS ANGELES HERALD: TUESDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 8, 1010.
HEYBURN FLAYS
LEE AND OTHER
FAMOUS REBELS
WOULD NOT LEND TENTS TO
CONFEDERATES
DENOUNCES SOUTH, BUT FAILS
TO GET SUPPORT
Every Democrat and Republican In the
U. S. Senate Votes Against
Idahoan After He Thun
ders 40 Minutes
! [Associated Tress]
ITT ASHINGTOX. Fob. 7 - Protest
l V ing against loaning government
' ' tents for the use of the Confed
erate veterans at th<>l»- annual en
campment in Mobile, Ala., next April,
Senator Heyburn of Idaho In the sen
ate today made **ie sharpest comment
upon the issues of the Civil War that
has been heard in congress in twenty
years. , . '',',
He inveighed against men In rebel
uniforms being permitted to occupy
government property, or the "rebel
flag being- allowed to fly above it.
Finally he drifted into the question
of honoring men by placiner their stat
ues in the Hall of Fame, and by un
mistakable inference condemned the
action of Virginia in sending the
statue of General Robert E. Leo to
Washington.
"Take it away and worship it if you
I please," he thundered, "but do not in
! trude it upon the people who do not
! want it." , *
Democratic senators moved uneasily
about the floor, conversing with each
other, or sat, frowning, during the
I speech.
When Senator Heyburn had con-
I eluded. Senator Bankhead of Alabama
said:
Should Feel Better
"I am sure the senator from Idaho
feels much better, and I ask for a
vote."
"By roll call!" shouted a dozen or
more senators, and hands went up
second of that request from every part
of the senate chamber.
When the vote was had on the tent
loaning resolution every Democrat and
all the Republicans except Mr. Hey
burn voted for it.
The resolution was rearhe* in Its
regular order. Mr. Heyburn was
prompt to raise an objection, and Mr.
Bankhead was just as alert in moving
the consideration regardless of the ob
jection. . „
It was immediately evident that the
objection had aroused some feeling,
for with flushed face and animated
voice, Mr. Bailey, who sat near Bank
head, declared that if the resolution
was ruled out of order no other busi
ness could be transacted.
The Bankhead motion being unde
batable, the senate immediately pro
ceeded to an aye and nay vote no the
question as to whether the resolution
should be taken up. This was decided
In the affirmative, unanimously, Mr.
Heyburn not voting.
Mr. Heyburn then spoke for probably
forty minutes, In which he went over
many issues of the war and declared
himself as much a patriot now as he
had been in 1862-63-64. There were no
material interruptions, but all senators
listened with evident Interest.
Ignore His Abuse
1 The southern senators held hurried
consultations while the Idaho senator
' was "proceeding, and decided to make
' no reply.
Accordingly, when Mr. Heyburn con
cluded, they contented themselves with
allowing the question to go to a vote
after the laconic remark by Mr. Bank
head.
It so happened that Mr. Heyburn s
; colleague, Senator Borah of Idaho, was
the first of the Republicans to be
reached In the roll call. Without a
twitch of countenance he voted in fa
vor of the adoption of the resolution.
Mr. Heyburn said that- while he did
not want to open the wounds of war,
he still thought the south had made a
great mistake in that war. He had
been told that the government was in
the habit of making such loans to the
G. A. 1!., and he thanked God that such
was the case, because the Grand Army
was composed of men who had fought
on the side of the Union, and "their
cause was a glorious and honorable
one."
"Do you expect," he said, going back
to the contrast of the G. A. R. with the
Confederate Veterans, "that those who
gave their support to the Union cause
would sit idly by and say nothing when
these issues are raised? They are none
; the less patriotic now than they were
in 1862-63-64. Could they be less patri
otic and can they complacently permit
: the subject of the war to become a jest
in this age? If so, the sooner we know
it the better." .
Was Not in War
At this point Mr. Heyburn received
his only interruption. It came from
- Senator Davis of Arkansas, who, even
without awaiting the permission of the
Idaho senator, abruptly Interposed the
question:
"Were you in'-the war?"
"Oh," responded Mr. Heyburn, "that
' is the stock expression of the cheap
reporter."
"I understand," replied Mr. Davis.
"that the senator represents 264 niggers
In his state."
Responding to the last Interruption,
Mr. Heyburn said if there were 264
, negroes in his state he Intended to rep
resent them. He added he was not a
. senator from his state alone, but a
senator of the United States as well.
As for his participation in the war, he
! stated he had been too young for that,
but that he had been very anxious to
enlist while the war was in progress.
I Mr. Heyburn said that if there were
senators who thought that it was
. proper that the "rebel" flag should
, wave over the property of the United
i States they could vote for the measure,
but he would remind them that there
were millions of people In the United
States who have implanted deep in
their hearts the spirit of patriotism
and who would not follow them in that
course.
From the consideration of the pend
ing resolution, Mr. Heyburn turned
temporarily to the question of the wis
dom of placing a statue of Gen. Leo
in the Hall of Fame in the national
capltol. He did not mention Gen. Lee
by name, but left no doubt that he
had him in mind.
Denounces General
He spoke of the fact that the object
of his remarks hud been an officer in
the army of the United States when
the war broke out, and said he had
done much to render more serious that
conflict which had cost the country
millions upon millions of money and
thousands upon thousands of lives.
He appealed to the people of Virginia
and the south to take the statue back.
"In sending us figures for the na
tional Hall of' Fame 1 would advise
you," he said, "not to overlook your
i snails, your Monroes and • your
Henrys. Don't violate a sentiment
PITTSBURG OFFICIAL
BUSY PROBING GRAFT
M 0& tSaX
■■% v9^ -''MKr -.-. '.-___. ■ -■ 4_l
__\\__ '' J. *{
IwilliAma. v
DISTRICT ATTORNEY
ON GRAFTERS' TRAIL
Official in Pittsburg Is Preparing
Prosecution Against Several ,
Prominent Men of the
City
PITTSBURG, Feb. 7.—Probably the
busiest man in Pittsburg these days is
District Attorney William A. Blakeley,
who is conducting the investigation of
the five men, city officials and others,
arrested on charges of perjury and con
spiracy and soliciting of bribes in con
nection with the selection of the Colum
bia National bank to be a depository of
the city's money.
The live accused men, who have been
released on bail awaiting trial, are
Max G. Leslie, county delinquent tax
collector and a prominent politician;
Edward H. Jennings, millionaire presi
dent of the bank, president of the Pure
Oil company, president of the Colonial
Trust company and head of the E. H.
Jennings Bros, company; Frank A.
Griffin, former vice president and
cashier of the bank; Frank F. Nicola,
head of the extensive Nicola Bros.' In
terests, considered the biggest business
man. in Pittsburg and many times a
millionaire, and Charles Stewart, busi
ness man and former member of coun
cils. . .
which you know to exist and which
exists today as it did in the '60s.
"I ask you in the interest of loyalty
and harmony to say to the people who
have sent this image here to come and
take It away. It may be dear to you,
but it is not dear to us. Take it and
worship it if you please, but do not in
trude It on the people who do not
want It."
Mr. Heyburn here declared that he
had no personal feeling in the matter,
and that it was not his intention to
"wave the bloody shirt."
"I am," he said, "as far from doing
that as any man you ever dreamed of,
but I love my country too well to see
it drifting on the shores of ' discontent
and personal strife."
DENIES LAND OFFICE MADE
EXTRAVAGANT EXPENDITURES
WASHINGTON, Feb. 7.—The furni
ture provided under the $1,000,000 ap
propriation for protection of the public
domain, instead of being extravagantly
expensive, was the same as supplied
other branches of the public land ser
vice, declared Amos Hadley, chief of
the supplies division of the Interior de
partment, before the house committee
on expenditures in that department,
today.
The committee Is investigating ru
mors that there were improper expend
itures under the special million dollar
appropriation.
Both Mr. Hadley and his assistant,
Mr. Ayres, denied tho allegations so
far as supplies were concerned. The
matter was brought before the commit
tee by Representative Hitchcock of Ne
braska.
The committee at an executive ses
sion, at which Mr. Page, a minority
member, agreed with the majority that
so far nothing had been brought out
that reflected on Commissioner Dennett
of the general land office, decided to
hear Chief Field Agent Schwartz next
Monday.
CAN'T EVEN GIVE IT AWAY
WASHINGTON, Feb. 7.—A drastic
form of prohibition for Hawaii is pro
vided for in a bill Introduced today by
Representative Scott, Republican, of
Kansas. The bill provides that it shall
be unlawful to manufacture or sell, or
to give away, except in a private resi
dence, any alcoholic liquors. The sale
of alcohol for medicinal purposes is
to be allowed, under supervision of tho
governor of Hawaii.
SLOAN REFUSES TO TURN
OVER ALLEGED KIDNAPERS
Governor of Arizona Denies Requisi
tion —Guardian of Boy Sues
Out Habeas Corpus Writ
TUCSON, Ariz., Feb. 7.—Governor
Sloan of Arizona today refused to
honor the requisition papers issued by
the governor of California for d. B.
Adams, IN. W. Murphy and Nora Mc-
Laughlin for the alleged kidnaping of
Adams' son, on the ground that Mrs.
Kimball, the boy's grandmother, had
not been appointed his guardian at the
time of the alleged kidnaping in San
Francisco.
On receipt of this news at Tucson,
Mrs. John S. Kimball, the boy's grand
mother, sued out a writ of habeas cor
pus for the child, alleging she bad
been appointed legal guardian of the
boy and was under a court order, to
produce him in court in San Francisco.
Hearing on the writ will be heard
tomorrow. In the meantime the boy
and the three alleged kidnapers are in
custody at Tucson. Twelve private
detectives are here, watching each
other to prevent the boy being carried
into another state or Mexico by one
I sled or the other. r
BADLY HURT IN RUNAWAY
ANDERSON, Cal., Feb. Eugene
Sbanahan, a prominent orchard!*! of
this place, and brother of former
Speaker of the rtate Assembly T. W.
11. Shanahan, was probably fatally In
jured in a runaway today.
" ... ...__-_.._-* _ ___..»*»*<_"■•__ _4___H._t_i.jv_., _>.____f>V«r________________________i
CORPORATION
BILL DERELICT
ADMINISTRATION WILL NOT
FATHER IT
TAFT SPONSOR, BUT DECLINES
TO BURDEN PARTY
President Says, However,' Proposed
Law Contains Several "Com.
mendable" Features; Won't
Urge the Lawmakera
[Associate- it..
WASHINGTON, Feb. The federal
incorporation bill Introduced In con
gress today is not to be pressed for
passage at-this session.
If the bill should pass, President Taft
has stated ids willingness to stand as.
its sponsor, but the president told sev
eral callers today that he would not
make the Incorporation bill an ad
ministration measure. lie declared he
felt lie had no right to do sd, and that
it did not rank With the proposed
amendments to the interstate com
merce law, the postal savings bank
and the measure designed for the con
servation of natural resources.
These- latter were promised in the
platform on which the president was
elected, and he feels that the party
is responsible for their passage at this
session of congress.
President Taft believes there are
many things In the Incorporation bill
that will commend themselves to the
legislators. Ha will not attempt to in
fluence senators or representatives In
Its favor, however.
The bill now goes to the judiciary
committee of congress for considera
tion.
Wall street interests, inclined at first
to look upon the idea of a federal
charter with the utmost favor, were
rather rudely awakened when it was
learned that the president would in
sist that in any bill passed on this
subject there should be included the
provision that nothing in the act
should be construed as exempting cor
porations from the operation of the
anti-trust act.
A great many corporations, it Is said,
were looking forward to a federal char
ter as an Indication that past sins
would be forgiven, provided there were
no more transgressions in the future.
Had Talk with Taft
Frank D. Vanderlip and George W.
Perkins of New York, who saw the
president last week, told him that the
corporate interests were anything but
pleased with the character of the pro
posed measure, and that few if any
corporations would take advantage of
the act.
The president, it Is understood, re
torted that the act was a voluntary one
and thta the corporations that did not
care to come under federal control need
not do so. He thought in time, how
ever, once the provisions of the net
were complied with, they would appeal
to corporations and that they would
come to see the many advantages that
the act -contains.
As to exempting companies with fed
eral charters from flic operations of
the anti-trust law. the president said
that was Impossible.
The constitutionality of the proposed
act is a serious question, however, as
it Would deprive the states of jurisdic
tion over corporations holding federal
charters.
Already Attorney General Wicker
sham is being plied with inquiries re
garding various features of the bill.
He has explained that the organiza
tions whose operations are covered
it are amenable to national authority,
for the reason that they thus have but
one master, against forty-six .they
might have did the repeal of their
charters or punishment for offenses
rest with the states.
There are a number of reasons ad
vanced why more satisfaction may be
secured by giving the federal courts
jurisdiction. Litigation in the federal
courts is more economical and more
rapid, and a federal jury is less liable
to prejudice.
One of the main objections to the hill
Is the denial of the right of state juris
diction over the corporations, but the
officials believe that after the law has
had a working chance it may be possi
ble to modify its provisions to make
them less objectionable from the state
point of view.
»-+-*.
NAMES VICE GOVERNOR >
FOR PHILIPPINE ISLES
President Nominates Hoosier for the
Office Declined by Charles E. Ma.
goon Because of 111 Health
WASHINGTON, Feb. 7.—Newton W.
Gilbert of Indiana was nominated to
day by President Taft as vice governor
of the Philippines, and Charles B. El
liott of Minnesota as a member of the
Philippine commission and secretary of
commerce and police.
Charles E. Magoon, former provis
ional governor of Cuba, was offered the
position of vice governor and secre
tary of commerce and police, but de
clined because of his doctor's advice
that lie remain in this country,
Mr. Gilbert will continue as secre
tary of public Instruction in the
Islands.
TO COMBAT TUBERCULOSIS
NEW YORK, Feb. 7.—To put an end
to the ravages of tuberculosis among
clerks employed In the city's depart
ment of finance, an alarming percent
age of whom have been found to be
Buffering from that disease, Mayor
Gaynor's new controller has ordered a
thoroughgoing war on germs.
TO BE RECEIVED BY PIUS X
ROME, Feb. 7.—Mgr. Hehdrlck,
brother of the late Bishop T. A. Hen
drick of the diocese of Cebu, P. 1.,
whoso death occurred last November,
has arrived here from the Philippines.
He will be received in special audience
by Pope Plus X, who wishes to learn
details of the bishop's death.
APPEALS FOR READING MATTER
NEW YORK, Fell. 7.—The Army and
Navy Y. M. ('. A. has sent out a nation
wide appeal to the public for contribu
tions of reading matter, which it de
sires to distribute throughout the world
at every point where a naval or army
station of the United States is situated.
HEAD-ON CRASH HURTS THREE
LA CROSSE, Wis. Feb. 7.—Two
mail clerks and a porter were the only
persons injured when two through
pasenger trains on the Chicago, Bur
lington & Qulncy railroad collided
head on today near De Soto, thirty
four miles south of here. v
TO CCRB A <01.1 IIN BMB DAY
T»Vi<! LAXATIVE HROMO Quinine Tablete.
Drugs!*** refund money If It fait* to cure.
W. GROVE'S slgnaturo i- on each box. lie,
AMUSEMENTS ' ' ■
Pay-no! Particular At-I "\ 7 *m. m•* _T"1 _f>»«- _"_ II *-_. I Presenting always the
lentlon to Entertaining I \l JJ I|| 1 _~T \/ I I If-" b"' European and
Ladle, nnd Children. | V V>*.V*.V*V^ ▼ -_.-_,-_-.>W | American nllraellons.
Arturo Bernardi Underwood & Slosson
Famous Italian rrotean. . ■ "Things Are Seldom What They
Willy Pantzer Co. . Matini-i- Basque Quartette
Acropantomlmtes. lViatlllCe Gr . B ? )d „>-. a alnge „.
Mr. and Mrs. Voelker Today Belle' Davis
"Twilight In the Studio." 3 And her i -raekerjaeks.
Una Clayton & Co. » '—————■ Fox & Foxie Circus
"His Local Color." Dogs, cats, ponies.
ORPHEUM MOTION PICTURES.
Night*—lOe. gse. 50v, 15c. - Matinees Dally—lOe, 85e, 50e.-
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER SLSS'StISSSSSS
ALL MATINEE SATURDAY.
FIRST TIME BY ANY STOCK COMPANY IN THE WORLD.
THE RINGMASTER^
A STIRRING DRAMA OF HIGH FINANCE AND LOVE
Prices- ":.c 86C, GOc. Matinees, 25c. Gallery, 10c.
Next Week—"CAMEO KIRBY." First time by any stock company.
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER SS^JfWSSi.
" B-Oadw-Ll mar Mnlh. rliones Main 7005; FII3S.
ALU ' WEEK-MATINEE TOMORROW-MATINEE SATURDAY.
RETURN OF LAST SEASON'S MUSICAL EXTRAVAGANZA HIT,
BABES IN TOYLAND .
• Prices- 2Cc 1" 11. A few front rows $1.50. Popular Matinees.
Next Week—John Cort presents MAX FIOMAN in ".Mary .lane's Pa.
BT-T a _»<-</-_ 'T'__^l-, ATITI? Hchisco-llla-k-vood Co., Proprs. and Mm.
__.._-/-_.•_■»_> lrl---i/llt->K MATINEES Thursday, Saturday, Sunday.
"SECOND' BIG" \MiKK AND TI RNING HUNDREDS AWAY—LEWIS 8. STONB
and tin- Beiasco company present George Broadhurit'e greatest play.
The Man of the Hour
THE SEASON'S SMASHING SUCCESS. Seats for the second week now selling fast.
GDAMT-i _-_■__-r_»-i_> A t_r/-tTT«S'-_» MATINEES" TODAY, Saturday, Sunday.
RAND OPERA HOUSE ™; , phones -tain l'J67: Home aids;.
HERE'S THE SEASON'S BIGGEST MUSICAL COMEDY OFFERING.
■pT^-p-pTO and his big company present a great '
rr-KKIO revival of tho internationally famous P 1 O d Or*
H ARTM AN musical comedy success. -
Ml MAI, BARGAIN MATINEE TODAY' AT 2:15—10 nnd 23 CENTS.
MASON OPERA HOUSE ££»' andVan^e™'
"WEEK COMMENCING MONDAY. ITS. 14—MATINEE Saturday Only.
DANIEL. V. ARTHUR PRESENTS
MARIE CAHILL
'Musl'ca.^uy 1'"8 THE BOYS AND BETTY
Book by George V. Hobart. Music by Silvio Hem.
Complete cast 'and production, and the famous Cahlll chorus 'all girls. Prices 50c to «2.
>..,, sale Thursday, 9 a. m. Coming—LAMHAHDI GRAND OPERA CO.
SIMPSON AUDITORIUM L' Van"™*"'
TONIGHT, FEBRUARY 8, at 8:15 o'clock-FIRST RECITAL OF THB
WORLD-RENOWNED PIANISTE, ._
Mme. Teresa Carreno ii
SEAT SALE NOW ON AT THE BARTLETT MUSIC COMPANY. PRICES-JUKI, $1.50,
$1.00. 700 and 50c. '
_„__._-_,,_ -"tli-c AT _. D FIRST ST., near Spring. Both phones.
ISCHER S THEATER elmer n. workman, Propr. * tut.
" Week Commencing Monday, Feb. 7—The hilariously funny farce comedy '•Duffy's
Daughter Kate" direction of Billy Onslow. Featuring Nan Halperin, 'The dolly
Kid Soubrette," and the singing and dancing sextet. Added attraction—Prof. .lean Le
Salx. "The Man Who Defies Electricity." Something you have not seen. Positively tha
most wonderful act of Its kind. Matinee every day. Two shows nightly. Prices 100,
_0c and 25c. »- _____—«_
LOS ANGELES THEATER NEAR 4 TH ." , shows nightly".
" Whitehead & Grierson. I T7>^,.,«-. T___-.1 _--__, I t""^,,^," 02"'
Leßrun Grand Opera Four Baltus r,y F.rn
The I-augh-O-Scope^^^^^^ pRICI - s _ loe 200 AND'3Oc.
OLYMPIC THEATER Phones—Main'Wis Home nm.
AT-PITIN AND FARGO present MENDEL AND WILLIAMS and BLOSSOM
seeley 'm DOUBLE DUTCH
TEN BIG SINGING AND DANCING NOVELTIES. Next Week— Chicken.
GRAND AVENUE RINK Management llempel Amusement Co.'
FEB. 7. AT 8 P. M., AND FROM 11 A. M. TO 11 V. M. DAILY TO FEB. IS.
OPEN SUNDAY.
1910 AUTOMOBILE SHOW OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
THE MOTOR AND SOCIAL EVENT OF THE SEASON
Magnificent Decorations A Gorgeous Spectacle
High Grade Amusement Features Numerous Souverirs
55 I EADING FIRMS EXHIBITING OVER 100 1010 MODELS OF GASOLINE, ELEC
TRIC AND STEAM PLEASURE VEHICLES, LEADING FOB-DON OARS AND A COM-
P__ETE DISPLAY OF COMMERCIAL VEHICLES AND AUTO ACCESSORIES.
SOCIETY NIGHT TUESDAY. FEB. B—NO INCREASE IN PRICE. ADMISSION .lOC.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE CHURCH EDIFICE ™Z<??KK£ii™?.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE LECTURE
-By—
MISS MARY BROOKINS, C. S. B.
Of Minneapolis, Minn.
MONDAY EVENING. FEB. 7, 8 O'CLOCK. Doors open 7.^. Admission Free
TUESDAY EVENING, FEB. ». t O'CLOCK. Doom open TiSO. nummiuil „
McCAREY'S PAVILION **OT junction.
TUESDAY, FEB. 8 8 P. M.
SAM LANGFORD vs. JIM FLYNN
. TEN BOUNDS
Also _ndv Rivers vs. Paul Roman, ten rounds; Gene McGovern vs. Marly Kane, ton
rounds? Bubbles Robinson vs. Kid Troubles, six rounds Admission W.M. Boiorr.* aeat.
ti and S3. Box seats 93. For sale at A. 11. Greenewald's cigar store. 107 S. Spring st.
DECLARE SWOPE
IMBIBED POISON
MILLIONAIRE TOOK TONIC UP
TO HIS DEATH
[
Physicians Say Long Use of Medicine
Containing Nux Vomica Alkaloid
Explains Presence of Drug
in Visclera
_____________ »»-
V
[Associated Press]
KANSAS CITY, Mo., Feb. That
Col. Thomas H. Swope. the millionaire
whose death on October 3 has been
the subject of a diligent inquiry for
the last month to determine If he died
from poisoning, took a patent medi
cine containing tonic of iron, quinine
and strychnine up to a few days of
his death developed at the inquest
over his body at Independence, Mo.,
today.
This testimony was given by Miss
Pearl Keller, Col. Svvope's nurse. It
was the most significant piece of evi
dence brought out in the inquest,
which opened tod ,y.
Miss Keller cared for Col. Swope
from September 12 until the day of his
death. She testified that the million
aire took the mixture daily in addi
tion to the treatment given him by
Dr. B. C. Hyde. .
Previously, In a deposition taken in
a damage suit of Dr. Hyde against an
attorney and two physicians, who are
interested in the Swope Investigation,
S W. Spangler, offlce partner of Col.
Swope, testified tl.at Col. Swope took
a patent "medicine containing strych
nine while at his offlce. It is sup
posed this is the same mixture to
which Miss Keller referred in her tes
timony.
Mr. Spangler said Col. Swope took
large quantities of the medicine daily.
Explains Poison
Physicians say the fact of Col. Swope
having taken much" of this concoction
would explain the presence of poison
In his vital organs. -
It is also pointed out that Col. Swop*
was in a weakened condition when he
took the medicine.
Eight witnesses besides Miss Keller
testified during the day.
Dr. Edward L. Stewart said that
while he had no part in the autopsy
other than writing down the record
he knew that no hemorrhage of the
brain, visible to the naked eye, was
found. -Col. Swope was supposed to
have died from apoplexy.
The calling of the Inquest today
brought together for the first time in
several weeks members of the Swope
household. i
Mrs. Logan H. Swope and her daugh
ters sat on one Ride of the room with
their attorneys, while Dr. Hyde and his
attorneys were on the other. There
was no sign of recognition between tha
two parties. Mrs. Hyde was not pre
ent. Her husband explained that she
was too ill to attend. • .
During the day Mrs. Swope and Miss
Keller were served with subpoenas
by""- an attorney from the office of
Frank P. Walsh, Dr. Hyde's counsel,
to appear and give their depositions In
the libel suits brought by Dr. Hyde
against Attorney John G. Paxton and
Drs. Frank Hall and Edward 1..
Stewart.
Dr. Hyde filed suit for $100,000 for
alleged slander against Attorney John
G. Paxton today, and service was ob
tained upon the attorney at the In
quest.
A similar suit against Mr. Paxton
was dismissed by Dr. Hyde in order to
keep from giving his deposition before
the Inquest began over the body of
Col. Swope.
DECLARES HIS CANDIDACY
FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR
Former Speaker Beardslee of Califor
nia Assembly Decides to Enter
Political Race
STOCKTON, Fob. - After making
a careful canvass of the slate, former
Speaker it. 1,. Beardslee of this city
today announced that ho would bo a
candidate lor lieutenant governor at
the next state election. Ho is one or
the moat prominent attorneys of Stock
ton and has served two terras In the
assembly. ... . ' .
Mr Beardslee will nt once send out
his petitions to secure the necessary
names to go before th.- coming primary,
and his friends believe he will secure
the Republican nomination by a large
vote

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