OCR Interpretation


Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, February 17, 1910, Image 9

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-02-17/ed-1/seq-9/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Pages 9 to 16
■4 >■ _ . h
I; OhiokorlnE wSjP\
11 ■ < >
For almost a century Chickering Tone .has held the
a v attention of musicians and musical people in every i |
W center of Europe and America. TODAY, the won- m
derful singing, carrying tone that has won distinc
{\ tion for this piano is present in every Chickering .
* I piano offered the public, in a more beautiful quality i j
than ever before —it is the delight of the great "
j $ artists, both for instrumental and vocal music.
¥ WE ARE SOLE AGENTS |&
Chickering Grands $750, $850, $1000
§ \ Chickering Uprights *... .V. $600, $650 ({ £
' \ i
A Chickering May Be Purchased on
j \ Convenient Payments. Ik
-The House of Musical Quality \ i
H Southern California Music Co. k
t . 332-334 South Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. "..
3ac ag as—are as ac %£*.
Z\ You Have Brains, Sir
/AjsiB&\ '" doubt—but brain? Rre a drug on the market.
/Qw|aMp\ Sucoessful men, however, are rare. It takes more
'/ "BwL than brains to win this fight. You must have
/©3llir\ \ money—if men, however, are rare. It takes more
;9ttSL » than brains to win this ii;-,lit. Yon must have
f_^7T^B^fr \ money if only a few hundred dollars—to make a
/ K2fifflfisi \ start. With a little capital you will find oppor
/ |«V^>?vH \ tunlty lying in wait for you at every corner. Be-
I in-m' 4t,<w \gln saving with us today.
Merchants Bank & Trust Co.
207-9-11 SOUTH BROADWAY
"THE BEAUTIFUL"
Verdugo Canyon
l"" 8™"! Tract I™-" —1
One Mile from Glendale -
Running Mountain Stream
Large —Live Oak Trees
Only 20 Minutes' Ride
AN IDEAL COUNTRY HOME
SPECIAL EXCURSION
NEXT FEBRUARY 20 .
Salt Lake Railroad will run a special train from
First Street Depot to VERDUGO PARK—2S cents
round trip.
TRAIN LEAVES 10 A. M. AND 2 P. M.
You will enjoy the Most Beautiful trip in Southern
California. Take your lunch and prepare to spend
the day among the trees.
Beautiful booklet mailed on request.
JOHN A. PIRTLE
• ■■»■■!■' -"(■-•■'.
401-2 Union Trust Bldg.
Telephone F6643 Los Angeles, Cal.
THREE WILL BE TRIED
ON SWINDLING CHARGE
of Seventy.Flve Drawn to Se
lect Jury for Case of Greene
and Conner Case
Because of a misunderstanding
among the attorneys Interested in the
case of Dolph M. Greene, Harry G.
Conner and R. E. Ivett, charged with
criminal conspiracy to defraud J. H.
Umberger out of several hundred dol
lars by selling him a half Interest In
a, garage in I,ebanon street, which af
terward was found to be worthless and
not as represented, the matter was
continued by Police Judge Rose yes
terday to today, when the work of se
lecting a jury from seventy-five tales
men will begin.
Conner and Greene have been on
trial in Police Judge AVilllams' court
for the past several days on a charge
preferred by James Guinn, who laid he
wai swindled out of $300 as the result
df a conspiracy between Greene and
Conner. The jury remained out almost
three hours Tuesday night, then re
ported that they were unable to reach
an agreement, and they were dis
charged. The case was brought up in
Judge Williams' court yesterday morn
ing and reset for March 30.
A similar case against Greene,
charging him with conspiring to de
fraud F. D. Kane out of several hun
dred dollars by selling the latter a
half Interest in a cigar stand, was set
for trial for March 20 by Judge Wil
liams yesterday.
1.1.1 M> 11.r. PATRONS
Kffottive February 18, salt l^axe
route trains for Glendale and Verdugo
Park will leave Los Angeles 9:SO a. m.
and 2:00 p. m. daily. Returning, leave
yerdugo Park 12:00 noon, and 4:30 i>. m.
GENERAL EDUCATION IS
NEED, STUDENTS TOLD
Motor Car Expert Talks to Collegians
on Lack of Fundamental
Knowledge
Charles Eckhart of the Auburn Mo
tor Car company lectured before the
students of tho University of Southern
California yesterday on education. Mr.
Eckhart formerly was prominent in
politics In Indiana, running for gover
nor of that state a few years ago.
He spoke of the need of general edu
cation throughout the country.
"In my line of business," said Mr.
Eckhart, "I come in contact with high
ly Bkilled machinists who have spent
years in learning their trades. You
would bo surprised to know, however,
that there is scarcely one of these men
who can write a decent letter. They
are good men, honest and hard-work
ing, but they lack a general education.
"The skilled workman spends too
much of his boyhood in learning one
particular thing and not enough In ac
iiuiring general knowledge."
KNOCKED DOWN BY HORSE
Joseph P. Clark, 74 years old, a
stonemason living at the Golden State
hotel in East Fifth stret, was knocked
down by a horse driven by Fred Har
rald of 909 East Fourteenth street at
Seventh and Olive streets yesterday
morning and Incurred a fracture of the
right hip. Clark, who has been In ill
health for some time, was attempting
to crocs the street in the middle of
the block. He stepped from behind an
automobile going north in Seventh
street directly in front of the horse
driven by Harrald. Clark was taken
to the receiving hospital.
The Angela grill naa excellent eerr-
Ice and better food. Fourth and Spring.
LOS ANGELES HERALD
THURSDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 17, 1910.
PASTOR LAUDS
HERALD'S WORK
DR. J. W. BROUGHER WANTS
GOOD GOVERNMENT
DECENCY IN POLITICS DEMANDED
BY NEW MINISTER
Pastor Declares That if Honest Men
Will Stand Together Munici
pal Problem Is
Solved
"It is far better for the. advancement
Of good government for an official to
possess a deep seated internal rather
than a shallow external conscience,"
said Dr. J. Whltcomb Brougher, pai
tor of the TVmp|r> Baptist church, yes
terday noon at tho luncheon of the
Federation club. It was a special
Brougher welcome event arranged by
the club, and a large number of tln>
club members greeted the new pastor.
As. Dr. Brougher entered the dining
hall ho was greeted by the Federation
quartet, which .sang a humorous song
of welcome composed for the occasion.
Members of the quart"t are A. A. Ma
curda, B. C. BOynton, A. C. Wheat and
it. P. Jennings.
Nathan Nrwliy, president of the club,
presided and introduced Dr. Brougher,
who congratulated the Federation club
for the work it is doing and especially
expressed high praise for the execu
tive and other officials of Los Angeles,
calling special attention to the recent
action of Tin? Herald regarding the
changes in the police department and
its stand in the advancement <'f good
government. Dr. Brougher said:
"The good people who slick together
can make a clean city. A city ought
to control Its interests for the best
good to all. One of the first precepts
to be considered regarding an official
is a clear conscience.
"I think that women should vote, for
they have clearer consciences than the
men, and the churches, too, should be
in politics to clean up the city, for they
have much to do in forming public
opinion. I balleve In a fight to a finish
on these lines.
"The citizens should stand by the
good officials and encourage them In
every way possible. :ind the wicked of
ffeials will flee if you get after them
sufficiently.
"It requires backbone for an official
to do good work, and we must have
the backbone to support him.
"Many business men are so busy that
they do not post themselves, and they
depend on the action of others In shap
ing their political destinies. They vote
for and therefore uphold people whom
they do not know. It is not so with
the saloon element. Each man posts
himself about his political aspirant to
office and sticks by him to the end.
"It may be a rather ticklish business
for some ministers to read from the
pulpit regarding the good and bad
characters of political aspirants, but
I think It Is the right principle to en
courage.
"I have come here to make my life
count all I can in Christian precepts
and to help to make better the City of.
the Angels."
EXPERIMENT WITH NITRO
PROVES COSTLY TO YOUT-H
Explosion of Cap Causes Injury to Leg
Which Is Treated at Re.
ceiving Hospital
Harold Christopher, a 15-year-old
school boy living at 007 West First
street, was treated at the receiving
hospital yesterday afternoon for a deep
laceration on the right leg which was
caused by the explosion of what is
thought to have been a nltro-glycerin
cap which he found and experimented
with by placing two short wires pro
truding from the cap to a strong elec
tric battery.
The lad, greatly frightened, ap
peared at the receiving hospital ye»
terday afternoon and told the police
surgeons that he wanted medical at
tention. When asked the nature of his
trouble the boy, who is unusually tall
for one of his age, held his head high
as he could and, \ith his eyes gazing
at the celling, pointcjj toward his In
jured leg and said, "Something Is
wrong there; It hurts. Please fix it
up quick."
After the wound was bandaged the
lad told the physicians that he found
a peculiar looking cap and decided to
connect it with a battery and note the
result. He said the effect was start
ling and he was perfectly satisfied as
to the manner In which electricity acts
on dynamite caps.
CHINESE MERCHANT MAY
FACE CONTEMPT CHARGE
Violator of Lottery Ordinance Alleged
to Have Interfered with Po.
lice in Warrant Servlco
Wong Wing, a Chinese merchant,
whose name has been entered many
times on the polieo blotter for violat
ing the lottery ordinance, appeared in
Police Judge Williams' court yester
day to show cause why he should not
be punished for contempt of court, for
blocking the efforts of officers of tha
Chinatown squad in their attempt to
execute a search warrant in a raid
made on the establishment conducted
by Wong a short time ago.
According to the police Wong saw
them approach, rushed into the place
where it is asserted, a number of Chi
neße were playing lottery, and after
yelling to them and warning them of
their danger, closed and locked the
massive doors, shutting out the of
ficers who were compelled to gain en
trance by battering down the doors.
The attorney for Wong contended
that the police did not serve a warrant
In the proper manner and Instead of
reading it to the person in charge of
tho place, accosted Wong in the aide
walk near the entrance to the latter b
store and attempted to force him tci
enter tho placo with them.
Judge Williams took the matter un
der advisement and will render a deci
sion later.
PLUMP WOMAN COMES TO HER OWN;
DAME FASHION HAS DECREED HIPS
& 111 '^11
Wmwßk
1 \ HE^/
«TT IPS> HIPS!! HURRAH!!' 1 ?'.
11 Hips are back again.
-"■-■- The clay of tho plump wor- j
an Is at hand.
No longer may all that Is smart and
beautiful in the frocks and coats be
enjoyed exclusively by the tall, slim [
sister. Dimpled women, plump women j
—aye, even fat women—may wear the i
new costumes and retain their self-
I respect: and if they are not too dim- j
I pled, too plump or too fat they may
even wear these same costumes a trifle I
more becomingly than the women of ;
the long, straight lines, ; who have so j
effectually monopolized the striking and
difficult gowns of recent months.
Once more the woman endowed by
nature with curving hips and round, |
graceful waist may enjoy that posses- j
sion Instead of lamenting it. She may I
even allow the shapely lines of her fig- i
ure to be revealed a little to the eye of |
the observer, instead of spending long, ,
painful hours straightening out the
curves and building frocks designed ef
fectually to conceal the hour-glass ef
fect so abhorred by fashion for the last j
year or more. , ,
Belts, which for the past twelve
month have been placed anywhere be
tween the bust and the knees of those
women who aspired to follow the modes
of the day, are once more restored to
their rightful place.
And listen! These belts are small. ■
With the return of hips comes also
the small waist.
This is a matter which may require
some serious consideration from the
woman who has been cheerfully letting
out her waist line, confident of the fact
that it made her hips- look smaller.
Will she be able to get that curve back
again as easily as she thinks?
ORANGE GROVES
BRING $102,000
Wealthy Nevada and Washington
Men Invest In Los Angeles Prop.
erty—Plan to Build Large
Number of Bungalows
Included among the realty transac
tions close 4 yesterday was the sale of
a fine 20-acre alfalfa ranch at Ana
helm, ImprovedAvlth a fiv<!-room dwell
ing, outbuildings and pumping plant,
transferred by J. M. and D. C, Fergu
son to M. W. Blenkiron. The consid
eration was $15,000. The deal was ne
gotiated by the Arthur W. Kinney com
pany.
George C. Fetterman. a wealthy min
ing man from Caliente, Nev., has
paid Calvin W. Brown $87,000 for an
improved orange grove of fifty acre*
located at Duarte. Mr. Fetterman is
the owner of sixty acres at Alhambra
ami forty-eight lots at Hollywood.
The property on th>> northwest corner
of Sixteenth and Georgia streets, USx
150 feet, Improved with four dwellings,
has been purchased from C. J. Fox, jr.,
by J. Jikel of Spokane, Wash., who
will make his future home in Los An
geles, Mr. .Tikel paid $30,000 lor the
corner. He will erect a new building
for stores and apartments. H. O. Cot
ton & Co represented Mr. Fox and Alt
house Bros. Mr. Jlkel in the deal.
Big Improvements Planned
The Bungalow Construction company
haa mapped, out a huge undertaking,
which represents an investment of ap
proximately $352,00. The company is
the owner of a largo home tract
bounded by Western avenue, Thirty
eighth and Thirty-ninth streets and
Santa Monica avenue. It Is the pur
pose of tne management to erect 128
model bungalows at an average cost of
$'OCO each. Kleven of these homos have
been completed and sold. Los Angeles
railways cars will run to this new sub
division and provide good service.
Among the building permits issued
Wednesday was one for a two-story
high school structure at 4107 South Ver
mont street to cost $83,704, a one-story
high school building at 4125 South Ver
mont avenue to cost $58,935, a two-story
high school building at 4147 South Ver
mont avenue, valuation $84,137.
FULLERTON-RICHFIELD
ROAD TO BE BUILT
Company Incorporates, and Construe
tlon Work Will Soon Be
Commenced
Incorporation papers were flleil in the
county clerk's office yesterday of a
llrm to be known ns the Fullerton-
Hichfleld Railroad company, a brancn
of the Santa Fe. Tho company was
incorporated for the purpose of build
ing a road from Fullerton to Rtchneld.
a distance of five miles, for the haul
ing of freight, which, when built, will
cut seven miles from the present dis
tance from Los Angeles to San Ber
n^The n°conßtruction of the road will
begin as soon as the contract* 'iin be
awarded and the material obtained.
The directors of the company are:
A O. Wells, a. Holterhof W. B.
Brenner, J. I. Hibbard and C. W.
Jon— ■
Lent may acquire more devotees who
WIH find fasting and exercise good for
penitential purposes and also for ac
quiring- once more the small round
waist.
A Broadway shop yesterday exhibited
the dernier cri in fashions. This gown
illustrated in no uncertain way the
fact that hips are restored to popular
favor. To judge by the delighted com
ments of the women, and the admiring
glances of the many men who did not
scorn to stop and gaze at the figure,
the new fashion is assured of Imme
diate success.
While it may be true that no one
loves a fat man, there are sure to be
many who will love a fat woman, that
is, if she is not too fat, and is suitably
moulded into one of these fetching new
■tyled gowns.
WORKERS IN SUNDAY
SCHOOLS TO CONVENE
Preparations Completed for Four Day
Meeting Which Will Open To.
night at First Methodist
Church
Great preparations are being made
for the opening of the big Sunday
school convention under the auspices of
the board of Sunday schools of the
Methodist Episcopal church at the First
Methodist church this evening. The
convention will continue over Friday,
Saturday and Sunday.
The Sunday schools and scholars of
Southern California have Increased
rapidly the past tew years. There are
218 schools, 3828 teachers and officers
and 34,834 scholars. In the Los Angeles
district, of which Dr. F. M. Larkin Is
superintendent, there are lifty-slx
Phones—F3o3S; Broadway 5150.
L. A. STEWART F. H. FREEMAN R- S. GOURLETC
L. A. STEWART COMPANY
Brokers - - Promoters
Collateral Loans
630 SOUTH SPRING STREET
Los Angeles, Cal.
February 10, 1910
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD,
Los Angeles, Cal.
Gentlemen:
We are pleased to say that the results wo have
obtained from advertisements placed in The Herald have
been highly satisfactory; in fact we feel sure your
advertising columns are read by a greater number of
people who are looking for investments in Los Angeles,
than any other paper in the city.
We have been able to note a marked increase in
our business since we began using The Herald for ad
vertising purposes.
Very truly yours,
L. A. STEWART COMPANY
Bargains fcl o 7L__a 1 lit _n ik^rv^jv , Side Combs'
ii*l9li fa wfYfli Side Combs
in Scissors, 25c K^^p^^g^^i^^^jj^ 15c Set
Basement MnSSEIkvSM Eff MsVßßlGti Basement
Bargain Basement
Boys' Suits $2.48! $9.48
How Can You Sell Them for "
—■ —; ; —— .. ~ "I wouldn't make them", for
Light On the >'ou for that," exclaimed ; a
L/. . clothing maker to whom we
Gas Range Question showed out bargain the
_ _— ■ & — ; other day—
—There are Gas Ranges —They are not regular—
and Gas Ranges— by a long s hot—lf we had
. r^^th^haW^ *°°a gone back to buy these suits
—Some claim 'to bake biscuits th e very day after we did we .
-others" claim to be more eco- wouldn't have been able :to
nomicai with gas— get them. If we had gone
-Otters claim 'to create more , before $$ qq
-aL 1' J"UBMJI-!I,JBKciL»J would be closer than $2.48
'—^'^•'^m'^^m'iihm*^* to the price in these head
,'rv claims ji'L^T? BWr —We were in the nick of time
without end. i|»J^^ H'«Hf 'I to furnish the finale to the
frj*igJ*i'*v]H| I season's business for this
Want the §B BhPb/ '-' —The Bargains we won are
I^ at ... i^* %0 Knit Undervests, -J Y\ ■_
. . LisJe Finish, at... 1 \J\^,
—bake biscuits quicker— . . , - '
that DOES use less gas— —Tape neck and sleeves—all .
—that DOBS create more heat— sizes— 6 and 6— ' •
dam? stronser more „ -Cool, comfortabl, s™r
—ana that costii the very lowest price for summer wear—Bargains,
consistent with supreme efficiency— a io c each.
There are gas stove surprises wait
ing for you on the fifth floor. U ntn we Children's RompersQ ~\ .
-Stove* we did not put in until we inuaren s Kompersr j J
were Fatistled that they were the best. Extraordinary at. /J 0
—From the tiny hot plates at 25c up Extraordinary ,t. .^^/ \*
, to ranges at $33 the line Is complete. : ;
—At $15 a range like that In the pic- —Whole table Of them—all Of
' » ture. . — _-_. fiMh splendid gingham — Different
—Visit the range department, flitn colonj &nd patternB _ mado
floor, today. j strong as iron—Bargains—23C
schools, 308 teachers and officers airl
12 051 scholars. The Sunday school of
the First Methodist church ■in which
the convention will be held is the sec
ond largest in the world the Brooklyn,
N. V., Sunday school being in the lead.
The local Sunday school contains 124
teachers and officers and a total enroll
mThe°prom4inent visitors will partici
pate in seeing the sights of Los An
geles and vicinity durmc their stay
here. ' .' r
The convention will be one of a series
to be held in each Methodist confer
ence in the United States. The gen
eral conference designated this series of
conventions as a "school of methods,
which will largely increase the forward
movement of the Sunday schools.
Dr F. M. Larkln will preside over
the opening session of the convention
tonight Rev. John L. Pitner, super
intendent of San Diego district will
conduct the devotional exercises Rev.
Charles Edward Locke, pastor of the
First Methodist church, will make the
address of welcome, to be followed by
Rev David G. Downey of Chicago on
the subject, "Methodism's Greatest Op-
POTho 'convention will be held morn
me afternoon and evening each day
excepting on the evening of Saturday.
REVENUE AGENT DEAD
PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 16.— F. A. Al
exander chief United States revenue
in Philadelphia and one of the
blst known men .in that branch of the
government service, died here today,
aged 67 years. _________■
Classified Ad. Section
ARREST SHOE CLERK ON
ADVICES FROM MISSOURI
Accused Man Retains Attorney to Con.
test Extradition Honored by
California Officials
W. A. Ingram, employed as a shoe
salesman was arrested yesterday on
telegraphic instructions from Spring
field, Mo., where he is said to be want
ed on a charge of obtaining money by
false pretenses. An hour later a tele
gram was received from Sacramento
notifying Sheriff Hammel that extradi
tion papers had been signed and were
on their way to Los Angeles. W. E.
Freeman, sheriff of Green county. Mo.,
will come to Los Angeles Sunday to
take Ingram back.
Ingram was seen later in the county
jail, but declined positively to discuss
his arrest. He retained an attorney,
who said extradition would be contest
ed and that his client declared he knew
nothing' concerning the charge against
him.
WIFE WAS HIGH KICKER
SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 16.—0n the
ground that his wife, Margaret, at a
public gathering kicked his hat from
his head, J. H. Koch yesterday .filed
suit for divorce. After demolishing his
hat, the petition asserts, Mrs. Kocli
struck him in the face, and on reaching
their home scratched his face.

xml | txt