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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, February 19, 1910, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-02-19/ed-1/seq-2/

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80. Broadway 235-237-239 So. Hill St 234-244
Butterlck Patterns and Publications tor March Now Ready.
Subscription* Taken for the Delineator. Dollar a Year.
—~ !
»
Sales for Today
Details of which appeared in yesterday's papers:
Several different designs in 7?c and B^c Swiss em
broidered handkerchiefs for ?oc.
Odd sizes in boys' single and double breasted suits,
formerly priced up to $8.50, for $2.95.
Boys' straight knee pants, of fine all wool materials,
formerly priced up to #1.7?, for forty-five cents.
Boys' $6.50 to $15 double-breasted Knickerbocker
suits, in 8 to 16 year sizes, at $4,717 to $10.90.
$1.25 all-wool sweaters for children of 1 to 4 years
at7?c.
$2 and $2,170 all-wool sweaters in 1 to 6 year sizes at
$1-25.
Misses' #4.90 and $5 sweaters at $3.50.
Misses' $7. "j0 to $1 sweaters, slightly soiled, for $$.
New $20 and #29 tailor suits for misses and small
women for $15.
Women's 35c and ijoc hosiery—mostly colors~at 2£c.
HOLLYWOOD IS
BANQUET HOST
BOARD. OF TRADE SPREADS
FINE DINNER FOR GUESTS
Los Angeles' Chief Executive and
Former President of Hollywood
Trustees Vie with Other Well
Known Men in Compliment
The Hollywood board of trade ten
dered a banquet to the officials of the
city of Los Angeles last evening at
Levy's cafe for the purpose of cele
brating Hollywood's annexation to (
Greater Los Angeles. About 200 of the
prominent citizens of the two com
munities sat down around the banquet
table and for more than three hours
discussed the future of the city and of
Hollywood.
The guests of the evening were wel
comed to the banquet by Judge A. E.
Uerrlll, president of the board of trade.
He spoke of the conditions now exist
ing in the foothill city and asked, as
Hollywood's only request from Los
Angeles, that morally none of the con
ditions should be changed there. He
intioduced Dr. 15. P. Rylancl, who acted
us toastmaster of the evening.
Dr. Hyland iirst introduced George
Alexander, mayor of Los Angeles. The
mayor congratulated Hollywood and
also the oity on the annexation and
spoke optimistically of the future of
both.
The second speaker was George H.
Dunlop, former president of the board
of trustees of Hollywood. He spoke of
the Hollywood of the past and present
and congratulated Mayor Alexander on
being now the chief executive of a
municipality including the foothill city. |
Following Mr. Dunlop came Motley
H. Flint, postmaster of Los Angeles, |
who expressed the sentiment that ]
Hollywood by its progressiveness and
spirit demonstrated in the recent, an
nexation campaign deserved the honor
and the good which must follow being
part of Greater Los Angeles.
W. M. Humphreys of the board of
public works; H. W. Hansom, former j
president of the Hollywood lil>rur7
board; Isidore Dockwaller, president I
of the. Los Angeles library board; Willis ''
H. Booth, retiring president of the
chamber of commerce, and Leslie
Hewitt, city attorney of Los Angeles,
followed Mr. Flint with short addresses.
Mr. Hewitt congratulated the city on
line thing in connection with the an
nexation of Hollywood which hitherto
had bten unmentioncd. This was the
(act that the latter municipality hail.
before its admission tv the city, brought
suit against a railroad to test whet]
■ street railway had the right to <,
freight on the streets of the city. Mr. '
Hewitt expressed himself as being I
gratified that this matter was now in
court, as it would settle once for all
t lie long disputed right of the railroads j
to do this. He said that his depart
ment would take up the case at once
and press it as rapidly as possible in
order that some definite decision could
be reached.
Following Mr. Hewitt, Judge John D. |
"Works, Dr. W. H. Snyder, president of
the Hollywood Union high school, and
Joseph Scott made a few remarks on
the city affairs coming directly under
their supervision.
FORMER BOOKKEEPERS OF
BANK ARE UNDER ARREST
Two Arizonans Accused of Shortage
in Accounts Will Be
Prosecuted
DOUGLAS, Ariz., Feb. Earl
Davis, former bookkeeper of the First
National bank of this city was today
placed under arrest by United States
Marshal C. A. Overlook from Tucson.
At the same time L. C. Hanks, former
bookkeeper of the bank, was Indicted
by i the fedaral grand jury at Tomb
stone, where he was placed under ar
rest.
Davis was taken to Tombstone, where
he - was released on $5000 surety fur
! nished • by well-known Douglas men.
I Hanks also. furnished bail and came
to this city.
The arrests follow a long examina
tion of the ; bank's books by Federal
Hank Examlner«Munson. Davis Is said
to bo short in his accounts to the ex
tent of from 4,000 to $18,000.. This,
it is declared, he confessed before a
meeting of the board of directors and
the bank examiners, and at once cov
ered the shortage. ■- The directors are
Mid to be satisfied, but the govern
ment agent pressed the prosecution, r,..;
LANDS WITHDRAWN
FROM COAL ENTRY
MORE THAN 2.000,000 ACRES
REMOVED TEMPORARILY
Investigation Shows Large Tracts of
Public Domain In Wyoming, Mon
tana and Colorado Contain
Valuable Deposits
tAssociated press!
WASHINGTON, Feb. 18.—Secretary
Ballinger of the Interior department
has temporarily withdrawn from coal
entry 2,068,492 acres of public land. He
I also has temporarily withdrawn from I
I all forms of disposition 127,122 acres.
Forty-six thousand, four hundred and i
thirty-one acres have been restored to I
settlement by the order issued yester
day.
Data recently collected by the. geo
logical survey. indicated that the* pub
lic lands in Wyoming and Montana
contained valuable deposits of coal, and
to determine the question, the secre
tary yesterday withdrew from coal en
try 1,208,206 acres in the former state
and 880,286 in the latter. This with
drawal is pending a detailed field ex
amination.
Twenty-one thousand, eight hundred
and twenty-six acres along the Red
Rock lakes, Montana, have been tem
porarily withdrawn from all entry in
aid of proposed legislation affecting
the disposal of waterpower sites on the
public domain.
Much Coal Land Found
A field investigation having shown
the existence of valuable coal deposits
of 67,255 acres in Colorado, the land
has been reserved from all entry until
they have been classified and appraised
by geologists, and 26,002 acres in that
state, whigb are now exempt from coal
entry, wore withdrawn yesterday from
all forms of disposition, pending their
classification and appraisement.
In aid of proposed legislation affect-
Ing the use and disposition of phos
phate deposits on the public domain,
the secretary has temporarily with
drown 2928 acres in Utah from all en
try, and has restored to settlement
56,431 acres that were temporarily
withdrawn in that state on December
9, 1908.
A field investigation proved that the
lands which have been restored did not
contain deposits of phosphate.
The total area covered, with with
drawals for examination as to phos
phate deposits, now amounts approxi- !
mately to 2.493,636 acres, of which 86,593
are in Utah.
In aid of proposed legislation af
fecting the use and disposition of pe
troleum on the public domain, 9109
acres of land in Wyoming have been
withdrawn from all forms of disposi
tion.
PLAN LAW TO CREATE FREE
POSTOFFICE LABOR BUREAUS
WASHINGTON, Feb. 18.—Employ
ment for the unemployed Is the subject
nf n bill that has been Introduced by
Representative Garner (Republican) oC
Pennsylvania, who proposes, through
the medium of the jxistofClce depart
ment, to bring the employer and the
employe in touch so that the labor
market may be normal at all times.
He proposes to authorize the post
master general to establish in the de
partment and in every postoffiee in tho
United States an "Information labor
officer," whose duty it shall be to sup
ply daily to employers lists of persons
wanting work and to the latter lists
of employers wanting laborers.
Each county seat Is to be a dis
tributing center for the county in
which it is located, applications 1 for
labor and for laborers being sent from
there dally to all points in the country.
SENATOR PERKINS RETURNS
TO DUTY AFTER ILLNESS
WASHINGTON, Feb. IS.—Senator
Perkins of California was in his seat
in the senate today for the first time
in more than six weeks.
His absence had been due to an lr,-
Jury to his spine received by falling
on the ice Roon after the Christmas
holidays. Ha has been undor the
constant care of physicians ever since.
He said, today he had almost recov
ered.
Manual Labor
"Have you ever done any manual
labor, young man?" nsked the lawyer.
"Any what, thlr?" lisped the youth.
"Any manual labor—labor with your
hands?"
"Oh, yeth, thir. I wole all my own
cisawettes, thir."—Yonkers Statesman.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: SATURDAY M()l!M\(i. FEBRUARY 10, 1010.
SHERIFF DEFEATS
MADDENED MOB
CROWD AT CAIRO, ILL. SEEKS
MORE TROUBLE
MILITIA GUARDS JAIL; GOVERNOR
UPHOLDS OFFICER
Negro Whoso Crime Caused Trouble!
Is Sent to Prison—Much Criti.
cism Indulged in by
Rioters
[Associated Press]
CAIRO, 111.. Feb. 18.—With three
companies of militia guarding tin
court house and Jail, Under direct'
SUperrUlon of Adjt. Gen. Frank S.
Dickson of Springlield. tills city Mt
ilf«l down tonight to complete quiet j
after a strenuous twenty-four hours.
The authorities believe they have the
situation well in hand. There me many
scattered groups of men in the streets
land near the Jail, but no crowd is al-,
lowed to congregate.
Threats have been made against I
Sheriff Fred D. Nellls for the killing of
Alex Halliday early this morning by
his deputies, and for the wounding of
four others In beating back the mob {
that would lynch a negro purse snatch
er, but the presence, of soldiers is hav
ing a good effect.
A third militia company was asked j
for by the sheriff this afternoon, and
company JI of Chicago was ordered
out, arriving at 6:30 o'clock.
John Pratt, the negro the mob in
tended to lynch, and who today was j
given an indeterminate sentence ofi
not more than fourteen years in the]
Chester penitentiary on each of two!
charges of robbery, will be taken to i
the prison tomorrow morning with,
twelve other convicted prisoners. j .
Lincoln Wilson, arrested as a sus
pected companion of Pratt In the
snatching of women's' poekethooks,
was released tonight. The grand jury
failed to indict him.
Trial Is Quick
Pratt's indictment and sentence took
less than half an hour. At 3 o'clock
the Indictment was returned, and ten
minutes later ho pleaded guilty and
was sentenced.
A searching investigation of the at
tack on the jail this morning when
Halllday was killed was ordered this
afternoon by Judge Butler, in a charge
to the grand jury after the disposal of
the cases of the two negroes.
Judge Butler's Instructions were, in
i substance, a demand that the rioters
be brought to justice and made to
Stand trial for rioting.
"This sort of procedure must be
stopped," he said. "Law that Is not
enforced ceases to be law. There have
been live murders in Cairo since No
vember 11, when wo had another occur
rence of mob violence. These crimes
show that mob law is no deterrent to
crime, and it is your duty to see thai
mob law ceases to be."
i'..roner James McManus has called
no inquest into the killing of Halliday.
I He said tonight that he intends to go
slowly in his investigation.
Sheriff N'ellis was in close touch with
Governor Deneen by telephone all day,
I and said tonight that his course has
been commended by the governor.
A stray shot fired by a member of
the mob was the direct cause of the
volley from tile deputies guarding the
jail, according to Sheriff Nellis.
"I was standing on the front porch
of the court house parleying witli the
mob, which was demanding that I give
up Pratt," he said tonight. "When
some one fired from the crowd.
Why They Fired
"My deputies, watching the parley
from a second story window, thought
that I fired a shot as a signal. They
then fired a volley into the air.
"The mob refused to retreat, and my
deputies fired into the crowd. You
know the result. My conscience is easy
over the entire affair. They were de
termined to get 1110 unless I got them.
I did my duty in protecting my pris
oners at any price."
A dozen broken windows In the court
house today showed the result of the
shots fired into the building- by the
mob, but no serious damage was done.
Sheriff Nellis received a slight flesh
wound on the hand. All the party
with him in the jail escaped injury.
There were six negroes in the party
of fourteen armed deputies that de
fended the jail. The defensive party
numbered twenty, but there were not
enough guns to go around. ,
Nellis had great difficulty in enlisting
deputies, and negroes were impressed
into service, 'he said, because ho could
not get enough white men.
Despite this explanation the sheriff
is being criticised for. deputizing ne
groes to fire, on whites, and the mal
contents are using the Incident as an
argument for further demonstrations.
• The conflict between city and county
authorities that marked the Novem
ber lynching is again in evidence.
Mayor Parsons says lie was not noti
fied of any trouble until 2 o'clock and
that he then ordered the police to go
to the assistance of the sheriff.
Orders Delayed
Capt. Greany of company X, the
Cairo militia company, ordered out at
10 o'clock last night and did not re
port until 2 o'clock, said he did not
receive the governor's order until 2
o'clock. ' '
• Mayor Parsons has ordered the sa
loons to remain closed until danger of
further disturbance is passed.
The Halliday family said tonight
that they had retained an attorney to
sue the sheriff and the county for dam
ages.
Halliday, who was a son of former
Mayor T. W. Halliday, was shot
through the neck and lay on the
ground near the court house porch
nearly three hours before Nellis would
permit militiamen to remove him to a
hospital. He died two hours later.
Nellis replies to criticisms of his
refusal to permit the injured man to
be moved by saying he obeyed orders
from Governor Dencen to permit no
person near the building, and believed
Halliday dead.
Samuel Wessinger is the only one
of the injured -whose condition is
serious.
George B. Walker, correspondent of
the Associated Press, who was shot in
the leg while watching the' affair, had
five holes shot through his clothes. ,
John Pearl, a street car conductor,
was pulled off his car by militiamen
after he had called one of them, it is
alleged, an insulting name. He was
locked up on a disorderly charge.
—i » » »
ONE KIND
"Pop!"
"Yes, my son."
"Were there two of every kind went
Into the Ark?"
"Yes, my boy; two of every kind."
"Aiul was thi re two suffragettes?"—
Yonkers Statesman.
MAR'S CANALS
Bill -I nee a wise astronomer la telling the
people that he li»» noticed some dlaurbance on
Man.- ■. .■■.-<■■..<•-.-■• - ■ ' • I
Jill—Perhaps It's one of those canal mules
kicking again !—Youker« Statesman, '
Notables Tell Why Cost
of Living Is So High
The reason for the rise in the cost of necessities can easily be
traced to the increase in our measure of values, the precious metal
gold and possibly in some cases to the combinations in restraint
of trade. — President Tntt.
I am gathering proof now which will demonstrate that the food
products of the American farms are being sold in foreign countries
cheaper than in the United States. This is not due, as some have
said, to the excess of production over consumption and the neces
sity for getting rid of the surplus abroad. It is due to the trusts —
just to the trusts. —James Wilson, Secretary of Agriculture.
You can eliminate the packers entirely from the situation and
high prices will remain. Prices are high by the laws of nature,
and natural laws cannot be changed. The best we can do is to
comply with them. Increase production and prices will fall.—J."
Ogden Armour.
The high cost of living is due to the cost of living high.—James
j. inn.
There is a widespread belief that among the causes of the high
cost of living combinations and conspiracies to stifle competition
and advance prices figure largely. This belief apparently is justi
fied by the enormous difference between the prices paid to farmers
and other producers and those paid by consumers: to dealers—Jud
son Harmon, Governor of Ohio.
It costs me more to keep my family than it did three years
ago. The cost of living has been going up steadily for fifteen
years, and it is the maladministration of the Republican party that
is to blame.—Representative Fitzgerald of New York.
I do not know how far trusts and monopolies have caused the
higher cost of living, but that feature of the problem should be
carefully scrutinized. The exact extent to which they have added
to the people's distress and embarrassment should be determined.
—U. S. Senator Elkins of West Virginia.
The people of the west know where to place the blame for the
present high cost of living. They know the Republican party
broke faith with them when it promised a downward revision of
the tariff and then revised it upward.— Norman Mack, Chairman
Democratic National Committee.
MEAT KEPT fOR
SEVEN YEARS SOLD
(( nntiniK'il from I'ag<- One)
purpose of purchasing a large farm and
supplying the shareholders with many
of the necessariei of lite
hi the beginning the products will I)''
vegetables, poultry and eggs. Eventu
ally the company expects to establish a
supply of dairy and cattle products.
The company will be operated on a
purely mutual basis with just enough
profit charged to pay the expenses of
operation.
SIX CONCERNS DO LARGE
PROPORTION OF BUSINESS
JKFFERSON CITY, Mo., Feb. 10.—
Six meat packing companies do Tv per
cent of the packing business at Kansas
City and about !)0 to !>."> pt cent out-
Side of the local business ai Kansas
City, according to the testimony of J.
N. Rich, general manager of Swift &
Co. of Kansas City, who testified at
tho attorney general's Investigation of
the packers here today. Prices for
buying live stock, Mr. Rich testified,
aro fixed on reports of daily receipts
and markets for live stock nt Chicago.
The selling locally is established by
the Kansas City branch of Swift & Co.,
but the outside price is made by Swift
& Co. of West Virginia, tho selling
company for all Swift plants.
FERRIS BACK FROM
FOUR WEEKS' TRIP
Advertising Accruing to Los Angeles
for Being Pioneer in Airship
Meets incalculable,
He Says
Dirk Ferris, aviation promoter ex
traordinary, whose work in advertising
Los Angeles all over the world is too
well known to call for comment, ar
rived in Los Angeles last night after a
four wees' trip through Louisiana and
Texas. Mr. Ferris acted as manager
for Louis Paulhan In staging the won
derful Frenchman's appearance at va
rious aviation meets and was unusually
successful in his enterprise.
"Just before I left New Orleans," said
Ferris last night, "I received a wire
from Edward Cleary, Paulhan's man
ager, that the suits brought by tho
Wright brother* for infringements on
their patents had been decided against
Paulhan. As record of this adverso
action by tho courts had not been filed,
I was able to close contracts for Paul
han'!! appearance in Houston, Dallas
and F/l Paso.
"Cleary Informed me he would carry
the case to the higher court on appeal,
and it looks very much as If the lower
tribunal's verdict would bo reversed.
In the meantime, though, Cleary -will
put up whatever bond is deJnanded by
the courts, and Paulhun will go on
with tlie exhibitions I have arranged
for him. Should the lower court be
sustained, then whatever damage! the
Wrights are entitled to will be taken
out of tho bond."
According to his present plans, Ferris
will go ahead and book Paulhan in the
principal cities of the country. The
promoter's hopes for a favorable opin
ion from the higher courts in the
WrigTit ease 1 are based on tho fact that
since IRO9 ailerones—the part of the
craft which the \Yrights claim to have
invented —have been in use.
Los Angeles, according to Mr. Ferris,
is very much in the limelight as a
result of the aviation meet held here.
"The entlro country has gone aviation
mad," he Raid, "but they all hand It
to us for being the pioneers. It Is im
possible to estimate the value of tho
advertising resultant on the Domingruez
field events."
After four weeks spent at his horrte
in Los Angeless. Ferris probably will
go to Minneapolis to attend to some
private affairs. Ha will than tour the
country as director of Paulhan's exhi
bitions, coming back as soon (is pos
sible to what he terms "tho only city
in the world."
Only One "BROMO QUININE," that Is £%/y*\f A on
Laxative Bromo Quinine 'j!f>^J^ box'
Cures a Cold in One Day, Crip in 2 Days %£/ WoJC*yKDtr\^ 25c
GTJAKTT"* rVPTTI?A T-TOTT^F Matinee. Today. Tomorrow and Tuesday.
RAND OFJJ.KA HUU&Ii. Phone.t Main 1901, Home A 1967.
LAST 2 TIMKS TODAY OF THE 810 MUSICAL , COMEDY, "IXOBODOIU."
i COMJUiNCLNO MATINKK TOMORROW,
FERRIS HARTMAN
and Ma bIK company will offer th. pa- WHEN JOHNNY COMES
,riolc America war-.ln, a ml c opera MARCHING H QME ■'„ I
Or ««irntf>, THTTATFI? ' Main "'•• bet. Fifth and Sixth.
LYMPIC ! LtiiL.J\lX^K Phone.— Main 151 i Home FHO*
"aEFiIIN «■• AA'T T-T? PUirVrM 1 Introducing ■ x ,'
A IVIKiO present M JuLjCj ' UrllL>xS.Xl(lN Sen«atlonal Apache Danes.
Ten Big singing and Dancing Moreltlei. 10c, Mq, tic. Next Week "A llnj at the Bacea."
I
MORGAN DENIES
ALASKAN TRUST
INSISTS NO MONOPOLY OF IN-
DUSTRIES EXISTS
Declare Developments in Northern
Territory Had Been Paid for by
Company, No Stock Having
Been, Sold to the Public
[Associated Press?
WASHINGTON, Feb. 18.—The inter
esting spectacle ot the Morgan-Guggen
heim syndicate, through legal repre
sentatives, appearing before a con
gressional committee to Justify its
j operations in the development of in
dustries in Alaska today packed the
room of the senate committee on ter
i ritories. It was denied the syndicate
had a monopoly of any industrial in
terest.
The proceedings were unique. Some
days ago Senator Beveridge received a
letter from J. P. Morgan & Co., asking
permission to send representatives to
answer "exaggerated reports printed
la the magazines and newspapers of
the work of the syndicate formed by
that company and the Messrs. Guggen
heim."
The permission was given, and today
John N. Steele, general counsel for the
syndicate, and Stephen B. Kirk, man
aging director, appeared.
Mr. Birch was put on thp stand and
his story drawn out by Mr. Steele. It
resulted in testimony that all the
money spent in the enormous develop
ment of Alaskan resources had been
furnished by the syndicate- itself; that
the Morg-an-Guggenheirn syndicato had
not issued to the public a single bond
or a share of stock; that the syndi
cate had never received anything from
the government in the way of money,
grants of In ml or special rights.
It was testified further the syndicate
owned ono railroad and had no interest
in any other in Alaska; that it owned
one copper mine and had no interest in
any other, and tlmt it owned no coal
lands at all.
Depend on Patents
It was said that the Cunningham
claims hinged on patents being issued
for the claims, and that these negotia
tions had come to nothing. It was
shown that the syndicate was formed
in 190G by the purchase of 46 per cent
of the stock of the Northwestern Com
mercial company, which owned the
Northwestern Steamship company and
tin? Northwestern Fisheries company.
The latter company packs 300,000
cases of .salmon annually, as compared
with a pack of 2,000,000 cases by other
interests. I^ist year the Alaska Steam
ship company was formed by reor
ganization of the. companies in which
the syndicate had bought largo inter
ests, and it now operates eleven steam
ers.
A long 1 list of steamship companies in
which tho Alaska syndicate has DO in
terest was given in support of its claim
that it was not a monopoly.
Both Steele and Birch denied that the
syndicate was trying to "gobble up
Alaska."
Interrogated by Senator Beverldga
concerning the syndicate's interest in
the coal land claims. Mr. birch re
plied that Messrs. Guggenheim had
agreed to form a $5,000,000 corporation
to develop the lands; one-half interest
to be held by the Guggenheims and the
other half by Cunningham and his as
sociates.
The Guggenheims were to pay $2, r.0.000
for their half, he said, and in addition
were to loan $100,000 if it was needed.
"I," SAID THE TAILOR
A physician, upon opening the door
of his consultation room, asked: "Who
lias been waiting longest?"
"I have," spoke up tho tailor; "I de
livered your clothes three weeks ago."
—The Argonaut.
TWO OF A KIND
■WeepinK women and poor soldiers do
not keep their powder dry.—lJfe.
V '■■■-„ AMUSEMENTS . -^Bjj
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER SSJ.™ d MSK^»:
MATINKK TOI>AV. TONKIIIT. AIX, NEXT WEEK,
WASHINGTON'S HIRTIH>AY , MATINEE TUESDAY
CAMEO KIRBY =====
' " 'Cameo Klrbj' linn proven the Burbank'* best production In a —Julian Johnson
In tho Times. v , \ «-*rj\ -
Prices 25c, 60c. First ten rows 75c. Matinees 25c. First ten rows BOe. Gallery, 100.
To Follow — Btlnsco sparkling success, "SWBBT KITTY JtJ :1.1,.V11{5."
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER rh0 ___irUB
Majestic Theater and Realty Co., Lessees.
Oliver MnniM-n. Manager. Broadway, near Ninth.
MATINEE TODAY. . I.\KT TIME TONIGHT.
MR. JOHN COI'.T PRESENTS THE EMINENT COMEDIAN.
Max Figman in Mary Jane's Pa
Prices: 25c to $1. A few front row?. $1.50. ' Matinee -■'■' to 75c. A few front rows $1.
NEXT WEEK—AT THE COZY MAJESTIC—NEXT WEEK
I Seats on Sale I Rose Melville I ' Popu
at the In tho characteristic play , lar
| box office | , Sis Hopkins | Prices
NIOHTS -150 60c, He. A FEW FRONT ROWS 11. WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY AND
WEDNESDAY MATINEES. '::..■. Me SATURDAY MATINEE. 2:, c. 60c. '750.
I ■uj-liiK |-iirtii'i>l>r At-1 \ / *> --. yj £~\T T -a 1 I£\ I ITe.enlinu always the
lentlnn to Entertaining \f >-| I II If^ \f 111 ¥"* best F.uropenn and
t.q.llf, nnd rlillrlren. | w V*. WAVAV^ V "IV [ American attractions.
Eight Geisha Girls Arturo Bernardi
Jln Native Songs and Dances. , . , Famous Italian Protean.
Burleske Cirkus 1\A^;,,..~ Willy Pantzer Co.
Jean Clermont's. J-YlalLlliCC Acropantomlmics.
Brown, Harris & Brown Tndav Mr- and Mrs- Voelker
Just to Laugh—Thaft All. \j\j.o.j "Twlllßlit In the Studio."
Doherty Sisters Una Clayton & Co. ..-'"
Tho^a Ginger Girls. «. "Hli Local Color."
ORI»IIKUM MOTION riCTUKKS.
Kliclits—loc. 2ur, BOe, 75c. Matinee. Pally— 10c. 23c, 50c
MASON OPERA HOUSE ~ZZKF^^r.
TONIGHT AND MATINEE TODAY— PERFORMANCES.
DANIEL V. ARTHUR PRESENTS
*7\A A "DTI? r* A UTTT T "' th° Spark"a* THE BOYS
C/rxri.JK.lH' \sdr\r±Xl-jjLs Musical Play, and BETTY
Book by George V. Hobart. Music by Silvio lleln.
• Complete caßt and production, and the famous Cahlll chorus (all girls).
PRICES SOc TO |i. SEATS now ON SALE.
SEAT SALE NOW ON FOR THE
LAMBARDI GRAND OPERA I
v COMPANY L
Prices SOc to $'i..*><>. Mall orilers reserved now.
Coming— HOBEHT MAXTKM, In KKI'KHTOIHK.
BT7T Acprv XHTTATTTR ndnsfo-Blackwood Co., I»roprs. and Mrt*.
'LAt)LU IHtlAit'K MATINEES Today, Tomorrow, Tuesday, Thursday.
FOURTH GREAT WKEK STARTS MONDAY NIGHT.
I.cm in S. Stone and the BalMOa company present Ocorgo Broadhurst's greatest play,
We Man of the Hour
Special Matinee Tuesday—Washington's Birthday. Seats now selling.
LO<? ANGELES THEATER spring st. mat, evert pat.
USfIIHUCLLO ini,ni£.l\ NEAR 4th. 2 shows evert NIGHT.
Whitman Brothers. I I.EO COOPER & CO. I Tralnor & Dale.
Eckcrt & Francis. In I Gertrudo Van Dyke.
The Laugh-O-Scope. | "THE OI'IOHATOK." I Three Keltons.
TOPULAR PRICKS— IHn. SOB nnrt .lOC.
LEVY'S _ Third and Main. Tables Reserved.
TODAY AT 3, 8:30 AND 10
Edith Helena, world's greatest col
s-\ p oratura singer and operatic prima
V-/cli6 donna; Elsa Ward, prima donna so
prano; Carl Bravo, sensational ten
f~\\ a j. or; Dare and Wolford, -whistling
I .[l2 X\ T T\ T prima donnas; Senor Galgano, em
>-'XJ>C*"*•■*' *-*-4-" *- i nen t harp soloist; Prof. Willey's
' '•" ■ ' ■ Orchestra of selected soloists. „ -.
Special Afternoon Tea, 3to 5; After Dinner, 8:30 to 10 After
s Theater, 10:30 to 12:30. ; '
Mountain, Valley and /f^\
Seashore Excursions
v FIRST CHOICE: _7VIT. LOWE
Special excursion rate Saturday and Sunday, $2.00 round trip. Fifty
miles of delightful travel from the ORANGE GROVES through
the foothills up the GREAT INCLINE through the Oak and Pine-
Clad Heights to ALPINE TAVERN. Through cars 8, 9, 10 a. m.,
1:30 and 4 p.m. <t
second choice: LONG BEACH
The gem of the Pacific, where special band concerts are given aft
ernoon and evening—Down the Pike—Dancing at the Majestic—
a dip in the GREAT SALT PLUNGE and a stroll to the end of the
pleasure pier. There is always something doing for pleasure seek
ers at this ideal beach resort.
THIRD CHOICE: * . ,-,_*'
The famous surf line ride to Balboa, Newport, Huntington Beach
and Bay City—miles of ride along the breakers.
Enjoy the fishing and still water boating at Balboa.
Elegant fish dinner served at Naples.
FOURTH CHOICE: t
A trip through the valleys out GLENDALE WAY to the OLD
SPANISH RESTAURANT at Casa Verdugo, or Covina and Glen
dora through California's finest Orange Groves.
FIFTH CHOICE: , •
Point Firmin, along the cliffs to the Government breakwater and
lighthousefine fishing.
Other Points: Rubio Canyon, Cawston'si Ostrich Farm and
Sierra Madre at the foot of the Mount Wilson Trail. ■
Fast and frequent service to all points from the ,
BIG SIXTH AND MAIN ST. TERMINAL
PACIFIC ELECTRIC RAILWAY
1
Shortest »*<* Quickest
Line to the Ocean '^J|^f
Venice of America
THE WINTER RESORT
. Band Concerts by CHIAFFARELLI'S SUPERB BAND.
Ship Hotel— —Dancing.
OCEAN PARK, SANTA cTVIONICA
Band —Dancing—Bathing.
REDONDO BEACH
Delightful 10-Mile Ride Each Way Along the Ocean.
' Band —Bathing.
Dine at HEPBURN & TERRY'S FAMOUS CAFE. -
Los Angeles-Pacific R'y.
Balloon Route Excursion Station, Hill St., Bet. Fourth and Fifth,

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