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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, February 21, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-02-21/ed-1/seq-2/

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HOME SEEKERS
WIRE PROTEST
TO BALLINGER
ASK INTERIOR DEPARTMENT
TO KEEP WORD
"FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED," IS
PLEA OF COMMITTEE
Rumor That Captain Dixon Had Fav
ored Spanish War Veterans
in Distribution of Tick,
ets Is Denied
Believing that the new order promul
gated by Secretary Ballinger will work
a great hardship on the women and
weaker persons who are trying to se
cure farms in the Yutna allotment and
will cause a crush at the place where
tlm application! are to be received on
the morning of March 1, which will
result in physical injury to many of
tbOße endeavoring to register for
farms, the famous land line is still
holding the fort in its quarters at 31S
\\ "st. Second street, patiently awaiting
further news from Washington.
c. C ''lark, treasurer of the "line"
and member of the committee on pub
licity, said "The question now is simply
this: Will the interior department live
up to its word and the information it
gave to inquiriers, that a line should
Be formed, subject to police regula
tion.*, and that allotments would be
made impartially, first come first
.served."
To make their position clear to the
authorities at Washington, an assess
ment of 50 tents per number was
levied last night and turned over to
thn treasurer to pay tolls on the. fol
lowing telegrams to Senator F. P.
Flint and Secretary Ballinger:
Flint Appealed To
Los Angeles. Feb. 20.
Senator F. p. Flint, Senate
Chamber. Washington, p. C: We,
150 citizens of thr: I'nited States,
Bad hona tide Innd seekers, as
sembled in regular order and under
police protection awaiting with
Kood intentions the opening of the
Vuma land project March 10,
i urne.stlv urge that you us* your
l»'st efforts and Influence with
Secretary Ballinger to reinstate the
original order governing the dis
tribution of this land as advertised
by the department —viz.: "first
mmc, first served."
We are here from all parts of
our nation, at great expense and
inconvenience.
The deferring of the opening of
the land to March 10 and later will
work unnecessary hardships on the
applicants which the original order
does away with.
We court open Investigation.
Signed, The "First Come" Mem
beri of the Prospective Yuma
Project Colony. H. H. Bacon, c:.
\V. Johnson, A. H. Thomas, com
mittee.
Wire to Ballinger
Los Angeles, Feb. 21.
Hon. K. A. Ballinger, Washing
ton, D. C. Department of the In
lerior: We, 150 citizens of the
I 'nited States, assembled here from
all parts of our nation en masse,
awaiting the opening of the Yuma
project, are one and all bona fide
home seekers, and believing that
you have been unofficially misin
formed s to the conditions here
and the facts in our case, earnestly
pray that you have a committee
from your local office here, or any
other .source, investigate our quali
fication and our intentions indi
vidually, and upon finding that we
are acting with good faith, to re
consider your "wired order of Feb
ruary 19 and reinstate the original
order of "first come, first served"—
as advertised by your department
and on the strength of which we
are here at great expense and mi
i nnvenience.
To defer the completion of each
entryman'a papers until March 10
and longer will also work an ex
treme hardship on all of us. which
the original order does away with.
An answer through your' repre
sentative here will be appreciated.
Signed, The "First Come" Mem
bers of the Prospective Yuma
\V. Johnson, A. H. Thomas, land
I'roject Colony. H. H. Bacon, C.
seekers' committee.
* onsiderable excitement was caused
by a rumor that ticket No. 44 was be
ing held by Police Captain C. B. Dixon
and that several tickets had been is
sued to members of the United States-
Spanish war veterans before the line
had formed on Broadway at all. When
questioned over the telephone last
night regarding these charges Captain
Dixon said:
"That any tickets were issued prior
to the forming of the line is untrue.
As to the other matter, ticket No. 44
was never issued for the. reason that,
When I gave out tickets 36 to 50 on
Friday morning the man at 44 was
away eating his breakfast, and he has
not appeared since to claim his
ticket.'"
Captain Dixon Is a member of the
Pasadena, camp of Spanish war vet
erans.
Homeseekers Stand Firm
Although the uncertainty of their
position is trying in the extreme, no
defections were reported from their
ranks yesterday, and the homeseekers
maintained a cheerful front. In the
evening some spread blankets on the
• lean-swept floor and slept, untroubled
save by dreams of "six crops of al
falfa " a«id uncounted flocks of spring
chickens.
Excellent discipline is maintained
under the officers elected by the home
seekers yesterday, and newcomers are
assigned their places the same as if
in the open air.
BALLINGER OUTLINES A NEW
PLAN FOR LAND SEEKERS
WASHINGTON. Feb. 20.—Unwilling
thai a record-breaking endurance test
should lie held with the approval of
tip government, Secretary Ballinger
Mas adopted a novel plan for the al
lotment of forty-acre, farms at Yuma,
Arizona, In March. Hardships that
would result from the endurance tent
i landing In line did not appeal to
the secretary, so he wired the land of
lie" that a different plan had been
adopted.
tn accordance with tho new arrange
.ment, the Brcretary has ordered that a
hall or a baseball park, larffe enough
to accommodate all who desire to par
* tlclpato In the allotment, bo engaged
In lion Angeles for March 1. To thosn
mbled in the hall or park, by 9
n'clock on that dny, cards will be dis
tributed. On these the name, age,
height and postoftlce address of each
horaeseckcr must ba written.
At liny time bstwMa March 1 and
in tlin applicant may appear at the
land office In JjO»-Angeles, and upon
li.'lpb identified by tbs card, may make
npplication ' for »ny <>f the 17:1 farms
that tho eovernment Is to (five away. j
Group of Prominent Politicians
Who Met President in New York
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HBe sS BB> *jy. ' - jBB B^mß^^BbV
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CCPVBI3HT J"^._g?l r'-MJi- TMO^PSOiy ""^^^rJx,^^^^^ 1*
This photograph, taken during President Taft's visit to New York a few days ago, shows some of the most promi
nent Republican leaders of the nation and state. On the extreme left of the reader is James W. Wads,
worth, jr., the young speaker of the state assembly. Next to him is Otto T. Bannard, defeated Republican
candidate for mayor of New York in the recent election. Governor Hughes of New York is easily recognized.
Next to the governor is Timothy L. Woodruff, former lieutenant governor of New York and chairman of the
state Republican committee. On the left hand of President Taft is Lloyd Griscom, former ambassador to
Italy and recently elected chairman of the New York county committee. The extreme right of the picture
Is taken up by Senator Chauncey M. Depew.
TAFT FORCED TO
YIELD TO PARTY
ADMINISTRATIVE ' MEASURES
DEMANDED CUT TO FOUR
President Insists Unrestri,ted Power
Shall Be Given Him to Withdraw
Any of the Public Lands
from Settlement

[Associated Press]
WASHINGTON, Fob. 20.—Announce
ment from the White House that Presi
dent Taft had, by Ills own motion, cut
down to four tho number of adminis
tration measures he would demand at
the present session of congress Is re
ceived by Republican leaders with un
mixed feelings of relief.
The administration program was bo
formidable that members warmly sup
porting the Taft policies hardly knew
where to begin.
A schedule including only the bills to
amend the interstate commerce laws,
to regulate the issuance of injunctions,
to start Arizona and New Mexico on
the road to statehood and to validate
the withdrawals of public lnn'ls for
conservation purposes is regarded as
quite possible of attainment.
Most of these measures, it is believed,
can bo put through the senate while
tha house Is wrestling with appropria
tion bills.
When it was reported P.t the capltol
yesterday that the president would be
satisfied with the enactmen' of the
four measures named, steps were taken
to bring these matters out of commit
tee at the earliest possible moment.
Tho postal savings bank bill already
is before the senate, and an agreement
between supporters of conflicting
amendments is assured. It is regarded
as practically certain the bill can be
passed this week.
Will Try to Report Bill
Hearings have been closed by the
senate committee on Interstate com
merce on the bill to create a commerce
court and to strengthen existing laws
for the regulation of common carriers.
The committee will meet tomorrow,
when an effort will be made to report
the bill. There is some, prospect that
this may be done.
Although the senate could not be
ready to take up the railroad bill until
late in the week It Is being argued
by members of the committee that the
bill should be reported so as to have
it printed and give senators a iew
days to study its provisions.
As soon as the postal savings bank
bill Is out of the way the railroad bill
will be made the order of business,
and probably will be before the senate
constantly until passed, except for the
limited time to be given appropriation
bills.
No decision has been reached in the
house committee on interstate com
merce on the proposition to eliminate
from the administration measure the
plan to create a court of commerce.
Even if this be not done, it Is practi
cally certain the court plan will be re
tained by the senate, and the question
of establishing the new tribunal thus
would be thrown into confusion.
Insists on Conservation Measure
The"one conservation bill that pres
ident Taft is determined shall be pass
ed is that which gives to the president
unrestricted power to withdraw public
lands from settlement and place them
in reserves. In the meantime an effort
will be made by a special committee
of western senators to perfect other
conservation measures so they will bo
ready for consideration at the next
session.
Hearings are In progress on the
statehood bill, but it Is unlikely the
measure will be brought out of tho
senate committee on territories until tho
postal Ravings bank and the railroad
bills are out of tho way.
The fourth measure to bo pressed
for passage Is that relating to tho
Issuance of Injunctions. Several bills
on this subject have been proposed,
but they have not been considered in
committee.
Thnt Introduced in the house bj
Representative Monn of PennHylvanla
has been indorsed by the president,
and there are others which, it is
thought, would prove satisfactory ta
him.
The donate judiciary < nmmltteo will
iler the (juestlon tomorrow.
Ship aubfldy legislation is unpopular
In so many srrtions of tho country
LOS ANiiIOLES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING, FKHIULVRY 21, .1.010.
that some members are distinctly re
lieved at the prospect that the Hum
phrey bill, reported from the house
committee on merchant marine and
fisheries, may not be taken up at this
session.
Will Get No More Appropriation
There is a feeling in the senate com
mittee on commerce that the rivers
and harbors bill as passed by the house
carries about as heavy appropriations
now as can be hoped for at this session.
It Is freely charged that the house
"gobbled up" about all available for
the present for distribution, and as a
consequence much dissatisfaction is
expressed.
Some members of the commerce com
mittee went so far as to argue that
the whole bill should bo killed in com
mittee, but they were overruled.
The policy of the senate committee
wil bo to scale down the house appro
priations wherever possible and make
room for pet projects favored by sen
ators without greatly swelling- the ag
gregate sum to be carried by the bill.
Inevitably this will lead to bitter con
troversy In conference, and the rivers
and harbors hill prohably will be one
of fhe last measures to he adjusted.
Democrats and insurgent Republicans
appear not at all to be satlstied with
the complexion of the special commit
tee of the senate to inquire into the
high cost of the necessities of living.
All tlii' Republican members are reg
ulars, regarded as stand-patters, except
Senator Crawford. Senators Simmon?
and Clarke of Arkansas are the Demo
cratic members of the committee, and
there is one vacancy because of Sen
ator chamberlain's refusal to serve.
It has been announced that the food
price committee will not hold open
sessions, and some members of con
gress charge this assures a report giv
ing causes other than the tariff for the,
high cost of necessaries.
Chairman Lodge promises, however,
that every sui'pecteii reason for the
increased cost in the last two years
Will lie weighed and that the tariff
will receive careful scrutiny.
Persons who have been following
carefully the investigation of the Bal
linger-Pinchot controversy think the
end is In sight. Proceedings do not
seem to indicate that former Forester
Plnchot will play an important part
in the investigation. He has outlined
the story he wants to tell on the stand,
and the Impression is that it will not
bear heavily on the question of
whether Secretary Ballinger has been
guilty of irregularities or impro
prieties.
TILLMAN TALKS
TO PHYSICIANS
Doctors Believe Solon Will Fully Re«
cover His Health and Speech.
No Indications of Unfavor
able Developments
[Associated Press]
WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.—Favorable
indications showed themselves today
in the condition of Senator Tiilman.
The initial symptoms which caused hia
partial paralysis and loss of speech
have abated, according to the bulletin
of the physicians tonight.
Today lie recogniz-d and called by
name, one of the physician!, a man
whom he had seen only once before.
Until today the senator had spoken
only two words since he was stricken
last Thursday, hut today, when the
family physician entered his faco
brightened as he recognized him, and
said:
"Hello, doctor." A little inter the
physician whom he had seen Imt once
■aid to th» senator:
"I don't suppose you rememljer me?'
"Yes, I do, replied Mr. TiUman.
•You are Dr. White."
The doctors consider this return of
Speech most favorable. ;ind they en
tertain no doubt as to the patient's
full recovery of his speech.
The senator pawed a comfortable
night and awakened this- morning'soon
Mil'i- tiie physicians arrived.
Following in the bulletin by the
physicians:
"The Hfiiator's condition is (is fav
orable an (ould be expected. Tlie ini
tial symptoms have abated >#i<l im
provement has commenced. The dis
turbance of speech is less marked.
Pulse 72, temperature normal. He is
resting; comfortably. There are no In
dication* pointing to the probability
of unfavorable developments m tbla
ENGINE HITS AUTO;
TWO WOMEN DEAD
(Continued from rage One)
Azusa. Yesterday afternoon a party
was formed, conducted by Mr. Ander
son, the real estate dealer, and a trip
made to Azusa.
On the return Mrs. Martin wa.s
pleased with the outlook and all the
party were in high spirits. A few sec
onds after they had started across the
dangerous track Mr. Anderson heard
the roar of the oncoming train and
with his auto at high sped endeavored
to get across. He nearly succeeded,
but the rear part of the auto was
struck.
The body of Miss MeFwen was sent
to l.iresee Bros.' undertaking rooms.
Brikson is a widower and lias a
3-year-old son.
'•: AMUSEMENTS \
MASON OPERA HOUSE i^.e/and S2^sl
TOXKiHT AND AI.I. WEEK—MATINEES WEDNESDAY and SATIRDAV.
LAMBARDI GRAND OPERA COMPANY
147 I-EOn.E. 60 CHORUS. BO ORCHESTRA.
IN KBPBRTOIRE.
Tonight, LA GIOCONDA. Tomorrow Night, IL TROVATORE
TRICES «0o to *;.nn. SEATS NOW ON SALE.
Coming—JlK, ROBERT MANTELL IN REPERTOIRE.
ALL NEXT WEEK
"MANTELL is a great actor. He is now the leader of our stage."
—William. inter, dean of American critics, in X. Y. Tribune.
... . , MR. wiiajam a. BRADY ANNOUNCES
Mr. cTWantell
In Seven Magnificent Productions of Shaksperean
and Romantic Plays.
Monday. "LOUIS XI" (by Delavigne); Tuesday, "MAC
BETH"; Wednesday, "HAMLET"; Thursday, "RICHELIEU"
(by Bulwer-Lytton); Friday, "KING LEAR": Saturday Matinee,
"AS YOU LIKE IT" Saturday Night, "OTHELLO."
ritICES .->O-' TO Si.OO. SEATS READY THIKSDAV.
GT?AWT"» HOUSE MATINEES Tomorrow, Saturday, Sunday
KANiJ U±*H,KA nUUja l-hone»—Main 1867; Home A 1067.
HERE'S A REALLY "GREAT" COMIC OPERA SUCCESS
You haven't seen all of the good things yet. Ferris Hartman has given the theatergoers
of Los Angeles many a fine production of which he is honestly proud, but nothing that
has been presented on the stage of the Grand opera house has won such enthusiastic
approval of two delighted audlenocs as the splendid presentation given yesterday by
Ferris Hartman
and his bl* singing and dancing company in the patriotic American war-time comic
opera.
When Johnny Comes
Marching Home
It's distinctly different from anything that has been seen at the Grand
opera house this season. You'll like it. BIG WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY
MATINEE TOMORROW. B«tl now soiling.
Next W**k—-Ferris Hartman in Frank Daniels' laughing success, "THE AMEER."
Beats go on sale this mornipß. Popular Hartman prices.
\xM/V^VCA\KY\" ,^iSi\r>f\\W C\- ' ' Matinee E»ery Day.
VTVJVyOO^^ . Both rhone_U«7
V X i COMMENCING MATINEI! TODAY
I'HyliiK I'artli-ular At- 1 T T-. _ 1 f~\ T< 11 t^ I Fresentinn always the I
tention to Entertaining \# JJ \jllf^ V/ I IlfT best European and
I.adlfn ■ »n<l (')illilreii | V C* UUV V AllY | Aroerlfan »ttriutli,n« [
Vilmos Westony Eight Geisha Girls
Hungarian piano virtuoso. , I , . i In Native Songs and Dances.
Claud & Fanny Usher __ . Burleske Cirkus
In "F«f a.n'a Decision." IVIAtinCC Jean Clermonfs.
Cook and Stevens Today Brown, Harris & Brown
"No Chack-M No Wash-ee." \j\iay Just to —That's All.
Mme. Panita Doherty Sisters
Flute virtuoso. Thn.io 'ilnger Girls.
ORI'IIEI'M MOTION riCTCKKM, RHOWINO FIRBT VIKWM OF AVIATION WEEK.
Klghts—loc. 25c. 50c. 75c. Matinees Dally— loc. 2Bc. 500.
T TERNON ARENA IC „m . Tuesday, Feb. 22—2 P. M.
Monte Attcll vs. Frankie Conley
45 ROUNDS lUX BANTAM 'lIAMPIOV4HII* AND McCAREY BKI/T.
Blllv CaDiiellFi anil Kid Cleveland, ten rounds and a four-rounri opener. Admission $1.
Rnrrred .eul- ft- Box Spain *3. For sal* at A. 11. UKEENEWALD'S CICiAR rtTORE,
107 South raring otreei.' - ' ' ■'/ *■■■■' _
Ox \rAxmr* TUUiTITP i •- ■ - .... ' > Main st., bet. Filth anil Sixth.
|LYMPIC t ,lHi^AXii.K , rhones—Main «li Home FUO3.
' Alphiu & [<"argo present A DAY AT THE RACES ,
TEX BIC! KlNlilNli AMI DANCINIi NOVELTIES—IOc,'. «oc, ,SBc. Next , Week, Mil 111.
■ ■M>.4i. fn i .ii nil ihi f ii ii is^iiii. ■ rsf Viiitiisf riilf>iiiii-<»MLi>iiWiMT«i nilr " ' x.sx.^ :*-*.** w- .a, ■ a>^ Eir-i^iitlriJ«j^.'*S*n*iJ»»,'* n > «.*'jSJW»'y*&*»<-i,.
BANK ROBBER
ADMITS CRIME
SHERIFF SECURES A CONFES
SION IN FORD CASE
ARREST OF OTHERS IS HOURLY
EXPECTED
Young Chauffeur Says He Was Com.
pelled at Point of Revolver to
Comply with Demands
of Cracksmen
[Associated ProssJ
HUTCHINSON, Kas., Feb. 20.— J.
Bear, one of the two men In custody
here charged with being Implicated in
the robbery of the Bank of Ford, Kas.,
a week atfo, is reported by the sheriff
tonight to have confessed.
According to Sheriff 8011, Bear im
plicated lour other nwn. One, Earl
Maw. is years old, chauffeur who drove
the robber* to the bank in a motor ear.
is in jail, and the arrest of the others
is hourly expected.
Hear is said to have admitted he
was one of the, ringleaders in plan
ning the robbery, but says he was in
Oklahoma at the time of the robbery.
The arrest of Bear and Maw was
brought about by , information fur
nished by Mrs. Maw, mother of the
boy. He confessed to her, it is said,
before fleeing to Oklahoma, where he
was arrested. Mrs. Maw said her boy
told her he was forced into the crime
after he had been plied with whisky
by the older men. One of the robbers,
he said, held a revolver to his head
while the others blew the safe of the
bank. They then forced him to drive
them to a railroad station, where they
boarded a train.
Maw, fearing arrest, fled. Maw is
said to have told his mother the man
he drove in his automobile had robbed
Other banks in Kansas and Oklahoma
and that they were the men wno
robbed a train near Ford recently.
Bear la an automobile dealer of King
man, Kas. __ J _.
AMERICANS HELP
INSURGENTS WIN
(Continued from Tage One)
themselves in a hand-to-hand light.
Five, additional Americans under Gen
eral Zeleden were placed in command
of forty Nicaraguans, with whom they
turned the enemy's left in a movement
that shortly afterwards terminated in
the enemy's complete retirement.
These Americans were Donald M.
Turner of El Taso, J. H. Herman of
Mascoutah, 111., F, E. Thomas, recent
ly of Johannesburg, Africa; Lewis
Ross of Milwaukee, and T. D. Moore of
Dover, Fla.
On the enemy's retirement Mena s
cavalry gave chase, but were unable
to come up before Vasqucz had taken
shelter on a high hill. It was from
this position that Vasquez bombarded
today.
Apparently further fighting is in
evitable, although prisoners taken by
the provisional forces report that Vas
quez' men are deserting In squads.
"*M AMUSEMFNTS . ■---
Bt^t AOnr\ TUPATtTB Belanco-Blackwood «'«•. Props. - »nd Mr".
ELAaLU 1 klti,A IJC»K^ Matinees Tomorrow, Thiimda.v. Sntiirday, Siiihlut.
4th Week Starts Tonight ' . Extra Matinee Tomorrow
LEWIS S. STONE and the Belasco theater company continue to turn away hundreds
every night from GEORGE BROADHURST'S greatest piny.
I THE MAN OF I
THE hour^l
.^M^— \
No such success as this sensational hit has ever been known In the history of the Be
la«co theater. No «uch superlatively line performance has ever been given by any stock
company anywhere In this country. "The Man of the Hour" as Biven by Mr. Bton.
and the Belasco players represent, the very highest achievement of dramatic effort. It
THE MAN OP THE HOUR and It's THE PLAY OF THE YEAR.
REMEMBER, THAT WHEREAS THERE ARE THREE COMPANIES
PRESENTING "TIIK MAN OF TUB HOIK" IN THE HIGH l'RUl.l>
SYNDICATE THEATEItS OF .THE EAST AT THE REGULAR \1 A SEAT
SCHEDULE, HERE AT THE BELASCO THEATER THE REGULAR
SCALE OF PRICES PREVAILS Foil THIS GREATEST OF ALL GREAT
BUCCKMBS EVERY NIGHT, II TO 75 CENTS. MATINEES TOMOR
ROW, THURSDAY, SATURDAY AND SUNDAY, 25 TO 50 CENTS.
SPECIAL MATINEE PERFORMANCE OF "THE MAN OF
THE HOUR" TOMORROW (WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY).
GET YOUR SEATS QUICK FOR THIS HOLIDAY PER
FORMANCE, FOR THE BELASCO IS SURE TO BE
JAMMED TO OVERFLOWING.
TOS ANGELES THEATER SgS'JtS. 1-', * Miow^E™?iF™uT
■ „,,-., B . r -- r j —' I Al Fremont & Co.
!k^W Romany Opera Co. I ™&i»«. ac—
. FOrUMB rRICE H—lo. SO and »flf. '
Grand Flag Day /?i§|y
Celebration ' . HSB?
South Pasadena
February 22
GRAND PARADE, 10:30 A. M. under auspices Chamber of Com
merce. Prominent Speakers. Good Music.
Take SOUTH PASADENA cars from Sixth and Main Sts.
PACIFIC ELECTRIC RY. CO.
TUT OROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER £"«?*.»/£««£
AI-L —MATINEK TOMORROW— MATINKB SATURDAY.
CAMEO KIRBY
" Tamm KJrby' has proven the Burbank's best production in a year."—Julian .lohncon
in The Times.
NEXT WEEK— the Popular Burbank—NEXT WEEK
POSITIVE PRODUCTION OF DAVID BELASCO'S SPARKLINO COMEDY,
SWEET KITTY BELLAIRS
UNDER THE PERSONAL BTAGB lIIRECTION OF FREDERIC BELASCO."•..'
FIRST TIME IN LOS ANGELES
li,, 2Sc, 50c. First ten rows 76c. Matinees 25c. First ten rows 50c. Gallery 10c.
HAM3URGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER . °Main F7oo'
Majestic. Theater and Realty Co., Lessees.
Oliver Morosro, Manag:er. Broadway, near Ninth.
ALL IVEKK—MATINEES TOMORROW, WEDNESDAY, SATITIDAT.
Rose Melville ToSfal Sis Hopkins '
•Popular prices—26c, BOe, fio. A few front rows $1. BARGAIN MATINEES.
NEXT WEEK —BEAUTIFUL BONITA TN "WINK. WOMAN AND SON«i." '
Washington's $j^\
Birthday Sports (^P
Tournament p asa( j ena
Tuesday, February 22, 2 P. M.
Roman Chariot Races
Three Chariots Racing at same time One half-mile dash—Old
fashion Cowboy relay race — One three-quarter-mile dash.
Humorous horseback novelty race—Three trotting races
Round Trip 25 Cents ;
CHOICE OF TWO ROUTES OF TRAVEL'
SHORT LINE AND OAK KNOLL LINE
PACIFIC ELECTRIC RAILWAY
lEVY'S Third and Main. Tables Reserved.
-*"-" ■ ' ■ ■
I n- a T?T7 Afternoon After After
Arii Tea Dinner Theater
CHANTANT 1 3to 5 | 8:30tolO| 10:30-12:30
FIVE ORKAT ACTS AND SPECIAL SOI.O ORCHESTRA,
Special $2.00 Rate to M^
o7VIt Lowe *^P
Washington's Birthday, February 22
Take a morning car and spend the day at the famous mountain re- '
sort YE ALPINE TAVERN. Enjoy the warmth of the balmy air
5000 feet above the sea. Through cars at 8, 9 and 10 a. m., 1:30
and 4:00 p. m.
LONG BEACH, NAPLES, BAY CITY, POINT .
FIRMIN, HUNTINGTON BEACH, NEWPORT
AND BALBOA ARE THE ATTRACTIVE BEACH
POINT RESORTS TO VISIT.
COVINA, GLENDORA, MONROVIA, SIERRA MADRE,
GLENDALE, SAN GABRIEL, RUBIO ( CANYON. CAW
STON'S OSTRICH FARM are the trips through beautiful valleys
of Orange Groves.
■ Fast and frequent service from 6th and Main Street ;
.. .y, ... Terminal. , ■
PACIFIC ELECTRIC RAILWAY

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