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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, February 22, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-02-22/ed-1/seq-2/

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*x£* BosmDRrGomSiORE
So. Broadway 235-237-239 So. Hill 234-244
Butterick Patterns and Publications for March are
ready. Ask at the pattern counter about special sub
scription offers for The Delineator—Main floor rear.
Precision in Corseting
A word explains it—precision—so perfect,
so systematized that no single detail of
manufacture is left to chance.
Accuracy—so positive that each „*:
bit of boning must take its place EStSC^^^fe^g
[ without a hairsbreadth's deviation & I
i in one model or a million. j| I^^?^^^^ H
tyjieKJrace.J>iJFro2it* |>J^Wf^lil
They lace in front; consider what |
that means—the classic back; cor- i WMlj ifMM^mi
rect poise; graceful lines; ease of p^|| |H^^^li
adjustment with absolute comfort. > W^P lj^P|
$25.00 and $35.00 <t^A
Robe Patterns . . . <P^v
$20 will. buy surprisingly beautiful spang
led robes —the sorts heretofore sold at $25
and $35 —in green, blue, pink, brown and
black. And the $40 to $65 grades at $25.
(Main Floor, rear)
Underpriced Soaps
Toilet soaps of sterling merit, else they
would not bear our brand:
"Violette de Panne" toilet soap, 3 cakes in box, 20c;
regularly 25c.
"Violette de Mai" toilet soap, 3 cakes in box, 35c;
Regularly %oc. (Near Main Entrance)
SWEARS BANKERS
CHEATED PUBLIC
CLARENCE ROBNETT TURNS
STATE'S EVIDENCE
Declares Bank Funds Were Used to
Pay Entrymen After Prop.
erty Along Clearwater
Bay, Idaho
BOISE, Idaho, Feb. 21.—Taking the
witness stand in behalf of the go\ em
ment, Clarence Robnett, a witness for
the defense at the former trial of Wil
liam F. Kettenbach, George Kester
and William Dwyer, charged with con
spiracy to defraud the government out
of valuable timber lands along Clear
water bay, in Nez Perce county, told
of a conspiracy in which he accused
the Lewiaton bankers, Kettenbach &
Kester, of. being the principals, Dwyer
being their tool.
The witness acknowledged that he
asked the bankers to let him in on the
deal, which he said they did to a cer
tain degree, although he did not share
in the profits.
During the cros3 examination Rob
nett admitted being under indictment
for subornation of perjury and em
bezzlement. The latter charge Is in
connection with the looting of the
Lewiston National bank, of which ho
was bookkeeper. Kettenbach and
Kester, former president and cashier
ot the bank, are under indictment on
the same charge.
Jtotmett testified that bank funds
were used to pay entrymen, the checks
being handled as cash as they were
presented, so that they would not show
on the books. He also said the same
hundred-dollar bill was used in mak
ing most of the entries, the bill being
used over and over again to make fil
ings. As to his reasons for turning
state's evidence Robnett said he de
cided to make a clean breast of the
whole matter, and told his story first
to Special Agents Watts and Smith at
Spokane. . __^^.
FREEZING IN NORTH
PORTLAND, Ore., Feb. 21.—Freezing
temperatures prevail throughout cen
tral and eastern Washington and Ore
gun, and the indications are that the
iold wave will reach the western sec
tion of the two states tonight. Snow
in the eastern parts of Oregon and
AVashington is delaying trains.
DO YOU USE
GAS?
It is absolutely the best and cheapest fuel for cooking and
heating. You know the qualities of gas for COOKING—-well,
it is just as satisfactory for HEATING.
Los Angeles Gas and Electric Corporation
645 SOUTH HILL STREET
PhooM—Kunaet Main 8030! Horn* I*ooB.
ROADS MUST PAY
TAX ON EARNINGS
U. S. SUPREME COURT FINDS
FOR MINNESTOTA
Missouri Pacific Ordered to Establish
Separate Passenger Trains on
Branch Road in State
of Kansas
WASHINGTON, Feb. 21.—1n more
than fifty decisions the supreme court
of the United States today declared
many state laws were unconstitutional;
upheld more state laws and gave the
federal statutes final interpretation.
The state of Minnesota won a com
plete victory over the Great Northern
Kailroad company and over the Chi
cago Great Western railroad, both of
which had resisted ..he state's attempt
to levy a 4 per cent gross earning tax.
The state oC South Carolina likewise
won a victory over railroads, when the
court adopted the view of the supreme
court of South Carolina that the law
requiring railroads to pay a penalty
of $50 for failure to adjust within nine
ty days claims for losses applied only
to interstate traffic.
The state of Kansas came out vic
torious in its flght with the Missouri
Pacific for the installation of separate
lussjnger trains on a branch road
from Madison, Kas., to the Kansas-
Missouri state line. It was in this case
that the court announced the doctrine
that even if this passenger train were
operated at a loss the railroad was
under a duty to perform wueh service
as long as it retained its charter.
The state of Alabama had its statute
levying an annual franchise tax on
foreign corporations declared uncon
stitutional. Kailroads brought the case
to the supremo court.
The state of Georgia lost In most of
Its contentions in the attempt, despite
charter exemptions, to levy property
and franchise taxes.
FLOOD SUFFERERS AIDED
PARIS, Feb. 21.—The American Red
Cross has cabled $5000 more, mak
ing the total contribution of the so
ciety to the floor relief fund nearly
$100,000.
JAMES GALL DEAD
NEWARK, N. J., Feb. 21.—Jamos
* iiill, widely known in this country and
Europe as a designpr of public parks,
is dead at his home in Preakness, N. J.
LOS ANGELES HERALD; TUESDAY CORNING, FEBRUARY 22, 1910.
STRIKE LEADER
IS IN CUSTODY
HEAD OF CARMEN'S UNION AC-!
CUSED OF CONSPIRACY
100,000 LABOR MEN THREATEN TO
WALK OUT
—————— . - » *
Philadelphia Scene of Constant Con.
flicts Between Police and" Sympa
thizing Mobs—lncandescent
Lights Used for Missiles
(Continued from l'age One)
rector of public safety tonight ordered
a K"»ieral Shifting of the force. \
A curious Incident In the situation
developed by the strike occurred this
afternoon, when a man charged with
robbing- a jewelry store and who was
beinir arrested was taken from the of
ficer by a mob of strike sympathizers.
When tho prisoner attempted to es
cape the policeman drew his revolver
and .shot him in the leg.
Temper of Crowd Grows Worse
While the damage done to the prop- j
erty of the Rapid Transit company to
\ day war not as great as yesterday, tho
temper of the rioters was no less bit- j
ter. The extra force of police seemed
to have a deterring effect on the strike
sympathizers fn many sections of the
olty.
In a statement Issued tonight Mayor
Reyburn said the public would be pro
tected even if the whole police power
of the city and state had to be
called on.
The first shot at a striker was fired
late thi3 afternoon in the excitement
incident to a great mass meeting be
ing: held by the union men. A police
man attempted to force the crowd back
when a motoiman interfered. The of
ficer drew his revolver and fired at the
man, but the bullet went wide and no
one was hit.
While this meeting was in progress
iron gratings that are used to cover
j sewer outlets were torn up and placed
on the rails. Soon there was a block
ade of cars and the crowd amused
itself by breaking all the windows.
The cars were filled with pasen
gers, several of whom were cut by fly
ing glass.
Occurrences of this character were
reported in nearly every section of the
city, but only -in one instance was
there an attempt to burn the cars.
Denies Breakers Hired
The company says It has lmpoFted
no men and is operating cars with Its
own employes. The strikers claim 6500
men out of about 7000 are on strike
and that the company is running cars
with strike breakers and power house
employes. \
Of about 100 rlotnrs arrested yester
day the greater number were less than
21 years old.
Street car service was uncertain all
day. Some of the cars were half tilled,
but the most of them carried few pas
sengers. That the fear of personal in
jury was well grounded was shown by
reports from different sections of the
city of the throwing of stones resulting
in the breaking of car window* anil
the slight injury of several persons.
Sensational reports that blood was
running in the streets and that the
police were having pistol battles with
citizens are not true. It was a notice
able fact most of the disorder uas
started by boys, generally in thickly
settled parts of the city.
In three Instances cars were set on
fire and In all other cases windows of
the oars were broken. When a squad
of police would arrive on the scene the
crowd would usually slowly disappear
without further serious trouble.
The four persons wounded by bullets
yesterday were watching the crowds.
Except in the case of the little girl
who was hit by a policeman's bullet,
those suffering from pistol wounds
were struck by stray shots fir^d Into
the air by persons in the crowds. It
was a bad day for the tens of thou
sands of persons who were compelled
to walk to their work, as a heavy rain
fell. Every teamster who was willing
to carry passengers found people eager
to pay high rates of fare. One of the
amusing sights of the strike was to
see men and not a few women go to
work on roller skates. The railroads
entering the city were taxed to their
limit in handling crowds.
Under the proclamation issued by the
mayor yesterday people are not per
mitted to congregate on the streets.
The first fatality of the rioting oc
curred tonight when an unidentified
man died at a hospital. He was in
jured today in a clash between a mob
and the police. Knocked down and
trampled upon, he was found lying
unconscious after the street had been
cleared.
Policeman Fred Tyson, whose skul!
was fractured in a riot, probably will
die.
That a general strike of the labor
organizations of this city would be
called, possibly tomorrow, was posi
tively stated at the car men's head
quarters at midnight by John J. Mur
phy, president of the Central Labor
union.
"Power has been pinned by the Cen
tral Labor union in the hands of my
self and Secretary Hope," said Mur
phy, "to call a general strike. This
will involve at least 100,000 working
men and women in this city.
"Nothing can stop a general strike
now. I can't stop it. With the arrest
of C. O. Pratt they have forced the
same conditions on the general trou
ble as on the trolley men. The pen
em! strike is likely to begin with,day
break. Before the end of the wMk
there will certainly be a general tieup."
STORM DOES BIG DAMAGE
IN THE UNITED KINGDOM
Blow Lasting Four Days Unroofs
Houses and Fells Telegraph
Lines —Wrecks Reported
LONDON, Feb. 21.—Belated reports
of the storm which spent itself during
the night after having raged intermit
tently for four days, show damage In
many parts of the United Kingdom. In
many places roofs were torn from
houses, hundreds of trees torn down
and telegraph and telephone lines laid
low. In many districts telegraph ser
vice was greatly delayed today. Ad-
Vlcoi from the Bay of Biscay Indicate
that another cyclone is approaching
from across the Atlantic.
Several boatmen have boon drowned
at various ports. The French bark
Aliarechal Cuchet from Nagazakt,
Japan, with exhibits for the Anglo-
Japanese exhibition here, which wont
ashore near Margate Friday, is break
ing up. Her crew was saved by the
lifeboats-.
The Wilson liner Galileo wag blown
ashore in the Humber during the night.
Tugs were attempting to refloat her
today. A large steamer whs seen off
the Berwickshire coast last night, help
li-h.s through disabled machinery Hnd
drifting toward May island. Several
distinct earthquake shocks occupying
two minute* were felt in Cheshire tills
morning.
NOTED ACTOR-AUTHOR
ANSWERS LAST CALL
IB
CLAY CLEMENT
IS EITHER IMPOSTOR
OR LONG LOST SON
WRANGLE OVER ESTATE DE
VELOPS STRANGE SITUATION
Testimony Warrants Criminal Action
No Matter What Result in
Suit Involvinug Sum
of $750,000
■ I
CAMBRIDGE, Mass.. Feb. 21.—The
wrangle over the $750,000 estate of the
late Daniel Russell of Melrose has de
veloped sufficient testimony to war
rant criminal action, no matter which
way the scales of justice fall.
A tall, dark-haired man from North
Dakota stands before the Middlesex
probate court either as the long lost
son or as one of the most accomplished
impostors In the loet.il annals of the
state. He says he Is Daniel Blake
liussell, the second son of Daniel Rus
sell, who disappeared when a boy and
that he did not hear of his father's
death until a year after the estate had
been practically settled.
On the other side stands William C.
RlMMll. the elder son and principal
beneficiary under the will, who alleges
that the North Dakotan is really James
Rousseau of Malone, N. V., find that
he has been backed In his fight for the
Russell property by a particularly
clever group of gamblers In or about
Dickinson, N. D.
The charges of both sides have been
sensational rind can hardly be disre
garded by either the prosecuting attor
neys of the state or the nation. If the
claimant's case is uphold the post
offlce authorities will be warranted in
arresting some of the other side for
forging cancellation dates and rifling
the mails.
If, on the other hand, the state wins,
the claimant stands as a perjurer, one
who has attempted to obtain money
under false pretenses.
Since the trial opened September 20
seven lawyers have missed scarcely a
session. They have been assisted by
more than fifty detectives. It is esti
mated that the case has already cost
$200,000.
EXPLOSION INJURES ELEVEN
PITTSBURG. Feb. 21.—Ten men and
a boy were injured, three probably
fatally, when sparks from a cigarette
ignited two five-pound cans of dyna
mite in an elevator descending into the
Kiiton mine, near Dubois, early today.
Those In the mine cage were stripped
of clothing.
SNOW IN KANSAS
WICHITA, Kas., Feb. 21.—Southern
Kansas is experiencing a snowstorm
today that will be of great benefit to
growing wheat.
TO CURE A COLD IN ONE DAY
Take LAXATIVE HROMO Qulnlna Tablets.
Druggists refund money If It falls to cure.
E.W QROYI^'S signature !■ on each box. 250.
• AMUSEMENTS ; -
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER . SS?" nd M^.™:
' ALL' WBEK^MATI.NIvK SATURDAY—WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY MATINEE
TODAY.
CAMEO KIRBY
"'Cameo Klrby 1 has proven tlie Burbank's best production in a ymr."—The Times.
Prices 25c, 60c. First 10 rows 75a. Matlness (So, First 10 rows 60c. Gallery 10c.
NEXT. WEEK—At the Popular Burbank—NEXT WEEK
First tlms In I>os Angeles of David Bolasco's sparkling comedy,
SWEET KITTY BELLAIRS
tinder the personal Ktago direction of Frederic Kelasco.
MOST STUPENDOUS PRODUCTION BVEK ATTEMPTED IN STOCK. ; ..
Ca*t of 100. Superb Scenic effects. Regular prlrea.
HAM3URGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER near'nlnth:
Majestic Theater & Healty Co., Lense«. OLIVER MOKOSC'O, Manager.
AIX WEEK—MATINEK TOMORROW—MATINEE SATURDAY.
WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY MATINEE TODAY. v
__. v __. . ..< in thn qnalut f . Ctt"' 1 •
Rose Melville jrr?. I™™1 ™™ Sis Hopkins
Ponular orlces 25c, 60c\ 75e. A few front rows |1. BARCSAIN MATINEES. >'!-"'■
Next Week—Beautiful Bouita In "WIXE, WOMAN AJ>'O SONC."
Gt>ahtt» riTJPD A MriTTST? MATINKES "TODAY,' Saturilay, Bunday.
RAND OPERA HOUJah / , Phones Main 1961 1 Home AIDB7.
ANOTHER HARTMAN WINNER /- ,■' ' "
' Ferris aml hl"blB UlBlne When Johnnie Comes
> company present the spec- _ _ 1_ . TT
Hartman taouiar comic opera triumph, Marcning; Jrlome
SPECIAL MATINEE TODAY AT IBIIS.
FTcrulTD'C TUTTATT) 1 Flrst • St.,. Near Spring—Both Phones.
XaL.rlt!,K a IMJIAI tijK. pimer N. Workman, Prop. & Mgr.
Week commencing Monday, l'eb. Sl—The amu*ing etory of a. sltspltfti-r's ex
perleirbe with a bit of lace, entltlod "BARGAIN DAY." Direction of Hilly
Onslow Featuring Nan Halperln, "The Jolly Kid Boubr»tt«." and absolutely the
best Trained Churiu of Singers and Dancers In the city. Matinee every ; day. Two
evanlng performances. Prices 10. 20 and 25 cents. ■
OT VMDtr 1 TWTTATT7J? Main st.. bet. Fifth and Sixth.
LYMPH IHEAibK ' , ruones—MalnDSl; Home FXIO3.
Alphin 8i Fargo present A DAY AT THE RACES
TEN BKi SIXUINO AND l>ANt'lNti NOVE I.TIKH—IOo, 20c. Me. Next Week, WKI-HI.
VERNON ARENA J3S3&, rr , m , Tuesday; Feb. ,22-2 P. M.
Monte Attell vs. Frankie Conley
15 ROUNDS, I'OR BANTAM CHAMPIONSUir AND McOAREY BELT. ',;•;,;
Billy Caupelle and Kid (levrland, tan rounds and »■ four-round opener.». Admission 11.
If.s.n.d seats *'.'. Box seats *3. Fur sal* at A. 11. ISW.M.O'S CIGAR STORE,
107 South Spring street, ■'..."'• ■*,'• "-, ■ .
CLAY CLEMENT
DIES SUDDENLY
CURTAIN RUNG DOWN ON AC
TOR-PLAYWRIGHT
Taken 111 Short Time After Closing
Week's Engagement in Kansas
City—Wife Was Constantly
at His Bedside
{Associated Press]
KANSAS CITY, Mo., Feb. 21.—Clay
Cloment, the actor and playwright,
died at the* University hospital here at
10:50 o'clock this morning of uraemic
poisoning.
Mr. Clement finished a week's en
gagement at a local theater Baturday
night. He. had not been feeling Well
and decided to remain here over Sun
day.
During the night it was found neces
sary to can a physician to the actor's
apartments at a hotel. lie grew tap
idly.worse, anil early today was seised
with convulsions. He then was hur
ried to the hospital, where the "con
vulsions continued. Soon he became
unconscious and died twenty minutes
later.
- Before he becamo unconscious Mr.
"Clement told Dr. Gordon A. Beedle,
his physician, he had been doing much
extra work during the last year, and
Dr. Beedle said this had added greatly
to the ravages of an aggravated form
of kidney trouble. x
The actor last Thursday called in the
physician to treat a chronic throat
disorder and seemed in ignorance of
the fact that he-had another more se
rious ailment. '
Cheerful Up to Last Illness
Tho throat trouble was relieved, and
the patient expressed his joy at feeling
so well only a few hours before he
was stricken with uraemic poisoning.
His physician said the convulsions
were the most acute uraemic convul
sions he had ever treated.
The actor's wile was with him con
stantly until a half hour before her
husband died. Then Dr. Beedle In
sisted she go to a hotel for a rest.
She was asleep in the hotel when the
end came, and was prostrated with
grief when informed of her husband's
death.
Mr. Clement and his wife had been
estranged lor some time, it in said,
until about two weeks ago. when a
reconciliation took place. She is an
actress, and her last engagement was
with a stock company in fan Fran
cisco. Her stage name was Karra
Kirwyn.
The actor was engaged in writing
three new plays when the end came.
He told his physician he hart been
working hard on these productions,
and that when finished they would
represent his best work as an author.
Nh funeral arrangements have been
made.
SUCCESSES OF CLEMENT
KANSAS CITY. Feb. 21.—Clay Clem
ont was born in Woodford county. 111.,
December 31, 1563. After graduating
from the University of Chicago he read
law in Chicago. Clement became an
actor in 1884 and was a surewsful
playwright as well as a star. His
most notable production was the "New
Dominion." Other pieces produced by
him were "A Southern Gentleman"
and "Ping Pong."
Clement's last appearance -on the
stage was Saturday night as the Drain
Man in "The Servant in the House.
BURY NEIL BURGESS
NEW YORK, Feb. 21.—The funeral
of Neil Burgess, the actor, was held
today The service was conducted by
Mrs Helen Temple Brigrham, head of
the Spiritual and Ethical society.
FAIL TO IDENTIFY MAN
SAID TO BE CRIMINAL
SEATTLE," Feb. 21.—The man who
was shot and killed last night in the
Phoenix hotel by his roommate in
what the police believe to be a fight
between two criminals over a division
nf spoils has not been identified. On
Ills left arm was an elaborate piece of
tattooing, a woman's head in a scroll
and an eagle with outstretched wingn.
The man was between 30 and 3~> years
old and had soft hands and all the
marks of a professional "grafter," the
police say.
In the room was a rase of working
men's clothes, supposed to be for
makeup purposes. A letter in Greek,
written by Mamiro Mayskyzatlatep,
postmarked at a soldiers' homo in
California and addressed to "Alexander
Feld, general delivery, Seattle," was
•-. AMUSEMENTS ; " .*'\.
817 T AOrri TUCATFO Bnlasro-nißCkwood Co., Proprs. and Mgr». I
IJ.LAOLU itl£iAl£<K Matinees Today, Thursday, Saturday, Sunday.
. —I \-
Special Washington's Birthday Matinee Today \ r
———— ——————j
Just think of Ilic very best play you have ncr M*n and then bear in mind that It 1«
not nearly n good v that bis Belasco theater success. LI3WIB S. STONE ana th»
Belasco company In QEOlifcE BROADIIUKST'S greatest play,
\Wb Man of the Hour
i j 1 —i
THIS BIG PI.AT IS NOW IN ITS FOURTH WEEK OF BUOCSBS A.T THE BELASCO.
AND WIHI.IC OVETt 43.000 PEOrI,K HAVE ALREADY BKEN IT, THOUSANDS HAVE
BEEN" TURNED \\VV\ FROM THE BOX OFFICE. THE MATIXI-.K TODAY 18
ooma to be rrowded, AND iv rou'Rß AT aXjL i.ate YOU'LL HAVE no
CHANCE TO GET BJ3ATB.
It sllll costs two dollar! a seat to Baa "THE MAN OF TUB IIOUB" In th» .
fiyndlonte tin■iti-t ■ of the SAatsrn cities, but there Is no ailvanci: over the
regular Belftaco prloaa for thta sensational success. Every night, 25c to 7."c
Matinees TOIJAY, THURSDAY, SATURDAY and SUNDAY lio to 60c.
To Follow—Broadhurst's 1910 mod»l 3lx-cyllntler laughing bit. "WHAT lIAI'I'IOTiD
TO JoNKs," the lainous mile a mlnuto fun Bhow.
L/-»O AMr"T?T TTQ TUUATT7D SPRING ST., MATINEB TODAT.
OS AINI(jKL,IiS> fHbAIhK NIOU . 4th . % shows evekv muht
"EdgarTjenrer. I „ , _ _ I ai Fremont It Co.
Sally Stembler. I Romany Opera Co. | g*SS»Sr!SSi*t- *<*«**.
Tho Laugh-O-Scope. ivuillrtiiy v^jjci a wu. | aardner> R ankln & Oriftln. ..
; lOll I-Alt I'KU'K S—1(1. 'in anil aoo.
IrujlnK 1-artlruUr At-1 T Tj^ _ _ Jnrr4 1 1 dTS I 'ri!nli"K »'«ay» tuel .
tentloS to Klltcrtalnlns \/ Q 1 iQCVIIIC .'"" S', Klir"p *" n .n, ntl '
1.a.11p. nnil rhtlilrcn. | V C<.WI,VJiS/ V ***V | Aimrlrnn Bttraftionn.
Vilmos Westony . . Eight Geisha Girls
Hungarian piano virtuoso. I l In Native Songs and Dances.
Claud & Fanny Usher -_. ♦:.,«<, Burletke Cirkus
In "Facan'a Decision." lVlSltinCC Jean Clermont's. \
Cook and Stevens Today Brown, Harris & Brown
"No Check-co No Wash-ee." * >^v»t4.jf Just to Laugh—That'B All. '
Mme. Panita Doherty Sisters
Flute \lrtuoso * Tho.;e Q(ns:er Girls.
ORIMHOOI motion riCTUKES, "SHOWING first views OF aviatiox a^-eek.
Nights—lOe, 23c, BOc, 74c. Matlneen Dallyloc, 25c. JOo.
— — — .
Washington's /^»\
Birthday Sports
Tournament 130 r»oH C±lT\ O v
Park r SLSaQclia
Tuesday, February 22, 2 P. M.
Roman Chariot Races
Three Chariots Racing at same time— One half-mile dash—Old
, fashion Cowboy relay race — One three-quarter-mile dash.
Humorous horseback novelty race—Three trotting races
Round Trip 25 Cents i
.CHOICE OF TWO ROUTES OF TRAVEL
SHORT LINE AND OAK KNOLL LINE
PACIFIC ELECTRIC RAILWAY
MASON OPERA HOUSE t««.*»S £££&
TONIGHT AND A¥.T. WEEK —MATINEES WEDNESDAY and SATURDAY.--
LAMBARDI GRAND OPERA COMPANY
147 I'EOrl-K. BQ CHORVS. BC ORCHESTRA.
. . .IN REPERTOIRE.
Tonißiit. "11.. TROVATOUE." Tomorrow matinee, "IA OIOCONDA." Tomorrow night,
■ **IjL"CIA ** ■v * ' ' *
LUCIA. TRICES.BOO to $2.00. SEATS SO)V ON SATE.
. , ALL NEXT WEEK
"MANTELL is a great actor. He is now the leader of our stage."
\ —William Winter, dean of Anferican critics, in N. Y. Tribune.
MR. WII'LIAM A. BRADY ANNOUNCES .. Jj
Mr. c7Vlantell
In Seven Magnificent Productions of Shaksperean •
and Romantic Plays.
Monday, "LOUIS XI" (by Delavigne); Tuesday, "MAC
BETH"; Wednesday, "HAMLET"; Thursday, "KING LEAR";
Friday, "RICHELIEU" (by Bulwer Lytton); Saturday 'Matinee, ,
"AS YOU LIKE IT"; Saturday Night, "OTHELLO."
: I'liltKS 50c TO $3.00. SKATS READY THCR-StIAY. .
, . -— .
Special $2.00 Rate to
oMtLqwe ' > {9
Washington's Birthday, February 22
Take a morning car and spend the day at the famous mountain re
sort YE ALPINE TAVERN. Enjoy the warmth of the balmy air
5000 feet above the sea. Through cars at 8, 9 and 10 a. m., 1:30
and 4 :00 p. m.
LONG BEACH, NAPLES, BAY CITY, POINT
FIRMIN, HUNTINGTON BEACH, NEWPORT -J .
AND BALBOA ARE THE ATTRACTIVE BEACH
POINT RESORTS TO VISIT.
COVINA, GLENDORA, MONROVIA,. SIERRA MADRE,
GLENDALE, SAN GABRIEL, RUBIO CANYON, CAW
STON'S OSTRICH FARM are the trips through beautiful valleys
of Orange Groves. .; : ,
Fast and .frequent service from 6th ands Main Street
Terminal. ~
PACIFIC ELECTRIC RAILWAY'
T EVY'S Third and Main. Tables Reserved.
i*"* A T7T7 Afternoon After After
™ /tins a ™ Tea Dinner Theater
• j CHANT . 3to 5 | 8:30tol0 I 10:30-12:30|
•. - ' FIVE OKISAT ACTS AMI SPECIAL 8OM) ORCHESTRA. , -.'^i
Grand Flag Day ■■■■■ jjj^l' /
Celebration (^P'
South Pasadena
' February 22
GRAND PARADE, 10:30\A. M., under auspices Chamber of Com- v ,
merce. Prominent Speakers. Good Music. .
Take SOUTH PASADENA cars from Sixth and Main Sts.
PACIFIC ELECTRIC RY. CO. /

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