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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, February 27, 1910, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-02-27/ed-1/seq-2/

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BAUINGERf ALSE,
uAl_LlllULl\ I ttLJL,
CLAIMS PINCHOT
■ ———' ■ -
SECRETARY ACCUSED OF DIS
LOYALTY TO TAFT
FORMER CHIEF FORESTER HURLS
BOMBSHELL AT HEARING
Declares Interior Department Head
Unfaithful to Country, Enemy to '
Conservation and Menace to
Public Property I.
(Continued from Page One)
opinion specifically held that the agree
ment was lawful.
This feature was temporarily passed
over, but it was evident from state
ments made by members of the com
mittee that they would take It up more
j fully before Mr. Pinchot was excused.
Indications were, when adjournment
was taken, that the former forester
would be on the stand for some time
to come.
Protests Against Reserve
One of the minor charges made by
Pinchot was to the effect that Bal
linger, in 1907, as commissioner of the
land office, protested against the
creation of the Chugach forest reserve
in Alaska. The reserve was created
over his protest, however, and includes
most of the Cunningham coal claims.
. The forenoon session was devoted in
part to a further examination of W. W.
Barr of Seattle as to the agreement now
I in effect between him and L. R. Glavls
- as to obtaining timber lands in Wash-
J ington. Barr said Clavis was able to
give him information as to the loca
tion of available lands, which he never
had been able to get before, and the
effort of the committeemen was clearly
directed toward bringing out the fact
that Glavls, within two months after
he had left the government service, was
; engaged in making use of knowledge
gained as a public servant for the
benefit of private parties, just as he
charged Secretary Ballinger with doing
j after retiring from office as commis
sioner of the general land office.
: Barr said that if the deal he and
Glavis had entered into were carried
through, Glavls' share in the profits
would amount to about $10,000.
- Barr said he had wired his office in
Seattle to send out the agreement be
tween him and Glavis.
Coal Expert Testifies
Andrew Kennedy, coal expert, who
testified yesterday, also was recalled
this morning to answer a few further
questions.
Kennedy said he had been Instructed
by Glavis to work in harmony with a
; coal expert sent by the forest service
to Alaska, but that Glavis had never
, attempted to Influence him in making
any finding or report. Kennedy said
he found It impossible to work wholly
in harmony with the forest expert, who
reported the Cunningham coal lands
worthless as a commercial proposition.
The witness estimated the amount of
coal available in the Cunningham group
at ninety million tons. The Alaska
coal, he declared, was as good as any
he had ever seen.
The profit to the mine owners he had
estimated at from 25 to 50 cents a ton,
a net value to the owners of from $25,
--000,000 to $45,000,000.
Mr. Kennedy said his estimates were
rough ones, for he had not gone thor
oughly Into the question of values in
dollars and . cents. The Alaska fields
were the richest that he had ever
seen. Mr. Kennedy was questioned in
detail, by members of the committee
as to the location of the claims with
reference to the coast, possible harbors,
etc.
Pinchot Is Sworn
When he had concluded his state
ment Mr. Pinchot was sworn. His
counsel, George W. Pepper of Phila
delphia, undertook the direct examina
tion. It began with a statement of Mr.
Pinchot's services to the government.
The witness told of the growth of the
; forest service since he was first con
nected with it. He said he first en
tered the service in 1896, under Secre
tary Hoke Smith as a special agent in
the land office, to inspect forest re
serves.
Mr. Pinchot said Mr. Ballinger, as
commissioner of the land office ln
1907, protested against the creation of
Chugach forest reserve in Alaska. This
forest, as finally created, Included most
of the Cunningham coal claims.
The contract or co-operative agree
ment, calling for co-operation between
the Interior department and forest ser
vice, arranged by Secretary Wilson of
the departemnt of agriculture and for
, mer Secretary of the Interior Garfield,
was introduced in evidence. This con
tract was abrogated by Secretary Bal
linger last year.
Mr. Pinchot proceeded to tell at some
length the story of the conservation
movement, which received its first
great Impetus at the meeting of gover
nors called by President Roosevelt
early in 1908. He told of his own ef
forts to bring about the withdrawal of
water power sites because of his fear
that these sites might pass into "mo
nopolistic control."
Public Lands Withdrawn
Attorney Popper said he would prove
by former Secretary James R. Garfield,
who will be called as a witness, that
at one time, prior to March 4, 1909, he
withdrew 1,834,520 acres and at another
time 1,615,940 acres of land from the
public domain as available waterpower
sites.
Mr. Pinchot referred to his own ac
tivity and that of former President
Roosevelt in the conservation move
ment, and in chronological order came
down at last to the inauguration of
President Taft.
"Up to the time he was Inaugurated
had President Taft made any declara
tions as to conservation?" asked his
"Yes," answered Mr. Pinchot. "He
made reference to the subject In his
Inaugural address and several times
before."
Mr. Pinchot then read from one of
Mr. Taft's speeches prior to his elec
tion, in which he spoke of the neces
sity of protecting the natural resources
of the country.
Pepper asked Mr. Pinchot to tell what
the status of conservation movement
was at the time President Taft came
Into office. : .
"It had grown from practically noth
ing a little more than a year before
until to my mind It was—and still Is
the most powerful movement travers
ing the minds of the American people."
said the witness. "It has reached the
point where we were all ready for
action—the foundation work had been
done." -
"And then what happened?"
; Ballinger Reverses Idea*
„-*'.■ "Mr. Ballinger reversed the "central
idea— withdrawal of the water
power sites—and threw the lands open
to private approprialipn."
' t Mr. Pepper here stated to the com
mittee i that the action -of Secretary
Ballinger ln restoring the lands would
be shown by competent witnesses and
documents. He declared Ballinger an
nounced •; that ;» the (Garfield with
drawals.were illegal and that when he
announced his purpose of restoring the
LAWYERS WHO ACT
FOR BALLINGER IN
LAND OFFICE PROBE
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lands to entry he made no reference
as to any rewithdrawals.
Pinchot read a list of restorations
made by Ballinger, but in response to
questions by members of the commit
tee he said he knew very little of the
reasons for the large amount of acre
age withdrawn except that the maps
did not show definitely the location of
the streams and the withdrawals were
sufficiently large to be sure to take in
all the power sites.
Attorney Pepper said he would prove
by officers of the reclamation service
that the restorations made by Secretary
Ballinger were made without further
investigation of the lands, and that the
officers were compelled under written
instructions of the secretary to recom
mend the restorations,
Ballinger Starts In Early
Pepper called the committee's atten
tion to a number of papers already in
evidence in the senate document, deal
ing with the whole cas«, which show
that while Ballinger did not enter of
fice until March 5, 1909, he was on
April of that year calling on the recla
mation service for reasons why cer
tain withdrawn lands In Montana,
Utah and - Uregon should not be re
stored to public entry.
The reply from the reclamation ser
vice shows date of April 10, but on
April 7 Ballinger had already restored
over 200,000 acres in Montana.
Mr. Pinchot said Mr. Ballinger
claimed the restrictions were made as
the result of recent investigations
which showed the lands were no longer
necessary to the interests of the United
Pinchot said he would prove that as
a matter of fact there had been no
"recent investigation" of any sort.
Mr. Pinchot was asked to detail an
Interview he had with President Taft
on April 19, 1909, on that subject of the
restoration of water power sites by
Secretary Ballinger. It is claimed by
Attorney Pepper that Ballinger made
no rewithdrawals of the .sites until
after Mr. Pinchot's interview with the
president.
"One moment," Interrupted Attorney
Vertrees. "I wish to make an objec
tion which is really a suggestion. The
witness is about to tell of a conversa
tion with the president This would
put the president in an embarrassing
attitude. Any written communication
to or from the president would be all
right, but if we allow witnesses to re
peat conversations It puts the presi
dent in the attitude where he must
either remain silent or come before the
committee, which would be undesir
able." ■
DISTRICT ATTORNEY TODD
DENIES JONES' STATEMENT
SEATTLE, Feb. United States
District Attorney Elmer E. Todd, after
reading last night the Associated Press
report of Horace E. Jones' testimony
before the Ballinger-Pinchot committee
yesterday, said:
"Jones and Glavis called on me May
18, 1908, In reference to a criminal pros
ecution arising out of certain Alaska
coal claims, but not the Cunningham
group. After an Investigation of the
papers presented, I advised Jones that
It could not be taken before the grand
jury which would meet May 19, owing
to the large number of cases that had
to be presented to that grand jury, and
because there was not time to prepare
the Alaska cases for presentment, nor
time to draw the necessary Indictments.
I made these statements to Jones in
my office, May IS, at the same time I
dictated' a letter to Glavis in Jones'
presence, in which I stated I would
take these cases up before the July
grand jury at Tacoma, and in the
meantime the matter should be referred
by Glavis to the general land office at
Washington for Its advice in the mat
ter. I never heard anything further
about the matter from either Jones or
Glavls. The testimony of Jones as to
the statements I made as to my rea
sons for not taking up the cases before
the grand jury la absolutely false."
BALLINGER SAYS HE HAS NO
REPLY TO MAKE AT PRESENT
WASHINGTON, Feb. Gifford
Pinchot's opening statement to the
Ballinger-Pinchot Inquiry this after
noon was read by Secretary Ballinger
ln his office late today.
In response to Inquiries as to whether
he intended to make any reply, Mr.
Ballinger wrote the following state
ment for the Associated Press:
"In view of the fact that I will
presently have an opportunity to ap
pear before the committee and acquaint
them with the truth, I shall not reply
through the press to the mendacious
aspersions which Mr. Pinchot attempts
to cast on me. He attempted, without
success, to deceive the president. He
will find It equally difficult for him to
deix-lve the committee.
* "Obviously the ■ only deception in
which he hopes to succeed -Is a' tem
porary deception of the public through
the.press. This he has endeavored to
do by giving out in advance the intro-
LOS ANGELES HERALD:' SUNDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 27, 1910.
ASQUITH SEEKS
ADVICE OF KING
FANTASTIC REPORTS FOLLOW
CONFERENCE
MODIFICATION OF CABINET'S
PLANS CERTAIN
Premier's Persistent Silence Increases
Difficulty of English Situation.
Limitation for Lords' .
Power of Veto
* — i
IiOXDOV. Feb. *6.—lnterest In pol
itics centers In the premier's audience
with the king:, and the prolonged cab
inet council generally 1* considered to
herald a profound change In the policy
of the government. It Is said the pre
mier conveyed to the king his belief in
the Impossibility of proceeding with
the reconstruction of the house of lords
and in the necessity of concentrating
all forces on the vela question.
Although several members of the cab
inet strongly favor reconstruction, it is
not believed a spilt will result, but the
attitude of the extreme Radicals and
Nationalists Is disquieting.
[Associated Tress]
LONDON, Feb. 26.—Premier Asqulth
had an audience with King Edward at
Buckingham palace and the circum
stance has given rise to many fantas
tic reports. The fact seems to be that
the premier, after yesterday's cabinet
council, asked for today's conference
with the object of acquainting his
majesty with the proposed modifica
tions of the government's attitude to
ward the principal questions dealt with
in the speech from the throne.
That modification of the cabinet's
original plans has been forced by the
rebellious radicals and nationalists is
undoubted, but the cabinet is repre
sented as having decided not to coun
tenance the demands of the extremists
that all mention of a reform of the
house of lords should be dropped from
the government's plan.
The ministerial view, or at least the
view of an Important section of the
ministry, is that if its progress is
confined to a proposal of the question
of veto pure and simple it would be
in effect a proposal for a single cham
ber government, to which plan the
country would be opposed.
To Curb Lords' Veto
In all probability, therefore, a plan
for the limitation of tho lords' veto
will be coupled with a reconstltution
scheme, in which the elective principle
will be submitted for the hereditary
practice. The ministerialists consider
that an elective versus a "hereditary
principle" will be a good battl# cry
with which they may appeal to thf
country when the time comes for the
election, which Is Inevitable, before
their proposals can be embodied in
the constitution.
Premier Asquith's predisposition to
extreme silence makes the situation
one of great difficulty, but it is clear
to see that a long list of grave prob
lems for the government is imminent.
But for the fact that no party or
group in the house of commons wants
another general election, the minis
try's term of office would not be worth
many weeks' purchase.
Taken as Confession
Premier Asquith's statement that he
had not sought guarantees from the
king is Interpreted on all sides as a
confession that the result of the elec
tions will be too inclusive to justify
his having such guarantees, and the
essence of difficulties facing him lies
in the impossibility of reconciling th*
divergent views of his supporters in
the manner of dealing with the lords.
Sir Edward Grey, foreign minister;
Chancellor Lloyd-George and Winston
Spencer Churchill, home secretary, are
paid to be In favor of reforming the
second chamber on the elective prin
ciples.
The Radicals, led by Sir Charles
Wentworth Dilke, want merely to
abolish all power of veto by the lords,
both financial and legislative.
Nationalists also want to abolish th»
power of veto and demand the abolish
ment of the house of lords.
ductory statement which has appeared
and which he has been malignant
enough to present, but not quite reck
less enough to state on oath.
"Fortunately, as already stated, I
will soon have an opportunity to give
to the committee, and through the
committee to the public, the facts and
the truth, and for that reason I have
no statement at present to make."
ASKS FOR OWN DISCHARGE
AFTER 33 YEARS' SERVICE
Lieut..Col. Abercrombie of the United
States Army to Be Relieved
on June 23
WASHINGTON, Feb. Lieut. Col.
William J. Abercrombie, Twenty-fifth
Infantry, upon his own application has
been discharged from the service under
the provisions of section 1243,, revised
statutes, to take effect June 26 next,
after more than thirty-three years' ser
vice.
Col. Abercrombie recently became In
volved ln some disagreement with Gen.
Maus, commanding the department of
the Columbia, ln regard to certain mat
ters of administration at Fort Wright,
Wash., which resulted in Abercrombie's
being relieved from command of that
post. _____
GOMPERS SAYS MOON BILL IS
CONTRARY TO G. O. P.'S PLEDGE
WASHINGTON, Feb. 26.— Samuel
Gompers, president of the American
Federation of Labor, told Attorney
General Wlckersham yesterday that the
Moon bill, now under consideration by
the judiciary committee of the house,
was a pro-Injunction measure, that It
did not fulfill the promise of the Re
publican platform on the injunction
question and that it would give
statutory authority for the Issuance of
Injunctions.
The proposed bill, Mr. Gompers
argued, would take away the base on
which the organized labor movement
ln America was founded. The Ameri
can labor movement, he said, was con
structive In character, based upon
American Ideals.
I j "If our» constructive and conserva
tive labor movement is outlawed," he
said, "it will give way to another
movement, not constructive and not
conservative in character. The labor
movement .Is not a trust. None sof
Its achievements In behalf of its mem-
bers and society at large can properly
be confounded with the pernicious and
selfish activities of the illegal trusts.'' !
V. AMUSEMENTS . ..
MJROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER Lessee and Manager.
MATINEE TODAY— WEEK—MATINEE SATURDAY.
The incomparable Burhank .lock company strongest stock organization In America,
presents David Belasco's sparkling comedy of love, j
| VERY FIRST TIME IN LOS ANGELES [
Sweet Kitty
. ' -. Bellairs
UNDER THE PERSONA STAGE DIRECTION OF FREDERIC BELASCO.
( Positively the Most Stupendous Production Ever
. Attempted in Stock ■
• OAST OF 100. SUPERB .SCENIC EFFECTS £ ' ELABORATE «»«*»»
rrlce»-2B C . 600. First ten rows TBc. Matinees 55c. First ten rows 50c. Gallery 10c.
To FoIIow—"BREWSTER'S MILLIONS," first time by any stock company.
H AMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER • *!*£**&
Majestic Theater and Realty Co., lessee. Oliver Morosco, Manager.
HI WEEK MATINEE WEDNESDAY. MATINEE SATURDAY
BEGINNING TONIGHT
M. M. THEISE PRESENTS FOR THE FIRST TIME HERE
The Most Beautiful TPJ /\T\TT' I- /V
SiSi ...t>UlNl 1 A
'..-'.-•'■- \ ' ■ 'i •
and Her Musical Company of Half a Hundred
Wine, Woman
and Song
Big • 400 Nights at the Big Sensation
Musical Broadway Circle Theater of the East.
Review. New York City. It>g Like Neyer
Same 100 Nights Each in
ORIGINAL Boston, Philadelphia and ocen "ere-
Cast as Seen Chicago A Novelty.
Prices—:sc. 50c, Tsc, »1, A few front rows 11.50. POPULAR MATINEES.
—————— ~ , H. C. YATT,
ASON OPERA HOUSE Lessee and Manager.
Week Starting Tomorrow—Matinee ' Saturday Only
CURTAIN AT 8 P. M. SHARP
•'__ ' —■ E 1
"Mantell is a great actor. He is now the leader of our stage."
William Winter, dean of American critics, in New York Tribune.
Mr if ANI r 11"-
Mi. Ifinil 1 Li 111- SUCCESSES
In Magnificent Productions
of Shaksperean and
Romantic Plays
Mr. Mantell played 100 nights of Shaksperean and romantic
plays at the New Amsterdam theater and the Academy of Music,
New York, last season. A record unequaled since the days of
Edwin Booth. . -
Monday, "Louis XI" (by Delavigne). Thursday, "King Lear."
Tuesday, "Macbeth." Friday, "Richelieu" (by Bulwer-Lytton).
Wednesday, "Hamlet." Saturday Night, "Othello."
Saturday matinee, "As You Like It."
Seats now on sale. Prices 50c to $2.00.
Week March 7—Matinee Saturday only
BLANCHE WALSH
IN THE GREATEST TRIUMPH OF HER CAREER
THE TEST
PRICES 800 TO »I.GO. SEAT SALE THURSDAY, MARCH 8. '
•DA Mr* rtt>T7T?A HnTTSP MATINEES TODAY-, Tuesday, Saturday.
GRAND OPH.KA HUUSa l'hones Main 1807; Home Al9^
THIS WEEK'S FINE MUSIC AND FUN OFFERING
-fej^^r-'l Commencing Matinee Today
F^W' HARTMAN
ff ■^_^K2>,^3 (%Mal ffi ,7 nncl his n"'rr-v company will offer a big
Wws!!iM&_ WOC" s&, « Br A production of Frank Dunlels' famous
\fll\^\ v ,-'?) ,ni llCpjm-/ I ' VV^ "THE AMEER" is ono of those subslan
yJr-rVWI V^«' k * _r\i tla1 ' wholesome, thoroughly worth
I _Vw/ Lg~ yHlf -™" I laugh will help smooth the wrinkles
*^ .*»■' .*3i* N POPULAR HARTMAN PRICES.
Neit Week's Big Attraction— Ferris Hartman and his company will offer for the first time
at popular prices Auguitin Daly's Immensely successful English musical comedy. "THE
GEISHA." Seats for this Important attraotl on will go on sale tomorrow morning. \ii'J
VETERAN OF BEAR FLAG
TROUBLES IN '48 DEAD
ST. HELENA, Cal., ! Feb. John
York, the oldest pioneer ln Napa
county, died today, aged 89.
"Uncle Jake," as he was familiarly
known, was a native of Tennessee and
came across the plains to California in
1845.1 He was one of the men who car.
ried the American flag from Sonoma to
Sacramento and delivered it to Captain
Sutter; during the Bear Flag trouble
In 1848. ■ ,v . . .-
PAID TO FIRE HOUSES, THREE
RUSSIANS TO BE EXECUTED
KURSK, Russia, Wednesday, Feb. 9.
—A timber merchant named Levuin
and two peasants of this province have
been condemned to death by the mili
tary court for arson, committed merely
to make a market for Levuln's build
ing timber. They will be i shot. The
testimony submitted showed that Le
vulej's terms were tt .for every peas
ant'^ house - fired .. and $5 for tiling
houses filled with sleeping peasants.
" . •■''-''';AMUSEMr.NTS"'^.-.-^.'"--'-^-r-^My
Bttt AOPn T'tlT? A'PTj'O BH*wiro-IlliM.'kwoocl Co., Proprn. ftnnßv'-
J^LAatU ltir*AllUK MVTINK^S today, rliurtcUr. fc*ail^sy.
' ' : rr yt ':
V
- , - \
J I "*) \ 1 COMMENCES TOMORROW NIGHT j|K
***f\ MEM 1
:fßm\. mm i.
-~-mM mm mdmmmm-^tm%l>- rm^ , ,* .-. !
Next Week George Broadhurst's greatest fun-maker, "What Happened to Jones."
Three hours of genuine fungood, clean, last, snappy. Seats now on sale.
LOS ANGELES THEATER N ear 4th , ' * shows ever* night
J. C. Tremayne & Co. I JOE BOGANNY I ' Emerald & Dupree.... .
Four Dancing Belles. J /tdXtIDP Frank Marckl °^ ,
The I.augh-O-Scope. | IKUUrUi I Four Melanis. .
POPULAR PRICES — Ifle, 200 ANT) 30c. . :. ,
I l-aying I'urtleular At-I X "T .mm. - — t*\ t-m-r —4 1 1 .— I Presuming always the
tentlon to Entertaining \f JJ 11 1 lr^X/l lIP hrst European and -
Ladles and Children, I » »■»*» V* V* V ***V I Aim-rlrsn attraetlons, | /
Vilmos Westony Eight Geisha Girls ■
Hungarian piano virtuoso. ■ i In Native Songs and Danoee. - .
Claud & Fanny Usher -_ . Burleske Cirkua
In "Fagan'e Decision." IVIaLInCC Jean Clermont's. .'"aOßiSi
Cook and Stevens Today Brown, Harris & Brown
"No Check-ec No Wash-ee." . «-"-»"J Just to Laugh—That's All. '
Mme. Panita Doherty Sisters
Flute virtuoso. Those Ginger Girls. ■' ■/.'•'
OKPIIEUM MOTION PICTURES, SHOWING FIRST VIEWS OF AVIATION WEES
Nightsloc, 28e, 80c, 76c. Matinees Daily— lOr, 35e, 80e.
FTOr»i_rirr>»Q TUrATITP First St., near spring. Both phones.
yj>\m.tlH.l\ a ItlHinldK Elmer N. Workman, Propr. and Mgr.
Week Com. Mod., Feb. —The Happy. Snappy Musical Extravaganza, "S1NBA1),
THE SAILOR." All new chorus—eight cute, cunning, captivating girls—new
specialties—new costumes. Matinee every day. Two evening performances. Prices >
lOC, HOC. 2 5c. —*———— mmm
OLYMPIC THEATER \\iS^^S^Si^
Alphin & Fargo present A DAY AT THE RACES '
TEN 810 SINGING AND DANCING NOVELTIES IOc, iiOc, 85c. Next Week. SKI-HI. .
YM. C. A. , .;. 721 South j Hope Street
• J HEAR MADAME WESTERBERG
The Noted Swedish Soprano— Recital— Y. M. C. A. AUDITORIUM. .^,'.i
MONDAY EVENING, Feb. 28, 1810. Open for all. Popular Prices. ,- ' -■ « "La.;,;
LEVY'S Third and Main. Tables Reserved.
"""" . Commencing Tomorrow, Feb. 28—NEW BILL -
•" • • Helen v Byron, Comedienne, late of
f j "Sergeant Kitty"; Rose Hoey Stevens, |
. /"I £_^ prima donna, late of "Military Oc
vJwlC tette"; Count Felix de la Sierra, tenor;
Count Jose de la Franconia, baritone, 1
cOl» i- *»•»- Cavalier Augustin Calvo, basso 1
I Jliif«iO i *flFt i S reat Spanish trio; and (by request)
*******-*****- Edith Helena, the tremendous popular
—~~ ~ : "~"~ favorite, with solo orchestra.
AFTERNOON TEA, 3to 5; After-dinner, 8:30 to 10; after-theater,
10:30 to 12:30. - , ■ . ' „.-■.. :■ ■
Go Today and (cWjjh
Go By Trolley- %!!?
Saturday and Sunday Excursion Rates $2.00 to \\'l
oMt. Lowe
Through cars at 8, 9, 10 a. m. and 1:30 and 4p. m., from Sixth and
Main. ■:.'. '-'. ■■•■■■- ■■\\%: '■■'■•
LONG BEACH— Atlantic City of the Pacific—Free Band
Concerts, Down the Pike, a dip in the GREAT SALT PLUNGE. :;
NEWPORT, BALBOA, HUNTINGTON BEACH and
NAPLES is a Seashore revel. ; , \
The Valley Trips
Casa VerdugoThe Quaint Old Spanish Restaurant out
GLENDALE way. MONROVIA, AZUSA and GLENDORA—
beautiful rides through the orange groves. .' ' '•■ ~'S-liWm
RUBIO CANYON, SIERRA MADRE, SAN GABRIEL J<;
MISSION and POINT FIRMIN are all very attractive.
PACIFIC ELECTRIC RY. CO. <||;
Shortest »»d Quickest i^%
Line to the Ocean %^^
Venice of America
THE WINTER RESORT. •v!
r Band Concerts by CHIAFFARELLI'S SUPERB 1 BAND.
Ship HotelAquariumDancing.
OCEAN PARK, SANTA CLONIC A
Band Concerts—Dancing—Bathing. ' -„-."
REDONDO BEACH
Delightful 10-Mile Ride Each Way Along the Ocean. -
| - v. •• S.'*- *' Band Concerts—Bathing.' V ..,'
Dine at HEPBURN & TERRY'S FAMOUS CAFE.
■ Los Angeles-Pacific R'y.
; , Balloon Route Excursion Station, Hill St., Bet. Fourth and : Fifth, '•;
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