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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, February 28, 1910, Image 10

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Late News from the Neighboring Towns and Cities
PASADENA
Correspondent—
Res. phone
Buniet 4367.
OFFICE, 30 WEST fOlOKAIH) STIIKKT. Phone* 26J7.
SALVATIONIST TELLS
ABOUT RESCUE WORK
MRS. MARY STILLWELL MAKES
TWO ADDRESSES
Army Has Specialized and Adopted
Business Methods in Dealing
with Conditions of
the Slums
[Special to THie lliTald.l
PASADENA, Feb. 27. — Two ad
dresses on rescue and slum work were
delivered here today by Mrs. Mary
BtUlwell, traveling secretary of that
department of the Salvation army. The .
in. ring this afternoon was hold in the |
First Christian church for women
only, and dealt particularly with the
white slave traffic.
In an interview on the subject she
said: "The meeting was "well attended
and many questions were asked and
answered. Our officers have been
brought into contact with vice in all
Us forms and it has developed a heart
to feel and sympathise, as well as a
shrewdness that is not easily deceived.
As a result the Salvation army haa
followed the natural tendency of mod
ern business methods to specialize and
has detailed some of its women officers
to pass their lives in rescuing the
fallen women.
"The trouble can often no traced
to a lack of education in regard to the
sexes and lack of restraint in the
home. In too many cases the parents
are no longer the head of the family.
"Mothers should make i ompanlons
of their girls and not force them to
look elsewhere for entertainment."
In the First Friends church last
night Mrs. Btillwell spoke of rescue
work in big cities and told how the
Salvaton army rescues girls who have
fallen by dealing with them on the
streets at midnight and visiting the
places they frequent. Those who are
rescued are sent to rescue homes and
given domestic employment and other |
light work, and she stated that very j
few return to their former haunts.
CH".DREN READ ESSAYS
IN W. C. T. U. CONTEST
Prizes Are Awarded Pasadena Sev.
enth and Eighth Grade
Pupils
PASADENA, Feb. 27.—The seventh
and eighth grades of fourteen schools
■were represented in the essay contest
held in conjunction with the temper
, Mice rally in the First Congregational
church this afternoon under the auspi
ces of the Federated W. C. T. U.
Miss Luella Hobson, 312 Cypress av
enue a pupil of Lincoln school, won
first prize in the eighth grade contest,
and Miss Hazel Stone, 436 South Madi
son avenue, a pupil of the McKlnley
school, won first prize in the seventn
grades. Charles H. Prisk of the Pas
na Star, Uev. Miles Nelson and
Mrs. S. S. Holmes were the judges.
These prize essays will be submitted
to a state contest.
In the Demorest silver medal con
test for inmates of the South Pasa
dena childrens' home Percy H. Coor
pender won first prize and Flora Som
raer second. Mrs. L. J. MerTltt, who
brought the seven contestants from
the home in her automobile, made the
presentation speech. The judges were
Charles Burger, Miss J. McNab and
Mrs. A. W. DeLong. Mr. Burger
commended the contestants in a short
speech.
\V. W. Ogier, vice president of the
board of education, spoke on "Tem
perance Teaching in Our Schools."
Misses Hobson and Stone read their
prize essays and Miss M. I. Crosby
gave two readings, "How Jacob Be
came an Honorable Member" and "Im
mortality."
Mrs. A. W. DeLong, state lecturer
and evangelist of Wisconsin, offered
invocation and the First Congrega
tional Junior Endeavoreri repeated
the first psalm in unison. Miss -Mary
Stewart, president of the Federation,
presided.
ENTERTAINMENT WILL BE
FOR HOSPITAL BENEFIT
Affair Will Be Given This Evening
In the Music Room of Ray.
mond Hotel
PASADENA, Feb. 27.—The Pasadena
hospital fund will be enlarged by the
proceeds of an entertainment to be
Kiven in the music room of the Ray
mond hotel Monday night at x o'clock
under the auspices of Mrs. Walter
Rayrrond, who annually arran
pffair of this kind. Prominent so-
CLASSIFIED
Fire Sale
OF
CARL WnM FURNITURE ROOK
AT AUCTION
' ■ Continued MONDAY, FEB. 38,
t at 10 a. m. and 'i p. m.
West Colorado Street
(Corner Delacey).
Don't miss this sale, as goods are going I
rapidly and it may be discontinued any
time. Great bargains. Goods going at
lees than wholesale price.
FOR SALE
Suburban Property
FOR BALE—LET ME SHOW YOU MY
splendid lot on Stephennon avenue, near
cars. Going away, so offer for $825. uvix
464. Herald. 2-26-3
SPECIAL NOTICES
SECOND-HAND HOUSE FURNISHINGS OF
all kinds wanted. THE ECONOMY. 123 N.
Fair Oaks. Sunset 4165. 2-9-lmo
PASADENA SHOE HOSPITAL
. MEN'S SEWED' BOLES AND HEELsTliuiii;
ladles', Etc. 164 N. Fair Oaks, ays.
' I-2iUno
Circulation lVpt.
Home 1647.
Sunset 2740
ciety people will take part and many
tickets are already sold. The pro
gram will be as follows: Orchestra
selection. "A Bachelor's Reverie,"
with living pictures, Harold Swift and
ten young ladies from the hotel; or
chestra; "Chinese Laundry," Thad
deus Lowe of Pasadena and S. Mc-
Ivor of Riverside; a coon song by
Mrs. I. Swabacher; the Toy Symphony,
by the Gemunder quintet and ten of
the guests of the Raymond; mono
logue, Charles Bell; Nonsense Song,
Mrs. Walter Raymond; solo, "On the
Road to Mandalay," Harry Clifford
Lott; toy symphony.
• » »
POLICE RAID CAFE
PASADENA, Feb. 27.—While the tem
perance rally was in progress at the
First Congregational church today a
temperance crusade was being con
ducted by Police Lieutenant Copping,
Detective Schulti and Patrolmen Nicoll,
Betts and Demerritt, who raided the
Magnolia cafe, 59 South Fair Oaks ave
nue, and found a number of men drink
ing liquor'out of hours. George Meyer,
proprietor, was taken to the station,
where he deposited $100 as a guarantee
that he will be on hand at 8:30 o'clock
Monday to answer the charge of vio
lating city ordinance No. 220, regulat
ing the sale of liquor with meals.
•• • ,
PASADENA NEWS NOTES
PAKADKNA. Feb. 27.-E. J. Sheehan,
George P. Cary, S. F. Hinds and Wil
liam Taylor formed a party of Over
land club members who passed the
week-end in the mountains. They went
by rail to Mount Lowe and walked
from there to Bwitser'S camp and back
through the Arroyo, returning tonight.
A meeting of the Citizens' league of
the dry tract will be held in the Cleve
land school, Washington street, Monday
evening to hear reports of eommitt.
on the water situation. Their attorney,
-Miss Phlloleta .Mill: !s..n of l.os An
geles, will lie present if the illness of
her m..tin r dues not prevent.
The week-end visitors at Mount Wil
son numbered over 1000, including a
party of seven from the Hotel Mary
land and another party from the Girls'
collegiate of Los Angeles.
The Modern Woodmen of America
will hold an open meeting for their
families and friends Monday night in
Odd Fellows' hall. A box social, whist
party and dancing- will furnish the en-
Miss Mary Stewart will speak at the
regular meeting of Hester Griffith, W,
C. T. U., at the home of Mrs. H. E.
Bradley, 195 South Pasadena avenue,
Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.
Court Crown of the Valley, Indepen
dent Order of Foresters, will hold its
initial meeting in the new hall, 131
West Colorado street, Monday evening.
Chief Ranger Fisher will provide a fish
dinner, and visitors are expected from
Los Angeles.
Mis.s Gertrude Lee, a native of Au
gusta, Ga., and a resident of Pasadena
for nine yean, died last night at the
residence of her sister, Mrs. James
English, 1115 Avoea street. She leaves
another sister. Miss Miriam Lee, resid
ing at the same place. The funeral will
be private and from the residence at
2:30 Monday, Key. F. G. H. Stevens of
the Lake Avenue Mevhodist church of-
delating.
The Pasadena board of labor will
meet in Carpenters' hall Monday night
to hear a report of the Saturday half
holiday committee and will also listen
to sections of the official report of the
Cherry mine disaster prepared by a
committee of mine owners, miners and
outsiders.
RUSHING STREET CAR WORK
POMONA, Feb. 27.—Work upon in
stalling the cross frogs of the Pacific
Electric company's line at the Southern
Pacific and Bait Lake railroads track
crossing lias been rushed today by a
crew of workmen on Qarey avenue.
There are now over eighty men at
work oij the lines on Garey avenue
and West Second street. The curve
around the corner of Garey avenue and
Second street is being constructed. All
of the work must be completed and the
cars running over the railroad tracks
on Qarey avenue and west on Second
street by March 6, on which date the
month's extension granted by the city
expires. The line on Second street ex
tends west nearly to the newly ac
quired property of the California Rose
company, which corporation is plant
ing thousands of rose cuttings and
erecting several new propagating atfd
storage houses.
MISSIONARY SERVICE HELD
POMONA, Feb. 27.—A laymen's mis
sionary service was held at the First
Christian church this evening. The
principal address was by Rev. M. D.
Clubh on the subject "The Present
Great Awakening." Short addresses
were given as follows: "India," <*„ W.
Roe; "China," H. H. Denny; "Japan,"
X. Williams; "Africa," G. H. Waters;
"Philippines," It. I- Pfaffenbach. A.
F. Musselman presided and there were
vocal solus by Arthur Waters and a
vocal quartet by Messrs. Waters, Al
kire, Wilson and Arthur Waters. Thi
new Christian church is fast nearing
completion. When the new structure
Is ready the "Id church will he abaji
doned 'and probably converted Into
flats.
NEW BAPTIST CHURCH PLANNED
POMONA, Feb. 27. -At the meeting
of tho First Baptist church this morn
\,,.j; plans wm. dISCUSSI '1 for the erec
tion "f the new $50,000 church, for
which a lot was secured at (larey and
Holt avenues about a year ago. It is
hoped that active work on the struc
ture may he commenced soon. The
church h growing under the pastorate
of Rev. Dr. W. F. Harper, who came
here from San Jose.
RETURNS FROM AFRICA
LONG BEACH, Feb. 87.— R. X Oli
ver son of A. W. Oliver of Belmont
Heights, arrived here today from
Washington, D. C for an extended
visit with his parents. Xoung Oliver
has had an unusually Interesting time
lof it during the past few years, The
last two years he has passed in the
heart of the ' 'ontf" l*ree State in Af
rica as surveyor for the (iuKeenhelm
Exploration company. He has just
completed maps made from Held notes
taken during that expedition.
LONG BEACH NOTES
LONG BEACH, Feb. 27.—Gerald
Counts has been elected manager of
the department of swimming In the
high school student body and will su
pervise contests In that sport at the
Long Beach bathhouse.
A large distributing plant for the
Standard Oil company will he built at
Sixteenth street and California avenue.
Tanks will be built and a stable for
teams. Oil will be delivered from the
station to San Pedro, Wilmington,
Long Beach, Compton, Naples, Ala
mltos Bay and Hay Clty/^iHuHuu
LOS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 28, 1010.
LONG BEACH
Circulation Hcpt. No. 4 Pine at.
Home phone 260.
Correspondent, Sunitet phone Main 900.
AERONAUT NARROWLY
ESCAPES DROWNING
EUGENE SAVAGE SHOWS SKILL
IN "DROP"
Parachute Carried Oceanward at
Long Beach, but a Landing
Is Made on the
Shore
[Special to The Herald.)
LONG BEACH-, Feb. 87.—Eugene
Savage's skill in directing a descending^
parachute saved him from a dip into
the ocean, and perhaps drowning, this I
art. moon. Alter making a gilt-edged i
balloon ascenßlon to a great height,
passing through a stratum of air In
which the breeze was to landward 'at<>
an upper .stratum where the current
took him over the ocean, Savage cut
loose and gradually, by swinging back
and forth with all his might, caused
the parachute to drift shoreward, and
he landed "ii the beach near the Kast
Side bath house.
The balloon came down in the water,
several hundred feet beyond the pier.
but was recovered by prompt work of
boatmen who hurried out from the
■■ hail. The soaked and heavy hag was
towed to the pier. In making his as
cension Savage performed various ac
robatic stunts, hanging by his toes, his
ankles, and finally by his teeth.
REFUSES TO SIGN CONTRACT
BECAUSE OF TECHNICALITY
Bids fop Street Work at Long Beach
Will Have to Be Readver.
tised For
LONG BEACH, Feb. 27.—Brenuse of
a technicality which, he fears, will
cause him to lost' his money, <'. \v.
Brashear, who recently was given a
contract to Improve a number of
streets, including American avenue,
between Anaheim and Hill streets;
Appleton avenue, from Alamlto.o av
nue to Junipero aYemie, and Railway
street, between Alamitos avenue ;>nii
Bixby park, has declined to sign the
contract and the work must be re
advertised.
Brashear's attorneys told him that
the Vrooman law requires all specifi
cations to be adopted by ordinance,
whereas those in regard to these street
improvements, although the work was
tn be done under the ten-year bond
net, were by resolution. Hence, they
stated, bond companies probably would
refuse to buy the bonds.
STUDENT BODY TO AID
POLYTECHNIC CAMPAIGN
LONG BEACH. Feb. 27.—The stu
dent body of the Long Beach high
school is to aid in the campaign for
the Polytechnic high school bond issue.
Committees of students have been ap
pointed to work in the various wards,
as follows:
First ward, Floyd Frazier. Julia
Ho well, Bert r>odd, William Cassel
berry, Lloyd Me Dermott; Second ward,
Ross Middough, Howard Berryman,
Ruth Craig, Wayne Middough, Lome
Middough; Third ward, Messrs. Cook,
Counts, MeClain, Mason and F!:nt;
Fourth ward, Thomas DeCoudres,
Albert Morosco, Floyd McKune, Bert
Meacham. W. E. Wallace and Edna
Lochridge; Fifth ward, Fred Herman,
Francis Reider. Don Day, Earl Put
nam, Miss Clark: Sixth ward, Clement
Nadeau, Elmer Hlgglns, Roy Buttor
field, Lloyd Vale, Mabel Scott; Seventh
ward, Messrs. Galhraith, Robinson,
Flint and Stone and Miss Pearl Mo-
Duff.
DISINCORPORATION MOVE
IS EXPECTED TO CARRY
LONG BEACH, Feb. 27.—There Is
said to be little doubt that the election
to be- held March 21 on the question
of the disincorporation of the North
west Long Beach storm water district
will carry by a good sized majority.
If the disincorporation is ordered
the plan Is to relncorporate the dis
trict with the addition of 2000 acres
more to the territory of 4000 acres
now included. It Is said that the pro
posed improvements to the river chan
nel in that section will servo the in
t< rests of the property owners in the
outside territory and that they should
be willing to help pay the costs. The
election will be held at the home of I.
Wetnberg, Pico street and Palm
avenue.
PORTER IS INJURED BY
FALL FROM MOVING TRAIN
SAX BERNARDINO, Feb. 27.—Qeo.
Lonvie, a Pullman porter residing in
I»s Angeles, was seriously injured here
this morning in attempting to board a
rapidly moving Santa Fe passenger
train. He was deadheading to Chicago,
and while the train stopped here went
to the H'ai'vey house to eat a hasty
lunch. He waited until the last mo
ment and endeavored to swing onto
the last ear as the train was pulling
out of the yard, but lost his Krlp on
the hand-hold and fell on his head.
Lonvie was picked up unconscious
and remained in that condition for sev
. r.U hours. He has COncUHOn of the
brain. .
WANT PAVED STREETS
SAN BERNARDINO, Feb. 27. De
■pita the forcible protest to the city
council when that body demurred ,it
pting iiy ordinance the newly paved
Third street, it Isvtated that the prop
erty owners of B street, also recently
improved! are refusing to .sign a petl*
lien asking for the same pn lure on
their thoroughfare. The council argued
ih.it when the streets are worn out In
years to come there "will be no money
with which the city can replace them,
and the power of the property owners
to revoke the Vrooman aot win not be
if .the streets are accepted by ordi
nance, it has nut been until now thai
the property owners have had a change
of Bentlment regarding the matter.
SAN BERNARDINO
Office at Brid'a, 3!>K Third «t.
rhonm: Home 380 j Suosct Main 380.
MAD DOG GIVES TWO
MEN SEVERE BATLTE
Animal Beaten to Death with Clubs
After Ferocious Attack on
San Bernardino
Miners
[Special to Thn Herald.]
SAN BERNARDINO, Feb. 27.—Face
to lace with a mad dog, a hug* blue
Dane, George Barker and Phillips
Newman Friday battled for their lives
at their camp in the Kan Bernardino
mountains.
For several days the men noticed
the dog about their camp, but though
j its actions were peculiar there was
no suspicttfa that rabies were develop
ing. Friday Barker found *ho animal
crouching In the woodshed. The mad
dened beast leaped upon him, knocking
him 10 the ground. Newman, who was
close by, rushed to his partner's as
sistance and the tv>n men then battled
with the animal. With clubs they
finally beat the dour to death, but not
before they both had narrow escapes
from being bitten.
The flgrnt lasted only a short time,
but the beast sprang at Barker after
he had regained his feet and sank its
teeth into his clothing.
It is thought that the animal either
contracted the rabies from coyotes or
was bitten by the mad do? near Beau
mont which later made Its way into
Redlands.
LAND TO BE RECLAIMED
BY SUBTERRANEAN CREEK
Valuable Property to Be Made by
Filling San Bernardino
Gulch
RAN BERNARDINO, Feb. 27.—A
subterranean creek is to be the result
of "making" valuable residence prop
erty in San Bernardino.
Through the entire city runs an old
creek bed, known as Town creek, and
for a portion of the distance it passes
through tlie best residence district.
At Kighth and D streets, where it cuts
diagonally across the street, property
has reached such value that the own
ers of the bed and- bank have decided
that it would pay to fill the gulch.
A concrete culvert has been put in
to carry the water that runs In the
creek during the winter months, and
the ground is to be filled level with
the street and prepared for residence
property.
The work at this point is being done
by R. F. Garner, who owns consider
able frontage on D street. Other prop
erty owners contemplate the same
procedure taken by Mr. Garner to con
vert the gulch into desirable land, and
it is probable that for a considerable
distance the creek will become a sub
terranean stream.
SEWER CONTROVERSY ENDED
SAN BERNARDINO, Feb. 27.—1t is
probable that no action will be taken
regarding- the turning of the sewer of
the city into Warm creek, to investi
gate which Dr. W. F. Snow, secretary
of the state health board, was in San
Bernardino yesterday. A. Gregory of
Redlands, of the firm of Gregory &
Langford, has made his position clear
by the statement that it was absolutely
necessary to turn the sewage into the
creek in order to repair the outfall pipe
line, which had been crushed by work
men of the county unloading rock at
the Santa Ana river bridge. The sewer
system is now in use, and the pollution
of the creek is at an end.
SAN PEDRO SHIPPING
SAN PEDRO, Feb. 2?.-Arrived: Steamer
Santa Rosa, fr.m San LMego; steam schooner
James S. Hlffßln*, from Port Brags;, via San
Francisco; steamer Roanoke, from Portland,
via S:Ui Franciscu.
Sailed—Steam schooner Fulton, for San
IM.-'>. steamer Santa Rosa, for San Fran
cisco, via Redondo and Santa Barbara; steam
schooner J. B. Stetson, for Portland, via San
Francisco; steam schooner Despatch, for
Eureka.
Miscellaneous Notes
The steamer Fulton, Captain Maloney, com
pleted discharge of a cargo of ties today and
sailed for San Diego tonight. From there
she will proceed down the Mexican coast to
load a cargo of onyx for San Diego dealers.
The steamer James S. Hlgglns, Captain
| Higglns, arrived today from Fort Bragg, 'via
San Francisco, with passengers and 400,000
feet of lumber for the Consolidated Lumber
company milt at Wilmington.
The steamer Roanoke, Captain Dunham,
arrived tonight from Portland, via San
Francisco, with passengers 'and freight for
the North Pacific Steamship company.
The steamer Santa Rosa, Captain Alexan
der, called this morning for passengers and
freight for the Pacific Coast Steamship com
pany on the way to San Francisco via He
dondo Beach and Santa Barbara.
The steamer J. B. stetson. Captain Sears,
worked cargo overtime today in order to
nail tonight on schedule for Portland with
passengers and In ballast to reload lumber.
The steamer Despatch, Captain Carey,
sailed today In ballast for Eureka to reload
lumber for the Pacific Lumber company, j
Movement of Steamers
ARRIVE
Steamers carrying passengers are due
from northern ports via San Francisco and
from southern ports direct as-follows:
Steamer— From Due.
queen, Seattle Feb. 28
Norwood, Cray's Harbor Feb. 28
Klamatb, Portland ...' Feb. 28
Samoa, Casper March 1
Erna, Corlnto March 1
Hanalet, San Francisco March 1
Carlos. Portland March 2
Ella, Victoria March 2
Queen, San Diego March i
Admiral Sampson. Seattle March 7
c.eorge W. Elder. Portland March 7
Hanalel. San Francisco March 7
Governor, Seattle March 8
Governor, San Diego March 10
Roanoke, Portland March 13
DEPART
All northbound steamers call at San Fran
cisco.
Steamer—For Sail.
Queen, San Diego March 1
Erna. Victoria March 1
James S. Biggins, Fort Bragg March 1
Queen, Seattle March '1
Hanalei, San Francisco March -
Ella, Corlnto March 3
Hanalei. San Francisco March '
George W. Elder, Portland March 8
Governor, San Diego March 9
Governor, Seattle March 10
Hoanoke, Portland March IS
SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 27.—Arrived:
Steamer Hanal«i from San Pedro. ' Balled
Steamer Queen for San Diego; Whittier
and Samoa for San Pedro.
Tide Tuiile
Feb 28 11:5*1 6:24 11:30 6:15
6.0 1.7 4.4 1.6
VENICE
<Imitation—Home 4711: Sunnet 35(11.
I CorTMpomlent—Home MSI I Sunset 791. I
MOTORCYCLISTS AND
POLICEMAN IN MIXUP
VENICE OFFICER ENTANGLED
IN MACHINE
Three Persons and Vehicle Land in
Heap Twenty Feet from Point of
Impact, but No One
Is Injured
rs;'ivlal to The Herald,]
VENICE, Feb. 27.—A near tragedy
was witnessed by the large crowd of
pleasure seekers at Venice this after
noon when a motorcycle ridden by
James Hill and a girl friend of l.os
Angeles bumped Into Officer William
1:. Cavanaugh of tin- Ocean park police
force and threw him violently to the
ground. There was a general mixup,
but no one was seriously hurt. The
accident created considerable amuse
ment, Cavanaugh. who i.s well known
to automobile men who visit the
beaches, took it as a huge Joke.
Cavanaugh, wearing his usual broad
smile and a brand new uniform, took
his customary position at the corner
of Windward avenue and Speedway
this afternoon to keep the automobiles
and other Vehicles moving and prevent
accidents. .This is one of the most dan
gerous corners known to automobile
drivers, Speedway is only twenty feet
in width, and almost concealed by tall
buildings on each side. It is nothing
unusual for 1000 automobiles to pass
around this corner on a sunny after
noon, which was the case today.
A motorcyclist, apparently not notic
ing: the policeman, sped around the
corner from Windward avenue and lit
erally sailed down Speedway. C'ava
naugh raised his club and ■book it at
the fast disappearing rider in a threat
ening manner. Hill and his friend were
followingr closely behind the other
speeder, ami Cavanaugh attempted to
wave him down with his hand, while
watching the first motorcyclist.
Lack of railroad knowledge on the
part of Hill caused the accident, ac
cording to Cavanaugh. Hill mistook
the "stop" signal for a '.'highball," and
came dashing ahead. The machine
caught the policeman squarely In the
rear and carried him at least twenty
feet before it came to a stop and police
man, cyclist, girl and machine fell in
a heap. The most disastrous result was
the demolishing- of Cavanaugh's. new
uniform, otherwise he said lie Didn't
mind the accident. The damage to the
Hue suit was such that Cavanaugh
was compelled hastily to get oft the
street and seek more comprehensive
garments.
The impact when the motorcycle
struck the officer was so great that it
stopped the engine immediately. Cav
anaugh's desire to uphold the dignity
of the law, his position as vice presi
dent of the Merchants of Venice, and
his Irish stubbornness, combined with
his great avoirdupois, are thought to
account for the absence of more serious
consequences in connection with the ac
cident.
Hill was taken to police headquarters
and severely lectured by Chief of Po
lice John H. Parrent, but was not ar
rested, as he agreed to pay for all
damage done. Parrent declared that
this accident only emphasizes the need
of more stringent laws in regard to
speeding- in the city streets. The city
board of trustees is expected to take
up the question and atempt to formu
late an ordinance that will prevent the
possibility of such accidents recurring.
SENATOR'S WIFE IS
SEVERELY INJURED
[Special to The Herald.]
VENICE, Feb. 27.—The right foot of
Mrs. J. C. Curtiss, wife of a lawyer and
state senator of Aberdeen, South Da
kota, was so badly crushed by a oar
this evening that it had to be arapu
tatid just below the knee.
Fivd Wilson, a young man from Los
Angeles, who witnessed the accldant,
sickened, reeled away and fell in a
faint across the second track, and but
for the prompt act of a woman would
have been run over by a train bearing
down from another direction. She
dragged him away while others in the
crowd appeared dumfounded.
Mrs. Curtiss was in the company of
her husband and Dr. William Dodge of
Los Angeles, and had just come out
from the city. They were on the first
car of a two-car train, and it was not
until this was again in motion that
they hurriedly decided to set off at
Windward avenue. The other two
alighted safely, but Mrs. Curtiss collid
ed with one of the Venetian pillars anil
■she fell back with her rlffht foot across
the rail. TUe foot was badly crushed.
She was taken to the Santa Monica Bay
hospital. 11 < ■ r condition (a not consid
ered serious. The accident was not ob
served by anyone on the train, and it
proceeded on.
WOMEN SHIRTWAIST
MAKERS PERSECUTED
Dr. Kate Walden Barrett, national
president of the Florence Crittenton
homes, spoke lust evening in McKinley
hall, Walker Theater building, under
the auspices of the Socialist women,
on "Tile Shirtwaist Strike."
Dr. Barrett gave many startling In
stances of how the striking girls were
persecuted by the police and unjustly
treated by the courts, especially the
night court, where they were lined on
the testimony of hired witnesses and
lined heavily on the most insignificant
charges.
Dr. Barrett blames present day econ
omic conditions for the deep-rooted so
cial evil, and says that of the 40,000
girls who have .been taken care of by
the Florence Crittenton homes In the
last two years three-fourths were wojk-
inn girls.
"The education of women in the past
has not been such as to make them In
telligent "i- even thinking women, cap
able of taking care of themselves in
the world; but it is not education alone
Which will conquer tin' social evil.
"So long as there are two standards
of morality, one for men and another
IHr women, just so long will sex evils
llouiish, and only when women de
mand the same high standard of moral
ity in UteiV husbands and sons as is
expected in themselves will the moral
plane of the nation rise to where it
should be."
THREE INJURED
BY ACCIDENTS
CAR AND AUTO MISHAPS ARE
SERIOUS FOR TWO
Chinese and Aged White Man Prob.
ably Fatally Hurt —Former Run
Over by Trolley and Se.
verely Bruised
Automobile and street car accidents
were responsible for three being in
jured yesterday and taken to the re
ceiving hospital.
Tin most seriously injured was Wing
\v < Bang, a Chinese laundryman, 1516
Pico Street, who was struck and run
over by an auto driven by O. W, Tay
lor, connected with tin- McStiy Sup
ply company. The Chinese, it is said,
was waiting to board a street car
at Main and Pico streets and became
confused when the auto and car ap
proached from different directions.
Ha stepped toward tlio electric car,'
and fearing a collision with the nuto,
darted back toward tlio curbing, He
waa .struck and run over, and it wns
found he waa Buffering from severe
shock, bruises about the head, legs
and abdomen. Ho was taken to the
receiving hospital ty Mr. Taylor, and
wltneaeea stated the latter was not
reaponatble for the accident. The in
jured man's condition is said to be
serious,
Cigar Dealer Hurt
C. F. Hadden, a cigar dealer, 437
Ruth avenue, fell from a westbound
Los Angeles Railway car at Seventh
ami Central avenues last nicri.t. Buf
fering abrasions of the head, face and
arms. 11,. refused to accompany the
police patrol to tho receiving hospital
and was attended at his home. Had
den was returning from Vernon,
Standing on the rear of the car. when
a sudden lurch threw him into the
stl t. His injuries are not thought
to be serious.
Charles Harding, 75 years old, living
at 1114 Bast Twenty-first street, fell
or was pushed from a street car last
night at Twenty-first and San Pedro
streets, aufferlng a concussion of the
bruin, abrasions of the face and pos
sible internal injuries. Mr. Harding
does not remember how the accident
happened, but believed he lost his
footing- and fell to the street Owln~
to his age his condition is regarded
as serious. - x
METHODISM SHOWS
GROWTH IN ITALY
In Address to Congregation of Amer.
ican Church in Rome Rev. Tip.
pie Takes Issue with
Catholicism
[Associated Press]
ROME, Feb. 27. - The American
Methodist church was crowded today
the congregation including many
American visitors, who were attracted
by the subject of Pastor B. M. Tipple's
sermon, "Why Methodism is in Rome."
It was in the American Methodist
church that Charles W. Fairbanks de
livered the address -which prevented
his reception in audience by the pope,
an incident which has created much
discussion in Rome as well as in the
United States.
Rev. Mr. Tipple said the Methodist
church was meeting with great success
throughout Italy. Such an inference
could be drawn from the extraordinary
action by the Vatican with regard to
the proposed visit of former Vice
President Fairbanks to the pope, and
also to the bitter resentment of the
Catholic clergy. ■
"With reference to the assertion that
Methodists have no right to be in
Italy," said the preacher, "the answer
is that we are here under the Italian
laws guaranteeing religious freedom.
"The Catholic church suffers embar
rassment' when it is required to satisfy
the ideals of a great liberty-loving re
public contemporaneously with heeding
the demands of the Vatican, which is
still bound by the ideals of the middle
ages.
"Italy needs Methodism because it is
no longer Catholic except in name.
The charge of Methodist proselyting is
foolish. Their hands are full in deal
ing with the unbelievers. This is
proved by the last census, which shows
that Italy reports the largest number
of men without religious convictions.
It is true that the Methodists . have
former priests among the workers, but
none has actively been sought. The
Methodist schools are full because the
children's Barents select them as the
best.
"The issue in Italy today is not
Protestantism vs. Catholicism, but
faith vs. atheism. Archbishop Ireland
has said that every convert to Meth
odism costs $1400. If that is true, can
not the American Methodists better af
ford to pay it than every three- Italian
laborers who carry one priest?"
The pastor urged that Archbishop
Ireland specify the dishonorable meth
ods here, and he added: "It Is playing
with fire for the Catholic church to
open the subject of moral methods in
Italy."
INTELLECTUALS DENOUNCE
PRUSSIAN SUFFRAGE ACT
Declare German Emperor's Promised
Reform Laughing Stock and At.
tempt to Enter Palace
BERLIN, Feb. 27.—Tho Intellectuals,
consisting of 1500 representatives (if
■cienoe, art, commerce and trade, held
a mass meeting of protest today on
existing Prussian suffrage and the new
government measure under discussion
After speaker! had declared the hill
had simply mad.- the emperor's prom
ised retorm a Utughing stock and had
left Prussia irt a wor.se state than
Turkey, a unanimous resolution was
adopted calling for equal political
rights for all classes,
hater a large number of those who
took part In tho meeting attempted to
call at the palace, but were dispersed
by the police. It was the emperors
nersonal wish that the police should
not" interfere with the demonstrators
unless they went beyond all bounds.
FRANKFORT RADICALS PEACEFUL
KKANKFORT, Feb. 27.—Fifty thou-.
■and Socialists and Radleali today at
tended nine open air suffrage demon
■tratioiu at which resolution* were
I,(opted denouncing the suffrage bill
as fallng to Introduce reform into the
medieval political system of Prussia.
Tliore wero no collisions with tho po
lice.
You can buy it, perhaps at many places, but
there's one' BEST place to buy It-and thai
Blace advertises.
PHONE COMPANIES
WANT TALL GIRLS
FIVE FEET IN HEIGHT RULE IN
FORCE IS REPORT
•%
Government Labor Bureau Agents
Declare After Investigation That
Overtime for Operators Is
Objectionable Feature
WASHINGTON, Feb. 27.—"Less
than live feet high? All right; you
can't be a telephone girl."
Such is the rule of the big telephone
companies, according to a report com
piled by the labor bureau and made
public today. ■'»■
The girls must bo high enough .to
reach to the top of the switchboards
and a reasonable • distance sideways.
This being the case, it is easy to see
how much chance, the short girl has of |
learning the "hello" game. •
The bulk of the report deals with
woman employes— there are 17,210 of]
them working at the switchboards for I
twenty-seven companies in twenty-six'■•'
states which furnished the data.
Agents of the bureau visited r sev- ,
enty-three exchanges and found them
generally speaking, well housed. : In (
many cases the girls were compelled 1
to walk up from one to four flights
of stairs, and more than two-thirds of ;■'
the complaints were because of the
lack of elevators. ■C-V.-
Efficient service is possible .upl to
22. calls an hour for each girl. SMI
Commissioner Neil strongly urges
the practical elimination of overtime
for operators, and says this can-bY
brought about if the, larger cities will
set the example. New York city has :
done this, but in Chicatro the Bell '
operators have about 28 per cent of
overtime, and in New Orleans as high
as 98 per cent. - •.-.,-,- „■'■
A widespread and Intelligent effort ■
on the part of the companies to look
after the comfort and wellbetng; of •
their woman employes was found. j^
On tho other hand, the investigators '?.
found that the women were loyal ;to *
the companies and enthusiastic over
their work, all of which is declared to ■
add much to the efficiency of service
to the public. . -:.;
FIRE DESTROYS COTTON
NEW HEDFORD, Mass., Feb. 27.—
Three thousand bags of cotton, and
some manufactured product were lost
in a fire that destroyed the storage
warehouse of Dennison Brothers com
pany here today, causing a loss of
$385,000.
OHIO RIVER RISES TEN FEET
CINCINNATI, Feb. 27.—A constant
downpour of rain in the last twenty
four hours presages the flood stage for
the Ohio river, which rose ten fuel,hero
today. At Loveland, Ohio, more than
twenty-five houses are partially sub
mersed and by morning it Is expected
the town will be surrounded by water.
20 FAMILIES BURNED OUT
NEW YORK, Feb. 27.—Twenty fami
lies in Jersey City were burned out to
night in a fire which destroyed ten
double dwelling houses, and razed tha
plant of the New York Veneer Seating
company. The damage i.-: $200,000.
FOR EXCHANGE
Real Estate
FOR EXCHANGE—CLEAR LOT IN CITY,
southwest, for small California house and
'lot in southwest; no Inflated prices. BOX
65, Herald. 2-27-tt
FOR EXCHANGE— '"SAVE A CLEAR 1 * j
lot at Itedondo, 8 blocks from city bail, \
facing the ocean, tine for apartments or '. '
hotel, street work all In, gas, electricity 1
and sewer; One view of the ocean; would I I
trade for lot at Huntlngton Park, Glen- " t
dale, or city. Lot valued at $90U; maka
offer. OWNER, Box 564, Herald office.
FOR EXCHANGE— S7OO EQUITY IN FlVE
room house and 4 lots In Gardena for ex
change for good team of mares, harness
and wagon; balance cash. This property
Is worth $3000. Will take *2600.
ERIKSON & CO. .
105 W. Sixth St., ground floor. - 2-24-7
FOR EXCHANGE-MY EQUITY OF 11000 IN
C-room modern cottage, corner lot 45x140 to
alley; nil kinds of fruit and flowers. Price
$3230. See C. S. HUMPHREY, 617 Laughlln
™*-- ■-■ 2-27-3 ; ';,
FOR EXCHANGE OR SALE—CLEAR; LOT, ,
45x123, corner alley, at Hawthorne, ;, for,;
equity or acreage with house. Best in town. :-♦,
A. DE CHERNEY, 1222 Glrard St. 2-27-1
—r ■. • - •,...W
Miscellaneous
WANTEDEQUITIES OK CONTRACTS \
for reliable securities •11 > to *2000 in val- ;>
ue. What have you? Call ■ -■ -'■<^,«:■', :■/:
It. M. Hi »1.l 1., 541 Douglas Bide. :;•
- - ■-<•, 2-28-3 :v
H)H EXCHANGE HAVE A CLEAR LOT?
In Colton that 1 will trade for diamond*,
furniture, auto, or what have you?-' Ad- j,
dress BOX 534, Herald. «-Jl-tt
WILL TRADE STOCK IN BISHOP CREEK
Gold company an! other mining stock i for ;'
stock -In California Wave Motor ■ company ■ i
(Reynolds). POX 842. He-aid. ' «-M-tt >( >>
PATENTS— PATENT ATTORNEYS 7
PIONEER PATENT AGENCY. HAZARD &
STRAUSE. ESTABLISHED 32 YEARS, i,^
Oldest agency In Southern California. j A
American and foreign patent* secured anil • 1
trade marks registered. PATENT LITI- ,
GATION. 639 Citizens National I' Bank .\,"
Building, Third and Main. Home AI49J; „
Main 2622. PATENT BOOK, FREE. ,' :'
. ■:!--,.-•■i-s-tf,■.■;.;!
JAMES T. BARKELEW. ENGINEER AND Ifvj
patent attorney. American and foreign pat- ■;";
ents, trade marks. Special assistance In
chemical,* electrical, mining and . complex ■-;-■
mechanical cases. 728 CENTRAL DLDO, ;-;<"
Sixth and Main. F23D9; Main 4«3T..FREa ■)■'
BOOK ON PATENTS. '.U-.-V l-!S-tiM|
PATENTS AND TRADEMARKS. ALL COUN- > i
tries. A. H. LIDDERS, patent lawyer and ft-;
solicitor, 613 Trust bldg., cor. 2d and Spring.
U-B-K
CHURCH NOTICES
Cftristiaii Science Services.
Second Church of Christ, Scientist
At the church edifice on Went Adams street, "v
near Hoover. Services Sunday, : 11 a. m. and 9 w'^
p. m. sermon from the Christian Science r,-+
Quarterly, Subject, "Man." Sunday school, t -
11 a. m.; Wednesday evening ' meeting, ■- 8 '■■%
o'clock. Reading, room, 704 . Herman W.
I li'llmuu Bldg., Spring and Fourth at**,, open f&
dally, Sundays excepted, from 9 a. in. to 1
p. m. ';■-:,-. 2-28-7
NOTICE TO CHURCHES-COPY FOR ■ AH. •'
church notices for the Saturday ' and * Sun- at.,, ]
day morning Issues Is requested .' to =' b« :' -V,
turned In at The Herald of flee by Friday V
noon, If possible. This will assure proper ,:._
clannlflratlnn anil publication.' ■■ ; l-H-tt '
WATCHMAKERS ,'
OSCAR N. BARNUM, WATCHMAKER AND „'
Jeweler— mo a trial on your watch and y
Jewelry repairs; low rent, low ' prices. n 424 ■■ V
S. BROADWAY, room 200 Broadway. Central •'s:
blilg. ; -■- ■ ■■■■ 2-20-lmo
DENTISTS
in. u.u-iI.UAMii, !iUa^ofi~MaJesUo rue»t«
bids., HIS 8. litluay. IO08I; , Main '; SWlft. ;
1-1-tt

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