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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, March 15, 1910, Image 13

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MADE TO ADMIT
SECOND FALSITY
CUNNINQHAMSAYSHEDIDNOT
TELL FACTS
Coal Baron, at Alaskan Claims Probe,
Characterizes Misstatements as
"Unfortunate" Wording of
Letter Sent to Juneau
CLEVELAND, 0., March li. For
the second titno during the Inquiry
Into tli.! Alaska coal claims lure, Clar
ence Cunningham, by whose name iii«
claims arc known, was forced today
by the federal attorneys to admit that
he bad mad* Incorrect statements in
document! which he had signed.
Tho llrst occasion occurred earlier In
the hearing, when Cunningham admit
ted an affidavit, to which ho had
■worn, was Incorrect. At' that time
■he claimed the affidavit had been
drawn up by Louis R. Qlavls and that
he had taken the word of the former
government land agent for the state
ments contained In it.
Today, at the final eesslon of the
hearing:, he wiV> shown a copy of a
letter written by him to the United
State* land agent at Junoau, Alaska,
asking for maps of the district in
''which the coal claims lay, and which
wore required before patents could be
Issued.
In the letter Cunningham laid ho
had seen the land commissioner for
the district and thnt everything in
connection with the claims was In
order and correct. Under cross ex
amination ho admitted this was not
an exact statement of the facts, and
at that time he did not know th" ex
act status of the situation. He Bald
the language was "unfortunate," but
that he had no intention of misleading.
At the conclusion of Mr. Cunning
ham's cross examination the bearing
was adjourned until Wednesday, when
It will be resumed In Washington.
CENSUS QUESTIONS
MUST BE ANSWERED
PENALTY FOR THOSE WHO RE
FUSE INFORMATION
President Taft Issues Proclamation
That Data Given by People Will
Be Kept Secret by the
Government
WASHINGTON, March 14.—Presi
dent. Taft in a proclamation Issued to
day urges everybody throughout the
I lilted States "to answer promptly,
completely and accurately all Inquiries
addressed to them by tho enumerators
or other employes" who will bo en
gaged in the taking of the- thirteenth
decennial census, which work will be
gin one month from today. The proc
lamation in part says:
" Whereas, it is of the utmost im
portance to the interests of all the peo
-1.1. of the United States that this cen-
SUI should be a complete anil accu
rate report of the population and re
sources of the country:
•Now. therefore, i, William Howard
Taft, president of the United States of
America, do hereby declare and make,
known that, under the act aforesaid, It
is the duty of every person to answer
all questions on tiio census schedules
applying to him and the family to
which he belongs, and to the farm oc
cupied by him or his family, and that
any adult refusing to do bo is subject
to penalty,
"The :01. purpose of the census Is to
secure general statistical information
regarding the population und re
sources of the country, and replies are
required from individuals only in or
der to permit the compilation of such
general statistics. The census has
nothing to do with taxation, with
army or jury service, with the com
pulsion of school attendance, with the
regulation of immigration or with the
enforcement of any national, state or
local law or ordinance, nor can any
person be harmed in many way by fur
nishing the information required.
There need be no fear that any, dis
closure will he made regarding any
individual person or his affairs. For
the due protection of tho rights and
Interests Of the persons furnishing: in
formation every employe of the census
bureau is prohibited, under heavy
penalty ( from disclosing any informa
tion which may thus come to Ills
knowledge."
HAMILTON'S AERIAL
CRAFT TURNS TURTLE
Aviator Narrowly Misses Deep Pond;
Is Thrown Into Muddy Field
and Has Other
Troubles
■ > \
-
\
SEATTLE, March 14.—Charles K.
Hamilton, sum and .stilt as a result of
his mishap Saturday afternoon, when
ins Curtlsi biplane turned turtle and ;
threw him Into a muddy field, made
two short ilii;hts at the Meadows this
afternoon."
(in the first flight the Steeling ap
paratus was Improperly adjusted, and
Hamilton narrowly escaped repeating
Saturday's unpleasant performance.
The biplane was slow in rising', and
after be had circled tho track once at
,i height of 200 foot he started to
descend. The machine came down
rapidly, and for a moment it appeared
to be driving straight into tho pond.
It barely cleared the water, landing in
a muddy field. Hamilton had .some ad
justments made and prepared for his
second flight.
This time the machine rose grace
fully, and the aviator circled the track
two and a half times. He was in the
air about llvo minutes and made a
splendid landing. This second flight
brought forth loud applause.
When a third liight was attempted
the engine balked and the machine
■would not move. The crowd, which
numbered more than 5000 persons,
■waited two hours while the mechanics
worked with the motor. At last thoy
got it going, but when Hamilton again
attempted a Bight the machine ran
along the ground for 200 • yards, but
would not rise into the air.
REQUISITION IS HONORED
PHOENIX, Ariz., March 14.—Gov
ernor Sloan today honored requisition
papers Issued by Governor Spry of
I'iali for the return to Ogden Of John
\v. Haynes, alias F. IJ. Meadenhall,
now In custody at Preecott charged
with passing on It. S. Joyce a. check
for $100 on tliti First National bank of
Scpulpa, Okla., In which he falsely rep
resented he had money. (
CANADIAN NORTHERN TO RUN
THROUGH ARROWHEAD PASS
Survey Completed for Route of New
Transcontinental
Line
VANCOUVER, B. «'., March 14.—
With the completion of the survey
through Arrowhead pass the Canadian
Northern has located the route to be
followed in the construction of the new
transcontinental line. The eastern ter
minus of the road will he In Cape Bre
ton, where part of the road Is already
in operation,
other sections <>r the road havo am
n ady been built and to COmpll tl B
transcontinental road the Canadian
Northern will have only to fill In a
number of k:ij>s.
it is expected that within the next
six weeks contractors will be invited
to tender bids for the building of por
tions of the line between New West
minster and Hope, the latter at the
eastern slope of ii"i>'' mountain. Con
struction also win be carried on this
summer at various points between
Kamloops and Hope.
CANADIAN PRODUCTS
FAVORED IN TARIFF
Misconceptions In Regard to Provis
ions of New Law Are Cor.
rected by American
Experts
WASHINGTON, March 11. .A tfen
eral miaconcepton of the provisions
of the American tariff Is believed to
be largely responsible for the hitch in
the tariff negotiations between the
American commissioners ami the Ca-
nadian authorities in their Ottawa
conferences.
it is learned at the state deps tment
that before the Americans art .zed at
Ottawa assertions were generally made
thai the American tariff on Canadian
products was twice as high as the Ca
nadian tariff on American products.
This was shown to bo an error.
It was disclosed that the material
reductions made by the Payne-Aldrlch
law on Canadian Imports into tho
United States were not understood In
Canada, on the basis of the fiscal
year l'.'Ofl the reduction amounted to
more, than $1,000,u0U, equivalent to
nearly 10 per cent.
While this whs the situation as to
Canadian products Imported Into the
United States, it was disclosed that
the remission of duties which the
United States would have received In
the same year, if it bad enjoyed the
benefit of the preferential rates given
to Frame and twelve other countries,
would have been approximately
$800,000.
In Cnnada the belief was said to bo
prevalent that the United States en
forced many prohibitive rates against
Canadian products, while Canada had
jio such discrmlnatlon against the
products of the United States.
Wool and woolens were cited on be
half of Canada. In reply the tariff
officers of the United States cited steel
rails, on which Canada lays a prohib
itive duty.
Attention nlso was called to the ad
vantages to Canada of the heavy re
duction on Iron ore, tho rate now
being' IS cents per ton, as against 40
cent! formerly.
Canada is an important source of
■upply to the United States for both
wood pulp designed for paper making
and for wood to be converted into
pulp. Contrary to the popular Impres
sion, however, Canada la not. tho only
source of supply of wood for such
purpose!, Mini the statement is made
that many years will be required to
exhaust the domestic sources of pulp
wood.
SUCCEEDS WADE ELLIS
WASHINGTON. March 14.—William
S. K'liyon of Fort Dodge, la., was to
day nominated by the president as as
sistant to the attorney general, vice
Wade H. Ellis, who resigned that po
sition to accept the chairmanship of
the Ohio Republican state central com
mittee.
WILL NOT VACATE WRIT
WASHINGTON, March 14—The su
preme court of the United States today
declined to vacate the writ Of error
Issued by Justice Lurton in the case
of Charles It. Heike of New York,
who was denied Immunity by the lower
federal courts from prosecution on an
indictment of conspiracy to defraud
the government.
PASSES RESOLUTION
WASHINGTON, March 14. —Amended
so as to eliminate objectionable fea
tures, tho Hawaiian prohibition joint
resolution was passed today by the
senate. As it goes to the house it pro
vides for a popular election but does
not make the result mandatory on the
legislature.
RATE LAW CONSTITUTIONAL
WASHINGTON, March 14.—The
North Dakota coal rate law of 1907 whs
today held to bo constitutional for the
nt by the supreme Court of the
United States, despite tho claim of the
railroads that the law requires the
transportation of coal below the cost of
scr\ ice.
STATEHOOD BILL REPORTED
WASHINGTON, March 14.—The Ari
zona and New Mexico statehood bill
was reported to thll senate today from
the committee on territories by Senator
Beverldge, who said it was an entire
substitute for the bouse bill.
GRAZING DECISION UPHELD
WASHINGTON, March 14.—8y an
equally divided court the supreme court
of the United States today affirmed the
decision of the federal court of Cali
t fornla, which held the grazing of sheep
without permission on forest reserves
was not a violation of law.
NEGRO KILLS WOMAN
KANSAS CITY, March 14.—An un
known negro entered B grocery store
kept by Mrs. Mary Albert, a white
woman, in the outskirts of Kansas
City, Kas., today, and after slashing
the woman's throat with a razor,
robbed her of several hundred dollars
and escaped. Mrs. Albert's windpipe
was severed and she probably will die.
ACTION DROPPED
WASHINGTON, March 14.—Justice
Wright today dismlssad the action
brought by the Valley Paper company
of Holyoke, MaF.s., against the joint
printing committee of congress on the
ground! that the paper company's bid
was illegal in form and did not com
ply with tho regulations as set forth
by the committee.
AFFIRMS DECISION
WASHINGTON, March 14.—8y a di
vided bench of four to four, I the su
premo court of the United States to
day affirmed the decision of the lower
federal court holding that 5 the i. sep
arate • shipment is , the proper unit ■ for
assessing, penalties under the • twenty
eight-hour law and not ; the. train. ;,
LOS ANGELES HERALD: TUESDAY MORNING, MARCH 15, 1010.
YOUNG KNOX
MAKES GOOD
SECRETARY OF STATE'S SON
SELLS TWO AUTO
I
First Day in Business of Eloper Proves
Success, and His Bride Ex.
presses Satisfaction
Over Fact
[Bpcelal to Th« Herald.]
PROVIDENCE, i:. 1.. March it
j Toung I', i". Kncix. jr., the eloping son'
of Secretary of State Kmox, who mar
ried .Miss May Boler wlthoul asking
his father'i consent, has scored a duc
ecs as an auto salesman.
This was his flrsl day In buslnes, l
ami he sold inn machines, which Isl
■ good day's record for any salesman
The young man appeared for work
early this morning and the chauffeur
took him out for a spin to show him
the workings of the ear.
The chauffeur soon returned and
said: "I can't, teach this kid any
thing about this car. He knows more
about 'em than i doi"
Consequently Knox was turned over
to an experienced salesman, whom he
accompanied when prospective cus
tomers were \ I Sited.
This afternoon Knox took cars and
went away alone. He returned with
two orders.
"I knew Tip would make pom!." said
hia bride. "All he needs is oppor
tunity."
BISHOP DECLARES
ALASKA LAWS POOR
GREAT NATURAL RESOURCES
SHOULD BE HELD
Prelate on Visit to 'States' Says North.
em Domain Rich in Agricultural
Prospects—People Are
Done Injustice
CHICAGO, stare)) !<■ —"The Alaska
'grabs' are due entirely to poor legis
lation," said the Rt. Rev. Peter Trim
ble Rowe, Episcopalian bishop of
Alaska, yesterday. "The great natural
resources Of tho northern territory are
the rightful property of American citi
zens, anil 1 hope hereafter the govern
ment will be wise and prevent their
falling into tho hands of any corpora
tion."
Bishop Rowe Is passing the week In
Chicago as the guest of Rev. William
i i Waters, rector Of Grace church.
This is his first visit to tno "States"
In five years.
"The sale of land rich in coal and
copper, with even greater possibilities
for agriculture, at $10 an acre, was a
barter for a mere song," he said. "I
do not say the transfer was fraudu
lent. For all I know every step was
legal, but the laws must be wrong
when so great an injustice In possible.
"Little is known of the agricultural
possibilities, possibly because conclu
sions are drawn from coast observa
tions. There the Japan current makes
the climate equable, but at no time Is
it warm enough to insure great crops.
But inland, where the winters are in
tensely cold, the summers, though
short, are warm and agriculture has a
future. The Xanana valley alone,
which now has about 16,u0U inhab
itants, could easily support a million."
CZAR WALKS ON STREETS
WITHOUT FORMER GUARD
Russian Ruler Declares Anarchists
Mean Him No Harm and
Laughs at Protests
ST. PETERSBURG, March 14.—The
czar is no longer a prisoner. Nearly
every day now his subjects see him
driving without escort In the streets
of St. Petersburg, and none of the
usual precautions are taken for his
safety. One day last week several per
sons saw his majesty, in the uniform
of a colonel of the Imperial guard,
walking on the Neva quay, gayly con
versing with an officer of the house
hold.
The czar later went shopping, and
bought, without being recognized,
gloves and sweets. He Is In the best
of spirits and seems really delighted
with his recovered freedom. But the
police are in despair, and it is even
reported that the chief of the secret
police asked his majesty on his knees
not to expose his life in this manner,
but the czar answered that he had
confidence in his people and that the
Almighty would protect him from at
tempts of anarchists and fanatics.
He said he was convinced the revo
lutionary Socialists do not wish to
murder him.
BALL PLAYER MARRIED
HEDONDO BEACH, March 14.—
Arthur Collins, known as "Sharkey"
on the Redondo Beach baseball team,
or which he is one of the best known
players, was married today to Miss
Clara Lynch of this city. Both young
people are popular here. Miss Lynch
recently resigned her position at the
local postoffice. Friends of the couple
have been on ihe lookout for the. wed'
ding for several weeks, but the couple
stole a inarch on them and had the
ceremony performed privately.
ARRANGE CLERGYMAN'S BURIAL
SANTA MONICA, March 14.—Kunernl
services over the remains of the Rev,
Herbert P. Bowers, D. D., LL. D., who
died last Saturday night, will be held
from St. Augustine*! Episcopal church
at 3 o'clock next Wednesday afternqon.
Bishop Joseph Johnson of the Los An
geles diocese will officiate. Interment
will be made In Woodlawn cemetery.
NAPOLEON'S HAIR SOLD
LONDON, March 14.— The. sale of a
lock of Napoleon's hair for $4 denotes
a serious slump. In July, 1900, a simi
lar relic realized $100, and in the pre
vious year two locks were sold for
$150 and $25 respectively, while at the
same sale a sword of Napoleon's
brought $3250, one of tho highest prices
ever paid for a historical relic.
ADVANCE STATE FAIR DATE
SACRAMENTO, March 14.—The tx
ceutive committee of the State Agricul
tural society, ut a meeting tonight, ad
vanced the date of the next state fair
from September 9-17 to September 3-10.
OPEN AND SHUT
"Thou lha.lt not steal," Is a good
sermon topic Cartye used to say
that we should have another eoniand
nient to go with it: "Thou shall not
be stolen from." —Milwaukee Sentinel.
INTERESTING ADDRESSES
AT LAYMEN'S CONVENTION
Missionary Work Is Discussed by
Clergymen and Others at
Fresno Gathering
FREBNO, March 14.—Several In
teresting addresses were made today
at the Laymen's Missionary movement
now |n session in this city.
Among those who spoke was Rev.
Ola Hanson on "Turkey."
"China the Greatest Thing in the
World," was ably discussed by Dr. C.
k. Reid, while Rev. p. M. Stead gave
tin Interesting talk on "Persia."
The Rev. Hay c. smith told of the
advancement Of Christianity In India.
and Cnl. Charles A. Hopkins spoke on
"Why Missions Should Appeal to Men."
Following this address a conference
was called tin "How i" Lead b Church
to [ts liitfh Missionary Efficiency,"
which was conducted by J. Campbell
While, assisted by C. V. Vickrey of
New v<>rk. Rev, i.. C. BaYiford, Rev. A.
\v. Rider, Rev, 11. Melville Tenney of
San Francisco.and Rev. 11. C. Mason.
SLAUGHTERS FAMILY
AND ENDS OWN LIFE
IDAHO MYSTERY IS SOLVED BY
CONFESSION
Wealthy Man Kills Wife and Two
Daughters, Cuts His Throat,
and Sets Fire to
Home
FILER, Idaho, March 14.—Telaford
Theonl early this morning brutally
crushed die skulls of his wife and two
(laughters, walked a mile to the resi
dence of a neighbor, there deposited a
strong box containing some money, life
Insurance papers, d< eds and a confes
sion addressed to the eornner, returned
to his home, where lie liberated his
horses from the stable, y<> they could
feed themselves, entered the house, set
fire to It in several places, cut his own
throat and lay down In ill".
Neighbors discovered the tiro about 4
O'clock, but all efforts to save the house
failed. A search of the ruins later re
vealed the charred and almost un
recognisable bodies, of the four mem
bers of the family.
The first rumors of the tragedy were
that burglars had committed the mur
der and then attempted to conceal their
crime by burning the house.
In his confession Theoni said he was
weary of life and yet could not bear
to leave this world without taking his
entire family with him. He had been
(respondent, he explained, over his In
ability to sleep regularly.
Theonl but recently came to this
vicinity from New Sharon, Pa., bring
ing considerable money. He was pre
paring to begin extensive farming
operations. He was rated locally as
worth $75,^00.
Theoni was 42 years old, his wife 52,
and the daughters 14 and IH. He had
shown no signs of mental disorder.
GOOD SAMARITAN ROBBED
BY TRAMP HE BEFRIENDED
Ungrateful Beggar Steals Document
Worth a Fortune from Man
Who Fed Him
CHICAGO, March 14.—Until Clarence
Miller of Crystal Lake, Wis., acted the
Ck>od Samaritan to a tramp last night,
he was heir to a valuable farm near
his home town. His standing as an
heir now is In doubt, because the tramp
stole his valise, and in it was the will
of his deceased father bequeathing the
lands to him, the document, as he
afterward told the police, being his
most cherished possession.
•You see, my mother has married
again," he explained, "and received the
Income from the lands until her death.
Without this will I don't know what
will become of the property."
Miller was met by the tramp as he
started to the depot to board a train
for Milwaukee.
"I haven't tasted food for over
twenty-four hours," was the salutation
tlie tramp gave him.
He feil the tramp, bought him cigars
and save him $5. Then he Invited him
to take a drink. Something distracted
his attention in the saloon and when
he remembered his new found "friend,"
the latter had fled with his valise.
BIG BANK CONSOLIDATION
IS RUMORED IN NEW YORK
Stock Movement Indicates Merger of
Rockefeller and Morgan
Institutions
XKW YORK. March 14.—Unusual
activity on the atock exchange in the
Bharea of the National Bank of Com
merce tonight gave renewed currency
to the rumor that the b;mk is to be
consolidated with the National City
bank.
Under active bidding the Hank of
Commerce shares, which a week ;is"
sold at $208, advanced to $240 after
opening at (220, and closed at $231.
Such shares are ordinarily torpid and
change hands only in small lots. To
day 100 shares sold at $220, and more
than WOu shares chanced hands in all.
James Stillman, leading figure in the
National City bank, mainly regarded
as a Rockefeller Institution, and Mr.
Morgan are now abroad, and negotia
tions are said to be under way between
them for a merger. The banks arc.
capitalized at $25,000,000 each and have
the largest volume of out-of-town ac
counts in the city. National City bank
shans have long been selling between
$405 and $11,..
CONFERS RHODES SCHOLARSHIP
WALLA WALLA, Wash., March 14.—
Joseph Harrison of the University of
Washington, Seattle, today was
chosen as this state's representative to
receive the Cecil Rhodes scholarship at
Oxford university, England. Samuel
Neere of Whitman college, Walla
Walla, was selected as alternate. The
selection was made by a committee of
live college presidents of the state.
There weie six candidates for the
scholarship.
EXONERATED BY JURY
STOCKTON, March 14.—Kdward T.
Murphy, a bartender at the Grand
Central hotel, who was taken in cus
tody last night at the instance of the
coroner when it was found that
Thomas Burke, an employe of the ho
tel, had died of a tract moil skull some
hours after Murphy had thrown him
out of the bar room, was exonerated
by the coroner'i Jury this morning. It
was shown that Burke came after
Murphy with a stool.
STOCK CARS TO
BE IDENTIFIED
PRESENT RACING SITUATION
NOT SATISFACTORY
Fact That Machines Are Rushed from
Track to Track Enough to
Make Public Sus
picious
That additional restrictions arc i
essary in order t<> insure that cars
talcing riart in contests, particularly
in races, arc bona fide stock cars, is
tl pinion nf Windsor 'I. White, pres
ident of the White company. Mr. ,
White proposes a rule whereby any |
machine entering in a contest may be
claimed by any other entrant >>n the
payment of the lh.t price of that car.
"I think no one will dispute the
statement that there has been much
ground tor dissatisfaction with and
dl trust or the stock car racing situa
tion," said Mr. White, In disclosing
the proposed reform. "The examina
tion of contesting cars ai race mccl
is necessarily of the most superficial
character and generally discloses
nothing more than that the cylinders
arc of the proper dimensions and thai
the general arrangement of parts is
the same as In the stock model. Such
an examination cannot reveal, for ex
ample, whether or not 'lie racing car
; has a chrome nlcki ' steel crank
j (when real stink cars of the same
! make use only common machine Btei I)
or whether or nol there has been ;i
similar substitution of materials
throughout. •
"The public lias had ample reason
in be suspicious. For example, they
have ii"i understood why it wan n<
essary for a 'stock' car which com
peted <jiio week In New Fork to be
rushed by express to compete In Min
neapolis or New Orleans the next.
The ordinary citizen would Imagine
that any car In Minneapolis or New
Orleans would fully size up to the true
capabilities of the stock cur and could
bemused.
"With this unsatisfactory situation
confronting automobile racing, why
should v.c not avail ourselves <>f the
experiem c of a much older line of
sport—namely, horse racing- wherein
\ritiims protective measures have been
devlrtd for safeguarding the Interests
of the public as well aa of contestants?
I refer particularly to the regulations
covering what, are known as selling
races, x believe that these regulations
could !>■ applied with advantage to all
stock cans racing in this country, with
the result that any car entering a stock
car race could be claimed by any other
contestant in the race on payment of
the list price of the car.
"By the enactment of such an
amendment to the automobile racing
rules, motor racing In this vicinity
would receive a tremendous boom.
There are ninny manufacturers and
agents who would be very willing to
engage in various kinds of speed con
teats If they were assured that they
would be confined to stuck models.
"But at present they feel that the
which are being sent lirst to one
city and then to another to engage In
race meets are not bona fide stock
cars. Under the proposed rule, any
maker who engaged in a race and who
suspected that one of the cars contest
ing against him was not a stock model
could simply bid it in at the list price
and could quickly assure himself
whether or not such was the case.
With this regulation enforced the prac
tice of building especially constructed
cars for racing would be discouraged,
there would be many more cars enter-
Ing races, and the public and the indus
try at large would benefit largely from
the new conditions."
AGENTS FOR AUTOS
ARE EASY TO FIND
Today the automobile show is pri
marily for the dealer and buyer; the
manufacturer has to a large extent
disappeared ltno the background. The
reason for this is obvious—motor cars
have become a staple product of our
manufacturing world, and the builder
no longer finds It necessary to offer all
sorts of inducements to attract agents
and representatives in various parts
of the country. It is just the other
way now. The maker of a standard
machine is never at a loss for a thor
oughly competent agent or representa
tive; any business man in that line of
business is glad to handle a well
known make of automobile. . It has
come to be one of the highest classes
of representative work in our business
world.
Though the manufacturer gets but
little actual profit out of the automo
bile shows, as they are conducted to
day, he is still glad to give them their
financial support as to give them their
i.LhI support as well as building
special machines for display. These
two departments —financial backing
and the construction of special exhi
bition cars —are the chief interests left
to the manufacturer at present.
Dealers in automobiles are the direct
beneficiaries of the annual exhibition.
There is a general belief among auto
mobile men that the time la not fur
distant when the annual exhibit will
be run entirely by the dealers and the
manufacturers will be called on only
for financial help when needed and
the production of the exhibits..
Some of the leading builders are now
taking this attitude. For instance, a
certain car was shown at the New
York exhibit by the manufacturing
company, but in all other cities, even
Los Angeles, Boston and Chicago, it Is
shown under the name of the local
dealer. What is true in this case Is
true In several others, and the trend
of sentiment among manufacturers
appears to be along that line.
Another reason why the manufac
turer is dropping out of direct repre
sentation In these shows is the fact
that they are staged so late in the
season. Models for the next season
are always before the public months
before the show season opens. Fre
quently makers have their next year's
models on the road in July and Aug
ust, while they cannot show to pros
pective buyers In the shows until late
In the. winter.
Hence it is that the dealer Is coming
more and more into prominence as the
exhibitor at these shows to the exclu
sion of the manufacturer. Education
of the masses who hope and expect to
own automobiles is the chief incentive
to the show, for the greater the Inter
est displayed by the public In these
machines the better will trade be for
the dealer. It'is, with him, a strictly
business affair.
The prospective purchaser of an au
tomobile depends to a large extent on
what he is told by the dealers when
making his investigation. A trip to
the automobile show is not only a so
cial event, but one of business interest
as well. The laity can, with a little
application, obtain a liberal education
In mechanics by a visit to one of these
fairy gardens in which the "fiery mon
ster" is put on public display. ;.; \
CANCERS CURED
§BYA SURE, PAINLESS METHOD *■■%*-*. B
no PAY until. cunEor^—J c/}<
HUNDREDS OF TESTIMONIALS 1 MMh&rK
FROM PEOPLE HO WILL WRITE YOU JJ B&Stmßfmß&T f-i
THAT WE SAVED THEIR I.IVES.kT Bsm§e£B&&p a^ ' :
BOOK SENT FREE. PRINTED GUARANTEE. Cs^^^^^Tl - l
THIRTY-SIX YEARS CURING CANCERS H J *\
CANCER NEVER PAINS until last Stage. Bffi^mffftSlfc. '*'
YOU MUST COME before it poisons deep jftmSS&MSffimjrSk f'i
or attaches to bone. We refuse hundreds tf^t^ntMtW' I *.'
who wait too lone; and MUST DIE. Any ST STB J^. Mil*
Tumor, Lump or Sore on the lip, face or S *
body six months is CANCER. ■ *•**■ >■".
Nox ß a, NoFr .ud. ANY LUMPin WOMAN'S BREAST!
•■WF TREAT ONLY CANCERS AND TUMORS. IF YOU WILL NOT COM* TOUSV
•BECAUSE WE ADVERTISE THE TRUTH, GO TO A SURGEON QUICKLY. J:
:Address Dr. S. R. CHAMLEY, FOR THE FREE BOOK:
; offlces74s and 7475. Main St.,Chamleyß!dg., LOS ANGELES, g
;I®" Kindly SKi to Some One With CANCER;
Amorimn American Motor Car Agency. l-.f
AMICNGan 1210-1212 South' Oliva
• A »«. ~.: *« .. C!.~..v1..., Bekins-Corey Motor Car Co.,
Amencan-oimplex Pi CO a nd no™ j
ixl Bekins-Corey Motor Car Co..
nliQo Pico and Flown
Cn\\fi\rn\* California Automobile Co.,
UdlllUl Hid Tenth and Main
rinrMQ Bosbyshell-Carpenter Co., r
l/"l I 15 1226-1228 South Olive
niimrar Durocar Manufacturing Co.,
l/UI UtCll 929 South Los Angeles
FmrtirA Munns Auto Co., ';
LmP" * 1351 South Main
Fnr/I Standard Automobile Co..
I "I Twelfth and Oliva
brcat Western 1130-1132 South Oliva
M ill j/l 11/ IcAtta Motor Car Import Co '
naiiaaay-iSOiTa B io s out h oh v «
UiitMnnkiL Tri - State Automobile and Supply Co.,
llUpillUUllu M. C. Nason, Mgr. 600 South Olive St.
I ana (Uamar Factor Branch 804 So. Olive,
Lail6 OlCdlllCl J. A. Tuthill, Representative.
Pat*rcnn Pico Carria ee Co -
I OICI SUII Pico and Main
P . I Williams Automobile Co., '«
rCuGI 1806 South Main
D mkLp W' K> Cowan« '
l\anlDlCr 11401H2 South Hope
q. i. A. N. Jung Motor Car Co.,
OlCrilny 1242-1244 South Flower
-w- . . California Automobile Co.,
lOUriSt Tenth and Main
• 1 1. Standard Automobile Co.,
Y6116 Twelfth and Oliva
LARGER WHEEL AND
TIRES IN DEMAND
NEW STYLE ADDS MUCH TO
SERVICE OF CAR
Rutty Roads Best Place to Demons.
tratt Superiority of Sizes Now
in Use Over Models of
Other Years
If anyone doubts tha increasing popu
larity of large wheels and tires over
the smaller sises, be may have nis
doubts (iuic-kly dispelled by comparing
the equipment carried by 1910 cars with
the tiivs and wheel! on automobiles
now three or lour years old.
Only three years ago JO ami 82 Inch
tires were the rule, and a 34xt W&M con
sidered exceptionally large. Now the
:;t> and 88 inch tiivs are the popular
sizes for similar cars, and even 42-inc.h
have become standard equip
ment on half a dozen makea of auto
mobiles, with more anounced (or the
future. So general has this preference
become that tires 34x4 and larger now
constitute over so per cent of our pneu-
matia tiro output.
Compare the service received from a
80-inch tire with that from a :«-ineh
one on a car of similar capacity. The
larger tire will invariably stand harder
uiage and for a greater period of
time.
on rutty roads the former will drop
into hole* that the larger tire will ride
over with fuse. The hub of the 30
--[nefa wheel being four inches lower
than the hub of the 88-lnch, the re
sistance, of road obstacles which would
he a severe shock to the momentum of
the Hist car and a discomforting jar
to its passengers is passed over almost
unnoticed by the larger wheel.
In a smaller degree the outward
curve of the :!0-inch tire being greater
than that of the 38-inch, a less abrupt
bending of the fabric invariably follows
a shock to the latter.
The strain exerted on the tread of
tin- larger tire when the ear is in mo
tion is divided over a larger area of
of road contact and is less tense at any
one spot, at the same time affording
better traction.
Again and important, any given
point of tho tread of the larger tire
touches the ground less frequently In
a sivcn distance. This means less wear
at any point, and also a more perfect
radiation of the heat generated by
friction,
Perhaps most important of all la the
fact that the larger the tire the greater
the total amount of air it contains to
serve as a cushion hack of the road
shocks, and tho easier the tire will
ride in consequence.
W. C. Bl Sll, Ho. C«L ArniV,
Game* and Repairing. ; ' ~f
ini-Z» tUliu iiai.\,
H«m» nwi. Mala Mlt.
NATIONAL
AUTOMOBILE CO.
Distributor!!. IIM-IMI So. Olive St.
UOKKUO CMllilt SEI.UKX PATENTS
BRINGS CONTRACTS
OF GREAT RACERS
New Pie Pan Track of Interest ti
Eastern Motorists, and Many
Will Attend Opening Ssr.
ies of Events
Brlnging with him the agreement of
the greatest triumvirato of automo
bile racing drivers. In the world —Old-
tieid, Robertson and De Palms — to par*
tlclpate in all the races of the motor
drome. Inaugural meet next mouth, P.
B. JVloskovius, general manager of the
motordrome company, will arrive In
Los Angeles this afternoon on his re
turn from a trip to New York and
i :hlcago.
Moskovlcs has had a remarkably suc
cessful trip from tho standpoint 0
entries, although the Interest excited
regarding the new board track at ]<■' .
Angeles presaged good results. Kigh.
or ten high-powered cars are now on
the way from New York, including
Robertson's Simplex, Caley Hragg's I>i .
Fiat, Leseauli's Palmer-Singer, the big
160-horsepower Christie and a numbc ■
Of others.
Oldfield's entry, which was signed up
by Moskovics before leaving Chicago
Saturday, is said to call lor a larger
sum than has ever been paid him be ■
fore. That would not have brought
him if the motordrome track did no
hold out inducements for greater speed
records than has heretofor ebeen pos
sible, is the opinion of local automo
bile men.
Parties of men prominent in the
automobile trade and racing world
have 1 p in,id.! up in Cincinnati, In
dianapolis. Chicago and New York to
come to i. os Angeles to witness the
tryout of the motordrome track in tho
inaugural meet April S to "17. A
those in the Indianapolis party are th i
cflicials of the si .edway .at that
who are anxious to see tho revolution
ary effect the I>>* Angeles "pio paa"
may have on automobile record*.
11

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