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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, March 20, 1910, Image 17

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-03-20/ed-1/seq-17/

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PART If
Nazarene's Life Is
Itself a Message
From the day of his birth in Bothlt
hem of Judea until the ascension
closed his earl lily career, the life Of
the humble Nasarene was the su
message a world of suffering human
ity ever received. His whole lifs WM
a demonstration of the Tact that Qod
Is Love and that hove Is the one ef
fectual remedy for all the sin and suf
fering of earth. His teachings, his
works anil his life were only partially
understood even by those who seemed
best able t mprehenri his mission.
From tin- beginning of his public ca
reer Unto this day llm multitudes have
failed to understand his teachings, his
works have been wrongly regarded
and his life mlssslon has been misin
terpreted. Nevertheless it Is impossi
ble to conceive of what would be the
moral and spiritual darkness of this
world if it were not for the sense of
good that humanity has gained from
his life and teachings. Unquestionably
the life of the Nasarene has been the
me I potent Influence for good the
world has known, ii can be said, how
ever, that humanity has experienced
scarcely a tithe of the preiM good it
was the Muster's sacred privilege to
bestow upon a n ly world.
The prophets saw as it were afar off
the glory of his life. They rejoiced to
see his day and were glad. For cen
turlai the people who had Ii arm 6 some
measure of obedience to the law and
the prophets awaited hln coming With
Joy. imriiiK" the succeeding centuries
Christendom has rommemorated his
birth and it Is to be hoped thai each
obi en am c of this momentous o
sion recordi a greater degree of lov«
and humility in the conduct of human
affairs than was manifest on the pre
ceding anniversary. if this lie Imt SO
It is because mortals have not given
earnest he'd to the heavenly message
mid Improved their opportunities.
Many times they would do better if
they knew how. Material beliefs have
blinded their eyes that they cannot see,
and caused them to turn a deaf ear to
tin- voice of Truth. The falsity of
thi ■■•■ h ii, fi is not recognised and
those in bondage thereto are sometimes
found contending for the truth and
reality of that which obscures the
heavenly vision. However, the light
continues to silln>< and the voice of
Ti Hi is not silenced. The prophet de
i land that the "eyes of the blind
shall de opened, and thr ears of the
deaf Shall bo unstopped," and the
prophecy Is being fulfilled. False theo
ries and belief! are giving place to
spiritual understanding and a greater
<lee. r t freedom and harmony is
realized by all those who are learning
to separate the true from the false and j
are able to distinguish between that
which really 1m and that which only
: .-. 11• tii to be.
T%e b!rth of the [Whir-hem bahr. was
announced t'> the shepnerds as they
kept watch over their Bocks by night.
Th ■ tiding;! of (real Joy which the an
gel brought was not to them only, but
"to ill people." To those who fell the
need of ■ Saviour and were anxiously
awaiting hi** coining there .hum i.. no
swi ter message than that the Bavtous
had appeared among men. The shep
herds had scarcely r lived the
when -in angel ii<>st was heard
"praising God, and saying, Olorj to
Qod In tho highest! in ! "ii oarth p ace,
I i will toward men." in this s.ms
of iho angels is clearly snm the divine
purpose to be accomplished by the
CASH OR CREDIT
Easter Sale
Of Ladies' Suits and
Trimmed Hats Continues
, All of This Week
Easter comes one ' week from ~-*s\j\
today. To most people that will do&)K<\
be ample warning to " get busy." fe^***,
We expect one of the busiest \^f]r^^^
weeks of the season, and have mi
prepared for it in every way. /p^l/^^J
This Easter Sale of Ladies' Suits J/A jjVV
and Hats is not only timely— it is/^;^ 1//<!J
much more than that. Such /\^^) \l'(
exceptional values as we >O^ / Jj(
offer this week are never put jjf j nil
forth at the beginning of the A^J I I
season. / "* j I I
Come tomorrow—or next day— / 111
don't put off buying until the last / I I
minute. / I I
Special Sale Leaders in /MI ll
£V • Ladies' /// |
Tpfjt Suits /// 111
/Men's Easter Suits
Men's Easter Suits
' / m ' New Greys in choicest <C 1 C <C9f. <C9C?
• V~rw''V/ •tripes and mixture*. «P1 J > *P^> «P^°
lli \ I ne Blue Serges In the always popular plain
1 I Ilk I goods as well as very new <C 1 tZ f n C9S
\\ y I striped effects, from 1D lO *PZO
1 11/ / Nobby Black Serges and unfinished worsteds,
1 J'i ' / with hairline stripes, they're bound to
AI i to be popularthis (£1 C C 1 Q COC
/\ill ' season,. .... 3>l«>> «l>lo> »^3

v Lowest Prices—Cash or Credit
Coast Outfitting Co.
H. W. Boyd, Manager
408 West Seventh Street
One Block West of Broadway
earthly ilfo of the Master. it wbm to
proclaim peaoe and establish good will
among men. Jmub domonatrated that
Inbarmony of any kind or character
bai no place In God's kingdom He
taught humanity to pray, "Thy king
dom come," and then he taught them
how to haiteti the coming of that king
dom. He did not teach that heaven
wua nfar off to be galngd at lome fu
ture time.
He taught that the reign of eternal
harmony is here, and now i.« the time
to gain it. At no time <iiii ho fall to
dem mstra'.c the power of Truth to save
humanity from evil. It mattered not
In what form the evil presented itself.
lie healed all manner of diseasei , ho
oast out devils and raised the dead;
he fed the multitude and stilled the
tempest in proof of Qod's presence and
power.
The Jews looked for one who would
establish a material kingdom and de
liver them from the oppression of the
Homans. The' salvation they looked
for and expected was temporal, but the
salvation Jesus came to proclaim wits
to save humanity from temporal Ills by
imparting the true sense of being
which Is eternal. The work which the
Jews had expected the Messiah to ac
complish was not to be compared with
the work he did accomplish. The
Saviour's mission was not to the Jcwh
only, but to all mankind; it was not
to save humanity from some of the Ills
they suffer, but from all tho discord
and suffering known to human experi
ence. In the teachings and the life of
the Master the power Of Truth was not
limited. It Is tiie mortal, material be
liefs "f mortals that seem to limit
Qod's power and willingness to save
and help. When those erroneous be
liefs are forsaken—and'they are for
saken when the Master's words anil
Works are understood —It Is learned
thai Qod'S love and power are not lim
ited,
Christian Science comei repeating the
song o( the angels, "On rurth poace
good will toward men." And nl! It is
doing to establish peaco In human con
sciousness and to Increase the feeling
of good will and brotherly love "no
man knoweth." Christian Science rle
clares that not only all the good that
humanity derived from the life and
teaching* of the Master in the early
centuries of the Christian era Is for
humanity today, but even more it in
■tore for them, for the poasibilitl of
good were by no means exhausted In
the cluys of Jesus and tho apostles. In
those days humanity but touched the
horn of Truth's garment, and today
humanity may find Truth an effectual
help In every time of need. Qod heals
the sick and saves the sinful today as
.ii old. If it is possible to realize God's
promises fulfilled today as of yore,
what sweeter message could human
lips repeat or what could bring greater
Joy to Uie human heart? The Master
said, "Come unto me all yo that labor
and are heavy laden and I will give
you rest." These were not the labor
are heavy laden and I will give
rest." These were not the words
of an to man, they were the message
of divine Love to all who feel the need
of help. it matters not what th. need,
divlno Love ts able to supply- It. The
j invitation Is, Come, and Christian Bel
ence teaches mortals what is required
of thorn that they may receive the
needed blessing. Herein lies the prac
tical value of Christian Science; It not
only points the way but helps one to
walk therein, thus making It possible
for him to provo for himself tho truth
of what 1b taught and to receive the
reward of one who gains the true sense
of belne.—Christian Science Monitor.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: SUNDAY MORNING, MARCH 20, 1910.
GEN. BOOTH WINS
IN WILL CONTEST
BEQUEST TO HEAD OF SALVA
TION ARMY TO STAND
WOMAN'S ECCENTRIC ACTIONS
FAIL TO NULLIFY IT
Mrs. Elizabeth Perona Shown to Have
Smashed Her Costly Furni.
ture with Aid of a
Hatchet
DUBLIN, March 19.—General Booth,
bead of the Salvation Army, w:us the
plaintiff in an interesting will case
which ' ame before Justice wrinht the.
other day. 'rii 1' action was brought to
prove tiie last will of Mrs, Elisabeth
ivioria, who died on April 26, I'm:1.
at Brighton-buildings, Rathgar. The
defendant, Mrs. .lame; Hedges, was a
sister of Mrs. Perona, ami ehe Im
peached tire will on the ground of want
of testamentary capacity.
The will was either losi or destroyed.
Advertisements offering a reward for
its r very v-rn: published, but it was
not forthcoming. The estate totaled
about 14600, ami after bequests
amounting to $400 the residue was
divided between General Booth, for
Salvation Army purposes, and the Con
gregational union.
Washington Bhea, a clerk to Messrs,
Kennedy and ITigglnß, solicitors, laid
that .Mrs. Perona executed a will on
February 24, 11)07, in the presence of
himself and another clerk, at her resi
dence, Sans BoUCi, Harold's Cross,
Dublin. After her dr.ith the witness
bed the rooms for the win and
failed to fiii.i it, but he found the en
velope In which It had been sent to her
from his employers' office. When she
executed the will she was perfectly
comptent to dispose of her affairs, in
the witness' opinion.
i>r. .1. Hamilton Olenderrlng, who
had attended Mm. Perona, said that
she began to show hlrhs of mental
collapse about fifteen months before
ber death, < m one occasion she had
smth.- lovely Chippendale furniture, and
she dragged it downstairs :m>\ out
into the yard, where niic smashed it
with a hatchet, sh.> became very
destructive and really Insane. Bhe
!>iirn<'<l her clothes and her l*".l sheets.
Bhe had a rope tied to the foot of the
bed iiy which she managed to spring
in and out Of It. She crawled on the
floor like a cat and lay down on tlm
hearth rup While blio burned clothing
and papers,
Further evidence of Mrs. Perona's
strange conduct was given by Mrs.
May Kelly, her landlady at Rathgar,
She' said that Mrs. I'.rnna. used to try
over General Booth's photograph, say
ing he was her son's favorite and
that he came next to the kintf.
Justice Wright ntiid be was satisfied
that the will had been properly exe
cuted and ix'en destroyed by the testa
trix herself at a time when she did not
know what she was doing, and that
She hail no intention of revoking it.
The will therefore will be admitted to
probate.
ROCK CRUSHER TESTED
A communication mi received by
the board of supervisors yesterday
from Hi. H>■nshiiw-Hiu klfy company
nf Sau Francisco, contractors for the.
Installation of the rock crushing ma
cinii' ■ y ■■<< the county quarry at Pa
. ..<iii i. stating that the plant had been
thoroughly tested and that all the de
t m!s of tin 1 machinery hart been per
fected, a trip of inspection will i>c>
made by the board of supervisor! to
the quarry Wednesday,
HERALD PATTERNS
A» * further convrnlrnce to our readen all
patterns ordered from The- Herald wliLhere
after be delivered within five iluy. frina the
(line the order Is received In thin office. This
inMiire* trn days' prompter delivery of pat
terns than has ever hpfore been attempted
by any newspaper In I.n« Antreles.
SI 04
BOTS 1 RUSSIAN SUIT.
HERALD~PATTERN NO. 3180
All Seams Allowed.
Wren planning the summer outfit fur
the tiny sun be Burn to Include In It sev
eral Russian suits of linon, duck, cotton,
poplin, Bedford cord or gingham, with
one or two of cloth or flannel for cold
days, for certainly no mora becoming
oostumes are to be found, and none that
is so comfortable to the small wearer.
The plotured suit consists of a front
closing blouse, with fancy panel facing
front and back and a detachable Eton
collar, and knickerbockers fitted on the
hips by darts and having the fullness at
the knees adjusted by rubber-run oas
lngs. As plotured the suit la made of
brown linen, with trimmings of scarlet
braid. The Eton collar Is of white linen,
and a tie of wide scarlet ribbon gives an
effective touoh of color. The pattern Is
cut In four sizes, 2to 5 years. For a boy
of 8 years the suit requires 2% yards of
material 86 Inches wide, with % yard of
white linen 18 Inches wide or wider for
the Eton collar, and 3Vs yards of braid
to trim.
Price of pattern. U conta.
ORDER BLANK
New Pattern No. 3180
Pattern Department If (raid I Inclosed
plruse flnd U)o, the price ot this pat
tern W'lien ordering please inrloae
illiiitvuiioii. Use the (ulluwluK blauka:
' • . i.-ZAft
Slxa •
•V. -v-^w
Name ••••
. -
Address .'.".'..
City and state.. •••••
SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES
MISS WING'S SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
1226 ALVARADO STREET
Day nnd boarding. All departments from kindergarten to college. Pre
pares for college and university. Fine school for girls visiting Southern
California for winter to keep abreast of their studies. Piano, elocution,
pottery, etc. Private tutoring. Winter term opens January 3.
MISS ETHELWYN WING, M. A.. Principal.
Horn* 111(1 • Sunaet Weit MM
'Y. M. C. A.
EVENING tnjuucpm
BLECTRIOAL ENGINEERING, ARITHMETIC, CHEMISTRY
MECHANICAL DRAWING, HOOKKKKriNG. ASSAYING.
MACHINE SHOP PRACTICE, PENMANSHIP. ALGEBRA.
\lt< 'iriTMTl 11.11, DRAWING, ' STENOGRAPHY. GEOMETRY.
BIIOW CARD WRITING. ACCOUNTANCY. SPANISH.
I'IUIUIACY, HUHINEHS UH'. ENGLISH.
SPRING TERM OPENS MARCH 28.
ACCOUNTANCY AND LAW
THOROUGH TRAINING FOR C. P. A. EXAM
INATIONS. SEND FOR 64-PAGE CATALOGUE.
Y. M. C A. 721 South Hope St. Los Angeles
f
953-7 West 7th Street
'Magnificent home of Its own. Ideally
located. Thorough courses. Fine
equipment. Unusually strong faculty.
The superior advantages 6f Browns
berger attract a doslrablo class of j
students. Graduates assisted. Send
for elegant new catalogue. t(
N K. cor. Bth an>l Hill sta. Entrance on Bth
*t. Best lighted, ventilated and flnest equipped
Business College rooms In the state. Call,
write or phone for full Information. ■
HARVARD SCHOOL. (Military)
Western Aye. Boarding and day pupils.
10-acre athletic field. Manual training sliojm.
Detailed U. B. army officer. Men teacher*
Kull commercial course, typewriting, book
keeping, stenography. Aoeredlted to tho
Universities. Write for illustrated cata
anavlila'c. Emery, Lltt. D.. Head Master
Grenvllle C. Emery. Lltt. D.. Head Master
THE ROWELL SCHOOL
720 S Broadway. Day and evening lfpsnnc
All grades high school studies. Broadway
3605. 3-20-3
RAILWAY TIME TABLE
BANTA FE
ua»» | | Arrive
I ttastern-Callf. Limited. I
1C:00 am d--lly. Chicago via Denver 1:0* pa
) and Kansas City |
Overland Uxjiresa-Dally
1:00 pm I Chicago via Denver and 1:30 aa
1 Kar.sa* City
~" Eastern Express — Dally I
7:«0 am Chicago via Denver and] 7:06 aa
Kansas Clt/ I
" ' Kiio sAaped—(Joins, via
1:30 am Pasadena. Return via •:*> pa
Banta Ana canyon [
TisTam" ~ lO^uo ao»
1:20 am Kedlande via Pasadena l:Mpa
1:00 pm *:40 pa
_4j3o_pm I 7:40 pa
f£o an I Hedlanasi via Orange I 10:35 am
10:66 am I | 4:30 pa
i "' 1:00 pa
7:35 «m [ Riverside via Paaadena 6:40 pa
1:30 am ! 1 ':<* P"»>
K:6fi am Riverside via Orange 10:35 aa
6:o^ pm I | *:30 n»
7:3u am ">■<"> am
10:63 am Corona via Orange 10:36 aa
6:oa pm ; <*0 pa
7:30 am | 7:06 aa
li'.tv am San Bernardino rla Orange U:U aa
6:ui pm »:»0 pa
7:36 am ' " M:3U am
l:ju am 10:o0 aa
10:00 am Ban Bernardino via Paea- 4:00 pea
1 00 pm dena 6:40 pa
4:80 pm •:<*> urn
1:43 pm
1:00 pm 7:40 pa
• 56 am *:66 aa
1:16 pm t«-ia Aaa urn aa
6:06 i>iu 1-00 pa
11:66 pm «-15 Pa
7:»« am « >»■ am
11:66 am 7:05 aa
10:66 am Fullerton. Anaheim. l:»u
1:16 pm Oranc* 10: M aa
6:u6 pm 1:00 pa
11:65 pm I 1:80 pa
7:36 am iban Jaclnto, Blsinore, Uo-j lu:3i aa
10:65 am | met and Murletta | «:M pa
51 aamj Redondo | 4:20 pm
2:15 pm ISscondldo 1:00 pa
1:66 am Fallbrook i:la pa
1:65 am Ban Diego and 1:66 aa
1:16 pm Coronado Beaca 1:00 pa
11:55 pm Surf Lin* f:l6 pa
7:Soam Randsburg 7:05 aa
>:uu pni Searchlight an'! Chloride 7:05 aa
1:00 pm Beatty, Rhyollte, Ooldneld I:W aai
and Tonopaa I
______-_
All trains dally except as noted.
Leave| First Street titalluP. |Arrl.e
s.»i Saa li«jniardiuu, n:l6a
11:00 a - Colton 10:41 a
l:40p Rlversld*. l:I6p
6:24p Ontario and 4:2tp
Pomona »:alp
'1:46 a • " ~"~ * s:l»»
1:60 a I<ong Beash and 11:10 a
•1:IOP
1-tOpe Ban Pedro 7:»0»
4':4op * >:6*»
* |:60al aania Catallna Island I i:uup
Til*! Pasadena I »:46a
Ijoopj Pasadena I 7:i«»
' epsuly except Sunday. sSunday only.
Illtah-Calllornla Special. I
Salt Lake, Butte, Denver, 110:00*
and Chicago. I
SCENIC RAILWAY IS
NEARING COMPLETION
STRUCTURE WILL HAVE TRACK
MILE AND HALF LONG
Venice Amusement Feature Will Be
Most Spectaocular and Com
plete in the Whole
Country
VENICE, March 19.—A Hundred car
penters are rapidly transforming an
odd looking piece of architecture here
into the Venice Scenic railway which
is expected to be completed and opened
to the public by the middle of April.
The structure extend 3 out 900 feet ovi i
the beach and ocean and winding
around through the various rx
the numerous rafters and sticks used
in its construction Is a mile and a half
of track over which three-car twins
capable of carrying: thirty persona will
run. The Venice Scenic railway is to
be the most elaborate thins of the kind
on this coast. It Is bains built by the
L. H. Thompson company of New York
under the direction of Superintendent
Charles Hlle.
According to Hlle, more than 280,000
feet of lumber have I n used in build-
Ing the .scenic railway, together with
thirty tons of plaster and cement and
a tou and a half o£-. hardware. Dne-
6CHOOLS AND COLLEGES
jS&ls^p? Los Angeles
J^^^^T Business
&$& j&tik' College
pr fVT^Ly-^*/^:-' Ini'orporntril 1891).
" I. I^'lei'vU.U^^* Open entire year.
I let' WiMiir^ Pnsltlonn for (rrailuatea.
jirE-'^^jj^J^^ Send for pronpectua
tP ~~^rrr f* 1 "' Both phones.
■"-*"" 417 W. IIFTII ST.
FUrTII-STBEET-BY-TIIE-rAKK.
German, English
Shorthand
by experienced teacher. Terms moderate.
210 W. list it. Phone South 6421.
NATIONAL SCHOOLS
of Typewriting
610 Chamber of Commerce Bldg.
Wanted, Rtuuenta to study shorthand and
bookkeeping. Two dollars a week. Home
use of typewriter free. Spanish, 250 a tea
son. Classes day or night. 3-3-ti
ith l'loor Hamburger Bldff.. I<oa Angelra.
Y. M. C. A.—DAY AND KVENING CUM
merclal, technical, automobile, college pre
paratory and grammar schools now open.
10-1-tf
L.OS ANGELES BUSINESS COLLEGE, 417
W. Fifth St. E. K. SlillADEll. Ph. D..
president since 1800. 10-27-tf
BROWNSBEKQEn COMMERCIAL COL
lega. 953-7 W. 7TH. Send for catalogue.
10-29-tf
KAILWA^Y TIME TABLE
•OUThEKN PACIFIC «
From Arcade station. Fifth and Central a»«.
L«ave| ~ |Arrlve
1:00 a San Francisco via Coast Lin«.| >:joa
l:l6a| Saa Luis Oblspo, Paso Robles.l 3:10*
S:l6pDel Munte, Monterey, Sania| H;JDB
1:l0p| Cruz, San Jose and eaat |ll:4i»
(Ban Franclaco and Mojav* I
• :00p[ tiacrameuto, Oakland, via 1 7:06 a
• slOpi iiakerafloid and 1 eano j t:ooa
l:ioai Fresno | 7:06 a
S:uupl BakeraUeld I I sou*
».Jt»y] and Mojave j 11:00 a
IChloaso, Kansas CUy, 81 L>ouis.|
i:46p| Uolden bLate Limlt»i | «:66»
».uup| The Caillorman, rla j 7:lc*
| Tuma, Benson, m Paso |
" | Overland ort*aiis via \
12:01p Yuuia, Benson, Man>it>pa, 'luu-| 1.1*»
son, £1 Paso. t>aa Antonio,[
J Houston |
U:olp| Vuiiia, Tucson, Benson, | 1:10*
t:oop( Lordsburg, Deinlng, j 7:16*
»jl6p__ Xl Paso | l:»0p
*fI4MJ | e-i/s
l:uua ■ 111:60*
1:16 a Banta Barbara j 2'iOi
1:46p and | 7:l6j>
I:*6p Ventura •] »:lOf
7:»up ('Not Ventura). |11:46g
S:l6a Oxaard, bauia SuMuaa, •{ n.ioa
3:35p Moorpark, •ill:50*
)i*op • tiomls, | 2:30f
Camarlllo. *j 7:Ji
(»O»nard only). |ll:t6a
Banta Paula via Sau«ua, j ~
• :45a Camuloa, I'lru, Flllmore, 11:50*
1:45p Eaticoy, Montalvo, Carpla- 7:*ss
teria. Bummerlaad
l:l6aj Nordhoff TiTJiT
iliSePI | I 7:lia
'7;«6a ~ |*t:(0*
t:66a Pomona • |7:15 a
12:01p Colton 7:16 a
>:00p Riverside, Redlands and 9:36 a
4:00p 6an Bernardino 11:36 a
• :46p *Not Riverside, Red- l:S0p
*«:16p lands or San Bernardino 6:2ep
7:10p
• :55»l , covina iIITISi
_tit 6p| | 7:lop
~7:46af"~ Chlno i »:36*
4.Uopj I 6:2 ip
Sautu, Ana, Anaheim, Downey, '
1:65 a Norwalk S:IOa
11:16 a I:16p
l:00pa* Buena Park, West a* 3:00*
IllOp Anaheim, West Orange 4:6<»
'Downey only j
■ :66a| Newport Beach | 4:60p
S;osa|i» Los Alamitoit . a| 4:Aup
«TT6a\ Brawley, Imperial. i:3ua
t:lsp El Centro, Calezloo tl:aip
>:06a Ban Pedro-Compton * 11:45 a
l:iop* 'Via Long Beach «:l»p
t:o6al* Long Beach-Comptoa |11:*4«
_|:30p| 'Via San Pedro »| 4:lip
t:o6a| Banta Catallna Island | 6:>ip
"eTTaaT I 7:06 a
1:50 a Fernando *| 1:40*
1:46p 11:60*
|:00p 'Motor . I 7:16 a
_^:lOp I t:0l»
t:lOaa Chatsworth Park. (Sac a 3:4»»
note). (NoteTo and from
Klver etatlon only). \
All trains dally exoept those marked a*
follows: "a" Sunday* exceptedi "b" Sunday*
o*uy.
third of the railway structure, that
part which extends out over the water,
is supported by 2^5 piling. The highest
point reached by the track above the
ground is eighty feet. The railway
Will tost $60,000.
The L. H. Thompson company has
twenty scenic railways In the larger
cities of the United States, but Hile
declares the one under construction
here is to bo an improvement over all
the others, including- those at Coney
Island. The track will wind among
high mountain peaks, through dark
canyons where only the stars may be
seen overhead, across yawning chasms
and past rushing mountain torrents.
None of the other Thompson railways
have the mountain feature. Hile says
it will be a more beautiful ride from a
scenic standpoint than can be found on
any railroad in the country. The rail
way will have a capacity for handling
2000 passengers an hour.
Other amusement projects are said to
be planned for Venice, which is ulti
mately expected to be known as the
Coney Island of the Paolflc.
A NICETY OF GRAMMAR
Two colored women were Rtancllng on a
downtown corner yesterday afternoon talking.
"Mlsa Williams have came home." said one.
Thi> other laughed. "Ma goodness!" she
said, "why don't yo' leahn yoh grammah?"
"What did I say that wah Krammahle-ss?"
asked tho other.
"You said 'have came.' "
The first speaker was provoked.
"Well, yo' knows so much about grammah,
now tell me what I should a-sald?" she de
manded.
"Yo' should a-eald, "Miss Williams ha« oamo
home,' " replied the other.—Denver Fast.
You can buy It, pernapv at many placet, but
there's one BEST placa to buy It—and thai
plaoe. advertise*. • ' — -^
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THE WEATHER
LOS ANGELES, March 19, 1910.
Tlme.|Barom.|Ther.|Hum|_Wina.|Vlo7iWeather.
sa."mT| 30? M I M I M fNW 1~2 I Cloudy.
6p_m.J_3l).o4_|_sS ]So I S [ 4 | loudy.
Maximum temperature, i>2.
Minimum temperature, ,',_'.
BAN FKANCIBCO, March Rainfall data:
Past 24 Seasonal Normal
Stations— hours, to date, to date.
Kurcka 0.26 30.97 36.01
R< I lllult 1.10 11 M 19.94
Sacramento 0 04 D 03 15.SS
Mt. Tamalpals 0.69 23.(t0 IH.V>
San Francisco 0.60 M.(M 18.54
San Jo - O.Ki 11.93 10.76
Fresno , 0.01 7.72 7.63
Independence Trace 7.45 7.31
Han I.uls Oblspo Trace ivi:: 16.49
Ixw AtiKnles ...^ Trace 10.71 12.»7
San Diego Trace 8.57 8.28
Weather Conditions
Tho following ma-ximum and minimum tem
peratures are reported from eastern ■tatlons
for previous day: Chicago, 63-50; New York,
44-30; Omtiha, 74-40.
Forecast
For Southern California—Cloudy, with show
ers Sunday; ll^ht southwest wind.
For San Francisco and vicinity— with
showers Sunday; light .-->uth wind.
For Northern California Cloudy, wl"i show
ers Sunday; light BOUthweal wind.
MARRIAGE LICENSES •
ARONS-KAUFMAN-Morrts Aron»; ac<!d 27,
and Anna Kaufman, aged 23. natlvee of Tox
as and Minnoeota; both reildeDUi of Los An
geles.
LANG E-COOPER— Bernard J. Lange. aged 22.
and Fannie B. Cooper, aged 10; natives of
Texas and California; residents of San An
tonlo, Tex. and East San Gabriel.
JOHNSON-NELSON—August Johnson, aged 41.
and Anna C. Nelson, aged 39; natives of
Rhode Island and New York; both residents
of Los Angeles.
YATES-VIGNES—Samuel H. YateH, aged 37,
and Daisy Vl(?n(is, aged 27; natives of Illi
nois and Texas; both residents of Los An
gelee.
STOLL-KLASS—Adolph Stoll, aged 32, and
Anna Klaaa, aged 26; natlvos of Switzerland;
residents of Los Angeles and Anaheim.
CHASE-MANNELL—WiIIiam J. Chase, aired
22, and Irene Mannell, aged 18; natives of
Missouri and California; both reeldente of
Los Angeles.
KELLEY-TURNER-Edward E. Kelley, aged
30, and Margaret Turner, aged 19; natlvei of
New York and Wisconsin; both residents of
Los Angeles.
STULTZ-WINKERT—MeIvIn 11. Stultz, aged
20, and H. Wlnnifred Winkert, aged 23; na
tives of Pennsylvania and Ohio; both resi
dents of Ontario.
PLEASANT-TRACY—Roy C. Pleasant, aged
22. and Cora M. Tracy, aged 18; natives of
Missouri; both residents of Pomona.
JOHNSON-SHERMAN—CharIes E. Johnson,
aged 33, and Clara Bell Sherman, aged 23;
natives of Michigan and Illinois; both resi
dents of Los Angeles.
SEDWELL-WOODS-Rlchard A. Sedwell, aged
21, an<l Rose A. Woods, leTed 21; natives of
Nevada and Vermont; both residents of Los
Angeles.
HILL-LAWRENCE—EImer P. Hill, aged 24.
and Kitty P. Lawrence, aged 16; natives of
California and Indiana; both residents of
Florence.
GIBUS-ROSS— B. Glbbs, aged 23, and
Anna Ross, aged 24; natives of Ohio and
Iowa; both residents of Los Angeles.
FERNANDEZ-FORRER—Frank P. Fernandez,
aged 4:1, and Anna V. Forrer, aged 40; na
ttvea of Louisiana arul Wisconsin; both resi
dents of Los Angeles.
KING-WOODS—James Harold King, aged 22.
and Margaret \Y. Woods, aged 88; natives of
California and Vermont; both residents of
Los Angeles.
BIRTHS
BOYS
■HIMORCHI—To Kameklchl and Setsu, 120
Nurth San Pedro avenue.
DEATHS
SALDlNO—Josuslta Saldlno, 221 North Utah
Street, native of California, age 1; meningitis.
BARPAQLI— Sarpa«li, Sisters 1 hospi
tal, age 23, native of Italy; burns from ex
plosion of oil stove.
FERNANDEZ—PauIa Fernandez, county hos
pital, aged -3. native of Mexico; tuberculosis.
MULKEY— Mulkey, county hospital, na
tive of Missouri, age 37; tuberoulosls.
DURKEE—DeIand Durkee. Ninth street and
Boyle avenue, aged 47, native of Michigan;
fracture of skull.
WHITFOHD— Leonard Whltford, county hos
pital, age 59, native of New York; paralysis
agltans.
\TO— Klnzioo Kobato, county hospital,
native of Japan, age 21; ttinetvu!
WARHANIK-Emll Warhanlk, 810 West Ave
nue 49, age 43, native of Japan; endocarditis.
BREBNER—Lewis A. Brebner, coumy hospital,
age 44, native of Michigan; tuberouluntl.
CAMPBELL—Esther B. Campbell, 2657 Mag
nolia avenue, age 64, native of England;
apoplexy.
WEINZETTEL—EIIen Weinzett.'l. Homo for
the aged, ago 68, native of Hungary; rup
turo of aorta,
STALEY—William M. Staley. 130 South Avcnuo
18. aged 15, natlvo of California; meningitis.
...
DIED
THEOPHITUS —March 18, 1910, Mary <"!.,
wife of Richard Theoiihltus. .1-20-1
CEMETERIES
INGLEWOOD^ARK :
CEMETERY
Two miles outside of city limits on the Los
Angeleß and Redondo Ry.; 200 acres of per
fect land with Improvements outclassing
any cemetery on the coast.
207 S. Broadway, room 101, Phones F3303;
Main 4659. . Supt. phone A 9593. 4-l-12m
EVERGREEN CEMETERY
The 1m Angeles Cemetery anitociulion,
Boyle Heights, near city limit*. Operated
under perpetual charter from l.o» Angeles
city. Modern cbapel and crematory.
Office, S3D Bradbury Bldg.
rhoues—Main BU| AStUti.
Cemetery—llume 1J10S3; lloyle 8.
«-6-12 m
"rosedale cemetery
An endowed memorial park, noted for its
natural beauty; endowment fund for per
petual care, over $250,000; modern receiv
ing vault, chapel, crematory and columbar
ium; accessible. City office, SUITE 302-306
EXCHANGE BLDGI., N. E. cor. Third and
Hill sts. Phones Main 909; A 3620. Cemetery
office, 1831 W. Washington st. Phones TJBSB;
West 80. 6-2-12 m
UNDERTAKERS
INDEPENDENT" OF THE TRU ST
We will furnish for $75 hearso, two hacks,
embalming, shroud and cloth covered casket.
GODEAU & MARTINONI.
Main office 827 S. Figueroa. Home 53427;
Broadway 2731. Branch offices, 2123 Brush
street, 305 Montgomery avenue, San Fran
cisco; 1306 Franklin street, Oakland. Hacks
for hire. Lady, attendant. v . 3-iti-tf
CHURCH NOTICEB
Clhiriistiaini ScSemice
Servnces
First Church of Christ, Scientist
of Los Angeles, In the church edifice, Sev
enteenth and Flgueroa streets, il a. in. and
s p. m.; sornu.n from the Christian Science
Quarterly, subject, MATTER. Sunday
school at 0:30 a. in.; Wednesday evening
meeting at 8 o'clock. Reading rooms 7'H Her
man W. Hollman bldg., Spring ann Fourth
streets, open dally, Sundays excepted, from 8
a. m. to 9 p. m. 3-19-1
■' ~- —.
CMstiai Scieice Services
Second Church of Christ, Scientist
I at the church cdlilce on West Adams street,
near Hoover, Service; Sunday 11 a. m. and
8 p. m.; sermon from the Christian Science
Quarterly. Subject, "MATTF.R." Sunday
pchool I! a. in.; Wednesday evening meeting
8 o'clock. Readli rooms, 704 Herman W.
Hcllman Bldg, Bprlng and Fourth sts.,
open dally, Sundays excepted, from 9 a. m
to 9 p. m. 3-M
-CMstfas Scieice Services
Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist
at W. C. T. V. hall, Temple street and
Broadway. Services Kuntlay, 11 a. m.; sor
mon from the Christian Science Quarterly
BUbiect. MATTER. Sunday school ■' HI
a. m. ; Wednesday evening meeting 8 o'clock
Reading rooms 7"4 Herman W. Hcllman
bWlg., Spring and Fourth streets, open dally
Bundays execpted, from 9 a. m. to 9 p. m.
3-19-2
Tie lidcipciCaCal Church
of Clirlst
Eighteenth and Flgueroa streets.
REV. .1. s. THOMSON, Pastor.
Bundaj service il a. m.; subject of ser«
mon, "The, Mark of the Beast on the Soul."
8010, "Come Thou Fount," Mrs. D. .1. Ken
nelly; solo, '■Tie- Palms," Mrs. Oeorgß F
Drake; duet. "In the Cross of Christ I
Glory," Mrs. Urake and Mrs. Kennelly
Miss Mary L. O'Donoughue, i ganist. Al
are Invited, especially strangers. 3-10-
St. John's Episcopal Church
514 West Adama Street (Near Flgueroa).
Tako Dalton sve. or Cirand aye. or Kedondo
car to W. Adams st., or yellow University
car to Chester place, and walk through Ches
ter place.
REV LEWIS O. MORRIS, Rector.
PALM BUNDAT—7:BO a, m.. holy commu
nion. il a. m., morning pi i: er, procession
,-,( palms, t.d sermon by the r.ev. L. B.
Rldgely, 7:30 p. m., the choir and quartol
will render the oratorio, "The Seven Last
Words," by Th. Dubois. The pews are free.
Services are short and hearty. All are wel
come. 3-19-2
St. laltliias Church
Corner Washington and Normandle,
REV. A. M. SMITH, Rector.
Mass at 7:30 a, m. Matins at 9:15 a. m.
Blessing of palms and distribution at 10:15.
Choral mass and sermon at 11 a. in. Even
ing prayer and Instruction at 7 1., o'clock.
Subject, THE RELATION OF THE BIBLE
TO THE CHURCH The I Instructions are
especially for those unlnstructed in the
faith Of our church. Come, learn what we
believe, and why. 3-19-»
People's Spiritualist Church
Burbank hall, 64J S. Main st. Sunday serv
ices ktarcn 20: 9:30, HeaUng circle; 10:30,
lecture by the pastor, Rev, W, F. Peck,
subject, "The Higher Life"; 2:30, message*
by Miss Freda Qeltser, followed by message
circles; 7:30 to 8 p. m., concert; S p. m.,
lecture by Dr. Peck, subject, "Some Conun
drums for the Clergy." Measagaa by Mrs.
Cora X, Smith. Monday evening, March 21,
Dr. Peck Will deliver a lecture, Illustrated
with Btereopticon views. 3-19-1
Universal Spiritualist- .
Brettalioofll Society
Holds meetings 10:30 sharp. Healing, devel
oping eirolea 2:50, lecture by Dr. Green; sub
ject, •■spirit Return," followed by tests,
messages. Evening meeting 8 o'clock; sub
ject, "Eternal Brotherhood," followed by
tests, messages; queatlona answered. Dr.
Green gives readings dally, Sunday, Cale
donia hall. nn'.o s. Bprlng st. 3-20-1
. Tlbc Us Angeles
FellowsMp '
REYNOLD E. BLIGHT. Minister.
11 a. m., service at Blanchard hall. 233
South Broadway. Subject, "Tapping God's
Resources of Power." Prelude, "Giving
Away the Rockefeller Millions." All seats
free. 3-19-2
St Paul's Pro-Catletal
523 SOUTH OLIVE STREET.
Very XXV. WM. MAC COKMACK,
I lean and Hector,
7:30 a. m., Holy communion.
11 a. in., morning prayer and pennon by
the dean; topic, "The Mind of Christ."
7:30, evening prayer.
The choir will sing "The Crucifixion," by
Sir John Stalner. 3-19-2
BROADWAY CHRISTIAN CHURCH,
Opposite Courthouse.
EvnnßeliHii, meetings continue. Rev. A.
C. Ranklne of Australia preaching; subject
on Lord's day at 11 a. m., "Christ Our
pai over," and at 7:45 p. m., "Baptism Ac
cording to the New Testament." Commu
nion following the morning dlsoourae,
Preaching every evening, except Saturday,
at 7:4r,. Sunday school at 9:30 a. m. Young
People's meetings at 0:30, Welcome to all.
I U j
Phono Home A 1715. Hours, 12 to 8 p. m.
New Thought Books and Magazines for Sale.
WIIVSICAI, CIRCULATING XIUUAItV
AND FREE READING ROOM.
Eleanor M. Rcesburg, Librarian.
Established February, 1902. 611 Grant building,
northwest corner Fourth and 3roadway.
Membership dues, 25 cents per month.
LITERATURE. FOR FREE DISTRIBUTION.
1-23-s-tt
The Commune
A meeting in commemoration of the Com
mune will be held this evening by thi So
clallsts in McKinley hall, Walker theater
building. The speakers will be Job liar
rlinnn and Harry Schade. The public ia
Invited. 3-50-1
Liberal Club
Mammoth hall, 517 S. Broadway. Tonight
Prof. Isaac N. Yuil on "Annular Theory of
World Evolution." Questions and discus
sion. MM
PEOPLE'S SPIRITUAL CHURCH-SPECIAL
meeting Monday evening, March '.'i. Lecture
by Dr. Peek on Astronomy, illustrated with
stereoptieon views. Sunday, March 27, cele
bration of the 62d anniversary of modern
Spiritualism; an all-day meeting. Prominent
speakers and mediums will be present,
among them the. well known John Slut, r.
3-20-3
First Unitarian Ctmircli
926 SOUTH FLOWER STREET
REV. E. STANTON lIODGIN, Minister.
Subject for Sunday morning', March 10,
"Temptations." Sunday school at ID o'clock.
Classes for all ages. 3-19-2
WOTICE TO CHURCHES-COPT FOR ALL
church notices for toe Saturday and Sun
day morning Issues Is requested to b«
turned In at Tha Herald offloe by Friday
noon. If possible. Thla will assur* proper
classification and publication. J-U-U
UNIVERSALIST,
McKinley hall. Walker Auditorium.
Tho pastor, Rev, C Bllwood Nash, D. D.,
will preach at 11. Subject, "The Sunday of
Paltiw- An Interpretation." Sunday school,
9.45. Welcome. 3-20-1
PENIEL HALL. 21-7 S. MAIN. NOON PRAY
er meeting dally; gospel meeting- every
night. 3-l-«mo
It's as easy to >ecure » bargain In a nse«
automobile, through want advertising, as M
need to be-and aUU to-W MOUt» 4JWCSI
and carriage. ' ""**"" ' i
5

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