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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, April 25, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-04-25/ed-1/seq-2/

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COMMISSION WILL
HEAR COAST KICK
Interstate Board Sets Aside Day
for the Transcontinental
Traffic Hearing
FIGHT TO EQUALIZE RATES
Shippers Will Make Supreme Ef
forts to Secure Lower
Pacific Rate
[Associated PrtssJ
WASHINGTON, April 24.—A notable
conference will be held by the members
of the interstate commerce commission
Thursday and Friday. Those days
have been set apart by the commission
for the consideration of the Pacific
coast cases heard by the commission on
its long trip last fall.
The cases involve not merely freight
conditions local to the Pacific coast,
but questions of rates affecting the
transcontinental traffic in its entirety.
The cases include the rehearing of the
Spokane rate matter, the Portland and
Seattle back-haul cases, the San Fran
cisco cases Involving the rate into !n
--termountain territory and the Reno
rate case.
ASK SAME RATE
The last is the most important now
before the commission. Reno shippers
have urged the commission to give
them the same rate on class and com
modity traffic from the Atlantic sea
board as now is given to Pacific coast
terminals.
It was developed in the hearing of
the case that the rate from Atlantic
ports to Sacramento and the Pacific
coast terminals was $3 on first class
freight, and proportionally less on other
classes and commodities.
The rate to Reno from the Atlantic
points is the sum of the Pacific coast
rate plus the local rate from Sacra
mento to Reno. The distance from
Sacramento to Reno Is under 130 miles,
and the back-haul rate is $1.29 on first
class freight. This makes the rate from
the Atlantic seaboard to Reno $4.29, al
though the freight Is unloaded at Reno
on the westbound haul.
•COMPETITIVE POINT
The defense of the railroads is that
Sacramento Is a water competitive
point, a boat line being operated be
tween- San Francisco and Sacramento.
They hold, therefore, that although
Sacramento Is a longer haul, they are
obliged to make a lower rate on ac
count of water competition.
It Is understood the commission Is di
vided on the question of the proper ad
justment of these rates. It appears
likely it will be determined to reduce
the rates to both Sacramento and Reno,
• the reduction to Reno proportionately
greater than to Sacramento.
This case in concrete form involves
the question of the long and short
haul, which Is being considered at
present by congress in the adminis
tration railroad bill.
WASHINGTON AWAITS
MEXICAN APPOINTMENT
WASHINGTON, April 24.—The state
department is waiting with much in
terest the appointment of a Mexican
minister for foreign affairs to succeed
the late Minister Ignaclo Mariscal.
The submission by this government
of i plan for the settlement of the cele
brated Chamlzal zone case, which In
volves the question of whether a por
tion of the city of El Paso belongs to
Mexico, was under consideration by
Minister Mariscal at the time of his
death.
Officials here are not willing to dis
cuss the suggestions made to Mexico
for the settlement of this case, but in
asmuch as th.- United States is the
leading exponent among the nations of
arbitration for the settlement of Inter
nationa, differences, it is. not unlikely
the proposition made i" Mexico may
Involve the references of this case to
some statesman of a neutral power for
definite settlement.
in any event. It is not believed the
United States would consent, as the
possible result of a decision of arbitra
tion, to convey to Mexico the land in
dispute.
HEINZE IS READY FOR
BANKING LAW TRIAL
NEW YORK, April 24.- F. Augustus
Heinze will be placed on trial tomor
row in the criminal branch of tie- fed
eral circuit court. He is charged with
violations of the national banking
laws; specifically, with over-certiflea
tion of the checks of Otto Heinze & Co.,
and misappropriation of the funds of
the Mercantile National bank, of which
he was formerly the head.
Counsel for Charles W. Morse In the
fight for a new trial made capital of
the fact that Morse's Jury was guarded
by special agents from Washington. To
avoid criticism, this procedure, it is
nald, will not be followed in the Heinze
case.
Two weeks probably wil! be taken
up by the trial.
IDENTIFY DONOR OF
$ 300.000 HUB BRIDGE
BOSTON, April 24.— mystery sur
rounding the identity of the Harvard
alumnus who had offered $300,000 to
build a new bridge over the Charles
river as an approach to the stadium
from Cambridge, was cleared tpday
when it was learned thai Larz Ander
son, '88, of Brookline, was the man.
The proposed bridge would replace
the present structure, which has been
Sound inadequate to accommodate the
crowds which flock annually to the
stadium for football and other games.
AUTO KILLS RANCHER
SACRAMENTO, April 24.—Thomas
Elliott, aged 21, and the son of a
prominent rancher of Franklin, was
killed early this morning, and Newton
Ehrhardt was seriously injured when
their automobile crashed through a
bridge railing, throwing the two men
out. Elliott's neck was broken. The
two men were returning home and the
icc'dent occurred on the lower Stock
ton road about five miles ftroa here.
CHINESE LOTTERY FIRM
IS RAIDED ON OPENING
Sergeant Sebastian Leads Offi
cers Against First Drawing
Detected in the act of a lottery draw
ing, five Chines,' were arrested in a
raid on the rooms of the Qwong Hlng
Dung company, 305 Marchessault
street, last night. A chance remark
overheard by Patrolman Hartnagle
that the 'next drawing would be at
9 o'clock" resulted in the raid led by
Sergeant Sebastian and a squad of
Chinatown patrolmen.
The Chinese were taken by surprise,
and were under arrest and a complete
lottery outfit and the books of the com
pany were in the hands of the raiding
officers before the prisoners realized
what'was going on.
The lottery company, according to
the police, was recently organized, and
the first drawing was held yesterday
afternoon. At police headquarters the
Chinese gave the names of Ah Sing,
Tom Dock, Qwong Gunn, Sam Wah
and Ah Lee.
Shortly after they were booked a
number of fellow countrymen appeared
with pockets full of gold and the pris
oners were released under bail of $50
each.
HIGHWAY CHIEF
FURNISHES DATA
Engineer Loder Supplies Figures
to Uphold the Commission
Against Advisory Board
Members of the highway commis
sion, in an open letter to the public,
last night, stated their position, and
through Chief Engineer Loder brought
figures to bear on their side of the
argument. The report, which follows
a communication to the board of super
visors from the advisory commission,
urging the removal of the highway
commission, Is as follows:
In view of the fact that at the
present time an erroneous Impres
sion of the work on the good
roads is being derived from the
figures in the report of the advi
sory committee, a statement of the
condition and status of the good
roads contracts and estimates is
due the public.
The contract price or prices which
work is costing by force account,
' together with the total cost of ma
terials to be supplied by the com
pany, is within the original esti
mate made at the time of the bond
Issue on ten roads, which have been
contracted, or are being construct
ed with complete grading, bridges
and paving. These ten roads on
which complete work Is being exe
cuted aggregate 68.9 miles in length.
These figures on macadam work
are derived from a draft of a re
port to be submitted to the high
way commission within the next
few days. These ten roads are:
The El Monte road, Wllshlre boule
vard, Long Beach boulevard, por
tion of Washington street, contract
known as Vermont avenue and
Sunset boulevard, Prospect avenue,
contract covering Slauson, Comp
ton and Florence avenues: Los
Fells road, Bassett and Pomona
road, and Whlttler road, aggregat
ing 58.8 miles.
The estimate previous to the bond
election on these particular pieces
of work was $680,965, while the ac
tual cost of complete construction,
including contract, force account,
all materials to be furnished, is
8670,844, showing a net saving of
$10,021.
It must be borne in mind that
on a large proportion of this work
the county is furnishing broken
stone from Riverside, In order to
supplement the stone to be pro
duced within the county this work
ing season Consequently the cost
is proportionately higher than will
be the case "ii other roads on which
the county Is to Currish stone from
its own quarries at a much lower
price per ton, with considerably
less freight rate. By the present
arrangement for furnishing the
major portion of stone for the en
tire system of roads from the
county quarries, a. margin of $115,
--500 will be realized inside of the
bond estimate for that particular
rock at the quarries. Furthermore,
such rock will be placed on the
roads with less average distance of
railroad haul and freight rate than
estimated iii the original plans.
The above deductions do not in
clude the large number of contracts
which have been let on work not
requiring macadam, such as heavy
grading jobs like Newhall pass,
Cahuenga pass, Eagle Rock road,
Harbor boulevard, construction of
Newhall tunnel and a number of
permanent bridges which have been
instructed to date.:, (en which a
much greater percentagu of saving
has been reallsi 'I than macadam
work above.
While tho entire. 307 mile's were
estimated to cost -;.; 500,000, it is not
correct to say that the cost of each
mile will be $11,400.65. Thai is the
average cost per mile, Some of
the construction will cost far below
this figure. The first estimates
show that the cost per mile of the
roads varies largely In each sec
tion. These estimates are now on
file in the office and are open to the
inspection of the public.
The taxpayers of Los Angeles
county will see in the completed
roads every dollar of the bond issue
advantageously expended. Figures
regarding the exact status of the
work will be forthcoming, but from
the present outlook there Is abso
lutely no evidence that the entire
system of roads will not be comp
lete A. E. LODER,
Chief Engineer Los Angeles County
Highway Commission.
SHOOTS SELF TO DEATH
SEATTLE, April 24.—John Benson,
aged 45, sheet himself through the head
while In bed at his home In Ballard
today, because he believed the closing,
of the shingle mills presaged a long
siege of hard times. it is said he can
not recover. All the shingle mills of
western Washington were closed by
the manufacturers last week In order
to preient the brokers from reducing
prices and 3500 men were thrown out
of work.
ORDERS OPERA FOR TEDDY
BERLIN, April 24.— emperor has
ordered that Arthur -Nee Ins' Indian
opera, "Poia," be given at the Royal
opera hou%e in honor of Theodore
Roosevelt during his visit to the castle.
Crown Prince Frederick William and
the crown princess and Prince and
Princess August Wilhelm witnessed to
night's performance of "Poia," which
was more warmly received than last
night
LOS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING, APRIL 25. 1910.
GERMANY BEGINS
BIG NAVAL PLANS
Huge Battleship Fleet Is Sta
tioned Permanently in
the North Sea
CALLED STRATEGIC MOVE
Garrison at Wilhelmshaven to Be
Increased by Over
8000 Men
BERLIN, April 24.—A step of the
greatest importance in the naval de
velopment of Germany was taken a
few days ago, when, for the first time,
a fully commissioned battleship fleet
was permanently stationed in the
North sea. Hitherto, although the com
missioned fleet under the Double Eagle
has nominally been divided between
the Ostsee, or the Baltic, and the Nord
see, or North sea, Kiel has, to all in
tents and purposes, been the headquar
ters of both the squadrons into which
the High Sea fleet (which the German
admiralty prefers to call the Aktive
Schlachtflotte, or active battle fleet)
Is divided.
Now this state of things has been
altered. Vice Admiral Pohl, comman
der, under Admiral yon Holtzendorff
of the first squadron, has taken his
ships to Wilhelmshaven, upon which
port they will henceforth be perma
nently based. The British will not have
forgotten the eclat which was raised
when, in 1907, the British fleet was for
the first time In recent years based
on the Nor*. This move on Germany's
part is no less Important than that,
and is part of a great scheme of na
tional naval preparation more far
reaching than anything yet attempted
by Great Britain on the shores of the
North sea.
Wilhelmshaven today Is in the proud
position of being the most fully equip
ped dockyard for Dreadnoughts in the
world. Nearly ten thousand men are
employed, and there are three docks
that can take Dreadnoughts and three
suitable for other ships, in addition to
three floating docks for torpedo craft.
In the whole of the British naval dock
yards there are only four docks that
can accommodate Dreadnoughts.
TO INCREASE GARRISON
It Is significant to note that simul
taneously with the transference of the
first battle squadron the garrison of
Wilhelmshaven Is to be increased by
no fewer than eight thousand men. It
Is not at Wilhelmshaven alone, how
ever, that German activity in the North
sea Is being manifested. One of the
most striking instances Is Borkum, the
island that Is situated at the mouth
of the River Ems. and the most west
erly point of the German territory. The
fortifications of this island, hitherto
only moderate, are being greatly in
creased, and their ultimate strength
will include between forty and fifty
heavy and medium quick firing guns.
The reason for the increase is that
It has become known in Germany that
the plans of the British admiralty, In
the event ot" a war with Germany, in
cluded the seizure of this island, to
serve as a base for torpedo operations
against the German coast. How Ger
many became possessed of such In
formation it Is impossible to say. but
the fact remains that it did, and that
Germany is consequently taking steps
to prevent the achievement of such an
object. Quite recently the garrison of
the island has been increased by three
battalions of artillery, while accom
modation for 400 reserves has been
erected at Emden.
Much of the same reasons probably
account for Germany's great expendi
ture on the island of Heligoland. Over
$15,000,000 is being spent upon the de
velopment of this mass of clay—one
half for fortifications and the other
half for the construction of a torpedo
harbor.
roNSTRUtrnON tard
Brunsbuttel is another point on which i
much energy is being concentrated. A
great repairing yard is in course of
construction here, and there Is every
likelihood of the work, which includes
two Dreadnought docks, being com
pleted by 1914. or two years before the
one dock of the British at Rosyth. The
Kiel canal, again, Is being so enlarged
that Dreadnoughts will be able to tra
verse it, and as this work Is costing
10,000, or $10,000,000 more than the
original cost of the canal, it will be
seen that Germany Is prepared to sac
rifice much to secure something that
may be of use to her when the time
comes. , „,
Vice Admiral Pohl's squadron will
not yet, eel course, stand comparison
with the British home fleet. It consists
of eight battleships, two armored
cruisers and three scout cruisers. Of
the battleships, only two, the Nassau
and Westfalen, are of the Dreadnought
type but they carry twelve 11-inch and
twelve 5.9-inch guns, which is a Mi
perior armament to anything yet put
Into a British Dreadnought.
It must be understood that the trans
ference of this squadron to Wilhelms
haven does not mean that it comprises
the whole naval force which Germany
has at her disposal in the North sea.
The second squadron, though continu
ing to be based on Kiel, will spend
even more time than previously In the
North sea. It comprises the same nu
merical strength as Vice Admiral
Pohl's command. Each new Dread
nought as it is completed will be draft
eel into the first squadron, relieving
vessels of older types, and it is the
Intention of the German admiralty so
to arrange things that early in 1911
it shall be composed exclusively of
ships of the super-Dreadnougnt type.
LIVES 93 MINUTES AFTER
HEART CEASES TO BEAT
Man Struck by Train Continues
to Breathe
GALVESTON, Tex., April 24.— That
a man can live one hour and thirty
minutes after his heart ceases to beat
Is the statement of three reputable
physicians at Shepard, San Jaclate
county, when Thomas P. Lewis, aged
38, was struck by a locomotive. It was
thought that he had been instantly
killed.
Dr. W. H. Beasley found Lewis still
breathing, but pulseless. Hypodermic
injectioins of strychnine produced no
effect. Drs. Wilbourne and Sampson
were summoned. Each made a critical
examination and declared positively
that the heart was still, even while the
man breathed.
Electricity and other heroic meas
ures were resorted to, and after each a
careful examination was made, and
the man breathed for 'just ninety-three
minutes after his heart ceased to beat.
BRITISH PRESS PRAISES
ROOSEVELT'S SPEECHES
Says He Hits Mark Though Not
Subtle Thinker
LONDON, April 25.—Theodore Roose
velt's Sorbonne address is printed in
extenso in the British newspapers and
is the subject of editorial comment.
All make reference to the triteness
of the ex-president's themes, which the
Standard considers better suited for a
platform audience than for the flower
of Parisian intellectuals. At the same
time, all concede the sound and healthy
gospel is doubly welcome, as the Daily
Graphic remarks, "because the world
is" waking to the consciousness of in
tellectual and moral hunger which only
these truths can satisfy."
In the same strain, the Chronicle dis
cusses the source of Roosevelt's un
questioned power and influence, und
says: '. -
"He is not a subtle tinker, but knows
the majority of mankind like to hear
the eternal verities thrust at them
i through a megaphone. He knows also
his preachings, if universally prac
j ticed, would mean a regenerated world,
and a large part of the effect they
' produce comes from the knowledge
i that Roosevelt does practice what he
I preaches and that the qualities he
I recommends he has himself displayed
before all men's eyes with astounding
results."
TAGGART STRONG FOR
PRIMARY INDORSEMENT
He Wants to Be Senator and Is
Fighting Against Convention
Plans of Rival
INDIANAPOLIS. April 24.—Open
controversy over whether the Indiana
Democratic convention, to be held In
this city this week, shall Indorse a
candidate for the United States senate
broke out today in the lobby of the
Denison hotel, where the party leaders
had assembled in great numbers.
John E. Lamb of Terre Haute, vice
chairman of the Democratic national
committee, a candidate for the nomina
tion for senator and advocate of tho
plan that the state convention indorse
a candidate, accosted Stokes Jackson,
state chairman, and charged that the
committee on arrangements represented
by the state chairman is planning to
block the plan through parliamentary
tactics.
The leader of the opposition to in
dorsement Is Thomas Taggart, former
Democratic national chairman. He Is
a candidate for the senatorial nomina
tion. Taggart tonight issued a state
ment in which he proposes that If the
Democrats carry the legislature this
year a primary election for the selec
tion of a candidate for the senate be
called Immediately after the general
election in November.
TURKISH DEFICIT IS
MORE THAN ESTIMATE
Finance Minister Explains to Dep
uties That It Will Exceed
Thirty Millions
CONSTANTINOPLE, April 24.—
plaining the budget in the chamber of
deputies today, the finance minister,
DJavid Bey. announced that the deficit
would be £.6,800,000 Turkish (a Turkish
pound is equal to $4.40), Instead of£4,
--500,000, as stated. Serious fighting has
been renewed in Albania, in the De
moicza district, where incessant artil
lery fire is heard. The Albanians have
cut nearly all the telegraph lines.
MOTHER AND 5 TOTS
ARE BURNED TO DEATH
PONCA, Neb., April 24.—Mrs. Jerry
Miner and five children were burned to
death this morning when their cot
tage, three miles north of here, caught
fire. Mr. Miner saved his two-year
old baby by throwing it out of the
window. The father made a desperate
effort to rescue the other members of
the family. He was terribly burned
and Is not expected to live. The origin
of the lire is unknown.
Miner, who operates a ferry on the
Missouri river, saw the fire and has
tened to the rescue. Within five min
utes the house was in ruins.
COUPLE TAKE WEDDING
JOURNEY IN EALLOON
Honeymoon is Spent Above the
Clouds in Swaying Basket
Decked with Flowers
PARIS, April 24.—A young aeronaut
of Roubaix, who has just been married,
nucceusfully made his wedding trip
with his bride in a balloon. He had
returnee: only recently from Morocco,
where he had served in the ballooning
corps. After the ceremony in the
church the whole bridal party went to
♦he velodrome of Roubaix. where the
balloon Neptune was inflated in their
presence. The bride and bridegroom
stepped into the basket, which was
festooned with flowers, and the order
to let go was given. The balloon was
carried by the wind in the direction of
Arras, where the couple were to land,
and to be met by friends in an auto
mobile". They landed safely at a vil
lage some nine miles from Arras, and
che peasants in the neighborhood who
helped in the landing carried away the
newer? from the basket, which they
intended to keep for good luck.
FLIES 140 MILES IN AIRSHIP
PARIS, April 24.—A dispatch from
Dijon says Baron de Caters, the avia
tor in a Farman biplane, today beat
all cross country records, flying with
a passenger with Mourmelon to nearly
ten miles beyond Dijon, a total dis
tance of nearly 140 miles. No con
firmation of this has been received
from any source and aviators are in
clined to doubt the truth of the re
port, „yl
FEARS MOB, FIRES
GUN INTO CROWD
Man Thought Shot by Constable
Who Holds Many
at Bay
TROUBLE STARTS ON A CAR
Shooter Enrages Passengers by
Pointing Out Evaders of
Fares on Trolley
Fearing that he was about to be
mobbed by a number of men returning
from a picnic of the Garibaldi society
at Schuetzen park, Martin Miklaushitz,
a deputy constable, fired a shot at his
pursuers at the corner of First and
Main streets last night. Although wit
nesses statep7 at police headquarters
that one of the party staggered and
was hurried away, detectives detailed
on the case were unable to locate the
supposed injured person.
The witnesses agreed that one of
the men was shot In the arm, and
Miklaushitz admitted firing the shot,
when but a few feet- away from his
pursuers.
According to the story told by Mik
laushitz, the trouble started In the
dance hall at Schuetzen park when he
ejected one of the dancers for unbe
coming conduct.
When the crowd boarded a car for
Los Angeles there was a dispute with
the conductor, who alleged several of
the crowd were evading paying carfare.
Miklaushitz is said to have pointed out
to the conductor those who refused to
pay their fares and an argument start
ed which did not end when First and
Main street was reached.
As the deputy constable left the car
he was followed and turning to those in
the rear said, "I will shoot the first one
who approaches me." The crowd Jeered
him and defied him to use his re
volver.
Without any warning he drew his
gun and fired.
A large crowd was attracted by the
shot and loud words, and a crowd of
600 followed the deputy constable to
police headquarters.
As no one was able to give a clear
version of the affair, all participants
having evidently been drinking, Mik
laushitz was not locked up. When re
leased the deputy constable, who has
figured in police courts on several oc
casions, expressed regret that he had
not killed someone. "That's what I
carry a revolver for," boasted Miklau
shitz, "and the only way to frighten
those persons is to kill a few of them.
My intentions were good, but my aim
poor."
Miklaushitz Is blind in one eye and
has a wooden hand, which Is given as
the reason for his poor aim.
4 SAVED BY WIRES
AS BALLOON PLUNGES
SACRAMENTO, April Five pas
sengers in a captive balloon narrowly
escaped being dashed to death Just at
dusk, when the big bag ripped and the
balloon rapidly descended to the
ground. Grace Flower, aged 13, and
Norma Riddle, 15, of Oak Park, an
unknown man and woman and the
operator, Earl Wayne, were the occu
pants.
The balloon was demolished, but the
passengers were saved from death by
the gas bag touching overhead wires,
breaking the fall.
EARTHLY MONARCHS WATCH
FLIGHTS OF KINGS OF AIR
NICE, April There was a fine
display today of aeroplane flights over
the sea, In presence of the kings of
Denmark and Sweden. Five machines
went through a series of evolutions,
and Hubert Latham twice accom
plished a flight to Antibes, fifteen miles
southwest of Nice, and return. He
started on a third trip, but dropped
Into the sea, and was fished out un
hurt by a torpedo boat.
CHINESE TRADING BOAT
IS REPORTED WRECKED
AMOY, April 24.— British Kwel
Yiang, belonging to the China Naviga
tion Company of Trade, is reported
wrecked on Ocksu island, between
Amoy and Foo Chow.
The steamer Kwel Yiang is 1798 tons
register. She was built in Glasgow in
1890 and was engaged in trading in the
China sea.
OAKLAND FIRE DOES
DAMAGE OF $125,000
OAKLAND, April 24.—An early morn
ing fire that caused a loss of 8125.C00
destroyed the big warehouse of the
Hall Warehouse company and nine cot
tages on the same block.
JAPANESE OFF FOR EAST
SAN FRANQISCO. April After
two days spent in this city the delega
tion of fifty-seven business men and
financiers of Japan who are touring the
world on an educational trip left to
night for the east. They are traveling
in a special train that will take them
to New York by way of Niagara Fays
and Buffalo.
A STATE OF THINGB
Naturally, as time went on, and more
and more men had their noses to the
grindstone, the price of grindstones
went up and was at length Intolerable.
Of course there was not lacking false
prophets whose chief concern was to
set class against class, and who quick
ly took advantage of so fair an oppor
tunity. "How long will you endure
this wicked forestalling of the necessi
ties of life?" cried some of these, while
others, bolder, openly accused the
grasping and merciless grindstone
trust. ■'•' X
And the worst of It was the stupidity
of the government, which condemned
various cheap substitutes for grind
stones, on the ground that the public
health was put in Jeopardy.—Puck.
THE GOLDEN RULE
He—Why is it that a girl wants to
kiss every baby she sees?
She—to show that she is willing to
do unto others as she would have oth
ers do unto her.
TOO BAD
Father—Tou are marrying my
daughter for love, you say? But she
gets $10,000 dowry. zy .
Suitor—Well, that can't be avoided,
can it?
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Comedy Acrobats. JYISeUinCC Berg's Dancers and Singers. J
Nonette TV^a-r Avery and Hart
Musician and Soloist. * UUcty Sunny Comedians. *
Girls from Melody Lane I 1 "His Last Appearance" j
Max Witt's Singers. A Tragic Incident. *
ORPHEUM MOTION PICTURES. 7-.'i«
NIGHTS 10c, 26c, 60c, ISC MATINEE DAILY, 10c, 2fle, 50*.
■ xy^x •—— 77.1-
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER , *KS
___—_&> a ** rx <5P
Wof^ 0 -/-^ y3? cgn
ll WBrewster's ?}
jp : Millions %
Wwl fXA \% The most magnificent performance of this s-~ilvs\
•%/ l:7X\ I 7 tremendous play ever witnessed, and at the /^P\\j3»2.
S, jlfflt lowest prices, 25c. SOc and 75c. Matinees (f^Z&ijXi
e^ ■"•____■ Saturday and Sunday. !oc. 250 and 50a. C?
HM3URGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER KS^^irafm
: ~~" THIRD WEEK
THOUSANDS TURNED AWAY IN THE FIRST TWO WEEKS OF
Xl J I j D GOO JJI.L/J—/ , hoggfnheimer."
PRICES 15c. 60c. 75c. II." MATINEES WEDNESDAY and SATURDAY. 25c. SOc. lie.
Next Week—"THE .MUSTARD KING," "THE COLLEGE WIDOWER" and "THE MUSIC
MASTER" (burlesque). ___.^________________.__— —_——————
Bni Acrn TuIL'ATITD Belasco-BlackwiMiil Co., Proprs. and Mgrs.
H.JL.Aa'UU inCftlfiß MATINEES Thursday, Saturday, Sunday
"| ■ — 1
FIRST TIME TONIGHT ON ANY STAGE
LEWIS -8. STONE and the Belasco theater oompany will present for the first time any
where George Broadhurst's newest play.
I THE PRICE
This Is going to be the moot Important event of the theatrical season.
"THE PRICE' Is easily the best of all Broadhurst plays and tonlrht'a
audience Is going to witness the making of theatrical history.
REGULAR PRICES FOR THIS 810 —EVERY NIGHT. 2^ to 75c. MATINEES
THURSDAY. SATURDAY and SUNDAY, 260 to 60c.
LAO ANfin F«l THFATFR SPRING ST., MATINEE TODAY
US j\NKjtJ.L.n,n. ltlttnlCK NEAR foitrth. * SHOWS moras
Keene * Briscoe. I FAMOUS I Miller A Russell.
Kelley A Wentworth. I .SCHIAVONYS Ralph Whitehead.
The Lauaih-O-Scope. I TROUPE. I Georgia Nelson.
POPULAR PRICES—IOc, 20e, 80c.
GRAND OPERA HOule MATINEES TOMORROW, Saturday, Sunday
_KANU Ul't.K.A MUUaii, Phone* Main 198T) Homo AIM 7.
Last 8 Times of This Smile-a-Minute Success
GEORGE M OOHAN'S NATIONAL SONG SHOW TRIUMPH IS THE TALK OF TK3
TOWN. y\- -ZX;;:
George Washington Jr.
SPECIAL BARGAIN MATINEE TOMORROW. ll)c and 2.V. BEATS SELLING.
MASUN OPERA HOUSE u..„^K:
WEEK OOMMENCISO TONIGHTMATINEE SATURDAY ONLY—
"America's foremost comedienne." —N. Y. World. Feb. 35, 1909.
GRACE GEORGE ;-
Direction of Win. A. Brady, in Thompson Buchanan's Comedy of Modern Life, -
"A WOMAN'S WAY
"The season's must substantial PRICES SOc TO $2.
success."—New York Tribune. J' SEATS NOW ON SALE.
Coming—MlSS MAY ROBSON In "THE^REJUVENATION OF AUNT MARY."
OLYMPIC THEATER HITS and novelties.
ALPHIN AND FARGO MINSTRELS, INTERNATIONAL FIRST PART, by tha
ENTIRE OLYMPIC OAST—IO BIG SINGING and DANCING NOVELTIES. 10c. 80c. tie. (
LEVY'S CAFE CHANTANT T^Sjffu/&^^.
THE RUSTICANA TRIO from EASC A7LA, wit* LA VERE A PALMER j AMOUR
ETTA, soperanoi UA ESTHELUTA. and KA MMERMEYER'S ORCHESTRA.
TO PULL RUSSIAN NAVY
FROM OLD WAR SLUMP
Vast Sum to Be Raised to Revive
Naval Prestig*
ST. PETERSBURG, April After
several years of futile dissensions about
shipbuilding programs, during which
the Russian navy has practically re
mained the negligible quantity it be
came after the Japanese campaign,
efficacious incisures of reorganization
have been resolved on. Thanks to the
Initiative of a couple of Influential
members of the council of the empire,
the question has been moved into the
forefront of practical politics, and
legislation will be set to deal with a
definite and clear-cut problem. It Is
understood that over half a million rou
bles ($250,000,000) will be required for
the reorganization of the navy, and
this sum will be distributed over ten
years.
Heretofore the duma has systemati
cally whittled away the naval esti
mates, on the ground that no confi
dence could be placed in the staff of the
ministry of the navy, and there Is no
doubt there were several cases of gross
neglect of public business there; but
at present all the doubtful elements
have been eliminated from the staff,
and there Is no reason why, if Russia
is ever going to possess a navy, the
ships should not be laid down at once.
The navy minister, however, Is so
compliant to the humors of the duma
that he expressed himself satisfied
with a vote of 24,000,000 roubles, al
though 85,000,000 roubles was admit
tedly the smallest sum adequate to
immediate needs.
Some patriotic members of the legis
lature amicably remonstrated with the
minister for thus subordinating the
pressing interests of Imperial defense
to the temporary interests of the cabi
net, and urged upon him the necessity
of standing up for the real require
ments of the navy, or else resigning
his official position. »'-'.
A number of admirals visited the
various departments censured by the
duma and acquired the conviction that
the abuses formerly complained of had
been remedied. At last the matter was
recently laid before the czar, and the
result is that an impetus has been
given to the movement which will
shortly take the shape of a shipbuild
ing program for ten years and a vote
of about $375,000,000 to execute It.
QUEEN ESTHER IS SUBJECT
At the First Congregational church
yesterday the pastor, William Horace
Day, gave an address on "The Cost of
a Girl," taking the story of Esther,
whom Mordelcla reared till she became
queen, for his subject
CUPID'S PRESENCE SAVES
MISSIONARY FROM MOB
Letter About Wedding Plans Sets
at Rest Fears
JOHNSTOWN, Pa., April 24.—White
friends and relatives here were fearing
that Miss Irene Poling, a missionary
in the Chang Sha district of Huname
province, China, had met death or
worse in the rioting of natives there,
news came that Cupid had taken her
from the scene of disorder in time to
avoid danger.
A letter just received by a sister,
Mrs. Harry Dunmire of South Fork,
announces that Miss Poling was to be
married to the Rev. Mr. Beck, a Re
formed church missionary stationed at
Shen Chow Fu. The young woman
said in her letter that following the
wedding she and her husband would
go to Shen Chow Fu to live, and it is
supposed that they have been at that
place during the rioting at Chang Sha.
OFFERS TO HYPNOTIZE
HOUSE OF DELEGATES
They Refuse to Take Any Chance
with Proposition
ST. LOUIS, April Members of
the house of delegates had an oppor
tunity to be hypnotized free of charge.
O. E. Laroge, who says he once en
tertained Mayor Wells with a mes
meric' seance, offers to provide "in
struction and amusement" for the del-
egates if they will give him the use
of the chamber after next Friday's
meeting.
The request tor the use of the cham
ber and the presence of the delegates
at Laroge's exhibition was not granted,
although It was suggested that a hyp-'
notic spell might give some members
a chance to imagine that they have
abolished the arbitrary, built th»
bridge, passed a natural gas bill and
eliminated the grade crossings.; ■'-
LAFARGE, NOTED ARTIST,
NEAR DEATH IN N. Y.
NEW YORK, April 24.—John La-fl
farge, artist and author of world-wide.',
reputation, is critically 111, and it '-M
said physicians hold out little hope for' '■:-.
his recovery. He is 77 years old, and®
is suffering from Infirmities of old V
age. His wife and son are at his bed's
•!d»

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