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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, May 15, 1910, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-05-15/ed-1/seq-3/

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v you cannot come. ey^\ \ Surprisingly Attractive $| "J .50 $C(l I I Men's
- oufMfl/'/iff# \ Suits at * • To U f Underwear
r^nty^ySy^ yl Style of a high order in even the lowest priced suits sold here-$17.50. Helps tO the summer
s£ Jsr '^w' And far better materials than you would expect to find for so little money. | COmfort of mam
6° o%°*Vx ATJi7.?o-Distinctivelynew lAT $22*0 - Splendidly tailored jAT #2?-Of gray mannish suitings, . White nainsook underwear-coat style
7 \^mXW <? */*X styles in neat hair-line stripes, I suits of smart homespuns, man- sharkskins, novelty stripes and shirts without sleeves and knee - length
( 'b1 t>X The Gossard shepherd checks, navy blue : : nish materials and white serges, checks, and white, black and navy drawers—soc to #1.50 eacn.
\ wtV^ +pr K y*/ r™-*n+ and black serges. Carefully with black stripes; full plaited : blue serges; full plaited skirts and p oros knit undergarments, 50c.
f\ yr^ir &X demonstration tailored and well line - I skirts: tight or semi-fitted jackets. \ the very latest short jackets. . Skeleton combination suits _ shortsleeves>
\ / continues another week AT ** 5 -Of hard-finished diagonals, English AT $ 4 AND English mixtures and home- i knee gfij^ 6 and
\ X . home-spuns, white serges, and beautifully spuns; latest straight front and Norfolk jackets; also anKie lengm ji.^wwu^uu
■ \^/\ . braided French serges, in champagne, wistaria, Russian and French blouses, braid trimmed; fancy All the old standbys, too, of course.
•>- I reseda and other shades. ■ collars and patent leather belts. (Just i ns ide Mam Entrance)
"■ " , , • .■ , ■■ ■ '
Art Goods |5 to $7.50 $3.95 /—Table Linens Heavily Reduced-^ Knit Underwear ] Wash Goods
■w aol M\ In the neighborhood of three I « y°" I™* Particular about your table cloths Igdes the -Erin" and the || ||^ *•*
cozy appearance of your hundred silk petticoats and napkins being matched, here is a chance tor ueimei nnen-mesn un- : your need s, no matter how
home buyable tomorrow at : J f them F well worth you to make three dollars do the work of four. derwear, we have complete j: simple or how elaborate a
surprisingly low prices. . "'d"^ ° a£-Tc A ■ v assortments of the gown you may be planning.
Comoletelv finished «;nf nil ' 4P0.5U and $7.50 are here $ 2.75 Napkins : $2.00 doz. )} $ 3.00 Table Cloths $2.25 . .
lowTo^ftfwli^awn t O Sell at $3 95 $ 3.25 Napkins $2.50 do, $ 4.50 Table Cloths $3.25 "Sterling" Union Suits, $2 to $8. j s^ZuZ^T^ S£S
-hand-embroidered in dainty !lU **" dl Cj>?.V3. $5 5Q Napking $4>50 doz . : $ 5.50 Table Cloths $4 25 Munsi » Union Suits, 75c to $2. ! Sllk mulls-white and colored
EStfKJf 1* **?** 11 l? Un/ i Solid COlor taffetas and messalines; $ 9.00 Napkin 3... $7.00 doz. $ 8.50 Table Cloths :..$6.00 a grounds- 35 c yard.
beautifully - $1.00 instead of ; changeab , e taffetas and fancy stHpec j $10 . 00 Napkins . [;. $7 . 50 doz . ! $10.00 Table Cloths $7.50 Itahan Sllk VeStS ' $2-50 UP" 47-inch solid color diagonal
20x54 inch white achtel taffetaS- All liberally full in CUt and $17.50 Napkins $13.50 doz. j $13.50 Table Cloths $9.50 Italian Silk Union Suits, $7.50 to $10. |: linens — newest weave for
scarfs in elaborate designs, spe- i Carefully made throughout. . The napkins are in Sizes 22 to 27 inches. Cloths from 2 Ita»a" Silk Knickerbockers, in white !j! suits and one-piece dresses
dally priced at 75c each. <— «- «-, »square up to x yards-some in round and oval patterns. . and black ' $450 and $6-00- I 75c a yd- all desirable shades
18x54-inch scarfs and 30x30- _ _ V ' - - - > The "Forest Mills" and several less 5 Exclusive dress patterns of
inch squares of brown linen I f*O|Vll!£C£fc costly makes of vests and pants. ! \ embroidered mull — a high
embroidered with white cot- ; Mavis C Hand-Made, Undermuslins -^ Sweaters erade imoorted fabric—s27 50
ton, elaborate designs — just ; __ .^rfl^flH MaHfl In H/O^TTfti \ QI IHC -N. grade imported tabnc—s)27.so
♦he covers for beach cottages P lal/AC C ilallU-naaC U1106111111311113 SlX7»afar€ $ & V *U™'
or porch rooms — specially ; ; UIUVCd • . w/WCCliCld Splendid assortment of sheer
'"waste pa O p Oer aCb ha,ket S of a ' The word "TrefOUSSe" Stamped in a . Not Priced Prohibitively High , For the Beach white materials for graduation
new material, closely resem- : glove is as Safe 3. guarantee of per- ... .. . . . . . . fWe raaA anA artpH „_ ' > &owns' includin S mercerized
bling embossed leather-rich ; fection as the "Sterling" mark on We are particularly anxious to have this read, and acted upon, To thoroughly enjoy the evenings at batiste, French lawns, St. Gall
brown tones with oak leaf and silverware by women who consider French hand-made underwear beyond the beach you must have a sweater Swisses—some plain and some
high-fsSs^nd shaped" \ ' The latest styles in Trefousse one- their reach- , -no other garment fully meets the -broidered-35 C to $1 a yard.
to $3.75, instead of $1.00 to | button pique kid gloves at $1.7 C. An inspection of our latest importation will disclose the fact that requirements. ; . Wide variety of Scotch ging
«S 00 ' ~r- * • ■'■--..■■"■ - .-•■»'■• l c i.- ' j ''• hams in solid colors, plaids
*;;■ . , f , „,,': TrefoUSSe two-Clasp pique and many of you are in the habit of paying as much for machine-made un- • Infants' wool sweaters, $1.25 to $2.50. and stripes, 25c to 50c a yard
and statue^: "be doS \ O^rseam kid gloves in all the cor- dermuslins a, we ask for exquisite hand-made garments which we think sweaters> ;27 inches wide .
l °l ats3 of brass, copper red Shades.^ kid gloves. |„7 5 ■ you will like better. t,« rV-it•» t tM P " ■ Misses'wool sweaters, $3.50 to $10.00. i . Many new and exclusive de-
A new line of brass, copper TrefoUSSe long kid gloves, txqS, _ _ »,„ «,« r v • t ti, ( t« c slSns m Japanese crepes,
and mission lamps, unique and Ito sc. Corset Covers, $1.75 to $7.50. Combing jackets, $12 to $35. Pnn- In the misses ' sizes are many in the which require no ironing—es
artistic in —suitable for \ _?- cess Slips, $35 to $50. Combinations, $4 to $25. Drawers, $2.50 to $15. t ! pecially desirable for beach
library, living room or bed ! The TrefoUSSe gloves can be Chemises, $1 to $20. Gowns, $3 to $125. Skirts, $7.50 to $100. Bridal new C °- Ed style with turtle necks. and mountain wear—2oc a yd. ;
room, $6.50 to $40.00. bought in no other Los Angeles store, i Sets O £ three p i eceS) $17.50 to $100. V (Maln Floor' Rear) 30 inches wide
WOMAN SHOOTS MAN WHO
PLANNED TO JOIN ARMY
Lover Refuses to Swear to Com
plaint Against Sweetheart
Who Wounded Him
PARIS, May 14.—Enghien, the pretty
suburban watering place of Paris,
famous for its casino, Its miniature
imitation of Monte Carlo gambling ta
bles, and Its lake, has been the scene
of a tragic love affair between a young
woman and a still younger man. He,
in fact, is just 20, while she- is 30 years
of age. They had fallen in love with
each other, but, of course, the usual
disappointment came when the young
man, who had not yet done Jjls mili
tary service, had to leave for the army.
To get through with it quickly, he ap
plied to be enlisted early, but this,
instead of ploasing hla sweetheart,
completely upset her. She thought that
he was only anxious to leave her, and
purchased a revolver, as if that were
going to improve matters. After a
pleasant boating excursion on the lake,
■he timidly drew out her revolver
when under the shade of the drooping
willow trees and 1 told him that it was
her last hope. She would commit sui
,clde if he left her. Ho tried to dis
suade her, but she became only moro
enthusiastic, and thought that perhaps
it would be well if he also committed
suicide.
The idea did not suit the young man
at all and he snatched the revolver
from her. Unfortunately, he did not
throw it into the lake, which would
have avoided further difficulties. The
melancholy young woman had, unper
ceived by him, got hold of the re
volver again, and this time sho made
use of it to flre a shot at him. He
was wounded in the neck, but, gallant
young man that he was, ho forgave
her, ;ind went to bed without saying
anything. He tried in vain to sleep,
and In the morning a doctor had to
be called, when it was found that the
bullet had remained in his head, and
was lodged behind the right eye. It
was extracted with great difficulty.
About the same time the young woman
drove up to the police station and ac
cused herself of having murdered her
lover. She said that she had Intended
to commit suicide immediately after
ward, but she had not had the courage
to do so. The 'police commissioner be
lieved that the young woman had lost
her reason, but an inquiry soon
showed that if she had not killed
her lover she had come very near It.
Still, the exemplary future soldier has
refused to lodge a complaint against
her. The bullet in his head had proven
to him that she was really fond of him.
This, at leas^, is his view of the mat
ter.
BOAR, SORRY HE JUMPED
ON BOY, KILLS HIMSELF
WHITESIDE, Mo., May 14.—After
attacking Leslie Long, aged 10, Theo
dore, a bear, belonging to Long"s
t\it her, a farmer, committed suicide by
leaping into a pond.
Theodore, whose antecedents came
from the rnzorback belt of Arkansas,
shuffled off in the presence of friends
and relative*. His sons and daughters,
gathered around the pond as their
papa committed tW "anh act, were
visibly affected.
FATE OF FINLAND STIRS
RUSSIAN POLITICIANS
Finns Declare Imperial Bill Is a
Clamp on Freedom
ST. PETERSBURG, May 14.—The
fate of Finland arouses more Interest
In political circles here than most
other political questions. The bill for
assimilating the principality to Russia
in matters of imperial legislation Is
expected to come up for discussion In
the duma. The cabinet afllrms that
this bill, which empowers the duma and
the council of the empiro to legislate
on all questions affecting imperial in
terests, will not impair Finnish auton
omy. The Finns, on the contrary, de
clare that its aim is the complete Rus
siflcation of the principality, while Its
effect will be to transform a loyal pop
ulation of three million Finns, occupy
ing the important Russian borderland,
into three million bitter and not alto
gether powerless enemies.
• The principal Finnish journal an
nounces that the project is already vir
tually buried, its framcrs having re
solved to postpone the parliamentary
discussion until the autumn. This do
lay is construed as a prelude to its
definite withdrawal. As M. Stolypin,
the premier, has completely identified
himself with the bill, he would regard
its interment; however decently carried
out, as a defeat of his policy by the
members of the Conservative party,
who, as usual, are alleged to be in
triguing against him.
It may be said, however, that the
Conservative party is intriguing
against nobody, and least of all against
his majesty's cabinet. They are as
zealous as the premier to unite all the
heterogenous elements of the empire
into one compact organism, but being
alive to the fatal dangers which would
result from a mistake in the choice of
means or season, they would first ad
dress themselves to other imperial
tasks, which are urgent and calculated
to loster union, not to provoke discord.
Therefore, if the Conservatives were
in power, they would certainly not have
chosen the present unpropitlous junc
ture to impart a disintegrating actual
ity to the Finnish question.
WINE, WOMAN AND DEBT
END IN TAXICAB TRAGEDY
PARIS, May 14.—A mysterious trag
edy in a taxicab is reported from
Pacy-sur-Kure, a chauffeur and a
young woman, with bullet wounds In
their heads, being both found inside
the car, which had been standing a
whole day by the roadside. A cart
drlver passed the automobile at 5
o'clock in the morning on his way to
work. It was then standing on one
side of the road and he paid little at
tention to it. In the evening as he
was going home he was surprised to
see It still at the same place. He told
the gendarmes, who proceeded to the
spot and found two bodies inside. The
young woman had long been dead, but
the chauffeur, though he had been shot
twice in the head, was still breathing.
He was taken at once to the hospital,
but there is no hope of saving his life.
It was then learned that the couple
*Hd come to Pacy-sur-Eure the even
ing before and had been at a cafe,
whore they took a drink. They drove
away soon afterward and there was
nothing: to Indicate any dosperate res-
LOS ANGELES HERALD: SUNDAY MORNING, MAY 15, 1910.
HO USE TALKIHq I'VE goT -.TriAVE A STENOGRAPHER 1 A NIC*LPoKWqYoUHq rtAH HAHLD ALBERT ANSWERED*
To HELP AE WITH AUTHiS WORK. .THE fsV .
AIBE.R.T SHOWS VEWqooo ABILITY IW OASHIHC- THE H°RE 1 SEE OF ALBERT THE AoREI LIKE HIM
" OFFTHEAAI^ ILLTAKE To LUHCH
THE WIFE BLEW IM AT 5 OCLOCK AMOISEEnSTo ' W£HT HOME AMD CWEMD^-TN AND I HAD A
LIKE ALBERT TOO . RATTLIHC COOD OTSCOURSe OM THE WORLD'S
ti»sc AUB"^ -vW--^, qPvEAT- BATTLES
' "^QJ&Zr* EHVwm,-
olution on their part. It is supposed
that shortly after leaving Pacy they
put an end to their lives. Before
doing so, however, the chauffeur prob
ably thought of other motorists, and
to prevent possible collision at night
he took the trouble to station the au
tomobile In which they were to com
mit suicide well on one side of the
road. A curd revealed his name and
the identity of the young woman. The
chauffeur was well known in a sub
urban resort. He was married, but.
It Is alleged, had been separated from
his wife and was living with the young
/
The Honest Diary
woman found dead in the car beside
him. He had purchased the automo
bile by installments, but had been un
able to pay it off entirely and was
threatened with legal proceedings.
NEGRO LYNCHED BY ARKANSANS
LITTLE ROCK. Ark., May 14.—Dirk
MeLain, a negro, v.ho severely injured
Ernest Hale, a younpr white man, at
Ashdown, Ark., last April, was taken*
from two deputies at that place early
today by twentyrflve men and hanged
in the Jail ya~*
REALTY DEALER HELD ON
CHARGE OF FORGING DEED
SAN DIEGO, May 14.—Edward Ball,
a local real estate agent, was held for
trial In the superior court late yester
day afternoon on a charge of forgery
of a quit claim deed to property owned
by a man named L. Livingstone. Two
other charges against Ball were dis
missed and ho was placed under $2000
bonds^for his appearance in court. The
bond» were supplied.
15 BABY BEASTS ARE
BORN IN BRONX PARK
Arriving Almost Simultaneously,
Keepers Gasp 'Miraculous!'
NEW YORK, N. T., May 14.—
6—Ringtailed Lemurs—s
4—Mexican Peccaries—4
3—Sardinian Mouslans—3
2—Gray Prairie Wolves—3
I—Baby Asiatic Cam<l—l
All born in captivity—fifteen—count
'em—fifteen.
Taken full and by, the average birth
rate in the Bronx Zoological park. yes
terday, while somewhat under that ex
pected of a growing Australian rabbit
farm, was a fairly good rate.
The first sign of a new life appeared
early in the morning, when" Keeper
Schlosser of the primate building came
on the run to the quarters of Dr. Reed
Blair, official veterinarian, and an
nounced that five little Madagascar
lemurs 1 arrived over night. Would
Dr. Blair please como at once? Dr.
Blair would, and did.
There, sure enough, were the five,
but Dr. Blair had hardly looked- at the
row of intelligent faces before he was
summoned to the small mammal house,
just too late to witness a quadrilateral
miracle in the form of four small Mexi
can peccaries born to four peccary
mothers in four separate cages.
"Marvelous!" said the veterinary and
keepers.
Time only for a hasty tabulation, and
then a wild alarm from a deer house
that a consignment of three mousions,
or Sardinian sheep, were bleating for
official notice and would not be de
nied.
A moment to count the lambs and
then a lons 1 howl from the wolf house,
where a couple of baby prairie wolves
had just made known their presence.
First class young wolves in every re
spect.
However, to camels. While all this
excitement about wolves had been go
ing on a wee camel bad come to the
camel house and already, in its intelli
gent way, was endeavoring to see how
long it could go without water.
Later, when Dr. Blair hail counted
noses and ascertained that all the ar
rivals and their mothers were com
fortable, he summed the situation up
In .i sentence:
"Not only extraordinary for the
Bronx .Zoological park, but as a co
incidental arithmetical retrogression
almost Incredible."
"You're wrong there," , spoke up a
keeper. "There ain't one of them
moUßlons got a mark on him."
AMATEUR GAMES TODAY
Yeomen and Teddy Boars at Vernrm.
McCormlcka and Redondo at Re
dondo.
Long Beach and Santa Ana at Santa
Ana.
Los Angeles Brick company and Fur
lnn^s at Salt Lake field.
Pecans and Hunting-ton Beach at
Iluntington Beach.
Burke Athletics and Blmlnis at
Fifty-ninth and Moneta.
Tigers and Fernando at Fernando.
Goldsmiths and Whittier ($25 side
bet) at Los Nietos. <
Florence Outlaws and Latins at
Latin (morning-).
Hughes and Gateways at Gateway.
■Racycles and San Podro at Ban
Peclro.
Silver Grays and Smith-Boooth
rjlhers at Mace park (morninp).
Great Kasterns and Pioneer! at
Boyle Heights (morning).
Los Angelns Grays and Dyas-Clines
at Mace park. t
FORMER GOVERNOR'S WIFE
CHARGED WITH SMUGGLING
Mrs. Catherine W. Rollins' Bail on
Complaint Is Two Thousand
NEW YORK, May 14.—Mrs. Cathe
rine w. Rollins, the wife of former
Governor Rollins of New Hampshire,
appeared before United States Com
missioner Shields today to answer to
a charge that she entered into a con
spiracy with her husband and son,
Douglas, to smuggle wearing apparel,
jewelry and trinkets on the Lusitanla
on her arrival here yesterday. Com
missioner Shields fixed bail at $2000.
Former Governor Rollins and his
son were arrested yesterday at the,
pier.
SEATTLE POLICE GO AFTER
ACCUSED GIRL SLAYER
SEATTLE, May 14.—Gov. M. E. Hay
has received word from the American
embassy at Mexico City that Juan
Jose Fyaad, wanted here for the mur
der of his 17-year-old sweetheart, Miss
Lada Nlchol, in her home on Pike
stre,t nearly five years ago, is under
arrest there awaiting the arrival of
an officer with extradition papers to
bring him bapk to Seattle.
The murder of Miss Nlcho! was a
particularly brutal one and the police
have been looking for Fyaad ever
since.
THINKS MAN FOUND DEAD
WAS HURLED FROM HORSE
BAKERSFIELD, May 14.—The Carl
son family, returning home last even
ing to their ranch at Wascoe, a few
miles from here, found James Carlson
lying unconscious in the corral. Ho
died in four hours without giving any
clue as to how he had been hurt. A
horse, saddled, stood near the body. It
is supposed Carlson, a well-known
young cattleman, was corraling a herd
of cows and was thrown from his horso
while at this work.
• CLARK ADMITS MINE SALE
NEW YORK, May 14.—Former Sen
ator William A. Clark of Montana,
departing today for Europe, continued
the report that he had sold certain of
his copper properties in the Butte iU>
trlct tv the Amalgamated Coppi r
jompany. Mr. Clark said the sale did
not mean that he intended retiring.
BEAT THIS IF YOU CAN
COLUMHIA, Mo., May 14.—Chief
Josephine, the Holstein at the slat.'
(arm, gave ninety-eight pounds of
milk yesterday, and has aw
ninety pounds a day since her
i. it is claimed she will prol
iplon milk producer of the world.
WANTED FOR MURDER
EL PASO, May 14.--Frank Wilson,
serving a term of thirty days in |ail
at jaures. Mex., i.^ wanted in Nevada
„n- murdi r ;i"<i blf extradition
today usked for. A\
liis identity.
$200,000,000 WASTED
LONDON. May 7. —It is calculated hero
that within the 'm twenty years at least
$200,000,000 of American money ha» b«en
wasted and aquandered by the titled Euro
pean husband* of American -women.
3

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