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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, May 18, 1910, Image 2

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" J*\l(+f* bostoh Dry Goods Siore ~m
So. Broadway, 2^-237-239 So. Hill Street, 2*4-244
The Butterlck Patterns and publications for June are ready.
"Butterlck Designs" Is a new publication giving minute In*
struct/on on all serfs of fancy work. Price, Including two
stamping patterns, ten cents.
'allfc (Main Floor. Rear.)
Suit-Case Umbrellas
Women who travel at all—especially if go
ing back East—need a suit-case umbrella.
We've a splendid assortment of all-silk umbrellas with
folding handles— s4 and $5 for the black, and $<; and
.$6 for the colors: grays, wisteria, chanteder red, marine
blue, greens, Copenhagen blue. Those in colors have
the long La Tosca handles, artistically carved.
$5.00 to $7.50 d» *V 95
Silk Petticoats *|J O
$3.95 for silk petticoats of the character
we'd have to sell at $5 to $7.50 if we
had paid their actual value. The loss
falls on the makers.
But little do they care for a loss on the sample lines
—it's the same to them as the rancher giving away the
few oranges left in the wagon box after his load has
been measured out.
Solid color taffetas and messalines; changeable taf
fetas; fancy striped taffetas. All liberally full in cut
and carefully made throughout.
(Main Floor, Rear.)
_—_ — .
Here is a collection of staw sailors and
more elaborate street hats which in
cludes every style that has received
Fashion's approval. Second Floor.
SHOT BY MISTAKE AND
JUDGE RELEASES HIM
Leo Owen. Oakland Newspaper
Man, Charged with Man
slaughter
OAKLAND, May 17.—Leo Owen, a
newspaper man, 26 years old, living at
Melrose, surrendered himself to Cap
tain of Detectives Petersen late yes
terday afternoon as the man who fa
tally'shot 10-year-old Leslie Herbert
at East Fourteenth and TeVla streets
yesterday morning at 2:25 o'clock.
Owen, 'when he surrendered, was
charged by Captain Petersen with
manslaughter and was released on his
own recognizance by Judge Edgar.
Herbert, who went through a capital
operation yesterday morning as a re
eult of the. bullet wound in his stom
ach, died this morning at 4:30 o'clock.
Owen was thereupon charged with
murder. Captain of Detectives Peter-
Ben declared this morning that On en's
story to him conforms in every detail
witli that told by the three compan
ions of the dead boy. lie Bald that he
helicves the coroner's jury will exon
erate Owen entirely or else charge him
with manslaughter.
Owen will not be arraigned until
fitter the verdict of the coroner's jury
is given out.
In his statement Owen declares that
he fully believed he was about to be
held up. He says that he fired in
order, as he thought, to defend him
self. Following the shooting he says
that the other three young men chased
him down the street, which added to
his belief that be was being attacked.
EAGLES ELECT SHAFER
HEAD OF STATE AERIE
Convention Chooses Los Angeles
Man to Lead Fraternity
mUAH, Cal , May 17.-J. 11. Sharer
of Los Angeles was elected worthy
state president of the California state
aerie of the Order of Eagles today at
the convention of the order, now in
session here. The other officers elected
are:
Thomas Carpenter, Alameda, worthy
Ftatu vice-president; H. F. Brigss,
Fresno, chaplain; »:us Pohlman, San
Francisco, slate secretary; O. W.
Hopman, Kealdsburg, conductor; J. B.
Harding, Santa Paula, Inside guard;
W. C. Brown, Lodl; T. Bassett of Sac
ramento and J. 11. Daley of Sun Fran
cisco tru> ;■
li was decided to hold the next an
nual ■ '■■ ii.n :it Stockton.
MRS. O'REAR ADMITS SHE
KIDNAPED HER DAUGHTER
SAN DIEGO, May 17.—That Mrs.
O'Rear, alias Julia Edwards, kidnaped
her 6-year-old daughter M
O'Rear from Phoenix, A. T., where
the child wai in charge of a probation
officer, was admitted today by the
woman when arraigned In court 01
charge- of vagrancy. A lette
by the chief of police trom Phoenix
authorities corroborates Mrs, O'l
statement. The local police are still
trying to locate- the girl's grandpa:
who are said to be wealthy, but
have been unsuccessful.
COURTS SUSTAIN CORT
CHICAGO, May 17.—1n dissolving an
Injunction restraining the police from
closing the Cort theater, Judge Scanlon
today held that th« musical farce
which hits been on at the playhou
not Immoral. Clubwomen took the in
itiative in seeking to have the play
ousted.
MAN MADE CRIMINAL
BY BLOW ON THE HEAD
Police of New Jersey Town Diag
nose Remarkable Case of
Dual Identity
ROMERVILLE, N. J., May 17.—That
the blow from a baseball on the head
can change a man of the highest moral
rectitude into a daring and expert
criminal, is the view expressed by the
police in their explanation to the court
of the charges brought against William
Miller of Karitan, N. J.
According to the police diagnosis.
Miller's arrest on a charge of larceny
lias brought to light a remarkable
case of dual Identity corresponding in
many points t.> the story of "Dr. Jekyll
and Mr. Hyde."
The police vouch for the statement
that before his accident In the baseball
game, several weeks ago. Miller was a
mo l"l in the community. After that
accident, his friends say, he frequently
had periods of apparent aberration,
when he would become morose, shun
their company and disappear from
their view for several hours. When
he returned he seemed to be again
happy and was unable to recall any
thing that happened in the meantime.
During one. of these periods of aber
ration, the police say, they caught
Miller robbing a railroad ticket office,
and that at another time they charge
him with looting the cash registers in
a local department store.
Miller declares he has no recollection
of thcs<> acts, and the police are con
vim ed he Is not shamming.
"This prisoner's plight is more psy
chological than criminal," was the ex
planation of the chief of police to
Justice Kitchen. "His impulse to
steal Is brain trouble that has resulted
from an accident that he suffered on
the ball field. In his normal state he
Beems entirely removed from the
criminal acts of his other ego."
A committee of New York experts
will examine Miller before his case is
taken up again in the court.
PYTHIAN DELEGATES HAVE
BIG FESTIVAL ON BEACH
SANTA CRUZ, May 17.—After the
business session of Hi" day the 1500
delegates to the grand lodge, Knights
of Pythias' annual conference, gathered
tonight in a festival upon the bi ach
nnd "until the, early morning enjoyed
themselves about the huge bonfires,
along the promenades and in the bis
dance pavilion. An Illuminated parade,
in which the uniform rank of the
Knights of Pythias, 600 strong, ac
companied by an escort composed of
the fourth division of the naval mi
litia of California, the Canton mili
tants and the uniformed rank of the
Knights of Maccabees, took part, pre
ceded the affair on the beach.
It was voted to subscribe $100 to the
relief fund of the Alameda lodge, and
to the fund of the lodge in San
Francisco.
LOCAL DAIRYMEN PLAN
TEST OF CITY ORDINANCE
Refusal of the l.os Angeles Cream
ery company to permit a large quantity
Ilk In its possession to be de
stroy, -ii by l>r. C. U. Durfee, chief
r. who claimed that it
was above 70 degi Fahrenheit,
w nil ii li prohibited by ordinance,
I a warrant to !"• Issue
I. !•'. Pellssler, president of tii« com
pany, yesterday. The complaint
charges him with violating the city
ordinance.
Bi veral thousand gallon* of milk
have been destroyed within in
few months by the Inspectors on the
nds that it is below the restricted
rature, it is understood the local
dairies Will take the matter to court
and settle it.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: >YKI>M:SDAY MOUSING, MAY 38, 101.0.
LAWLER GIVES THE
LIE 10 BRANDEIS
Accused of Evasion. Angeleno
Cries 'That Is an Absolute
Falsehood!'
IS TAUNTED INTO A RA.GE
Assistant Attorney General Re
fers to Pinchot and Gar
field as 'Foul Flock'
[Associated Press]
WASHINGTON. May 17.—A day ;
filled with Interesting episodes reached
an exciting climax in the Balllnger-
Pinchot investigation late today,
when Assistant Attorney General
Oscar Lawler, author of the famous
hauler memorandum, rose wrathfully
from the witness stand and accused
Attorney Brandell of uttering a de
liberate untruth.
Then, after he had been rebuked by
several members of the committee. Mr.
Lawler withdrew his remark and apol
ogized to the commute*
Mr. Lawler was called to the stand
by the •defense' to explain the cir
cuinitancea under which he h.id pre
pared for the president a memorandum
containing his opinion on the charges
filed by t*P'•■■ial Agent Glavis against
Secretary Ballinper.
Several hours had been consumed in
the examination of Frederick M.
Kerby. the stenographer In Mr. Bal
linger's office, who was discharged yes
terduy because he made public In
formation relating to the Lawler mem
orandum.
Mr. Kerby was called unexpectedly
by Chairman Nelson, that he might
give sworn testimony about his testi
mony which Mr. Brandeis had en
deavored to have printed in the record
With the president's letter of last
Saturday.
Directly contradicting Secretary Bal
linger's testimony, Kerby said his
former superior knew about the
preparation of the memorandum and
participated in a conference on the
subject. Furthermore, he said, Lawler
.had told Private Secretary Carr in his
presence that he had left a copy of the
memorandum with Mr. Ballinger.
TAINTED INTO RAGE
Under cross-examination by Mr.
Brnndeis. Lawler was reminded of
various requests for the document and
information bearing on it, which the
attorney had sent to .Secretary Ballin
ger through the committee. Mr. Law*
ler had informed the secretary in each
instance that he had supplied all the
matter bearing on the Glavis charges
"In his possession."
"Didn't you discuss with Mr. Carr
the obvious purpose of my requests?"
"No, sir."
"Didn't you discuss with Carr how
you could evade my requests?"
"No."
"Didn't you know you were evad
ing—"
"That statement is an Rhsolute false
hood by you, sir," shouted the wit
ness. Jumping from his seat and facing
his inquisitor with flashing eyes.
Mr. Brandeis instantly appealed to
the committee to reprimand the wit
ness.
"If my remark has been offensive, I
withdraw It and apologize to the com
mittee," said Mr. Lawler.
Mr. Lawler said ho had burned the
original draft of the memorandum he
had prepared for the president.
"I was confident," he said, "that
'gumshoe' men had been on my trail
for months and I knew there were no
depth of depredation to which they
would not stoop. I was afraid some
one In the office might be corrupted
as Kerhy has been corrupted."
BLAMXB roil. FLOCK
Asked who he thought were behind
the "gumshoe" men, Mr. Lawler de
clared dramatically:
' "James It. Garfield, Gifford Pinchot,
William Hapgood, a man named Con
nelly and that man there."
"You moan Mr. Brandels?"
"Yes. He came in later. He's the
flower of that foul flock."
This reference to the champions of
conservation caused an uproar among
tlie spectators, most of whom were wo
men, and there was some hissing.
The witness said he gave two copies
of his memorandum to the president's
secretary and one to the attorney gen
eral and had not given one to Secre
tary Hallinger. He produced the orig
inal which he paid he had obtained
from the White House Saturday morn-
Ing.
Confidential letters which passed
between Secretary Ballinger and R. P.
Thomson, city engineer of Seattle, last
spring and summer were read by Sten
ographer Kerby to bear out his con
tention that Thomson was not a fit
man to be director of the reclamation
service.
The committee declined Mr. Bran
dels 1 request to have made a part of
the record the statement issued from
the "White. House last Sunday denying
there was any foundation for the
Kerliy statement. Senator Root
charged Mr. Brandeis' whole line of
Inquiry was a covert attempt to drag
the president into the investigation,
to which Mr. Brandeis replied it was
material to the investigation as tend
ing to show that the president's letter
exonerating Ballinger was prepared in
such haste that it was "not judicial
in its nature but was extremely par
tisan."
SENATE DELAYS ACTION
IN SUITS OF RAILWAY
WASHINGTON. May 17.—After giv
ing the greater part of the day to the
question whether tin; government ur the
Interstate commerce commission shall
appear as defendant in cases growing
out of orders <>f the commission under
the terms of the railroad bill, the sin
ate today postponed action on tho
subject until tomorrow.
The postponement was on an ob
jection made by Senator Cummins to
the presentation of the subject in a new
form on I In 1 eve ol' voting.
The discussion had been upon an
amendment offered by Mr. Cummins.
As the bill was reported, the United
States was made the defendant in all
cases growing out of the proceedings
before the commission. Mr. Cummins'
amendment proposed to substitute the
commission Itself »s defendant, To
ward the close of the session Senator
smith of Michigan Introduced as a sub
stitute for the Cummins amendment
the house provision bearing upon the
same subject, which provides that the
commission shall be permitted to lnter
vi i.. in i ate arising from the proceed
ings before that body.
• ••...•• *
TABLE OF TBMPBRATI'BKS
<i> . '.ÜBS. .mil. -
<•» Amsrlllo. Texa. «» 40
--<♦> BnMon •» &°
« Buffalo '2 »;»
|> Chicago ™ ? 55"'
«> Cincinnati *• 54
<§ Hoover M j«
<& El ra«o M 52
<j> (ialvealon *° ™
■ •■> Jacksonville ]* X'
.- Kium CUT • M *? '
♦> Knoxvllle *« . »*
<5> Little Hook ™ «»
• ■ lon \niselen J; *J '
.*> Miles CIO. Mont J« ~** '
<* Montgomery jj- Si
* New Orleans "•••!J '2?.
A New York BH **} '
<$> Oklahoma •■ "C -*• ■
$ Omahn gj **
... I'ortlanil. Ore ....HI 84.
• Rapid Clti. .S. I) *« |4
| «■■«" «* *'
...St. I.MIU , ■•» •«
<L st. . run! *• ♦; ■
A Halt Lake City «• ♦•
& San Antonio • • • • J» ', JJ '
<*. Kan InliulßC.i <« ' JJ '
& Seattle ™ j;|
Waxhlnnton, 1». C 0« 4
v .< Yuina, AH« »• "°
.' . ■$**♦*$♦$♦♦♦♦♦♦<
HYDE MAY NOT GO
TO MISSOURI PRISON
Motion for a New Trial May Be
Made Before Judge Lat
shaw Today
KANSAS CITY, May IT.-If Dr. B.
Clark Hyde's attorneys carry his case
to the supreme court, and the physician
will not have to go to state's prison
pending action by the higher tribunal.
He must remain In jail here, however.
This announcement was made by
Judge Latshaw late today. Earlier he
had Bald the statute provided an appeal
did not act us a supersedeas, but on
further Investigation found he was in
error.
Attorneys for the convicted man said
tonight it was possible a motion for a
new trial would be made before Judge
Latshaw tomorrow.
Dr. Hyde was well known among
the physicians as a serious student,
well abreast of the times in medicine
and surgery. He has determined to
continue his studies while in prison.
Hyde has become popular with the
prisoners at the jail. He is an hon
orary member of the "Mock Court,"
by virtue of paying a dollar Initiation
fee when tho regular cost Is but 50
cents.
INSANITY CHARGE AGAINST
COLLIER IS DISMISSED
Patient in Hospital Says Drink
Caused Queer Actions
Presiding Judge Bordwell yesterday
reproved Dr. Robert V. Day for pre
ferring- charges of insanity against
John M. ("oilier, a patient at the Home
sanitarium, who is said to be out of
funds.
The physician charg-ed Collier with
.lumping out of the window of the in
stitution so that he fell and sprained
his ankles, and from this fact he al
leged Insanity. The defendant, how
ever, told a straight story and looked
anything but an Insane man.
It was shown that ho had secured
liquor which made him act wild, some
thing which the commission did nnt
think unusual. Judge Bordwell said it
was a strange proceeding to wait until
a man waa practically helpless from
injuries and then swear out a com
plaint against him for Insanity, -when
no such action had been taken pre
viiously.
He told Dr. Day to use better judg
ment and dismissed Collier.
IMPERSONATES AGED WOMAN
TO ROB EAST SIDE HOUSES
Wearing the garb of a woman ap
parently !5 or 80 years old, Llllie
Lookbridge, who is but 43 years old,
was arrested last night charged with
petty larceny. Walking with totter
ing steps and wearing a "grandma"
bonnet, the Lockbridge woman is said
to have been systematically robbing
houses in 1 the Kast Side district, and
It was not until last night that evi
dence was obtained which resulted in
her arrest.
According to the police, the woman
would go to a house and enter. If no
one was home she would ransack the
rooms and take what valuables she
could carry. If detected she would
make a pitiful plea of poverty and
Invariably her clever personation of
an aged woman resulted in no com
plaint against her.
Last night she was found with a
bundle of clothing and a handbag,
which had been taken from a house
in Griffith avenue. Her arrest fol
lowed.
WEEPING MOTHER GREETS
SON HELD BY DETECTIVE
H. D. Allen, leader of a Hungarian
orchestra, who was arrested In San
Diego Monday morning on a charge
of Issuing a valueless check, was
brought back to Ixis Angeles last night
by Detective George Home and lodged
In the central police station.
The complaint against Allen was filed
by <"}. A. Armstead of the Hotel
Iveighton, who alleges he received a
check for $25, which was returned
marked "no funds."
The young prisoner was met at the
Arcade station last night by his moth
er and a number of his friends and
taken to police headquarters In an au
tomobile. The grief of the prisoner's
mother was pathetic.
DAUGHTER DISMISSES HER
CHARGES AGAINST FATHER
On motion of the petitioner, the ap
plication of Lillian Price Smead to have
her father, Edward Fleming Charnock,
declared Incompetent, was dismissed by
Judge Rives of the probate court yes
terday. This leaves the father free
to take his share of the estate of his
brother, John J. Charnock, who left
property valued at $250,000.
MAY GET INCREASED PAY
Three clerks in the auditor's office
will have heavier pay envelope! If the
supply committee of the council ran
be made to see it the way Auditor
Myers doc*. The auditor asked the
council to Increase the pay of two
clerk! from $100 to $110 and one clerk
from $110 to 1126. These Incri i »
are to pay for the additional work
dona in paying laborers every Thurs
day night. The extra work keeps them
on duty five to six hours longer every
week.
TENNIS NOVICES
TO HAVE TOURNEY
Amateurs at the Game Are to Be
Given Chance for Prizes
on Courts
NEW IDEA WINS APPROVAL
Handicap Arrangement Will Give
New Players Opportunity
to Show Class v
Beginners at the tennis game ana
thoae who are somewhat timid about
venturing to enter their names among
the topnotchers in the championship
tourneys will he interested In learning
that they are to have a tournament of
their own. where they Will line up with
embryo cracks ami where they will get
a chance, to thoroughly absorb the Ins
ami outs of the court game as played
in a tournament. The Idea is a Rood
one and is becoming the topic of con
versation between fans far and near.
Whether the event will bfl an invita
tion a*Tah\ nr ft, free-for-H 11. open tou>'
nament, lias not yet heen fully decided,
but that the meet will take place is
now assured.
The date set for the mtxup. although
not definitely arranged, probably will
be about two weeks after the Virginia
championship tourney, which takes
place In August. Dubs of all sorts and
sizes. thOM who have tennis talent
and those who are doomed to lie al
ways among the lower ranks, will hive
ample chance to show what they can
do in a tennis way lined up with their
own class and given a fair opening to
win. Prizes similar to those which will
he awarded the winners of the other
local tourneys will be offered, and
everything wil be done to make the
tournament a success, not only from
the outsider's point of view hut also
from the player's standpoint, giving
every entry ■ liberal education in tour
nament play without blotting him out
of the schedule before he has a chance
to give a fair account of himself.
The tournament will bo a handicap
affair, if plans mature, arranging all
entries according to their showing in
the past: or. in ease this is not feasible,
giving them a tryout and elaasln*
them accordingly. The handicap idea
is a good one, and it is all the better,
as the west has never seen anything
of the kind in its tennis history. If
this plan could be carried out the event
would be thrown open to every one,
but the 'champs" would be laboring
under a sufficiently heavy handicap
to balance the skill or lack of skill of
their pponents. Wallace Robh of the
Dyas-Cline company Is the originator
of the scheme and has been talking
It up among the players. Every one
seems to he in favor of the plan, and
the tourney probably will become an
annual event of Importance second
only to the, Virginia championships.
SOUTHERN PACIFIC MAN
MAY GO TO GUGGENHEIMS
PAN FRANCISCO, May 17— J. H.
Young, general superintendent of the
Southern Pacific company, resigned
his position today. "Word was received
from Mr. Young by General Manager
E. B. Calvin that lie had severed his
connection with the railroad.
Mr. Young left here several days ago
for the east. It is said he will accept
a position with either the Southern
Railway '>r the Guggenheim interests,
though no announcement of his plans
has born made.
Mr. Young hod held the office of gen
eral superintendent for three years,
succeeding to it from the position of
division superintendent in charge of
the western division, with headquar
ters at Oakland.
BOILERMAKERS STRIKE
FOR RAISE IN WAGES
REDDING, Cal., May 17.—Twenty
boilermakers' helpers employed at the
Mammoth Copper company's bag house
at Kennet went on strike today when
their demand for an Increase of •>%
cents an hour was refused, and the
boilermakers, whose wages had Just
been advanced 4Ms cents an hour, quit
Immediately afterward because they
would not work without helpers. .
STRIKE ORDERED
HOANOKE, Va., May 17.—A general
strike of clerks on the Norfolk &
Western railway was ordered today by
the Railway Clerks' union, after a vote
which showed 93 per cent of that class
of employes in favor of It. The strike
calls out about 600 men.
HURLED FROM BUGGY
AFTER WILD MILE RIDE
SANTA CRUZ, May 17. — Thrown
from her buggy after a wild ride of a
mile behind a runaway horse. Mis. 1.,.
A. Keller, a prominent resident of this
city, was seriously Injured today.
When the rig overturned Mrs. Keller
was caught beneath the wre.-ked ve
hicle and dragged some distance, sus
taining three broken ribs and numer
ous lacerations and contusions.
U 8. NAVY NEXT TO ENGLAND
WASHINGTON, May 17.—The United
States leads the world In the total dis
placement of completed warships with
the single exception of Great Britain,
but is behind five other countries in the
number of such vessels. Adding to
these completed war craft the ships
provided for but not completed this
government outranks all others except
England in total displacement, but
ranks sixth in number.
POLICE ASKED TO HUNT
FOR MISSING CYCLIST
A telephone message was received at
police headpuarters last night from
THra. O. S. Furlong of Uplands asking
for assistance in locating her husband,
O. S. Furlong:, who left Uplands Mon
day afternoon for Los Angeles on a
motorcycle tandem.
He started for Los Angeles to have
his machine repaired at Smith's bicycle
shop, and was expected to return home
Monday night.
TO DISCUSS ORDINANCE
The ordinance providing for the pav
ing "f the rights of way of street rail
ways und laying grooved rails will
come up before the council next Tues
day morning. It would have been re
ported for adoption by tha itreeta com
mittee yesterday, but several matter*
need adjustment. The Municipal league
is strong for the new ordinance, it
has adopted resolutions asking the
council to adopt the measure as it Is.
. . ■ .-• AMUS_EMENTS_.-. i-.?^- __L_j_^_L.
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER im5J2 lS5lt ,
MOST ORIGINAU COMEDY EVER WRITTEN • .
esie Man on the Box
TRtCBS —350 i 50c. ■'.''■ Matlneeg Saturday and Sunday. 25c and 50c.
NEXT WEEK—THE ROSE OP THE RANCHO—Direction Frederic B«la»co.
( • ; .■ A -
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER B^f
HAVEN'T YOU %E£N IT YETT
Kolb Dill ll^sii
Trices—;,-,c, 50c. 750 and Jl.OO. Matinee. Wednesday and Saturday, ate, 600. Tla.
I sir-psa Vaudeville i:sss:-fi
Cressy & Dayne "The Night Birds"
In "Tho Wyoming Whoop" , I - With Nellie Brew*ter and It
Lockwood & MacCarty _, -. Nellie Nichols
Late of Planophlend* JVIatIDCC Singing Comedlonne
Lancton, Lucier Co. T .j QW Dancing Bugs
■A Fool* Errand" *■ OUety Al White
Walsh, Lynch & Co. I » The Picquays
"Huckln's Run' Entertainer*
ORPHEIIM MOTION TICTURKS'
Every night. 10c, 85c. 60c. Me. Matinee dally. M*. .Xc, BOf.
BTTT AOPn TUPATUO I»elH»<'O-Blnpkwond Co., Prop*. * M«rr».,
Ii.L.A&UU ltih,Alh.t<. Matinees Tomorrow, Snlurdnv and Sunllny.
| THE BIGGEST. BRIGHTEST. BEST SHOW IN TOWN~|
The BellBCO theater stock company offers Oeorgo M. Cohan'* gr«atest musical success,
FORTY-FIVE MINUTES
FROM BROADWAY
A fast, snappy musical show with host* of pretty girls and all of the beat
song hits of the season, straight from the big Kroadway successes. Don t
overlook the fact that KORTY-FIVB MINUTES from BROADWAY
Wild, HE PLAYED FOR THIS WEEK ONLY. _
Regular Belaaoo prices for this famous s.>n and tun show —Every night, z&c to i»o,
Matinees TOMORROW, SATURDAY and SUNDAY, !5o to 60c.
COMMENCING NEXT MONDAY NIGHT
The Belasco theater company, with I,BW IS S. STONE, will positively present for one
week only Edwin Milton Royle'a great American play.
1 THE SQUAW MAN
Tuesday night's performance secured by Royal Onk Lodge No. 220. Order Sons of St.
SKA^S f,", r>K"TIiBHW?AW MA EN m AREdNo\v ON BAIJS. BEf.ri.AH BELASCO PRICE*.
GRAND OPERA HOUSE ""^J^yt^Z-HoL"™^:
nIOGKST MEI^>DRAMATIO HIT EVER BEJSN AT TUB GRAND
CHART ES KINO and hi. big company prssent Ralph Stuart* famous melodramatlo
—-'" ~ By Right of Sword
NEXT WEEK-That great comedy hlt.VoW BAXTER BUTTED IN. Beat, now
selling. ;v<; ___________
MATTVEE TODAT—S SHOWS MGnTLT i
jtt M *F .m ,«-nf Foster A Foster.
JOSfiHQBB IWIUn The Bering c mc n
AsBUNtMVCONSIDINt tOtaCIHTUIfr Meier * Mora. • ,
|fV___-MMMKHCTO^y Harry Tiacheller.
#J* -^ft AMm^^^^^ The I>auKh-O-Bcnp«.
' rr"rrvfi nr v™ r"puUr Trie"' 10Ct ■;nc "" s°c'
yKffT" —— HOMT! OF HITS AMI NOVELTIES.
OLYMPIC THEATER oooi^st theater in los ajjokijm.
—' '— — TM ciA-r PARES, with Gerald. Carter. Stainle. Hyde. Oolde
M %Trm*otT aTr.. Ob T. enV NB < unyTer A.nd B excceptlona. choru. New faces, music, nov.
e.Hes, scenery. 10c »oc. 2 6 c. . MAIN ,
LEVY'S CAFE CHANTANT 8 , : 3 o an.i io:so datlt.
MEYER'S ORCHESTRA. .— — ———■ ———————
BASEBALL— Pacific Coast League „ E f
SUndr i ; a »f-rt m 'm^r a .hnat-F t I U VDIY On.r J.°.rnoo n game, and SUNDAY (MORNING)
f.°" CT^"FgRK e'EVERY RDAY'EXrErT SATIRDAT, SUNDAY ANT> HOLII>AYH.
EARTH fINDGOMET'STAIL
10 GOME IN CONTACT
(Oontlnuod from rage One)
who have crossed the Pacific for the
sole purpose of observing the phenom
ena of the transit of the nucleus of
the comet across the sun disc tomor-
The calculations were conducted in a
program outlined by Professors
Leuschner and Crawford.
The main result of the calculation Is
that the prediction of a transit is fully
verified. The comet will cross the sun
three degrees of arc above the sun a
center from west to east. The in
stant of geocentric conjunction is May
18, 16 hours 7 minutes 3 seconds Green
wich mean time.
NOT VISIBLE HERE
The phenomena will not bo observ
able in any part of the United States.
The comet will not be nearest to the
earth at the time of transit, but clos
est approach will occur a day or two
later. The exact instant now is under
computation. In a statement given
out tonight Director Leuschner said:
"According to photographs taken
here May 11 the tail of the comet was
£,000,000 miles in diameter at the dis
tance from the nucleus at which the
earth will cross it, but according to
information received from Lick ob
servatory the tall is diminishing rap
idly in absolute width and length, as
Is always the case. after a comet has
passed its perihelion.
TAIL DIMINISHES
"Photographs taken at Lick yester
day give the estimate that the width
of the tail through which the earth
will pass will have shrunk to 1,000,000
miles. On the basis of the latter fig
ure it will take the earth about six
hours to pass through the tail, the 1
relative velocity of the particles of the
tail and the earth being approximately
fifty miles a second. We may expect
to enter the tail at about 6 o'clock in
the afternoon and to come out of it
at about 11 o'clock at night, Pacific
time "The earth will not pass exactly
through the center of the tall, but the
deviation is so slight that it ■ will not
affect materially the duration of
transit through the tail. Theoretically
the tail will stretch over 180 degrees
of the sky, from horizon to horizon,
Just before and after transit is seen
from the earth. It probably would be
faintly discernible in the southwest
ern sky if the moon were out of the
way. The phenomena, therefore, will
pass entirely unnoticeable by the peo
ple on the American continent, and It
is doubtful whether the observers In
the orient, for whom the transit the
oretically is visible, will observe It."
BUSINESS MEN TO FIGHT
RAILROAD RATE ADVANCE
CHICAGO, May 17.—The concentrat
ed op] tlon ot 175 big manufacturing
companies to an advance in railroad
rates took form here today in the per
manent organisation of individual or
ganization* and companies into a nig
association to fight the orads. John
i: Wilder of Chicago was elected pres-
Idant.
COOL AND CLOUDY WEEK
RETARDSCOUNTRY'S CROPS
WASHINGTON. May I".—Unfavor
able weather throughout the country
prevailed during the last week, much
to the detriment of all crops, according
to the weather bureau's weekly bulletin
Issued today.
Of the conditions it says: Much
cloudy weather prevailed over the
central valleys, especially from Kansas
City and Nebraska eastward; over tho
lower Missouri, middle Mississippi and
Ohio valleys, and middle Atlantic
states.
Farm work over this region has been
greatly retarded by unfavorable weath
er, and vegetation made but little
progress on account of cold, frost and
lack of warm sunshine.
Over the cotton growing states them
was sufficient sunshine, hut the weath
er whs generally too cool for rapid
plant growth. Rain is also needed in
nearly all portions of this region, and
especially In portions of Florida, Ala
bama and Mississippi. Home good rains
occurred in northern Texas, but the
creator part of that state has been
without material precipitation for sev
eral weeks.
Over the districts from tho TJockios
to the Pacific coast, also, tho weather
was generally unfavorable, except over
Washington and portions of Oregon
and Idaho, where warm showers and
sunshine were beneficial. Over most
of the northern districts, however, the
weather, especially at the end of the
week, was too cold, and over the more
southerly portions it was too dry.
CANADIANS FANCY POMONA
POMONA, May 17.—Fred Kaltenbeok
has returned from an extended trip
through Canada and the oaßtern states.
He reports having met many families
who are planning to remove to South
ern California next fall.
Dean Edward C. Norton of Pomona
college, who delivered the commence
ment address at the Pacific Theological
seminary graduating exercises recent
ly, has received the honorary degree
of' doctor of divinity from that insti
tution.
NO OFFICIAL CELEBRATION
POMONA, May 17.—There will prob
ably be no official celebration of the
Fourth of July here this year. For a
time It was thought that the local
lodge of Elks would take general
charge of a monster celebration, but
that order decided that the matter
should be handled by the board of
trade or Business Men's association.
If at all. As these latter bodies have
taken no action the matter is receiving
no attention. Chino will be the only
town in this locality to observe the
day with a special celebration.
WOMAN wVI*L INSURED
SANTA ANA, May 17.—The fact has
developed that Mrs. Ethel Skelly, be
cause of whose death from gasoline
burning Friday morning, May 6, her
husband, Frank F. Skelly, Ih under ar
rest accused of murder, carried life in
surance to the amount of $8000. This Is
distributed as follows: Five thouwiind
dollars in the North American Life In
surance company, $2000 in the Fraternal
Brotherhood and $1000 in the Foresters.
Part of the policies were made with tho
Skelly children as beneficiaries.

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