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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, May 21, 1910, Image 1

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XUIIIKII •;:!■; 1 I\JLL<Jii. :)\) l^HilN I o I'Klt MONTH
TORNADO SWEEPS
OKLAHOMA TOWNS;
1 DEAD; 20 HURT
Girl Seeks Safety in Cyclone Cel
lar and Is Killed by Fall
ing Timbers
THREE VILLAGES DESTROYED
Pauls Valley, Paoli and McCarthy
in Path of Twister Laid
in Hums
rAspnciateil PreiM]
PAUL'S VALLEY, < ikla., May 20.—
Tornadoes and hail and rain
storms traversed section! of Gar
vin, Met'lain and Pontotoc i-ounties
this evening, killing one poison, se-<
vrrcly Injuring several others and
practically devastating moo ucres. •
The village of .McCarthy, eleven
mlli b sbuthwesi of here, wan literally
wiped out, buildings I><-111<jt ripped isit.>
splinters. Mrs. George Dewberry, wife
of 6 minister, was Injured by flying
timbers, shr died in a few hour*. A
little girl wbO had BOUghl refuge In a
storm cave was seriously injured by
timbers which penetrated the roor of
the oave, Tin ■ 18-year-old daughter of
Robert Clark, living in the same neigh
borhood, was injured in a similar
manner.
The towns of Maysvllle -i-nd Paoli
were reported to have been blown
away, but communication with those
points cannot bo established,
The McCarthy tornado started three
miles oast of the village, traveled in
a northeasterly direction and spent Its
force near Paul's Valley. Houses and
barns were wrecked, fences blown
away, many cattle and horses wore,
killed, and crops worn beaten Into the
earth by rain and hall.
Nearly all the physicians of Paul's
Valley have been called to the stricken
district. A dispatch from Wynnewood
tonight says the number of Injured at
McCarthy will reach twenty.
HAIL STORM DOES DAMAGE;
STREAMS RISING RAPIDLY
ADA, Okla., May 20. —A destructive
hailstorm visited this section early this
evening. Crop* an considerably dam
aged. Miss Ruby KiiKlcnian, a tele
phone operator, was seriously injured
by falling hailstones.
LIGHTNING KILLS ONC
HOUSTON, Tex.. May 20.-Hoavy
windstorms on the const list night and
today blew down scores of houses and
several substantial structures In a
number of little towns. At Menumont
oil derricks were overturned. One death
by lightning is reported.
OIL OPERATOR KILLED
MADILL, Okla., May 20.— W. S. Lind
say, an oil mill operator, was killed in
a small tornado here this evening. Ten
houses were blown away.
MRS. CECIL CLYNE JOINS
RENO DIVORCE SEEKERS
Wife of Local Mining Engineer Al
leges Extreme Cruelty
(Special to Tho Herald)
RENO, Nev., May 20.—Although Cecil
B. Clyne, connected with the firm of
Blaisdell company, 334 Pacific Electric
building 1, Los Angeles, with apartments
at the Hampden Arms, denied the pres
ence of his wife in Reno, she tiled suit
here tor divorce today, alleging extreme
cruelty from September, lUOB, to June,
190! l, at J,os Angeles.
Mrs. dyne was formerly Miss I3er
tha Wlngato of Cleveland, from which
city it is said (he ran away from home
and married clyne, a mining engineer
at Phoenix, Ariz., in March, 1905 Clyne
is a prominent member of the Scottish
society of*Ameriea.
The complaint is sealed in order to
prevent disclosure at present of tho
specific nature of the charges oi 1 cru
elty. Clyne is quite prominent In min
ing circles in Southern Nevada.
Since her advent into tile local di
vorce colony Mrs. Clyne has resided in
a fashionable apartment house, and lias
participated freely in the social life of
the city. It Is said that her suit will
not be contested by her husband.
VAULT DOORS STICK, AND
BANK ROBBERY IS AVERTED
SALT LAKE CITY, May 20.—The in
ability of the cashier to-open the Inner
doors of the vault saved the First Na
tional bank of Laytona, a small town
twenty miles from here, from looting
today at tae hands of two daring rob
bers. TUe men overpowered the town
might watchman and compelled him to
ad as guide to the home of the cashier,
whom they marched before them to the
bank. He, opened the outer door of the
vault, but was unable to open the inner
one. The robbers locked the cashier
and watchman inside the outer door of
the vault and made their escape.
LEAVES BODY FOR DISSECTION
SAN FRANCISCO, May 20.—Having
made provision that after his death
his body should be ;»lven to some med
ical ooQege for dissection, Sydney S.
Brewster, who is supposed to have
been a member of the New York prod
uce exchange, committed suicide in his
room at tile St. Francis hotel some
time yesterday by shooting himself
through the head. His body was found
tonight by attendants.
MRS. BELMONT REBUKED
NKW YORK, May JO.—Mrs. O. H.
p, Belmont, who conceived the Idea of
iii corating on Memorial day the gi
of noted suffragists, ims bean rebuked
by tho antl-suffraglsti. Even the
niigs Mho supplied air under t)io ban,
the in. Us declaring the plan "a deu«
i ration" and "a travesty on "patriot
ism."
LOS ANGELES HERALD
Millions See Edward's Body Borne to Tomb
INDEX OF
HERALD'S NEWS
TODAY
FORECAST*,
I/O* AnicrN'N and vicinity—Cloudy Satur
day; light south wind. .Minimum tempera
ture ji-Klrrilay 63 degrees; minimum, 53.
LOS ANGELES
Public to flirt with comet's tall at Mt
Lowe observatory. PAOB 3
Decision of Interstate commerce com
mission holda Industrial tracks are
terminals. page 4
Fifty children to bo given first com
munion Sunday at at. Vincent de
Paul church. PAGE 5
Mrs. Fischer again elected hoad of mis
sionary society. PAGE 8
3ury decides Donovan Is not an em
bezzler. • # - FAGB 8
Watchmen In city parks file referendum
petition to stop abolishing their jobs.
:.' ; *~ ■ PAOB 8
Bell, accused of perjury, Is freed. PAGE) 8
Los Angeles Democrats plan to make
war on Nathan Cole. Jr., national
commltteeman. PAGE) 9
Democratic leaders positive of i election
• of Thomas Lee Woolwlne. PAGE 9
Heir to large estate protests support of
grown children. PAGE-9
Sharp contests mark close of Episcopal
convention. PAGE 9
County officers reported to have formed
a $100,000 machine. . PAGB 13
Democrats will hold Important sessions
at Long Beach May 28. fl PACK IS
Brartner W. Lee and J. W. McKlnley
talked of as candidates for United
States senate. • PAGE 13
Albert M. Norton char/yea secretary of
Jefferson club with representing other
' Interests In seeking state senatorshlp.
PAGE 13
Former Governor Folk and Congressman
Lloyd of Missouri to campaign in
California. PAGE 13
Thousands crowd auditorium to attend
memorial to late King Edward. PAGE 3
Young Woman's Christian association
give pretty fiesta at Iluntlngton hall.
PAGE 9
Candidates Whlffen and Stewart ad
dress Good Government assembly In
precinct 214. PAGE 9
Judgre Houser says perjured testimony
I* given In four out of five divorce
cases. PAGE 16
Churches. PAGE 6
Clubs and music. PAGE 6
Sports. PAGE 6
Markets and financial. PAGE 7
News of the courts. PAGE 8
Municipal affairs. PAGE 8
Minos and oil fields. „ PAGE 11
Building permits. PAGE 11
Citrus fruit. PAGE 11
Shipping. PAGE 11
Editorial and letter box. , PAGE 12
Around hotel corridors. PAGE 13
Noted men and women. PAGE 13
City brevities. PAGE 13
Marriage licenses, births, deaths. PAGE 14
Classified advertising. y,,;^ PAGES 14-15
SOUTH CALIFORNIA
Harmony expected to prevail at Pasa- .
dena board of trade election. PAGE 10
Frank Skelly held to answer to superior
court for murder of his wife at
Westminster. PAGE 10
Father Interferes in boys' quarrel and
is fined for battery, t PAGE 10
Los Angeles delegation guests of honor
at San Bernardino centennial cele
* bration. PAGE 3
COAST
Astronomers see Halley"» comet, tail and
all, in west; tall makes It look like
. fan-tailed pigeon. . ■ PAOEJ 1
Thousands see Greek Jump eighteen
stories to his death. PAGE 16
EASTERN '£'{; £:%■ss*£■[
Life insurance companies to adopt new
plan of arranging policy holders in
squads. PAGE 3
Tornado destroys two Oklahoma towns;
several lives lost; much damage to the
crops reported. PAGE 1
Representative Ames startles house by
fierce attack mn, Bereno Payne, chair
man of ways and means committee, '.v t
**• " PAGE 1
Presidents and managers of twelve
western railroads to confer over de
mands of yardmen who demand
higher wages. - PAGE 1
Evidence in Hal linger- case all
before congressional committee. PAGE 2
FOREIGN
Funoral of King Edward seen by more
than 2,500,000 people in ' London, the
greatest In England's history; favorite '
horse and dog follow coffin. PAGE 1
MINING AND OIL
American Oilfields finishes . 6000-barrel
well In West Side. PAGE 11
Oil holdings In Coallnga sell at 13000 an
acre. ■ PAGE 11
Big Bug makes last payment on pincers
at Mayer, Aria. . I'AGE 11
—: —; : y .
'GUILTY!' FORMER GOVERNOR
SAYS IN SMUGGLING CASE
. NEW YORK, May 20.—Frank iW.
Rollins, former governor of New
Hampshire, | entered a formal plea of
guilty before Judge Hand late this
morning and his counsel made a plea
for clemency. The court v imposed a
tine of $2000, which the ex-governor
paid at once In cash. The charjre was
smuggling. r - -• J
SATURDAY MORNING, 21, 1910.
'JACK, 1 KING EDWARD'S FAVORITE DOG, WHICH FOLLOWED Dl.
RECTLY BEHIND THE GUN CARRIAGE ON WHICH WAS BORNE
COFFIN CONTAINING HIS DEAD MASTER
AMES DENOUNCES PAYNE;
STARTLES CONGRESSMEN
Solon Charges Chairman of Ways
and Means Committee Buried
Canadian Resolution
WASHINGTON, May 20.—A sensation
was sprung unexpectedly In the house
late today by Representative Butler
Ames, a Republican member from Mas
sachusetts, when he obtained the floor
for five minutes and proceeded to read a
serios of letters that had passed between
himself and Representative Sereno
Payne, chairman of the ways and
means committee, and Republican
floor leader. He scored Mr. Payne in
strong language.
The letters concerned a resolution
introduced in the house March 31, by
Mr. Ames, advocating that negotia
tions be opened with Canada to es
tablish closer commercial relations
with that country.
The resolution was referred to the
ways and means committee and the
author charged Mr, Payne refused to
allow the committee to consider it,
although he (Ames) presented a peti
tion favoring it signed by 77 Republi
can members.
"On three separate days I approached
your august person and asked verbally
and politely for a hearing by your
committee on my resolution,"-said Mr.
Ames in one letter. "To my first re
quest you arrogantly insisted that 'as
far as you could find out, no one want
ed the resolution and it was not good
political' sense."
"Believing your lack of courtesy was
excusable and you were unable to un
derstand or appreciate that many Re
publican members of the house not
only wanted the resolution adopted,
but who, not yet having lost all touch
with the present desires of the party
and the country generally, did believe
the resolution to be good political
sense, I went to the unusual labor of
circulating a petition which I inclose."
MANY IIKITBLICANB SIGN
Continuing, the letter said the peti
tion was signed by seventy-seven Re
publican members, but Mr. Payne had
given it no consideration. It was re
counted that Its author had seen a
letter dictated In his presence by Pres
ident Tuft and addressed to Mr. Payne
favoring the resolution.
Mr. Payne replied, saying: "The fact
that seventy-seven men have signed
your petition does not change the sit
uation In regard to your resolution."
After expressing surprise that the pe
tition nf seventy-seven Republican
members should be disregarded, Mr.
Ames' letter continued:
"Your whole attitude has so lacked in
common courtesy and a proper sense of
proportion I feel forced to make this
written protest. Your letter, if freely
translated-, should be Interpreted to
road: 'The desires of many Republican
members and the public be damned.' "
When Mr. Ames had concluded Mr.
Payne said he had Informed Mr. Ames
he believed the president should take
up the Canadian negotiations, and after
that it would be time for congress to
act. Continuing, he said:
"Now. I stated that to the gentleman,
not with mt hat in my hand, but as
politely and suavely as I could. I dl*
not exhibit any contempt Of the gentle
man, who, i understand, is to be the
next senator from Mas.-achusetts, if he
gets Mites enough. I did not do any
thing of that kind, but I treated him
kindly."
HEADS OF 12 ROADS TO
CONFER WITH ROADMEN
Failure to Reach Wage Agree
ment May Cause Great
Strike in West
DENVER, Colo., May 20.—Presidents
and managers of twelve big eastern
railroads have been summoned to Den
ver for a conference May 25 to take
action on the demand of the yardmen,
who insist that the roads put into
effect at once the new wages and
working rules adopted by the general
managers' committee for Chicago and
eastern territory.
Leaders of the yardmen assert that
unless the wages and rules are put
into effect a strike may be declared
on all of the western lines.
ERIE RAILROAD ANNOUNCES
AGREEMENT WITH TRAINMEN
NEW YORK, May 20.— J. O. Stuart,
vice president of the Erie railroad,
said today that all important points
in dispute between the company and
its conductor! and trainmen had been
.settled satisfactorily. It was learned
that the rates tentatively agreed on
were to become effective June 1. The
Baltimore & Ohio rates for freight
crews become effective July 1. 1911;
passenger crews, September 1, 1911.
BEACHED SCHOONER TOWED
TO SAFETY BY STEAMER
Chas. R. Wilson Apparently Un
damaged by Going Ashore
SAN FRANCISCO, May 20.—A re
port received by the Merchants' ex
change from the weather bureau ob
server at Point Reyes states that the
schooner Charles R. Wilson has gone
ashore on the south side of Point
Reyes.
The schooner loft this port May 18
for Gray's Harbor, commanded by
Captain Nelson and carrying a crew
of about ten men.
The schooner Despatch went to the
assistance of the Wilson and succeeded
in towing it off without any apparent
damage. The crew is safe.
ROOSEVELT MAY COMMAND
SPANISH WAR VETERANS
NEW YORK, May 20.—Theodore
Roosevelt was mentioned today as a
likely candidate for commander-ln
chief of the Naval and Military Order
of the Spanish-American War, whose
first meeting wil be held in New York
tomorrow.
Rear Admiral Oscar W. Parenholt of
San Francisco is now eommander-ln
chlef.
SENATOR ROOT SAILS TODAY
NEW YOHK, May M.—Senator Klihu
Root will sail for Europe tomorrow.
He goes abroad as one of the American
commissioner! in the Newfoundland
BaherlM dispute at The Hague. He
passed an hour yesterday with Presi
dent Toft before leaving Washington
for New York.
NINE MONARCHS FOLLOW COFFIN
BEHIND KING'S HORSE AND DOG
Pageant Greatest in London's History-More
Than 6000 Persons Overcome While
Watching the Spectacle
LONDON, May 20. —Hero are some features of the greatest funeral cor
i tege in tho history of' the British empire—that of King Edward to
■* day:
More than 2,500,000 persons—tho greatest throng In London's history
saw tho funeral procession.
St. John's Ambulance society cared for 6014 cases—most of them heat
prostrations.
Nine crowned heads of Europe followed the coffin. They wore: -King
Seorge V, Emperor William, King- Haakon of Norway. King George of
Greece, King Alfonso of Spain, King Ferdinand of Bulgaria, King Freder
ick of Denmark, Kinig Manuel of Portugal and King Albert of Belgium. The
crown princps and princesses, and lesser royalties, were too numerous for
enumeration.
Thirty thousand red-coated soldi ors, with rifles reversed and heads
bowed, lined the streets of London through which the procession moved.
The late king's favorite terrier, "Jack," and his charger, followed the
coffin in which their master lay dead.
LONDON, May 20.—Sovereigns and
representatives of the powers of
all tho world paid their last trib
ute today to England great monarch,
Edward 11, whose body now rests in
St. George's chapel, Windsor castle,
where the bones of Edward IV, the
sixth and eighth Henrys, Charles I,
the third and fourth Georges, and Wil
liam IV, are entombed.
Bright sunshine followed a night of
thunderstorms that swept the city and
soaked the funeral decorations that
hung along the line of march, but had
no deterrent effect on the gathering
throngs who sought points of vantage
from which to watch the passing of
the cortege.
London s millions filled the streets
and open places as they have never be
fore been filled, either at a funeral or
festival. More than 2,500,000 persons
lined the route of the funeral pro
cession.
The pageantry that marked the bur
ial of Victoria was as naught com
pared with the magnificence of today's
Oeremony, which was splendid in Its
accompaniments of gilded coaches,
brilliant uniforms and decorations, far
Surpassing the ceremony attending the
removal of the king's body from Buck
ingham palace to Westminster hall.
The. procession today included nine
sovereigns; a former president of the
United States, Theodore Roosevelt, who
alone was not In uniform; the heirs of
several thrones, the members of the
royal families, the officers of the house
holds, the officials of the government,
field marshals, generals and admirals,
detachments of troops of all the Brit
ish arms and representatives of for
eign armies and navies in variagated
uniforms, a solid phalanx of glittering
color
30,000 REDCOATS I,INK STItEETS
The lines of red-coated soldiers were
drawn as on that other great occasion
of England's mourning nine years ago,
with arms reversed and regimental
flags clipped to the ground. There was
30.000 of these soldiers,
The vast throngs along the streets
wire massed so tightly that those once
caught, found it impossible to raovf.
The great stands, covered with mourn
ing emblems, wore crowded, the roof
tops black, and through this multi
tude, from among whom not a whisper
arose, the gun carriage that bore the
king s bodj;, moved to the strains of
funeral marches, the tollln.gr °f bells
and the booming of minute guns. •
At Westminster hall, the widowed
queen, to spend a last few moments
beside the body of the king, was as
sisted from her carriage by the Ger
man emperor, upon whom the loss of
his royal uncle has rested heavily.
The emperor kissed the hand and
cheek of Alexandra and passed her to
her son, King Oeorgo. Here the queen
mother, glancing up, caught sight of
the king's charger, waiting to follow
his master, and near at hand the king's
favorite dog, "Jack," a terrier, and she
faltered, gripping the arm of the king
pathetically and gazing upon the ani
mals Edward had loved so well.
Then she entered the hall with King
George, Emperor William and the duke
of Connaught, there to offer a silent
prayer and watch the removal of the
coffin to the gun carriage.
When the procession began moving
the late king's charger and his favor
ite terrier, the latter led by a High
land soldier, followed directly behind
the coffin of their dead master and
just ahead of the imperial ensign.
The booming of minute guns and the
tolling of bells accompanied the move
ment of the procession, while the bands
(fiperlal to The HfraM)
[Associated Press]
in turn played the "Dead March from
"Saul" and Chopin's "Funeral March."
It is doubtful if so many people were
ever before seen In London. At the
Mall, In St. James street and at Hyde
park the throng almost overwhelmed
the procession. The police and soldiers
had to fight to prevent the lines being
swept away by the crush. Many bro
ken limbs and other injuries were re
ceived. Hundreds of persons fainted.
The order of precedence of Sovereigns
in the procession was governed by kin
ship. The special envoys of the United
States and France occupied the eighth
carriage, and although former Presi
dent Roosevelt was inconspicuous in
the procession, King George gave him
marked attention at the lunch in Wind
sor castle after the funeral, seating
him with eight other guests at his own
table. The German emperor sat with
the queen mother and Queen Mnry.
What seemed to impress Mr. Roose
velt was the demeanor of the people,
the solemn dignity of the ceremony.
From Paddington station the royal
train carried the coffin and mourners
to Windsor, while special trains wore
filler! with officials and foreign repre
sentatives.
Bluejackets dragged the gun carriage
through a line of purple to St. George's
chapel, and there simple services were
conducted by the archbishops of Can
terbury and York, assisted by other
prelates. King George, with Alexan
dra on his arm, walked up the nave
behind the cofiln with the German em
peror and Queen Mary following.
During the service the widowed
queen moved to the foot of the cata
falque and knelt, und Just before the
coffin was lowered to the crypt King
George placed on the coffin a royal
standard.
TIJOCKHSION STAKTS AT 9:50
The procession started from West
minster hall at 9:50 o'clock, just as
the first minute gun boomed. The oak
en coflin, with the crown and cushion,
regalia and insignia of. the Order of
the Garter thereon, was borne on a
gun carriage the same as was used at
the funeral of Queen Victoria.
The procession proceeded through
Parliament street and Whitehall. The
public buildings were heavily draped
with black and purple throughout the
route.
Leaving the district of officialdom,
the cortege passed through the hone
guards' parade and thence along the
Mall. The embassies and private resi
dences, including those of leverai
Americans on Carlton House terrace,
overlooking the Mall, were heavily
draped with mourning.
From the Mall, the procession passed
Marlborough house, emerging In St.
James street, proceeding to Piccadilly
and along that thoroughfare to Hyde
Park corner, where it entered the park
and passed along the popular drive to
Marble arch.
Emerging from the park, the pro
cession followed Edgeware road to Ox
ford and Cambridge terraces and
turned up those wide thoroughfares,
on either side of which, throughout
their length of half a mile, were un
broken stretches of temporarily erect
ed stands filled to their capacity with
black-garbed humanity.
By arrangement between the West
minster city council and I'addlnston
borough council the. official signs of
mourning along the route were uni
form. Venetian masts with laurel
wreaths at their tops had been erect
ed at intervals. The route was lined
with thousands of troops, behind
whom wen massed countless thou
sands of i>eople in deep black. Pave
ments, balconies, windows and roofs
were crowded.
Every branch of the defensive forces
(Continued on Pago Two}
CENTS
CI Vf'Tl? PYlT'Tirsj • i>ait.y «c. ON trains Be.
Sill VJT-LiJl* vfl IJ-iO. MM)\V5r. ON TRAINS 10*.
SCIENTISTS LIKEN
HALLEY'S COMETTO
FAN-TAILED PIGEON
Tail Spread Out at End Through
_ Several Degrees of an Arc
and Easily Seen
NOW FAR BEYOND OLD EARTH
Hale Says Figures Alone Will
Show Whether Earth Did
Pierce Appendage
[Associated Pr< i
CARNEGIE OBSERVATORY, Mount
Wilson, May 20.—T0 the BCientlflO
star-gazers peering through the
bit? telescopes Halley'a comet presented,
a fantailed-pigeon appearance tonight.
The wanderer's appendage was B]
out at the end through several degrees
of an arc, and despite the bright moon
light Bhining upon the peak of Mount
Wilson, above the clouds, appeared dis
tinctly. The comet was an hour ami
fifty minutes behind the sun.
Director Hale said that tonight's ob
servations show conclusively that the.
comet has passed far beyond the earth
and taken its tail with it.
"I cannot say whether the earth
passed through tile middle of the tail,
or through any part of it," Dr. Hale
added. "That matter cannot be defi
nitely ascertained until a very careful
comparison has been made of the ob
servations taken in various parts of tha
world 5-k) far as we are concerned,
there has ben no indication that W9
passed through the tail."
YERKES OBSBRVATORT, WIL
LIAMS RAY. Wis., May 20.—Halley'a '
comet was under observation here
from 7:40 to 8:35 tonight. Astronomers
first observed it in the west through a
four-inch telescope at 7:40. At 8:10
the phenomenon *vas visible to tha
naked eye and remained so until it
became lost behind a. cloud bank at 8:35
I>. m. It set at 9 o'clock.
"The comet appeared as of tha
brightness of a star of the second
magnitude," said Prof. Edwin Frost.
"No tail was observed. The exposures
of the spectrum show principally a
'continuous spectrum, which means it
is chiefly due to reflected sunlight.
The gaseous constituents were less
conspicuous than when in the morning
sky and appeared faint.
"The comet will be visible to tha
naked eye tomorrow night from S to 9
p. m., in spite of a bright moon."
NUCLEUS IS BRIGHTER THAN
STAR OF FIRST MAGNITUDE
Astronomers of Lick Observatory
Get Good View
SAN JOSE, May 20.—Director Camp
bell of the Lick observatory gave out
the following statement at 8:30 this
evening:
"The comet is brilliant in the west
ern sky, the head being brighter than
a first magnitude star. It was vislblo
shortly after sunset. The tail can ba
seen as of length 10 or 15 degrees,
projected on the moonlit sky."
The observatory is several hundred
feet above the fog which envelops the
(Continued on Page Three)
HUNGRY MAN SENDS IN FIRE
ALARM; GETS MEAL IN JAIL
Says He Was Starving and Hit on
Plan to Get Food
DENVER. May 20.—A new, duty was
imposed on tin- fire department yester
day when Alfred Altman used a flra
alarm box as ilrst aid to the hungry.
Altman was found standing by the
box when the fire wagons arrived. Ha
admitted turning in an alarm and was
placed under arrest.
In police court the man declared: '[
was starving to death and when I
happened to see the alarm box I
turned in an alarm, because I thought
maybe I would get something to eat."
Altman was fined $120 and costs and
committed to jail, where he is insured
against hunger for some time.
CLARA MORRIS, CRITICALLY
ILL, WILL LOSE EYESIGHT
(Special to The HeralJ)
TONKERS. N. T., May 20.—There
was a turn for the worse today in the
condition of Mrs. F. C. Herriott, who
was Clara Morris, actress. Tonight she
is very low . A consultation of physi
cians, including Drs. Miller, Leonard.
Hartley and Markle of New York and
Dr. Belcher of this city, was held at
the Herriott home. At the end of tha
conference one of the doctors said that
all hope had now been abandoned of
saving the eyesight of Mrs. Herriott.
Effort is now being directed to prevent
ing another relapse, which, should it
occur, would doubtless result in the
patient's death. Mrs. Herriott, it wa.s
learned, does not wish to see anyone
other than her husband, F. C. Herriott,
and her aged mother, Mrs. Sarah Jane
Morris, both of whom are in constant
attendance at her bedside.
SALT LAKE.RAILWAY
EXTENDS ITS SERVICE
SALT LAKE CITY, May 20.—TUo
San Pedro, Loa Anm 1< n X- Salt Lako
railroad today extended its regular
train service from this .uul to Caliento,
N'i'v. This extt nalon will admit of tbo
operation ol the Ploch* branch, which
leaves the main lino at Callente. since
the flood of January, trains have !•■ ■• D
run only to Aoona, thirty miles east
of Caliente.

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