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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, May 23, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-05-23/ed-1/seq-2/

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JOHNSON HOPEFUL
OF NOMINATION
Lincoln-Roosevelt League Guber
natorial Candidate's Cam
paign Brings Him Here
SAYS HE'S SURE OF SUCCESS
Declares Voters Are Thoroughly
Aroused Against Domination
of Southern Pacific Bosses
"A political revolution is being waged
In California now, the greatest in the
state's history," said Hiram W. John
son, candidate of the Lincoln-Roose
velt Republican league for the guber
natorial nomination, at the Alexandria
yesterday afternoon, "and when it ii
over disaster and defeat will be the
portions Of Herrin, Parker and others
who have so long dictated the policies
of the state
"The primaries August ifi will he the
Waterloo of the Southern Pacific politi
cal machine and all adherents thereto,
for they, like Napoleon of old, have
made the fatal mistake of considering
the masses only as so many pawns in
a. great game Instead of human be
ings, and the people, realizing that
their chance has come at last, are
going to oust such men and methods
from the control of things."
Such were the statements of Mr.
Johnson, not the statements of Hiram
Johnson, candidate for governor, but
the unbiased opinion of Hiram John
son, private citizen, arrived at after
two months and a half of the most
minute kind of investigation into the
feelings and desires of the people of
California. They are the opinions Mr.
Johnson gained after having traveled
from one end of California to the Other
and after meeting voters of every city
and town In the state.
CONFIDKNt'oi- success
"I am as confident of success for the
Lincoln-Roosevelt Republican policies
as I am that I am sitting here," con
tinued Mr. Johnson. "On our recent
trip we felt the pulse of the voting
public, in this state In a way no other
candidates ever have done, and from
this I' say we will carry Southern Cali
fornia, the Sacramento and San Joa
quin valleys, AJamoda and Fresno
counties and the counties of the north
ern part of the state.
"The great centers of population, San
Francisco or Los Angeles for instance,
are uncertain quantities, to a great
extent. Such cities always are uncer
tain, but we have the most encouraging
reports from both the great cities of
the state.
"My running mate, A. J. Wallace, is
becoming extremely popular In the
north, making fast friends and sup
porters wherever he goes, and with
the popularity which is undoubtedly
his in this part of the state his success
seems assured. Almost the same
may be said of Judge John D.
Works, Lincoln-Roosevelt candidate
for United States senator. He im
presses everyone with his firm stead
fastness of character in a most favor
able way and his speeches have won
him many supporters in sections of the
state where he has been little known
hitherto."
.Mr. Johnson, accompanied by Mr.
Wallace and Mr. Works, will begin his
second trip over the state tomorrow.
Traveling in automobiles, they will
cover practically the same territory
covered previously, but will take in
towns which they were unable to visit
before.
Accompanying Mr. Johnson to Los
Angeles was Chester H. Rowell of
Fresno, president of the Lincoln-Roose
velt league, who came here to complete
final arrangements for this second
campaign.
INFERNAL MACHINE IS
DISCOVERED ON PORCH
Attempt to Blow up Omaha Man
Proves Futile
OMAHA, May 22.—An infernal ma
chine was this evening discovered on
the porch of tin residence of Thomas
Bennlson, well known man of this
city. Fra.uk Krdman was arrested a I
a suspect and is being held for Investi
gation.
Dennlson made h, statement to the
effect thai Erdman had stated some
time ago that, he would murder Den
nis, hi.
Tho. Infernal machine «as in the form
of a suit case, containing two com
partments, in one "t which was found
twenty-four half pound sticks of dyna
mite, and in the other, with a barrel so
placed as to flro Into the dynamite, was
:i loaded revolver.
When founl the suit case was fas
tened with a string tied to a screw
which w.is In turn fastened to the
porch.
The belief i.s that tho dynamite was
intended to be i xploded through the
agency of the trinß and revolver when
uit case wns lifted from the porch.
BEQUEST TO PRINCETON
WILL EXPAND UNIVERSITY
Wyman's Gift of Millions Reopens
Graduate College Discussion
PRINCETON, N, J., May 22.—The
repori of a 1 t, amounting
everal millions, to the
: i ii.... i of Prlncel i hauncej
Wynian 01 loned
a sensation In Princeton tod iy among
the tri ci ho happened I
the faculty members and the inder
gradu 'line.-ton.
The bequ anew the graduate
college discussion iha i beci ■ ■
sue when an offer i was made
for the graduate school bj William
■ proctor, '83, of < !ini Innatl.
it is believed the additional
\ ble for the gi ■ ehool will,
• s.in of its magntlude,
i . ondltions that have hith
erto been prime factors In the dlsputi
The question of Bite, ii is said, prob
will be eradicated, as the gift
, poMibli tho territorial ex
j.an.si..n of tho university Into parts
now remoto from the campus, but
Which will not have th(
rvenlng buildings.
PINCHOT ON WAY HOME
UIVERPOi ili, M« ■ -1 !■ Glfford Pin
.. pai i iig boai ■! the
ncr Arabic, which sailed for New
STork toJ;iy.
TWENTY-TWO STORY
NEW YORK BUILDING
NOW TO BE RAZED
3m~7v1 -■■ - --' acPB WR rrff '^mB
GILLENGER BUILDING, WALL AND
NASSAU STREETS, NEW YORK
CITY
TO BE HIGHEST OFFICE
STRUCTURE IN WORLD
Thousand Workmen Pulling down
Towering Pile to Make Room
for a Greater One
NEW YORK, May 22.—"That's a
neat looking building," said the strang
er in New York, as he gazed toward
the top of the twenty-two-story Uillen
ger building. "What are they doing
to it?'
irins it down,' 1 said his guidp.
And EUch Is the fact. One thousand
men arc Bwarming through and over
the structure, which would take rank
with the finest buildings in any city on
the globe. They are demolishing it as
rapidly as possible, and' when the
ground is cleared there will be erected
on the sit" tie' loftiest office building
In all the world—one that will tower
forty-two stories above the narrow
chasm of Wall strei t. it will be nearly
twice aa high as the structure now be
injr remove I.
It may sound foolish for an owner
tn destroy a twenty-two-story building
that is a perfectlj r 1 building just
because it is not big enough, but such
is ti use In the Qillenger building.
The owners wanted to start destroy
ing the building April 1, but three ten
ants bad leases until May 1, and not
withstanding the fact that they were,
I a bonus of $1000 each for tho
extra month they refused to move.
But they goi out May 1 and now,
brick by brick, down conies the struc
ture to make way for modern progress,
Glllenger is across the street from
the office of J. P. Morgan & Co. and
United States subtreasury.
ANCIENT ORDER OF DRUIDS
PICNIC AT SCHUETZEN PARK
Outing Nets Considerable Sum for
Order's Sick Fund
More than 1000 persona gathered at
Schuetzen park yesterday to celebrate
the ninth annual picnic and reunion of
Orange Grove lodge No. 122, United
Ancient Order of Druids. The affair
resembled a large family gathering,
and everybody was Imbued with the
spirit of loyalty and good fellowship.
From both a social and financial
standpoint, the picnic was fully up to
expectations. The affair was tor a
worthy cause, the receipts to go to a
fund for the sick, and no "tight wads"
were seen on the grounds.
The crowd began to arrive early in
the morning and continued to come
until late In the afternoon. They did
li,, i .leave until the shadows «an to
creep across the hills on each side of
the park.
The athletic program furnished the
real sport of the day. . The races for
all-comers, the fat men's race, the fat
women's race, the girls' race, the boys'
race, the egg race lor women, the mar
ried women's race, the sack race and
the thrcti-U-Kged race all had plenty
of entries, and the rivalry for prizes
was keen.
The fat men's race furnished the
most sport. li. G. Doyle, acknowledged
fat man champion sprinter of Los An
geles, was on the grounds but did not
enter, giving as an excuse that he did
not have liis racing pumps. He quali
fied this statement by Baying lie was
,ii one race—the race for councilman—
and wanted to hold his energy In re
serve.
A tidy sum was netted as a result of
the picnic. The committee on arrange
mentß consisted of E. C. Oieschen,
Jnmis Gospodnetich, Frank Garllch,
Rudolph Heydorn, C, H. BoUch, Joseph
It. Gee, it. DokliiiU'h and Lyle Fen
degast.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING, MAY 23, 1010.
MOON ECLIPSE WILL
AID COMET'S SHINE
Unusual Celestial Visitor Will Be
Boss of Heavens for an
Hour and a Half
CAN SEE IT IF NIGHT IS FAIR
Total Eclipse Will Begin at 7:37
and Last Until 9 o'clock
This Evening
All previous antics of the comet and
Us merry little tall will be dwindled
by comparison uhen the real show is
presented tonight. There will be a total
eclipse oj the moon this evening which
Will throw the comet in relief against
the unlit sky in a most spectacular dis
play. Few on earth will ever again
have an opportunity to witness such a
sight.
Professor Kdgar Lucien Larkin, In
charge of the Lowe observatory, says
the eclipse "ill begin at 7:37 and will
become total at 9 o'clock. At this time,
if the night is clear, everybody in
California will be able to see the firey
wanderer plainly.
Owing to the brilliancy of the moon
the comet light has been much dimmed
recently and it has been Impossible
for astronomers to obtain satisfactory
photographs. At the time of the eclipse
direct photography of the comet nu
cleus and segments will be possible. It
is expected that photographs obtained
tonight will he most Interesting and
will disclose several unlearned truths
regarding the celestial visitor.
Mt. Lowe anil Mt. Wilson will bo vis
ited tonight by hundreds, and although
the'rush has been great during the
past week, unusual preparations for
guests have been made both at the Mt.
Wilson hotel and Alpine tavern. Mt.
Wilson reservations already made will
fill the hotel cottages on the peak and
overflow into Strains camp, which lies
just below the peak and is within easy
reaeli of the vantage point.
The Pa< Iflc Electric has provided ex
tra Mt I.one cars and Is running daily
excursions. Especial efforts will be
made to handle the crowds this even
ing. The Mt. Lowe observatory, with
its big teies. ore, is open, and Professor
Larkin has extended an invitation to
the public to come up and look at the
comet and moon.
Hills within the city and the strand
at the beaches were again utilized last
night by curious throngs of comet
gaasers.
POLICE AT BREWERIES
HAVE DULL TIME OF IT
Fourth Day of the Strike Proves
Uneventful
Policemen in the shadow o£ Los An
geles breweries hart little to do yes
terday except to stand around on one
foot, their right hand above their eyes,
In an attitude of anxious expectancy.
Neither to morth nor to south; east or
to west, was trouble to be sighted. The
brewery strikers did not seem to be
keen at their job of striking and the
brewers were not frantic in efforts to
end strife.
Little groups of men gathered on the
streets yesterday und perhaps dis
cussed the strike, perhaps the big
Fourth of July glove fest The strik
ers and their former employers, how
ever, seemed inclined to enjoy a vaca
tion from the strenuoalty that has
marked the past few days.
The breweries having hauled around
enough wet stuff, either by special
drivers of express wagons chartered for
the occasion, to satisfy the oafes over
Sundny, were not compelled to deliver
and bottled goods in wheelbarrows
yesterday. All was peace and quiet.
Not a wheelbarrow rumbled. Not a
striker struck.
MILLIONAIRE COAL MAN'S
WIFE INJURED BY FALL
Mrs. W. H. Morris of Johnstown,
Pa., Hurt Leaving Car
.Mr.- W. 11. Morris, wife of a million
aire coal operator of Johnstown, Pa.,
was painfully Injured last night when
she attempted to leave an electric car
before II came to a standstill. She
was thrown to the pavement, suffering
a fracture of tlm rifcht Bhoulder and
minor Injuries about the face and
hands. Tin- accident occurred at Ninth
street and Krand avenue.
The injured woman was troated a.t
the receiving hospital and later was
removed to the Taylor apartments, 626
Wist Ninth street.
Mr. and Mrs. Morris, accompanied
by their daughters, Berne and Eulah,
came t.. T.<.s Anpeles from Johnstown
la.si December to pass the winter. The
family had planned t" return to their
horn' 1 in Johnstown Friday, but tho
accident will postpone their departure.
DESERTED WIFE; FOUND IN
TEXAS; WILL BE RETURNED
Word was received ;it police head
quartera last night to the offp«t that
Frederick M. Melater, wanted on a
charge of drsortlnfr his wife and two
children in Los Angeles last October,
had been arrested In Wichita Falls,
Tex Detective Home will leave Lob
Angeles Wednesday to bring the pris
oner back to face trial.
Melßter was formerly an employe of
the Los Angeles Railway coftipany and
later engaged as b paint salesman.
u-ist October ho disappeared suddenly,
and istant efforts have been made U)
apprehend him.
The deserted wife is a daughter of J.
A. Kuykenrall, 1902 Cordova street.
TWO DOG BITE VICTIMS
TREATED AT HOSPITAL
Two persons were victims of dog
bites last night and were treated at
the receiving hospital. Miss Maggie
Ferguson was attacked by a dog at
Eighth and Olive streets and bitten on
the right arm. The dog was muzzled
but bit through. The Injury was slight.
Walter Bruce, 6 years old, of Ingle-
WOOd, was visiting friends in San Ben-
Ito street, when attacked by a dog. He
broke away and escaped with a slight
scratch. The wound was cauterized
.wid dressed.
ROCKS GRIND TO DEATH
SWIMMER AND RESCUER
Contestants in Match Race Lose
Their Lives in Colorado River
PHOENIX, May 22.—Last Sunday,
near Quartz King, a Colorado river
mining catnn above Parker, Jack
Dunn, a miner, and Joseph Perez, a
bartender, were drowned whilo en
gaged in a iwtmmlng match. Both
were strong swimmers ond had decided
to i ach a point far down the river.
Dunn went first, and soon was seen
to disappear in I patch of rough water.
Perm, appreciating the peril of his
friend, plunged after him and dlsap
-1 at the same spot before the
eyes of a number of horrified watchers
on the hank. It was later found that
the rough water covered jagged rocks
on which the swimmers were ground to
death. Neither body has been found.
Bodies rarely are found In the Colo
rado.
ROBS WOMAN GUEST
IN FASHIONABLE HOTEL
Crook with Pass Key Gets Some
Trinkets and a Boa from an
Apartment in Van Nuys
Miss Louise May, who with Miss
Alice May registered at the Van Nuys
hotel Thursday from San Francisco,
reported to the police department yes
terday that she had been robbed of
jewels ad wearing apparel valued at
about $100. The theft Is supposed to
have taken place some time Saturday
afternoon, presumably between the
hours of 1 and .">. the articles being
taken from her room, No. 312 In the
Van Nuys hotel.
The articles which it is claimed were
taken consist of a marabout fur boa,
which Miss May claims is a very rare
adjunct of feminine wearing apparel,
and which she valued at about $80.
There was also missing an amethyst
brooch and an amethyst and pearl
necklace.
When asked nliout her reported loss
yesterday Miss May refused to talk and
seemed unwilling to give any informa
ton whatever in regard to the matter.
To all who called at the hotel she was
steadfastly "not at home," although
she remained in her room for the
greater part of the day.
The Van Nuys hotel management
itself was very unwilling that any
knowledge of the theft should become
public, and Clerk A. E. Rateliffe, who
was on duty, stoutly maintained that
all those who knew anything about the
robbery were out automobile riding.
He neglected to inform the telephone
operator at the hotel of the fact, how
ever, and she gave away everything by
connecting all who called up with Miss
May's rooom, much to the clerk's dis
gust when he discovered it.
At detective headquarters it is be
lieved the job was done by some clever
professional. From the meager infor
mation furnished by Miss May and the
hotel management It seems that the
door wns entered by means of a pass
key. The thief, whoever he wns, cov
ered his tracks In a baffling manner,
leaving no clew to his Identity.
NEWSBOY PUTS GRIEVANCE
BEFORE CHIEF GALLOWAY
Five New Vendors 'Jump Claim' of
Three Originals at Fourth
and Broadway
"Please, mister policeman," asked a
small boy yesterday of a patrolman
Standing in front of the central police
station, "kin I see do chief cop?" The
big fellow looked down on a little
freckled face framed in shaggy red
hair that sadly needed a trimming.
"Who do you wish to see, kid?" he
asked smilingly. "Chief Galloway?
He's the chief cop."
"Dats him. Dats do guy. Pc main
squeeze wat 1 read about," replied the
little urchin eagerly.
"And what is the nature of your
business, young man?" asked the pa
trolman, endeavoring to look serious.
"Aw, I'm not tellin' me bizz to any
private secretary. I want to Ret next
to de main guy, see?" said the boy.
Convinced that this young man really
was serious in his desire to see the
rhief, the policeman escorted him past
the guards of the. chief's sanctum and
into the chiefs office. Galloway looked
up pleasantly and then frowned on
what he thought a young transgressor
of the law.
I'KIOR CLAIM
In a voice thrilled with the import
ance of his mission the little fellow
introduced himself as Tommy Kelley,
who sold "polpers" in Broadway on
"Fort."
"Me and tree udder fellers has stuck
on de job on de same corner fer tree
years, We all got resier custermers.
I represent de tree originals. Five
udder guys gut wise to de coin we was
plckln' and taught deyed get sum uf
<\f easy money. Den all of er sudden
dey .lumps de claim. Dey was bigger'n
wr fellers ami besides we didn'd like
ter take no liberties wid de peace. So
we jus' walks over to de cop wat holds
down de car tracks in de middle of de
street and asks ter be freed from der
hunch dat jumped our claim. He didn't
seem to like our looks or ter seem to
take us serious. He told us he had
troubles of his own and to beat it. So,
chief, de originals of us bunched to
gedder and dey sent me to make me
appeal, Kin we have dat corner?"
chief Galloway smiled grimly. "We
Will make an investigation, and if*\ve
can substantiate your testimony as to
you three boys having sold on that
corner three years I will trp and find
another place Just as good for the
other fellows."
Tommy grinned his delight. Here
was recognition that would mean in
vestigation. He bowed happily and
put out his little hand, grimy with
the dirt of the street. The big chief
shook it cordially and Robbie left the
I i with his escort. As they reached
the street he turned to the policeman
with a comical grimace on his face and
said. "He's a BOoa chief, but don't he
Use big words?"
AUTO KILLS BROKER
RT I'Ai'l, Minn., May S3.—B. B.
Shotwell, a stork broker. was run
down and killed by an automobile to
night while on his way home from the
ball name. The machine was driven
by Miss Theodora Btark, aged 19, of
Minneapolis, who was accompanied by
her mother and sister and two men
relative*. MUw Stark is being held
without bai] pending Investigation.
FACTORIES KILL
30,000 EACH YEAR
Investigator Declares Industrial
System of Country Is
All Wrong
EXPOSURE IS SOON COMING
Congressman Speaking for Sec
retary Nagel Says Life
Conservation Is Issue
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., May 22.—
Ten thousand persons filled the aud
itorium of the "Million Dollar Pier"
today to attend the mass meeting for
labor, the greater popular meeting of
the Presbyterian general assembly. ■
Charles K. Nugol, secretary of com
merce and labor, did not appear to de
liver his scheduled address on the con
servation of national life. A slight ill
ness was given as the reason for his
non-appearance by Congressman Ben
nett of New York, who declared that
he was speaking; for the cabinet officer
when he said that the national turmoil
over the conservation of forests and
national reservations is not nearly so
important as the. conserving of human
life throughout the country.
Congressman Bennett hinted "that
the coming report of the commission
of immigration, which has been study
ing conditions in American factories, is
likely to create a sensation in the num
ber of preventable deaths caused in
factories."
Rev. Charles S. Stelzle, superinten
dent of the department of commerce
and labor of the Presbyterian church,
said that "when 30,000 Industrial work
era are killed every year it means
there is something wrong In our indus
trial system. In some cases it Is noth
ing short of murder. The railways of
America alone kill nearly 12,000 persons
every year, and injure 120,000, others.
The present ! working day from a
physiological standpoint is too long. It
keeps the majority of men arid women
in a constant state of over-fatigue, it
leads to the craving of means for dead
ening fatigue and Induces drunkenness
and other excesses."
Officials of the Atlantic City Central
Labor union led a delegation of -I.W
mechanic! and laborers who attended
the meeting.
PUBLIC SHIES AT THE NEW
PAY-AS-YOU-ENTER CAR
Easterner Thinks Conductor Has
Been Social Center Too Long
to Change Quickly
"The public doesn't bohave very
wel lon these pay-as-you-enter cars,"
complained a conductor yesterday aft
ernoon on the Central avenue line, on
which the new wagons are being tried
previous to an extension of the sys
tem to all lines of the I,os Angeles
street railway. "They won't move up
In front, and there is no room for
them to loaf around on the back plat
form."
This has seemed to he the only trou
ble on the new cars for the past week.
Otherwise they are a success. In the
near future passengers will.realize that
the motormun is not a dangerous per
son and show less hesitancy about
moving into his vicinity.
An easterner on one of the cars yes
terday afternoon ventured an explana
tion of the reticence of the public to
move forward. He said:
THE EXPLANATION
"Everybody in Los Angeles Is good
natured. Everybody on every car line
has a conversational acquaintance with
the conductors on his line. The law
has prohibited talking to the motor
man and he has become a social
recluse. The social center of Los
Angeles cars has been on the rear plat
form. If the company could put a
graphophone or some other attraction
on the front of the car or make it a
crime to hold converse with the con
ductor, the evil would be abated if not
banished."
The pay-as-you-enter cars have been
in service just one week. They are
still regarded with great curiosity by
passengers. It was observed yesterday
afternoon that hardly a person got off
the new cars without turning and
stopping to give them a close inspec
tion.
NEW BCHKDUI.E
A new schedule was tried on the
Central avenue line yesterday. All aft
ernoon the cars were run on four 'and
a half minute time. The best schedule
that has ever been used on the lino
heretofore has been a five-minute
schedule which could be maintained
only for a short time in the afternoon.
The pay-as-you-enter cars save a great
deal of time, and it is the intention of
the l.os Angeles street railway com
pany to run them from now on on a
five-minute schedule up to 9 o'clock
each evening.
The pay-as-you-enter cars, thirty
seven of them, have been in service
(inring the week. Forty more are now
in course of construction. When they
are completed they will be put on the
Pico Heights and Hooper avenue lines.
WOMAN CHASES BURGLAR
INTO BROADWAY CROWDS
Belated Report of Robbery Made
to the Police
Although somewhat belated, C, E.
Churchman, 1011 South Hill street, re
ported at police headquarters last
night the robbery of his home May 18
and an exciting chase, in which his
wife pursued thn burglar after discov
ering him in the house.
Mrs. Churchman had been shopping.
When she returned that evening and
inserted the key in the door it was
opened from the Inside and a man
■topped <>ut. He fled. Mrs. Church
man dropped her bundleß and gave
cha»e She kept the man in sight un
til he reached Broadway, where he wai
lust in the crowd.
Mr. Churchman WBJ iiway and when
he returned last night his wife told of
i). i experience and lie reported at po
lice headquarter*.
ah that was found mining In tna
house were three razors and a kodak.
'.AMUSEMENTS_;£^_^^
I is—a Vaudeville i3SSf
BEGINNING MATINEK TODAY.
Elita Proctor: Otis & Co. Cressy and Dayne
"Mrs. Bunner-s Bun." , I 1 "row " 'I"11 Tonight."
Anna.Laughlin £*£* "The Night Birds
Toyland Prim* Donna. MatIQCC Nellie Brewster and Co.
Five Juggling Normans Tn j,, Lockwood and Mac Carty
Club Manipulators. . TOOay 1...1, of Planophlends.
Marshall Montgomery I 1 Lancton-Lucier Co.
Ventriloquist. " "A Fool's Errand."
q ORriiKiM MOTION nOTfTKM
EVERY NIGHT 100, tie, 800, We. MATINEE DAILY, 10c, SSc, Me. ;/.J-. ,
ttTTOROSCO'S BURBANK fHEATER MA^" l 8uetK
Revel of Beauty H
THE SPIRIT OF EARLY CAIJFORNTA NEVER HAS BEEN
DEPICTED WITH SUCH MAGIC ART AS IN ' „;
of the
■. y- -: ' : ■;•;".
Rancho
At the Burbank this week under the persona! direction Of
nUOMHHO iiki.xm i).
,A rainbow of color. Quaint characters.
Stage a floral bower. Mission days recalled.
Splendid costumes. Orlngo Invasion.
Showers of confetti. Land of Manana.
Graceful Spanish dances. Dons' last stand.
Lovely senoritas. Fairyland of art. ;^
Prices 25c, ftOc, 78c. Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, 10«, Mr, SOc.
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER D£>.V >NTno[:
LAST WEEK OF ~ THIRD WEEK OF
Kolb(®,Dill The cTWerry Widow
JS.OID V»Ok LJlii and the Devil
PRICES ISC, 808, 7.V. $1. MATINEBS WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY, 26c, SOe, 75c.
COMING—JAMES K. HACKETT. '
GBAMn nmr»A MnTTJSTT MATINEES TOMORROW, Saturday, Sunday.
KAN Li U^BKA MUUhli . phones Main 1967: Home A 1067.
TONIGHT AND AIX WEEK—SPECIAL BARGAIN MATINEE TOMORROW.
HOW BAXTER BUTTED IN
Owen Davis' famous melodramatic comedy success.' It's the best yet.
NEXT WEEK —First production In this city of "LENA RIVERS." Seats on sale this
morning. . -■— . - ■■ ■■■■-■ ■—
If OS ANGELES THEATRE
i*£^&M%i-rVA UDE VILLE
MATINEE EVERY DAY— SHOWS NIGHTLY
Max York'g Dog». I "A HORSE I Four Idanlas.
Countess Leontlne. ON Fox A Ward.
Edwin Winchester. | HOGAN." I Ths Laugh-O-Scop*.
POPULAR PRICES— inc. 20c, :tnc,
Bnt icrn THTfATI?P nelaHio-lllacknood Co., Proprs. and Me".
B.LflO^U tntLftlCß Mallnees Thursday, Saturday, Sunday.
• TONIGHT—Commencing—TONIGHT
LEWIS S. STONE and the Belasco theater company will present FOR THIS WEEK
ONLY, the great American play.
THE SQUAW MAN
Tomorrow night's performance under auspices Sons of St. Qeorga.
The Big Record-Breaking Play Comes
The Belasco theater company will present George Broadhurst's Immensely successful
play THE DOLLAR MARK
This Is the remarkable play that was given for ten consecutive weeks at the Belasco
theater last season and was MM) by over 140,000 theater goers of this city.
Beats for "THE DOLLAR MARK" GO ON BALE THIS MORNING. Regular prices.
ENGINEERING T? YT-TTRTT
AND MECHANICAL X-zYVIUJJI 1
UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF STATIONARY EN
GINEERS, FOURTH FLOOR, HAMBURGER BUILDING. EIGHTH AND BROADWAY,
MAY 23 TO 28. COME—BUT DON'T BRING YOUR MONEY.
LTTVV'Q PATTTT fHANTANT THIRD AND MAIN.
*±J_±jLJ~At C" Afg XAN A », 8:30 and 10:30 DAII.V.
The KRISTOFFY TRIO, grand opera vocalists: OBHLMAN MUSICAL TRIO,
Instrumentalists and quick change artists; CARLTON CHASE, the fashion
plate tenor; the CELEBRATED RUSSIAN DANCERS; MAE RERBDELL, dainty and
dashing. In long and story; and KAMMERMEYER'S ORCHESTRA. .'-'•--■■>
OLYMPIC THEATER home of hits and novelties.
ALPHIN v FARGO OFFBR "ROUND TOWN." AN EGYPTIAN ABSURDITY.
10 BIG SINGING AND DANCING NOVELTIES. inc. SOc, 25c.
PLENTY OF MONEY FOR
AQUEDUCT IS EXPECTED
Engineers Say Work Will Be Com
pleted on Time Without
Larger Force
Following an order Issued by tho
board of public works and which was
made necessary by a temporary lark
<>L' cash in the aqueduct funds, Btepi
have boon takon to reduce tho monthly
expenditure for work on tho great
Owens river aqueduct from $550,000 to
$400,000 monthly. To accomplish this
result about 1000 men, all of them day
laborers, were discharged from tho
aqueduct service Saturday night.
The situation is serious, but by no
means as serious as appears on the
surface, for engineers In charge of the
work assert confidently that the aque
duct will be completed on time, even
at the rate of progress possible with
the force as now reduced.
On the other hand, It Is likely that
the money shortage will lie obviated
within a few days. In fact City Attor
ney Leslie Hewitt said last night that
he expected a telegram from New York
today that will assure all the money
needed and as fast as it may be de
sired.
The trouble arises through the terms
of the contract under which the Owens
river bonds were dispored of to east
em buyers. Tinder that contract the
bonds were sold for delivery at staled
periods to A. B. Leach & Co. and to
Kountze Bros., bond investors of New
York city. The next date for delivery
is in December. Meantime v/ork on
the aqueduct has proceeded so much
more rapidly than had been antici
pated that a money shortage is threat
ened, despite the fact that the work
already done has been accomplished
at a cost considerably below the engi
neers' estimates.
W B. Mathews, attorney for the
aqueduct, and W. J. Washburn, chair
man of the council finance committee,
;ire in New York in consultation with
the bond linns concerned, and hope to
perfect today an agreement whereby
the issue will be taken over as speedily
as the neeods of the work demand.
HE HEARD THEM
••The audience is calling you." the
playwright "'as Informed. "1 hear
them," ho answered. "Show me the
quickest way out of here."—Birming
ham Age-Herald.
'WORLD'S SUNDAY SCHOOL
DAY SERVICES ARE HELD
Protestant Chuches in Washing
ton Begin with Early Devo
tion at 7:30 in Morning
WASHINGTON, May 22.—Churches
In every clime echoed the precepts of
the World's Sunday School association,
which is holding its sixth convention
here, by the observance through a
common form of service of "the
World's Sunday School Day."
In this city services were conducted
in all Protestant churches. The de
votions began at 7:30 this morning,
when in many of the churches the sac
rament of the Lord's supper was ob
served.
Delegates from the executive com
mittee of the convention visited every
Sunday school; there, were missionary
rallies for boys and for girls during t'.ta
afternoon, and in the evening meetings
in more than 100 churches wore In
dorsed by foreign missionaries fresh
from the field.
The work began with a sunrise
prayer meetl.g at a hotel, at which
the Rev. S. D. Sweimor, for many
years a missionary In Arabia, pre
sided, and prayers were made for the
Moslem world.
All the services were strictly Inter
natloal In their color as well as inter
denominational. Practically every
Protestant denomination was repre
sented, and it was estimated folk of,
fifty-one nationalities were gathered.
Some of the foreign workers who
spoke at meetings were Prof. Albert
dot, Italy: Prof. J. R. Chltambar, In
dia; Prof. T. H. Yun, president of tho
Anglo-Korean .school in Korea; the
Rev. N. Tamura, Japan; the Rev. N.
E. Pressley, Mexico; Francis Connell
of the Stockport, England, Sunday
school, the largest in the world; George
Wlnstone of New Zealand; the Rev.
Aquila Lucas of the West Indies; the
Rev. Jean Paul Cook of Algeria; tho
Rev. J. M. (iibson of London.
WORTH $100,000; KILLS SELF
TACOMA, May 22.— Godfrey Welter,
aged 71, a wealthy pioneer, committed
suicide today by shooting himself. Fear
that l-e would became Insane was trie
,is.' of the self-destruction. Mr.
Wcller leaves a fortune of over JIOO.WU.
i . . i '-..••,■.■■■ .■ ».',:,"- ■• ■'■■,■ .■ ■ '

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