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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, May 25, 1910, Image 1

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PRICE: 50 CENTS IKK MONTH
I'Ol* xxxvn.
MMIIIIII '-'SB
PORTLAND WOMAN
SAID TO BE HERE
IS THOUGHT SLAIN
Writer of Fake Message Found at
Hotel by Los Angeles
Police
SAY MAN IS FRIEND'S DUPE
Sends Telegram on Advice of the
Northern Undertaker, Who
Handled Woman's Money
"XT ESTERDAT'S developments In tho
of the missing Mrs. Hannah
cane of the missing Mrs. Hannah
-*- Smith, who disappeared from
Portland two weeks ago with $600 In
her possession leads to the belief that
the woman was a victim of foul play.
Los Angeles detectives who have
worked on the case report that Mrs.
Smith is not In Lou .Angeles despite
the fact that a telegram purporting to
have been written by the woman in
Los Angeles was forwarded to a Mrs.
Anna Harper' in Portland. •■•
That the message was written by a
man has been established, and It la
also said, that the wiltcr Is F. W.
Lebricks, a traveling salesman from
Chicago, who is stopping at the Hol
lenbeck hotel. Detective. Hawlny in
vestigated the telegram yesterday and
learned the name of the man who sent
the Portland dispatch, stating Mrs.
Smith was well and;, In Los "Angeles,
also asking, that her household goods
be forwarded to the Angel City. „
Suspicion was first ■ aroused by ! the
fact that Mrs. Smith' does not write.
Investigation showed who sent J . the
telegram, and it Is now . believed the
message was sent to allay suspicion
Of the disappearance of Mrs. Smith.
It is said Lebricks acted innocently
in sending the message and did so
on the advice of his friend; Undertaker
Krickson of Portland, r .
Erlckson is Bald to have had charge
of Mrs. Smith's financial affairs, also
is said to have been indebted to her
to the sum of $1200.
When interviewed last night, cap
tain of Detectives Flammer stated he
did - not believe the message was a
"Joke," as had been Intimated. .
"Personally I believe there la a deep
mystery back of the story, but I think
the story will develop In Portland and
not Los 'Angeles.
"We have looked for the woman
who is reported as missing, but have
been unable to locate her. Whore she
Is or what has become of her Is a
matter that the Portland, police will
effort to locate the missing
woman has been made and she has
disappeared as though swallowed up
■by the earth. Why Erickson should
nsk a friend to send a telegram which
L a untrue is a matter which the
polio lUve taken up. and startling de
velopments are expected.
UNDERTAKER ERICSON IS
QUESTIONED BY POLICE
'Blind' Telegram About Mrs.
Smith Inspired by Him
PORTLAND, Ore., May 24.—Devel
opments today in the mysterious dis
appearance of Mrs. Hanna Smith, a
wealthy widow, from this place May 8,
served 'apparently to demonstrate that
a telegram sont from Lob Angeles say
lnir the woman was "all right,' was
ft ■•blind," and that it was inspired by
Frlc X Bricson. at undertaker of this
city with whom Mrs. Smith had en
trusted $1200 of her money for safe
keeping.
According to the police, a message
was received from the chief of police
at Los Angeles stating that F. W. Leb
ricks had acknowledged sending the
telegram from Los Angeles and had
done so at Erlcson's request.
Kricson was summoned before Dep
uty District Attorney J. J. Fitzgerald
mid Captain of Detectives Moore and
questioned. According to these of
ficials Kricson is said to have admit
ted that he telegraphed to Lebrlcks to
have the message sent.
Kricson, it is asserted, stated the
■woman's relatives were much wrought
tip over her disappearance and that to
allay their apprehensions he caused the
message to be Bent.
STOLE A HOUSE WHILE
OWNER WASN'T LOOKING
Denver Man Takes Five-Room
Cottage off Woman's Lot
DENVER, May 24.—1f the allegations
of Mrs. Sophie Ferguson, contained In
a complaint filed in the district court
yesterday, are true, L. F. Wright of
this city is the champion of the many
varieties of the light-fingered gentry.
According to Mrs. Ferguson, Wright
stole a house. She says she bought the
house, a five-room frame cottage, on
the installment plan, making the final
payment the first of April. When she
prepared to move in she found the
ho«se occupied by the Wrights, who re
fused to move. Mrs. Ferguson and her
husband piled their effects on the lawn
and laid siege to the house. But while
their vigilance was relaxed, Mrs. Fer
guson declares, Wright secured help
and moved the house to an adjoining
lot, where he continues to bid defiance
to the Fergusons.
PHONE TRUST ABSORBS
EXCHANGES IN SOUTHWEST
EL PASO, May 24.—The Tr!-State
Telephone and Telegraph company to
day acquired the telephone exchanges
at Silver City and Doming, and the
toll line between those places, belong
ing to the Southern Independent Tele
phone company.
Since it entered tUis field a few
weeks ago, the Trl-State has acquired
th« exchanges at Alamo (Jordo and
Las Cruces and the toll lines which
reach all the important mining camps
in New Mexico and Arizona.
LOS ANGELES HERALD
INDEX OF
HERALD'S NEWS
TODAY
FORECAST
I.oh Ana-rlea and vicinity —rinudy ,Wed
nesday i light wind, changing to south.
Maximum temperature yesterday 68 degrees)
minimum temperature 54 degrees.
LOS ANGELES
Stockholders of local concern quarrel •
over its affairs. PAGE 8
Edmtson, fighting for divorce, says wife
married him for money, then (kipped
out. I'AGE. 8
Bite Sespe Oil company, sued for |100,»
000. . PAGE 8
Portland woman Raid to be here la thought
slain. PAGE 1
Jay Ransch, famous Jockey, charged by
mother with threatening to kill her and
granddaughter. PAGE 1
Democratic I committee fills county ticket,
with two exceptions. PAGE 9
John ~~ M Eshclman, IJncoln-Roosevelt
league candidate, touring southern coun
ties. PAGE »
Republican machine leaders declare Lawlor
logical man for senate. PAGE 16
National Association of' Stationary En
gineers plans stats license law. PAGE 5
Murphy, prominent Eagle, thought a sui- '
clde. PAGE 5
City council fixes rates for Ban Pedro water
company which Increases Us revenue. -
PAGE 11
Charles E. Fredericks, business man, dead.
PAGE 9
Dropping of aqueduct workers must stand.
says commission. PACE 8
New bogey leaps up to pester G. O. P.
machine. PAGE 9
Country Justice arrested for violating the
, law by running a "blind pig." PAGE 9
Democratic headsman poises ax over Na
tional Commltteeman Nathan Cole. PAGE -9
Good Government workers organizing new
clubs In all parts of city. PAGE 9
Clubs and music. PAGE 13
Mines and oil fields. PAGE 6
Sports. PAGE 10
Editorial and Letter Box. PAGE 13
News of the courts. PAGE 8
Municipal affairs. PAGE 8
Markets and financial. PAGE 7
City brevities. PAGE 13
In hotel corridors. PAGE II
Marriage licenses, births, deaths. PAGE 14
Classified advertising. ■ PAGES 14-16
Citrus fruit report. PAGE 5
Building permits. PAGE II
Shipping. , PAOB 11
Theaters. PAGE 13
Goclety. ( PAGE 12
SOUTH CALIFORNIA
George Flgueroa held responsible by coro
ner's Jury for murer of wife In Banta
Monica. ' PAGE 3
Bert Mcc shot In self-defense. Is testimony
at Ban Bernardino murder hearing. PAGE! 14
Ocean Park dairy herd Impounded and milk
famine Is threatened. . PAGE 14
Lo» Angeles lads, helpless In rowboat, res
cued from sea by Long Beach wharfinger.
(PAGE 14
European polo expert* may compete In
Pasadena tournaments. PAGE 14
COAST
Ban Francisco » supervisors recommend
permit 'for Jeffries-Johnson contest,
I despite prottrta. - ' PAGE 10
Los Angeles woman, hurrying In auto
| to deathbed of Infant, says driver at
tacked her. - PAGE 2
Rudolph and Claus Bpreckels, Jr., claim
•father gave sons 11.000,000. PAGE l-
EASTERN
Poisoned by gases, C. C. Dlckerson, New
York banker, dies. PAGE 1
Presbyterian assembly make appropria
tion of 12.600,000 for mission work.
V PAGE 2
Churches uphold Ideals. Bays President
Taft -In message to Unitarian Lay
men's league. PAGE 3
W. B. Thomas, president of American
Sugar Refining company, subpoenaed
as witness in Helke trial. PAGE 2
Liquor men ulan to fight prohibition.
PAGE 3
Millions stolen from fraternal orders.
PAGE 2
Steamer rammed by another sinks In
Lake Huron; 18 persons missing. PAGE 1
Senators expected to show railroads
mercy In rate bill settlement. PAGE 2
FOREIGN
Roosevelt visits people and places In
London. "*• • PAGE 3
English scientists murdered In French
Congo. . | PAGE t,
Madrid police believe bomb wu Intended
for Alfonso. PAGE L'
Chinese rioting becoming serious; IT. B.
fleet held In readiness. PAGE 1
Fierce attack on Blueflelds repelled. PAGE 1
ENGLISH SCIENTIST IS
MURDERED BY SAVAGES
Lieut. Boyd Alexander Killed in
the French Congo—Had a
Notable Career
LONDON, May 24.—Lieut. Boyd Al
exander, the noted traveler, has been
murdered by natives near Wadai, in
the French Congo. This bare fact
reached the foreign office today. No
details are obtainable yet.
Lieut. Boyd Alexander, late of the
Seventh battalion of the British Rifle
brigade, retired from the army in 1907.
He had led several notable scientific
expeditions. He headed the expedition
to Cape de Verde islands in 1897; also
the expedition in 1904 to Feranado Po,
which resulted In the successful'ascent
of Mount St. Isabel and the discovery of
many new birds, and in 1904-07 he was
the leader of the Alexander Gosling ex
pedition across Africa from the Niger
to tho Nile. He was the author of sev
eral volumes descriptive of his travels,
and received gold medals from the Roy
al Geographical society of Antwerp and
the .Royal Geographical society of Lon
don, and was an honorable fellow of
the Royal Scottish Geographical soci
ety. He was born' in 1873 and made his
home at Swifts Place, Cranbrook.
CEMENT PLANT BURNS
OGDEN, Utah, May 24.—Fire tonight
destroyed the store house and oil tanks
of the Union Portland Cement company
plant at Devil's Slide, thirty miles east
of Ogden, with a loss estimated at
$150,000. The origin of the fire is a
mystery.
GOLDEN RULE CHIEF ACCUSED
CLEVBLAND, May 24.—Charges
were filed with Mayor Baehr today
charging Chief of Police Koehler,
known throughout the country as the
"Golden Hule" chief, with gross im
morality, habitual drunkenness and
disobedience of the orders of his su
perior.
WEDNESDAY MORNING, MAY 25, 1910.
U. S. MINISTER TO
CHINA PREPARES TO
PROTECT AMERICANS
:lk
>-• Tffifc IS
WILLIAM J. CALHOUN
CHINESE TROUBLES
GROW; NAVY READY
Asiatic Fleet in Readiness to An
swer Call-Anti-Foreign
Sentiment Spreading
[Associated Press!
CHANGSHA, May M.—A messenger
who arrived here from VI Van* reports
100 houses have been burned by mob*.
The officials have fled and the town Is
at the merry of the rioters. The tele
graph wires have been cut and details
are lacking.
; Bands of rioters have advanced along
the main road and are moving north
ward. Several villages have been en
tirely destroyed. • .. <•■■',
(Special to The Herald)
PEKING, China, May 24.—Assurance*
were received here today by United
States Minister to China W. J. Cal
houn that the Asiatic fleet, under com
mand of Rear Admiral John Hubbard,
is holding- Itself in readiness for emer
gencies which seem bound to arise as
the result of the anti-foreign sentiment
that is spreading riot and bloodshed
throughout the empire.
Advices telling of unprecedented out
rages on the part of huge mobs of
armed natives are reaching here from
all parts, and are daily increasing.
Word has reached here from Shang
hai that Chuan Chia, thirty miles
northwest of Changsha, was devastated
last Saturday by rioting natives, and
many men, women and children killed
and tortured. A considerable portion
of the city was burned.
The Lutheran churches have been the
most pronounced objects of native hat
red and have been destroyed and looted.
The government seems powerless to
cope with the situation and shudders
at the gigantic proportions which the
uprising is assuming.
The troubles began with a shortage
of rice crops in Hunan province, due to
the great floods of a year ago. This
was followed by widespread charges
that territorial rulers had forced the
natives to pay exorbitant prices for
what food could be had. An agitation
was then started against the foreign
element, it being charged that they had
increased the famine by speculation
and modern business "throat cutting."
OLDEST OFFICEHOLDER, 85,
PROUD FATHER OF NEW BABY
North Carolina Man Is Probable
Holder of Two Records
DURHAM. N. C, May 24.—After hav
ing served in office continuously for
fifty-two years, John Laws of Orange
county, at the age of 85, again is in the
field as a candidate for re-election for
register of deeds. He is declared to be
the oldest officeholder in point of
service in the United States, and dur
ing his l< ng term has weathored many
political upheavals. It is not doubted
that he will come out victorious at this
—his latest—battle at the polls.
But Laws' claim to distinction does
not rest alone with his political suc
cess. His matrimonial experience has
given him fame as well. At the age of
80 he took to himself a wife barely en
tered on her teens, and only recently
became the proud father of the third,
child by this union.
The vereran officeholder saw service
in the Mexican war, was a friend of
Andrew Jackson and knew President
Polk rirsonally. Except for the fact
that "Laws does not drink water
straight, but mixes it with milk, lemon
juice and other Uigrcdlents, he is with
out accentrlcltles.
CHINESE WHO KILLED GIRL
IS TRAILED BUT ESCAPES
KANSAS CITY, May 24.—A special
from Wellington, Kas., says:
Leon Ling, alias William H. Deon,
the Americanised chinaman accused of
having murdered Elsie Sigel, a mission-,
ary worker in New York, last June,
was in Wellington until two months
ago. The Ney York authorities wen
communicated with, but about that
time the Chinese left here, saying he
was going to Chicago.
GEORGE C.ROBBINS FOUND
NOT GUILTY OF BIGAMY
MEXICO CITY, May 24.—George C.
Robbins of Los Angeles, whose extra
dition on a charge of bigamy has been
asked by the state department at
Washington, was found not guilty by
the Mexican federal district court to-
day.
Robbins was charged with having
married Miss Genevieve Lindsay of Los
Angeles on January 1, 1910, although he
already had a wife living in the same
city.
POISONED BY GAS
N.Y. BANKER DIES;
IS DEEP MYSTERY
Explosion in Laboratory Results
in the Death of Charles
Couter Dickinson
PHYSICIANS ARE PUZZLED
Chemist Who Performed Experi
ment Overcome— Known
Details Earning
[Associated Preßfl]
NEW YORK, May 24.—Charles Cou
ter Dickinson, organizer and for
mer president of the Carnegie
Trust company, died in St. Luke's hos
pital today from congestion of the
lungs caused by inhalation -of a mys
terious gas in the laboratory of Dr.
F. E. Lange at Scranton, Pa., May 16.
V. V. B. Hedgepeth of Scranton,
president of the Tlppecanoe Insurance
company, at whose instance Mr. Dick
inson went to witness an experiment
Kn the laboratory, was also seriously
affected by the gas, as was the ex
perimenter, Dr. Lange. Both are re
ported ill, but probably will recover.
S. C. Dickinson, a brother, gave out
the first news of the mysterious trag
edy today. He was in an adjoining
room when the others were stricken
and was unaffected.
' W|THHBU» NAME • J,'
At first he declined to give the name
of the chemist or of. the friend who
invited his brother to witness the ex
periment, but tonight, fearful lest a
rumor of suicide be given credence, he
made a statement. He does not know
the nature of the experiment or exactly
why his brother went to witness it, and
the character of the ingredients is so
baffling that two of New York's most
eminent physicians, Drs. Janeway and
Delafleld, could not account for the
effect on Mr. Dickinson's lungs. ,
"I lingered in the main room of the
laboratory," said 6. C. Dickinson, "af
ter my. brother and our friend went
into the smaller room where the chem
icals were being prepared. The chem
ist called out to me to come, as they
were ready. . I started to go into the
other room and just then there was
an explosion. . .. ,
"I rushed in and found all three men
gasping for breath and almost uncon
scious. .The room was filled with a
strange, stifling gas. . ... -. - !
• LTOOS CONGESTED -■ ''- * *
"My brother's lungs became con
gested Just as if he were suffering from
pneumonia and his condition baffled
every treatment which physicians could
devise. We sent to the chemist who
performed the experiment, who suf
fered only slightly, in the hope that
he could suggest an antidote, but he
could do nothing."
Nothing could be learned of the na
ture of the experiments.
Mr. Dickinson, in the forty years of
his life, achieved marked prominence
in the banking world. He was founder
of the Carnegie Trust company and
after the retirement of Leslie M. Shaw
in 1908 he became Its president, retir
ing last December.
COLLISION IN ENGLISH
CHANNEL; 22 DROWNED
Bark Escapes Injury, but Steamer
Goes to the Bottom
COWES, Isle of Wight, May 24.—
Twenty-two persons were drowned as
a result of a collision today between
the steajner Skerryvore and tho Ger
man bark J. C. Vinnen in the English
channel. The Skerryvore sank. Only
two of the crew of the steamer were
rescued, one of whom died a short
time later.
The bark put in here, but Inter left
for Southampton. Apparently she was
not injured. As far as known, no
passengers were on either ship.
STATUS OF BAKERSFIELD
FIXED BY COURT RULING
SAN FRANCISCO, May 24.—1n
granting a peremptory writ of mandate,
directed against the board of trustees
"f Bakersfleld to T. F. Allen, and deny
ing a similar instrument to J. R. Wil
liams, the state supreme court today
held that Iv calling the election of offi
cers for the consolidated cities of Bak
•^rsfteld ai d Kern City the trustees of
the former exceeded their powers.
The first petitioner got an alternatiA-e
writ of mandate compelling the trus
tees to call the election from at large
instead of by the five wards into which
they had divided the consolidated mu
nicipality, while the second petitioner
asked that the election be held by
wards, the latter being denied. The
decision denying the writ held that af
ter the consolidation Bakersfleld con
tinued to rank as a city of the fifth
class, the position it held before the
consolidation became effective.
TRAIN RUNS OVER BABY,
AND TOT LIVES TO TELL IT
SYRACUF 11", N. V., May 24.—The 2
yetir-old soiC of Ernest Allen had a
wonderful escape from death here last
night. The baby was playing close to
the railroad tracks near his home, and
evidently was struck by the step of a
locomotive. He lay between the tracks
while the locomotive and forty-four
cars passed over him. When the last
car had passed the babe was picked up,
uninjured, save for a bump as the re
sult of his fall.
SAYS COMET'S HEAD IS SPLIT
TUCSON, Arli., May 84.—11r. A. E. Doug
las of the Milvcrnlti of Arizona., tonight
found that Holley's comet's head or nuclei™
liml iIUIiIihI -Into two pails, the more bril
liant In advance of the second portion.
"Theae pltM-ex," he wild, "are about thirty
second* apart or a dMnm-e of 8000 mile!*.
The brighter of I lie two piece* li In advance
•f the other, both surrounded by bright
background. The last great example of thin
kind wait in the great comet of 1883- whjch
divided Into four parts."
Uncle Sam's Men Ready to
Guard American Interests
r— — • .■■•■■ ■■■■'■ -' —r ■'■■ ~;"' '' ' 1
I'
; : A"
\ SQMZOF"™t\
\£STFIAM'S TROOPS}..:- „, .<. -\. *:, < „., .'^ll
MOTHER SAYS SON
THREATENED LIFE
Jay Ransch, Famous Jockey, in
City Jail Charged
by Parent
Charged with threatening to kill his
6-year-old niece, Kissie Ransch, whom
he feared would inherit the $300,000 es
tate of his mother, Mrs. E. M. Scholl,
who is lying at the point of death, Jay
Ransch, a noted jockey who figured
prominently in a $3,000,000 race track
scandal in Paris a year and a half ago,
was arrested yesterday and lodged in
the city jail in default of $2000 bail.
Behind the story ot Ransch's threat
to kill his niece lies a story of greed
and avarice, according to the detectives
who have investigated the case. It also
involves a bitter feud which has ex
isted in the Ransch family for many
years. This feud was accentuated Jan
uary 4, when Mrs. Kissie Young, sister
of Jay Ransch, died In Los Angeles and
Mrs. Scholl adopted the 6-year-old
child. . .
For several years bitter enmity had
existed between-Ransch and his sister.
It is said the sister resented the life
her brother was leading and his bohe
mian method of living- also caused the
mother to frown on him whom she had
always thought of as a dutiful son.
Shortly after the race track scandal
in Paris, when Ransch was ruled off
the race track for life, he came to Cali
fornia with a small fortune, the result
of money earned while riding under
the Vanderbilt colors and his share of
what is known as the greatest race
scandal of the age, turned the young
man's head.
Shortly after the death of his sister
he came to Los Angeles and upbraided
his mother when he learned she had
adopted the granddaughter.
When Jay heard of her intentions ho
went to his mother's home and is said
to have threatened to kill his mother
and the niece. In his rage it is al
leged he seized a knife and cut to
shreds several hundred dollars' worth
of furs and silks belonging to his
mother.
The culmination of these bursts of
fury came yesterday, when, it is said,
he placed a gun against the head of
his dying mother and told her unless
she gave him her property and cast off
the nioco he would kill them both.
Physicians who have been attending
Mrs. Scholl assert she cannot live more
than a week or ten days and that the
acts of her son have aggravated her
illness.
The actions of Ransch wore reported
to central police headquarters, the re
sult being his arrest yesterday after
noon. Ransch was leaving the Scholl
residence when he was approached by
Detective Zlegler and placed under ar
rest. He was searched and a loaded
automatic revolver found in his pos
session. A complaint was issued in
the afternoon charging him with
threatening to kill his niece and he
was arraigned before Police Judge
Rose.
As his mother is unable to leave her
bed the preliminary examination on
the charge will be held at her bedside
this afternoon at 2 o'clock. A com
plaint was also filed against Ransch
charging him with carrying concealed
weapons: He was fined $25 on this
charge, which he paid.
CURTISS PLANS LONG FLIGHT
NEW YORK, May 24.—Glenn H. Cur
tisw will attempt, on Thursday, the
most ambitious flight over the water
ever yet essayed In an aeroplane. Un
der the terms of the competition of
fered by the New York World, he will
try to fly from Albany to New York
with but one stop
OTVrT T? fOPFirQ • nAIf.TIc. ON TRAINS Be.
OIJ-M.J».L<-Ij vUI lijjO. MNKAVSr. OJf TRAINS lO<>.
GUNS BOOMING
AT BLUEFIELDS
Attack by Government Forces Re
pelled by Provisional
Troops Near City
(Special to The Herald)
BLUEFIELDS, May 24.—The long
hostilities that have devastated Nic
aragua came nearer to their climax by
the attack, last night and today, of
the government forces under General
Lara upon the provisional govern
ment's position on the bluff just out
side the city.
Over 500 government troops were
landed in the steamer Venus and an
attack was at once begun on the en
trenched provisional, but it was re
pulsed and the attacking force fell
back out of range. Today the assault
was renewed, but with no definite re
sult.
The United States gunboat Paducah,
whose commanding officer. Com
mander W. W. Gilmer, has served no
tice on the government forces that he
will not permit a bombardment of
Bluefields, is standing by vigilantly
to see that no harm comes to the non
combatants who are undefended in the
city, where there is no armed force.
No restrictions will be placed on the
combatants while they follow their
present line of combat, but the Amer
ican "nrships will instantly put a
check on either force that violates the
rules of modern warfare. |
PROBATION OFFICERS ASK
FOR FEMALE POLICEMAN
Only Women Are Fitted to Handle
'Wild' Girls
ST. LOUIS, May 24.—The plea for
women "policemen" last night was the
signal for an enthusiastic demonstra
tion by the National Probation Officers
association convention. A Btorm Of ap
plause greeted the submission ot the
idea by Harvey H. Baker, judge of the
juvenile court of Boston.
••Women police officers are the logical
solution to the question of handling
girls who have gone wrong." declared
the Bostonian. "From the moment she
comes into the hands of the law a girl
should be given the most sympathetic
treatment, such as only women can
understand. She should not be sub
jected to the brutal use of a burly
criminal handler."
That probation court judges should
restrict themselves to their judicial
(unctions and not attempt probation
work was the general theme of the af
ternoon session.
OBTAINS $4000 JUDGMENT
AGAINST CHARITABLE HOME
INDIANAPOLIS, May 24.—Judgment
of $4000 against the Good Shepherd so
ciety, a Roman Catholic sisterhood that
maintains a charitable home in this
city, was granted today In the circuit
court in favor of Mrs. Mamie Smith,
who alleged that she was Imprisoned
against her will in the Institution for
six years, during which she complained
she was forced to work in an insani
tary laundry.
As Mamie Sullivan, she was placed in
the home by her father. She ran away
at the end of six years and married.
C^, CENTS
STEAMER RAMMED
BY ANOTHER SINKS;
18 PERSONS LOST
Vessel's Back Broken and It Goes
Down Before Boats Can
Be Lowered
TRAGEDY ON LAKE HURON
Captain, 2 Passengers and 3
Members of Crew Only
Persons Saved
[Associated Press]
PORT HURON, Mich., May 24.—Fol
lowing is the list of missing who
are believed to have lost their
lives in the sinking of the steamer
Frank Goodyear:
MRS. LILLIAN BASSETT, wife of
steward.
JOHN BASSETT, aged 3.
GUS ZAETSCH, first mate.
ARCHIE FULLER, second mate.
JOHN GIBSON, chief engineer.
WHEELSMAN JACOB PLERGIS,
South Chicago.
JOHN PAPP, Cleveland.
WILLIAM PITT, watchman. Mid
land, Ont.
WILLIAM SCHLUETER, -watchman,
Milwaukee.
LOUIS KRAMER, deckhand, Keno-
Bha, Wls.
IVOR CARTER, deckhand, Kenosha.
FRED HERMAN, deckhand, Chey
boygan, Mich.
FRANK JANKOWITZ, deckhand,
Chicago.
WILLIAM ROMERT, oiler, Carson
vllle, Mich.
HOWARD SHOOK, oiler, Au Sable,
Mich.
VANDERSLAW KLUBOZEWSKI,
South Chicago, and
ERNEST STREKK, Kenosha, Wis.
Man, name not given.
Families and friends of the missing
eighteen members of the crew of the
steawer Frank Goodyear, which sank
Monday off Point Aux Barques, after
being rammed amidships by the steam
er James B. Wood, tonight practically
gave up hope that any of the missing
persons have ben rescued.
The steamer Sir William Siemens,
said to have picked up some of the
missing crew, passed Detour today and
made no report of any survivors on
board. , -"; ■ .
Four of the rescued members of the
crew have gone to the Goodyear head
quarters in Cleveland, and Mrs. Emma
Bassett, the only other survivor, is
still at Port Huron.
The Goodyear, operated by Mitchell
& Co. of Cleveland, was coming from
Lake Superior, laden with ore. The
Wood, owned by the Gilchrist Trans
portation company of Cleveland, was
going up light. There was little sea at
the time, and fog is held responsible
for the accident.
The Goodyear was sunk in forty-sev
en fathoms of water. The steamer
James B. Wood of Cleveland which
struck the Goodyear bow on came into
Port Huron harbor today with . a big
hole in her bow, carrying half a dozen
survivors from the Goodyear. The lat
ter carried a crew of twenty-three men
and several passengers.
ONXY SIX ARE SAVED
Captain P. R. Hemenger of Algonac.
Mich., who commanded the Goodyear;
Chief Engineer Gibson; Steward David
Bassett; one wheelsman and two pas
sengers, Mrs. Thomas H. Bassett and
hed daughter of Mariane City, Mich.,
were saved and brought to Port Huron
on the steamer Wood.
The Goodyear was struck amidships
on the starboard side and the bow of
the Wood was punctured.
In a moment It was seen that the
Goodyear was doomed, as she began
rapidly to fill with water. Every one
on board was supplied with a life pre
server, and every effort made to man
and launch the small boats. But the
water poured into the hold so fast that
the heavy hatches were forced from
their frames by the pressure from un
dorneath and shot into the air in every
direction, and the falling hatches
spread injury and death among th,,
terrified crew and passengers. With
his infant child in his arms. Steward
Bassett hod almost reached safety in
one of the life boats when one of the
tumbling hatches snatched the baby
ivZ hi? arms. The little one fell into
the Hike and was drowned despite the
frantic efforts of Its father to rescue it
When the Goodyear settled beneath
the •urfaca of the water it was evi
a" nt she was practically broken in
two the action of the water having
completed the destruction begun by
the blow received In the collision.
DAUGHTER OF GEN. FREMONT
IS TAKEN SERIOUSLY ILL
Pneumonia Follows Apparent At
tack of Ptomaine Poisoning
Miss Jessie Benton Fremont, only
surviving daughter of the late Gen.
John C Fremont, whose name ia in
geparably linked with the early history
of California, lies seriously ill at her
home 2158 West Twenty-ninth street.
Miss Fremont's trouble is pneumonia,
folowing an attack of something which
closely resembled ptomaine poisoning
and which developed several days ago.
Miss Fremont has made Los Angeles
her home for many years. Her father
brought the Bear flag to Low Angeles
In the early days and commanded the
first United States troops to Invade
what was then Mexican territory. He
served for a term as United States
senator from California, and was ter
ritorial governor of Arizona from 1878
to 1882. He was once a candidate for
president but was defeated.
Mrs. Jessie Benton Fremont, for
whom her daughter was named, died
In Los Angeles in 1902, having made
a name for herself as an author. Bar
son ("apt. John Charles Fremont, la
In the navy, belnff at the present time
in command of the battleship Missis
sippi. Ho also is prominently known
as writer on naval topics and has
served his country as navel attach*
In Paris and St. Petersburg.

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