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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, May 26, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-05-26/ed-1/seq-2/

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So. Broadway, 2^-237-239 _ So. Hill Street, 234-244 ••
All the Butterlck Patterns and publications for June are ready
Corset Cover Sale Today
.
I $2 to $3 French Embroidered corset
i cover patterns to be sold in our Em
; | broidery Department today at $1.25.
! A half dozen or more really beauti
| ful designs.
Rare Values in Bedding
There's not a month in the year in this
climate when warm bedding is not
necessary. So offerings like these are
always timely.
Twelve-quarter — inches—white wool blankets with
wide silk binding, doubly stitched— and $13 grades—
a pair.
Eleven-quarter blankets of thick, soft, fluffy white wool
with wide silk bindings and pink or blue borders— $10
grade—now $8.50.
Extra heavy white wool blankets with just enough cotton
to prevent shrinking—eleven-quarter size—s7.so grade at $6.
Eleven-quarter blankets of pure white wool with button
hole stitched edges and pink or blue borders — $6 quality—
$4.75 a pair.
Full size comforts filled with fine down and covered with
best grade sateen — $7 grade—ss each.
Bed pillows, filed with thoroughly cleansed feathers —
nothing but feathers— to $6 a pair.
Goose-down pillows in German linen tickings, $7 a pair.
CROWN COMBINOLA, the King of Player Pianos
\ -- -— x*"^
Two proofs that the Crown Combinola is winning:
First — Buyers like them and praise them at every opportunity.
Second —Competitors don't like them and decry them at every oppor-
Why not examine this wonderful instrument for yourself before pur
chasing?
It might he of interest to you to know that we have other Player
Pianos at $385, $450, $500 and $6. You can't afford to overlook these
bargains. Being out of the high rent district, we sell for less.
Smith Music Company
406 West Seventh Street i
tv niTfi RustiG HiGkory
*&k Inn T i^l Jor PorGh Use
,j ran' H i *s*°' an '**m *nlßainff In our
"Kb. t '^—Zi r ~r^: *7-- rr !jr:^:f*S'^..?Jr."=..L- wn^r 1 i /jy great stock —her* you will find
tryyl I m all patterns In Hickory
) -sot an It**11! missing In our
rr.^i. ¥ ?^j t /# gr^at ptock—here ynu will find
j /./ a" Patterns in rockers, chairs,
tUJMjLirjHgT jj 13 settees, tables, swings, plant
- !Wgj^iMMl stands, bench.s, tie. This 19
. \j^F^^~^^^^^j^^^!^4' the most substantial Una >ri
ft /JO? *-^' "'"■» &'<} th« market. It Is high-class,
H i-STl''^*"^y"!!"!'" "~*irm" nWjj-TWirMp , str.ini, tough goods that stand
—Mainr^Byy the «car and tear W» sell II
!Tfta li \j faTM fit rU'*i that savn you money,
fna^^irr*^" t*-^'"g^**-^^*^^-7^^r-^-^,^ijJ^: Get your lawn and porch fur*
0 al " mrji nlnhed with "Rustic Hickory"
l.i ' —tt means solid Hummer com*
** US fort tor evtry member of thf
.M*» ' family.
Your Credit is Good |||OU^I^^GQqM
——-—— Lfwi. m» tl
'WiTiMmMiMiiwiiM n-r-n—iini mmv urn «eo-o£e so. main am
AK.miiiiyf. HUUnIUITOMJuSM
DISMISSED ON CHARGE OF
SLAYING GIRL ON PIER
Jury Acquits Seyler After Five
HoursN Deliberation
MAYS LANDING, X. J., May 25.—
William Seyler, charged with the mur
der of Jane Adam.-; on the million dol
lar pier at Atlantic ' 'lty last February,
..(iiit ■ I tonight. The Jury was
out over five houi
When the verdict was announced
there was a chi er '■ rom I ■
■which was qulcklj ■< by Judge
Trenchard. Si j ler 1 i pod at his
counsel when he realized again
a in. man.
After greeting
<.\ er 1 1 Ihe jurymen and shook I
■with each of them, at thi same Urn.
\varmls exprei thanks.
Orville Seyler, William's brother, who
)lilM been held ;■ II «il li
silly discharged, :<n<l the two brothers
Immediately left toi Vtlantlc 1 !ity.
THIRTY GIVEN DIPLOMAS
RENO, May 26. Thirty graduates
were liand' d tiolr heepukin to
president .1 B. Stubbs of the Nevada
Ftntr- unlvi rslty. The comi
I silvered by Dr. 1 >a-\ Id P.
nws, professor of education of the
University of California.
LAND IN THREE STATES
GOING TO HOMESTEADERS
Areas in Wyoming. Utah and Ari
zona Now Designated
WASHINGTON, May 25.—Additional
an as in Wyoming and Utah today
were designated by the department of
the interior for disposition under the
enlarged homestead act. Approxlmate-
res wen so designated In
Wyoming.
An area, of about 606,608 acn a in ' en
trai Arizona, withdrawn temporarily in
190] i 1" ton 1 purposes, has been re
; to the public domain by the In
terior di partment. The land li'»s in
i ai and Marli opa counties.
All the unappi ■■■' la Led lauds <>n the
ed 1 raet will become .subject to
homestead settlement August 7. The
unappropriated public lands In the
eliminated li "in tha 1 tan eg na
/Vrlzona bs presidi ntial
proclamation w il! be subject to home
stead settlement the same date.
KENTUCKY FEUDIST SLAIN
JACKSONi Kj\, May 25.—Alexander
i 'oniben, mi mber of a well known
■ uiti county family, was shut and
killed from ambush today while float
ing down the Kentucky river uu a raft.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: THURSDAY MORNING, MAY 20, 1010.
8000 BUILDINGS
BURN; 100 PERISH
Thirty Thousand Gather in Refu
gee Camps and Devour
Uncooked Rice
INABA MARU BRINGS NEWS
Family Seeking to Save Valuables
Locked in by Police and
Cremated
[Ainelttad Press]
VICTORIA, B. C May 25.—Details
of tin; disastrous tire at Aomori, North
Japan, In which 100 persons were
burned t.i death and 8000 of the 11,500
buildings were rased, with loss of $8,
--000,000, were received by the steamer
[naba Maru today. The burned area
was one and three-sevenths miles long
and a quarter of a mile broad. Soldiers
searching the debris found several
■cores or charred bodies.
Thirty thousand homeless persons
were gathered In the refugee camps.
Great suffering followed thn fire nnH
supplies of rice brought in were eaten
raw by the starving people, a store of
powder exploded and shook the whole
area soon after the fire was extin
guished.
The tire originated in a small house,
and high wind and lack of water re
sulted in a conflagration on both sides
of the river. One family seeking to
| nave valuables from a storehouse » r*J
] locked in by tlie police, who were igno
rant of their jjresence, and ail per-
I ished. ARonizlng scenes occurred in
I the streets, where crowds seeking to
I save their furniture were driven away
j by (lames.
Men who ferried their Roods across
the river, thinking there to tind safety,
were driven away and their goods de
stroyed.
LONG BEACH CELEBRATES
WITH EDISON COMPANY
(Special ti The Herald)
LONG BEACH, May 25.—Two hun
dred and thirty men, including a num
ber of gesta of honor from Los An
gelea, were seated al the banquet
tables at llotd Virginia tonight when
a "Get Together" banquet was Riven
by tlie chamber of commerce, the prin
cipal motive being to celebrate the
location here of the $8,000,000 pow< r
plant of the Southern California Bdl
pon company and to cement tlie bonds
of friendship between local business
men and the officials of the Edison
company anil ether corporations with
local interests.
The president of the chamber of
commerce, P. E. Hatch, the toastmaa
ter, .1. A. Miller, and the speakers of
the evening were seated at the north
end of the big Gothic dinins; hall. A'!
the tables were elaborately decorated,
Col. Charles R. Drake, president of
the Hotel Virginia company, extended
hearty greetings. Toastmaster Miller
Introduced Vice President Rrackenridße
of tlie Edison company, who explained
tlie vast scope of the company's plans
for their new Long Beach plant.
Other speakers were J. Ross Clark,
second vice president of the Salt Lake
railroad; Dr, Hibbard, who is at the
head of the Southern Pacific's pub
licity bureau; George Pillsbury, chief
engineer of the Pacific Electric com
pany, and Walter J. Desmond, presi
dent of the Long Beach board of
works.
The following were the guei'ts of
honor at tlie banquet:
From Southern California Edison
company—Directors Geo, 1. Cochran,
William R. Staats, .1. C, Drake, \V. S.
Wright; \V. A. Brackenrldge, vice pres
ldi nt and general manager; R. H. Bal
jni(i. si cretary and assistant manager;
8. M. Kennedy, general asrent: B. P.
Pearson, general superintendent: J. A.
Ughthipe, electrical engineer; W. L.
Percey, treasurer; K. W. Sax, auditor;
John Ott, purchasing agent; C. H.
Coulter, assistant agent; If. W. Den
nis, construction engineer; W. T.
Sterling, genera] storekeeper; H. W.
Burkl engineer; A. W. Childs,
assistant general agent; Ft. E. Cun
ningham, assistant superintendent; P.
B. Lewis, assistant superintendent; W.
ij. Boxali, power contract agent; Wil
liam Dleterie, power development
agent; 11. C. Stinchfield, surgeon; R.
j. c Wood, engineer; C. if. Plerson,
advertising agent; A. B. Morphey, as
plstani secretary; W. J. Wallace, right
of ivay; M. D. Mann, jr., engineer; B.
H. Warner, engineer; J. X. Pyster,
engineer; C. S. Walton, T^is Angeles
district agent; J. K. Page, assistant
I os \ii" '• a district agent; A. F. Ham
man, surgeon; F. A. Creen, district
From Halt Lake railroad—J. Ross
Clark, spronri vice president; F. A.
Warm. traffic manager,
From Pacific Electric railway—
Geoi ;■■ Plllsbury, chief enfiineer.
From Southern Pacific railroad—Dr.
Hibbard, gonernl superintendent pub-
Ucltj department.
YOUNG MADE HEAD OF
GUGGENHEIM INTERESTS
SEATTLE, May 25.—Joseph H.
Young, formerly general superintend
ent of the Southern Pacific railroad at
San Francisco, today was elected pres
ident of the Northwestern Commercial
companies and the Alaska Steamship
company, placing him sit the head oi
all the Morgan-Guggenheim interests
in Maßka and on Puget sound.
President Charles K. Peabody of the
steamship company and President W.
X Rust of the Northwestern Commer
cial companies retire from active serv-
Ice
President Young will take oft!
once at headquarters In Seattle and
will pay special attention to the com
pletion and operation of the Copper
River railroad, of which he is vice
lent. Mr. Young announces the
appointment of Charles J. Jones, for
merly assistant general freight agent
of the Southern Pacific railroad, as
traffic manager of the Copper River
railroad and also of the Alaska Steam
ship company.
Captain Frank B. Hums, general
manager or the Alaska Steamship
, ompany, has resigned and the office
has not been filled. The purpose of
ih. changes, according to s. W. Eccles,
vice I,resilient of the various Guggen
heim companies, is to concentrate au
thority.
The eompani te steamships,
railroads, fisheries and in fact all lines
of business in Alaska.
CHECK FORGER PROFITS BY
DEATH OF TWO WITNESSES
H. J. Peck Sought by Authorities
of Several Cities
SANTA CIUZ, May 2. r ,.—By the
death of two prosecuting witnesses, one
nt Eiugane, ore., and the other at Walla
Walla, Wash.. 11. J. Peek enjoyed a
short period of liberty in this city yes
terday after serving thirty days for
passing a HotltiOUl check. When his
time elapsed the authorities in tlie
northern towns, who sought ldm on
similar charges, were notified, but re
plied that the prosecuting witnesses
had died during Peek's incarceration.
He was given his liberty, but was ar
i last night on advices from Walla
Walla that two new warrants had been
issued for him.
Peck, it is stated, is sought by the
authorities of Sacramento, Stockton
find Oakland on similar charges, but
the amount is so small in each case
that no effort to bring him back was
made.
'BLAB MOUTH,' SAYS COL.
WATROUS OF DARLING
Past Army Chief Made Object of
■ ***** ill Ml j WIIIWI ■■ | w %.» w VMj VWk VI
Bitter Attack by United
States Paymaster
MILWAUKEE, May 85.—C01. Jerome
A Watrous, paymaster of the United
iStatea army, retired, criticises past
Commander-in-Chltf James Darling as
a "blab-mouth" for his fiery protest
against the installation of a statute
of Gen. Robert R I^ee in the Hall of
Fa.me, and said Darling* style of pa
triotism i.s the veriest sham.
Col. Watroui 1 statement, in part,
follows:
"Darlitiß's latest advance on the dead
enemy and his dead flap, uniform and
confederacy, recalls Senator James
Gordon's recent remark about a class
in the south that is still carrying on
the war of the rebellion. The old sen
ator, himself a gallant confederate
soldier, called the rampant fighting
.lass that hops in the limelight on the
slightest 'vocation, 'blab-mouths,'
adding that they had only a small part
in the war and have little Influence.
"Darling's fresh outbreak Us proof
that we have at least one of Senator
Gordon's class of 'blah-mouths' at the
north. Darling's style of patriotism
is the veriest sham."
ANTI-LIQUOR FORCES
ACCUSED OF FORGERY
SPRINGFIELD, 111., May 25.—8y
testimony given before the Sangamon
county grand Jury today, a few facts
upholding the reports that corruption
was pra"tie«*d In connection with liquor
legislation were brought out.
Nathan A. cole of Peoria, publicity
director for the United Manufacturers
and Merchants association, an organ
ization of liquor dealers, denied his
organisation used money to influence
legislation or that a. lobby had been
maintained. He* claimed work of the
association was purely educational. He
"In Chicago the prohibitionists sent
a man into my office to steal my pa
pers In an effort to make an expose of
the organization of which I am an of
ficer. They even forged my signature.
The United Manufacturers and Mer
chants 1 association has never used any
money in the furtherance of Its ob
lecU except to conduct a campaign of
education. The prohibitionists are not
'Representative Charles Richter of
Representative Charles Richter of
Chicago said he knew nothing about
any corruption fund at Springfield.
Ernest A. Scroggin, legislative super
intendent of the Illinois Anti-Saloon
league, Bald he. knew nothing positive
a The Rev. Dr! Shields, president of the
Anti-Saloon league, said he had no
positive evidence of graft.
That at least three persona will be
Indicted as a result of evidence given
before the grand Jury in the Investiga
tion of legislation for new desks in the
house and the senate was predicted
L°Tlfe happearance before the grand jury
today of a mysterious witness was
followed by the Issuance of a sub
poena for Senator Holtßlaw of lute,
a member of the committee that had
charge of negotiations for furniture.
Sheriff Werner left tonight for luka
with the subpoena..
RECLAMATION PROJECTS
TO INCLUDE 80-000 ACRES
PHOENIX, Ariz., May 25.—An Im
mense i larrmtlon project probably
had its Inception today, when repre
sentatives of the Santa Fs railway Bled
;,; go . n f government land,
south of the Southern Pacific railway,
between Maricopa and Casa Grande.
It Is expected ihat filiiißs will he made
tomorrow on 30,000 acres on the Little
Colorado river above St. Johns and
skirting the petrified forests.
It is understood that the 50,000-acre
(„,,.( ] S to be turned over to Col. W.
C. Greene an.i hi* associates, who have
a large tract Immediately to the east,
in the Santa <'mz bottoms, and that
It will be developed with the Greene
company's holdings.
The 30,000-acre tract nn -which filings
an- expected tomorrow will ba turned
over it is understood, to J. H. Sher
man nnil J. H. Church. Denver capital
ists, who have $1,500,000 to Invest In the
reclamation project,
The filings made today were with
Mnkl scrip, which the government had
Issued to the Indiana In return for
their reservation lands.
AGITATORS INVADE FRESNO
AND DEFY LOCAL POLICE
FRESNO, May 25.—Industrial Work
ers are arriving in this city from Spo
kane in targe numbers, and the agita
tors have created such disturbances
that it has come to open war between
them and the local police. Leading ag
itators have said that they will speak In
Fresno despite all orders, ami several
already have been thrown In Jail.
MINE RIOT RUMORED
CHATTANOOGA, Term., May 25.
Rumors are In circulation here tonight
that been In progress at tho
Lookout Coal -and Coke company*
plani "ii Lookout mountain, Governor
Brown tonight ordered the militia com
pany al iLlndale t" *,'■> on a special
train Thursday to the scene of trouble.
ROOSEVELT'S 'BEST
CHIEF' SUSPENDED
Kohler of Cleveland Removed by
Mayor of City on Seri
ous Charges
fI.K.VKI>ANI>» May 25.—Chief of Po
lice Frederick Koehler, known through
out the country as the "Golden Rule"
chief, and lauded by President Roose
velt as the best chief of police in the
country, was suspended today by .May
or Baehr on Charges of gross immoral
ity, habitual drunkenness and dlsobe-
dienee of orders.
Tuesday has been set as a tentative
dato for Koehler's trial by the civil
service commission.
Statements by Koehler and his ac
cusers today point to sensational testi
mony, which may Involve many promi
nent men.
Mr. Koehler has Intimated that he
intends to fight the charges to a finish,
and if he is disgraced he will not be
the only one to fall. ."'.-■; I.
Among the charges brought against
Kohler is that during the seven years
be has been at the head of the police
department he ha utilized the detective
force for the collection of facts con
cerning prominent officials and others
to be used if he was attacked.
The present charges are the culmina
tion of a series of attacks against the
police chief. After he had been in
formed of his suspension Mr. Kohler
explained:
"These charges are the work of the
character snatchers, grave robbers and
blackmailers who have been after me
for years"
UTE INDIANS LOSE $500
ANNUITIES AND CLAIMS
WASHINGTON, May JR.—By the
judgment for $8,400,000 rendered Mon
day in the court, of claims, the outcome
Of claims for certain lands in Utah and
Colorado, settled tho account between
the United states and Indians Involv
ing the proceeds of the Bale of about
1,400,000 acres Of land within the latter's
reservation.
The judgment has also finally ad
justed various expenditures made in
behalf Of the Indians, extending over a
period of more than thirty years.
By the lodgment the payment of an
nuities which the Indians have been
receiving from the government, b
gating $500 a year, ceased, the trust
fund for such annuities returned to the
treasury, and the Indians hereafter will
receive only the interest on the money
actually awarded by the court of
claims,
The claims of the ten tribes, aggre
gating more than $16,000,000, were re
, by the judgment to $3,400,000, in
consideration of which the government
mes the absolute owner of about
3,200,000 acres of valuable agricultural,
timber and coal lands in Colorado,
$25000 IN CASH AND
OSTRICHES SETTLEMENT
PHOENIX, A. T., May 25.—Cash and
ostriches, approximating $50,000 in value
Is the settlement accepted by Alma Y.
Pearson, jr., and his sister, who sued
the Pan-American Ostrich company
last fall for judgment of nearly $250,
--000. -,
After the death of A. Y. Pearson, spi,
then the largest ostrich raiser in the
country, his wife transferred the birds
and property .to his predecessors, the
Pan-American company. The children
sued to recover on the ground thai it
was community property and the trans
fer Irregular.
CRETE TO RETAIN ITS
AUTONOMY. IS PLAN
PARIS, May 25.—France and Grea(
Britain today" submitted to the gov
ernments of Russia and Italy, the
other two protecting powers, a propo
gltlon i" invite Crete to admit Mussul
mans deputies to the Cretan assembly
and thus restore the status quo of
prior to 1908.
According to the plan, which it is
believed Russia and Italy will accept,
Crete would retain its autonomy under
the suzerainty of Turkey.
REFUSES TO DISCLOSE
NAME; GOES TO PRISON
OAKLAND, May 25.—Rather than
disclose his identity. Frank Harris,
an aged veteran of the Philippine in
surrection, willingly received a two
year sentence in San Quentin this
morning for forgery committed while
he was Intoxicated. Harris t.>ui judge
Everett J. Brown that he had for years
been a slave of liquor and preferred
prison to disclosing his Identity and
al.so running the risk of again com
mitting crime through his craving tor
liquor. __
JUROR SAYS NO CHANCE
GAME CONVICTED HYDE
KANSAS CITY, May 25.—Samuel R.
Sililiy of Sedalia, the last juror to agree
to the conviction of Dr. B. C, Hyde,
does not want people to think he was
influenced by anything but his own be
lief when he voted adversely to tlia
physician. Writing to Judge Balph B.
Latshaw today the juror said:
"As one of the jurors in the Hyde
case I wish to say that there was not
pny game of chance to my knowledge
In deciding the case, and that I reached
my verdict by my own deliberations.
ROOSEVELT CONFERS WITH
UNIVERSAL PEACE UNION
LONDON, May 25.—A deputation
from the British prroup of the. Inter
parliamentary union was received by
Mr Roosevelt today.
The deputation was headed by Lord
Weardale, and presented the former
president with an address setting forth
the aims of the union and the hopes of
the nritish group for universal peace.
Mr Roosevelt in reply expressed hu
sympathy with the cause represented
by his visitors. He spoke briefly, as
liis throat is still bothering him some
what.
MRS. ROOSEVECT HONORED
London, May -•"'■ -Mrs. Theodore
Roonevelt visited Buckingham palace
today nnd had a. long chat with Alex
andra queen mother. The call was at
the suggeutlon of her majesty, who,
ivhen She received Mr. Honsevel;
terday, expressed tin- hope thai
might see t:»e fonnw president's wife,
. . AMUSEMENTS _
ifcV A^!Qa" «>» » »-w«l!{€sl^3k *-\«r% Vl#rT * B*ATINI«R EVERY DAY.
*" yt t. 1 •11' .
Ir»ill|C lllrlii'iiiar »1- I\ / fcLlJ.lj.C T't I 1 d I *-r«r.rn. KuJ" n«n »<«« •
tniti.mto KutrrtnlnliK V fd JLJ.CVJLIV3 *""" l:"! ll"™", l"li
I,ndle« and Children. | • ***• V*^*^* * *.*M.^* | American Attractions.
Elita Proctor Otis & Co. Cressy and Dayne
"Mr* Bunner's Bun." I I "Town Hall Tonl.ht."
Anna Laughlin __ *?. "The Night Birds"
Toyland Prlma Donna. IVI&tIQCC Nellie Brow.tor nnd Co.
Five Juggling Normans «T/-.^o« Lockwood and Mac Carty
Cluh Manipulators. * Ouay Late of Planophlonds.
Marshall Montgomery I 1 Lancton-Lucier Co.
Ventriloquist. "A Fool. Errand."
ORPIIKUM MOTION PICTHRKS
EVERY XIC3HT 10*, ISO, BOc, Mo. MATIN DAILY, 100, tSti, 800,
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER MjUNe" RBush:
The Urratest Culirurnla Play,
The Rose of the Rancho
PRODUCED UNDER THE PERSONAL DIRECTION OF FREDERIC HELASCO
PRICES 250, tOO, Ho, MATINEES SATURDAY AND SUNDAY, 1".-, 280, 800,
SPECIAL MATINKK MONDAY, DECORATION DAY.
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER "Se^Mntl 1
LAST WEEK OF THIRD WEEK OF
"17*^1 /^3\ "TV 11 The cherry Widow
IVOID t®» Ulll and the Devil
PRICES 2BC. 800, 75c. $1. MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY, 26c, 500, 750.
CUMINC—JAMES K. HAOKETT. _^________
G,,. VP /-vnuDA uniiaP 1 MATINEES SATI'KDAY and SUNDAY.
HAND UJriiKA tlUUhll Phones Main 1067; Home AI9S7.
tonWht AND ALL this MEEK—
How Baxter Butted In
Owen Davis" famous melodramatic' comedy success. It's the best yet.
NEXT WEEK—First production In this city of "LENA RIVERS." Scats on sal. tnl.
morning. SPECIAL MATINEE MONDAY, DECORATION DAY.
ft OS ANGELES'THEATRE
ff^^LSSrVA UDE VILIE
""' "''^^^^iStlNElS JfivKKY DAY—TWO SHOWS M(.llil.\
Max York". nogs "A JHORSK I Four Idanlas.
SSSS Sr| l ThetYrO-Sco,..
Edwln POPULAR PRICES—inc. '.■"'■■ '!"<•■
GAMUT THEATER
Saturday Evening, May 28
Big Bungalow Benefit
For JENNIE VAN ALLEN, Candidate for the American Woman's
League in The Herald's $25,000 Voting Contest.
A Fine lv..ram. ClMdMl Number.. Vaudeville Act.. I>rofr«lonal ,r'. rf" ■■"""•.„.
TlrketllßOo. First performance, 8 o'clock .h»rp. Get ticket, at 4.4 Blanrhard
Hall. Telephone Home HIOB-.
B_ . -,^. m M r, A'TITO Relanro-Itlarkn'ood Co., Props, and Mgr..
ELASCO THEATER matisbijs today, catt and m m>ay
THIS WEKK ONLY—LEWIS B. STONE and the Belawo company In
THE SQUAW MAN
Commencing" nest Monday-SPKCIAL DECORATION DAY MATINKE—Georse Broad-
SSS?i' world'i recoVd-breaklng play. "THB DOl.l,\lt MARK." Seat, on sale.
SIMPSON AUDITORIUM— L a M anlle Mr. Eß>
TONIGHT, MAT 26, 8:30 O'CLOCK, OAI.A CONCERT AND PRESEHrIA
\ OF FLAQ. ij
Fidelia cTHaennerchor
mm v niORUS—BEATRICE PLUMMER, SPENCER ROBINSON, SOLOISTS. TICK
ETB ON SALE AT HAUTI.ET MUSIC STORE. PRICES-50C. 76c. 11.00.
P~RINCESS THEATER ■ FIRST ST.,
RlNCr«bb XHrLAI^K v ■;.. s, ear spring.
PRINCESS" MUSICAL COMEDY CO. offers the furiously funny farce, "?Uils?"
■ , lute i s now scenery, new wardrobe, new faces, new show. Real fun comedians
who are really funny, and the favorite chorus of the cl»y. THREE SHOWS DAILY—3
o'clock. -.:>:, and 9:15. PRICES I'ir. 20c. 1!..-.
LEVY'S CAFE CHANTANT ,_ ,«"«» *»? d^.?:
—The KRISTOFFY TRIO, grand opera vocalists; OBHLMAN MUSICAL TRIO,
Instrumentalists and quick change artists: CARLTON CHASE, the fashion
nl up tenor- the CELEBRATED RUSSIAN DANCERS; MAE REUEDELL, dainty and
sa»hln«, In song an.l story; and KAMMEHMEYEIf ORCHESTRA.
LYMPIC THEATER iiomjs of hits and novelties.
OLYMPIC THEATER iiomk ok hits am. koveltieh.
»>'ALPHIN & FAROO OFFER "ROUND TOWN," AN EOYPTIAN ABSURDITY.
10 RIO BINOINO AND DANCING NOVELTIES. inc. 20c. :sc.
QSPEL PAVILION
GOSPEL PAVILION
WHERE SHALL IGO THIS F.VKXIN<J? To the OOSPEL PAVILION, of
course, corner of Main and Fifteenth street". Good music. Free seats. Special
addreaiea by Evangelists I. U. McCord of London, Enßland. and Milton St. John of
San Francisco.
BASEBALL— Coast I League
«, OAKLAND' VS. VKIIXON —Tuesday, May M; Wednesday, May 23; Thursday,
.May 28; Saturday, May 28; Sunday, May 59, at Chutes Park, 2:30 p. m. Friday,
May 27, 3:801 Sunday, May 20, 10:30 a. in., at Vrrnon Park. Ladles fro« every day ex
cept Saturdays, Sundays ami holidays. -•—-:*:
PULLMAN CO. FIGHTING
ORDER TO CUT RATES
Wants Court to Permit Present
Sleeping Car Schedules
to Remain
CHICAGO, May 25.—The legal battle
to prevent the interstate commerce
commission from reducing the rales on
berths In sleeping cars began here to
day before jii'iHes Qrosscup. Baker,
Seaman and Kohlaaat, In tho federal
circuit court.
George Fernald and F. B. l>aniels,
arguing for the Pullman company, de
clared the Pullman concern is not a
comi i carrier, and therefore is not
amenable to the commission's orders.
They said the company Rets nothing
but the berth rentals from the opera
tion of its cars over the railroads in
the northwest.
Burton Hanson, representing the
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul aliroad,
who had ben granted permission to in
tervene for the company, said that his
ralroad operated its own sleepers and
would be affected by the order.
Following an extended investigation,
the commissioners ordered the Pullman
company to reduce rates on upper
berths on railroads In the northwest,
beginning June 1.
The Pullman company is now seeking
ap Injunction to stop the commission
trom putting the order into'effect.
Arguments for the commission will be
made tomorrow.
GREAT HOTEL BURNS DOWN;
SECOND MYSTERY OF KIND
ALBANY, N. V., May 25.—The Hotel
Champlain at Bluff Point, N. V., on
Lake Chatnplaln, was destroyed by flre
today. It was one of the largest and
flne«t hotels in Northern New York.
The orieln of thfe lire is a mystery.
The hotel was to have been opened for
the summer season on June 25. There
were about sixty employes in the build
iiiK. All got safely out with the possi
ble exception of an eleotriclan named
Herbert, who is reported missing. The
loss will be about 300,000, Insurance
1233,000.
June -is last tho Fort William Henry
hotel on Lake George, a nearby hotel,
■,v;is destroyed under similar elrcum
stance!, a few day* before the date
fixed for the summer opening.
HETCH HETCHY FACTS
PUT BEFORE BALLINGER
Secretary Hears Oral Arguments
on Necessity of Supply to
San Francisco
WASHINGTON, May 25.—An oral
hearing to determine whether Hfitch
Hetchy valley In the STosemlte national
park will be necessary to Sun Frnn
clsco as a future source of water sup
ply, began before Secretary of the In
terior Balllnger today.
Secretary B&Ulnger will lie assisted
in his decision by three army engineers
appointed by the president to advise
the secretary on technical engineering
problems.
The hearing proper was suspended
temporarily while the engineer* of all
the interests Involved submitted to thn
army engineers their views on whether
there were iuftlcient scientific data
available toncerning the adequacy of
Eleanor valley, cherry, Jack Main and
Stubblefleld creeks as sources of wa
ter supply for Han Francisco to permit
the secretary of (he interior to render
,i decision <mi the revoking of the per
mit granted by Secretary Garfield.
This permit authorises the use of
Heteh Hetchy when the needs of San
Francisco exceed the capacity of tTio
Lake Eleanor project.
Attending the hearing were Mayor
McCarthy of San Francisco; City At
torney Long; Assistant City Attorney
Lane; City Engineer Manson and Prof.
Marks of Leland Stanford university,
all representing Kan Francisco; J. Hor
ace MaeFarland, president of tho
(Unerlcan Civic association; Kdmund
\ Whitman and Prof. W. F. Bade of
the Sierra club; Ccorge Kdwards of the
Association for the Preservation "f Na
tional I'arks, and Mayor Hodghead of
Berkeley.
The hearing will continue tomorrow,
when the question of postponement of
the whole matter probably will be de
cided.
$250,000 LOSS IN POTTSVILLE
POTTSVri-LE, Pa., May 25.—Potts
villo today finds the loss by the storm
of last night will total almost $250,000.
It. was the worst storm in the town's
history, and equaled even by the flood
of 1860. Factories are shut down, the
mines are flooded and many stores are
closed.

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