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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, June 18, 1910, Image 1

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vol. xxxvii. T>T?Tr <I?« r:A "'"K'IVPm by carrikk
M'MIIKH MO JT IVLVj.I!i . O\J ijlililO I'EK MONTH
PRIZE FIGHTS IN
CALIFORNIA OVER
ASSERTS GILLETT
Says He Has Already Ordered
Los Angeles to Stop the
Coming Battles
BAY CITY IS IN AN UPROAR
Militia Put on Call to Prevent the
Langford-Kaufmann Bout.
The State Defied
"This means the end of prize lighting In
this state, and by tills stale I mean I.im An
geles, as well as San Francisco, The two
tights scheduled for the southern city will
not be held. I have Instructed the proper
authorities there to stop them."—Gov. GU
leti.
"I shall carry out the light tomorrow aa
nilvi-rllHril, nml petition for an Injunction re
ntriiinhiK UMrtot Attorney Fickert and Ohtef
of Police Martin from mtrrfcrlnn with the
bout."—Louis lflot, promoter of Kaufmarin-
Langford bout.
"If I.OIILI Wot does what he xnys he will
do, I will cull out the nilllla. That In the
only course left.
"I shall also file a criminal Information
and complaint, charging him with a felony
If he holds that fight."—Gillett'a reply to
Blot's statement.
[Associated Press]
SAN FRANCISCO, June 17.—A prize
fltfht plunged San Francisco today Into
a crisis zearlngr all tho aspects of a
miniature civil war.
One man—the fight promoter—is In a
state of Insurrection against Califor
nia's chief executive. Openly defying
the governor, who had ordered out two
companies of state militia to prevent
the "ring contest" If the city authori
ties refuse to act, Louis Blot declares
that he WIH hold the Kaufmann-Lang
ford affair notwithstanding tho pres
ence of the militia, and even though
"an army" Is called on to block pro
ceedings.
Ostensibly Blot eltands alone, hut
until late today he had at least th©
passive support of the district attorney
rind the courts themselves, though at
the eleventh hour District Attorney
FVkert and Chief of Police Martin
7iler]ged their word to Attorney General
Webb to prevent the fight, and acting
upon their reassurance, Governor Gil
lott ha« held up hiß order calling out
the state troops.
BT<OT OBDURATE
But, still obdurate. Blot persists In
his declaration that the fight will be
held as scheduled, and unless he re
trofits from his position the outcome of
the rebellion will not be determined
until tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock,
when the fighters are timed to come
together.
The situation which has been pre
cipitated as a direct outcome of the
Jeffries-Johnson heavyweight battle,
which the governor has ordered stopped
In California, Is believed to be unpar
alleled In the history of the city, and
probably Is one of the most novel Im
broglios In the annals of tho country.
For tho time being It arrayed city
against state, for the district attorney
persisted in his contention that there
«v;i.q nothing In the laws of California
which could be construed as Inhibit
ing either the Langford-Kaufmann or
the Jeffries-Johnson contest.
IIIKKKT BACKS DOWN
But the pressure brought to bear on
the local autthorltles had induced
Piokert to rotreat from his position,
find tho positive assurance has been
given by the chief of police that the
principals of the Langford-Kaufmann
battle will not bo permitted to enter
the ring tomorVow.
Blot, It Is evident, cannot carry out
his determination to override the gov
ernor's authority, and to all interests
and purposes the brief one-man war is
at an end.
Governor Glllett, however, is not en
tirely convinced that Blot may not
attempt to go on with the fight, and
In order that there be no hitch In tho
police precautions to prevent the con
test, he has Instructed Adjutant Gen
eral J. B. Tvauek to be at tho ringsido
prepared for instant faction if the need
arias.
Rumors are afloat tonight that the
governor has misunderstood tho decla
rations of the local officials, and that
notwithstanding the pledges'given him,
the authorities do not intend to step
111 and call off the fight unless they
feel that the fight has broken tho
bounds of the elastic definition of a
boxing contest and has developed into
a genuine prize fight.
PERMIT PRELIMINARIES
Just before leaving for Sacramento
at B p. m. Chief of Police Martin asked
the governor If ho should permit the
"preliminaries" of the Kaufmann-Lang
ford contest to be held.
"I am not concerned with your pre
liminaries," replied tho governor, "let
them go on."
He hesitated a moment, as if debat
ing the matter, but dismissed it with a
smile.
"What do you mean by 'prelimi
naries' anyway?" he laughed as he
turned away.
Tho question of what Is a "prelimi
nary" and that of wherein a "curtain
raiser" to a big fight differs from the
fight itself, probably will bo deter
mined tomorrow—perhaps by Adjutant-
General Lauck, who will be on hand
a.s the governor's representative, and
with tho militant power of the state
within reach.
EXCITEMENT FEVERISH
A feverlEh suspense is everywhere
evident tonight, for no one knows what
another twenty-four hours may bring
forth. Apparently the Issue Is between
the governor and lilot, but no one re
gards that as more than a surface
manifestation of the real element In
conflict. Elver since the announcement
of the governor tli.it the Jeffries-John
son and the Kaufmann-Langford fights
must not be held In California, indica
tions of open hostilities between the
Ohief executive and the district attor
ney have been in evidence. Then came
from Chicago the bold, challenging
declaration, alleged to have been made
by Mayor P. H. McCarthy that he was
"running his town," and that the fight
(Continued on Page Five)
LOS ANGELES HERALD
INDEX OF
HERALD'S NEWS
TODAY
I f
FORECAST
Los Angeles and vicinity— Saturday;
light north wind, changing to Mouth. Maxi
mum temperature 74 degree*; minimum 55.
LOS ANGELES
City council to Bdvano* money to keep en
gineers at work on preliminaries for '
aqueduct pownr System, PAGE 5
City may fight suit of discharged em
ployes. PAOB 13
Mayor Alexander takes hand In metal
"""Ike. PAOE 18
Clan of seven fair girl graduates given
diplomas at St. Mary's academy. PAOE 13
Twi-nty-one hundred persona lit down to
largest banquet In world's hlHtory, given
In Los AnKdeH last night by Federation
of State Hocletles. PAOB 1
Arizona certain to bo admitted, Is belief
at WashlnKtun. PAOB 1
Leslie H. Hewitt, city attorney, will re
sign and run for state senator In thlrty*
clghth district. PAOE 1
Lottery paraphernalia seized by raiders in
homo of wealthy Chineso. PAGE 16
Mrs. .lames A. Woodbury working In store
to get money for husband's defense.
PAOE 9
Bell Is making strong nght, says Spollaoy.
PAGE 9
Mm. Pccklmm. witness In divorce case,
tells of following hor husband's love trail
and getting a black eye. PAGE 9
Fight on election of officers by dental as
sociation Is expeetnd. PAOK 16
Frantic imrentß of Wm, Butt ask po
llre to locate 9-year-old son, who aspires
to be oowboy. PAOB 8
Friends of Leslie Harris, youth on proba
tion, believe that he has married again.
PAOE 8
Hulk nf largo estate left by Mm. Mary T.
Mullen boqueathet? to children. PAQF3 8
Mra. Eva J. Tlnsley granted divorce and
decree revoked soon after at request of
• her husband. PAOB 8
Mrs. E'lson sayH city charter hampers milk
Inspection. PAGB 3
Editorial and letter Box. PAOE 12
Marriage licenses,,births, deaths. PAOE 14
Society, clubs, music PAOE 6
Mining and oil fields. PAGE 6
Markets and llnanclal. PAOli 7
Sports. PAGES 10-H
City brevities. PAGB 13
Personals. PAGE 4
Classified advertising. PAGES 14-15
Bhlpplng. PAOB 7
SOUTH CALIFORNIA
Graduating class at Riverside high school
presents picture to school. PAOB 14
Aged sleep walker saved from death under
train at San Bernardino. PAOE 14
Pasadena citizens call meetins to aid
lighting system. PAGB 14
Redondo merchant drops dead In street.
PAOE 11
Lumber company's engineer thrown from
speeding motorcycle and badly Injured.
PAGE 14
COAST
I«» Angeles fights for railroad rate before
commission. PAGE 13
Oakland woman and ion fatally burned in
cnsolln* explosion In Sacramento. PAOIS 3
Governor Otllett declare* prtm flirMlng In
California Is at an end. PAGES 1 AND 8
Wlrth hanging bungled; Warden Hoyle de
clares Htiuin-st capital punishment in Cali
fornia. PAOB 2
EASTERN
Benate Indorses conference report on rail
road bill. PAGE 3
Walter Brooklns soars 4803 feet In air and
breaks world's aeroplane record for
height. PAOE 1
Bradstreet's will say trade In west shows
Improving condition. PAGE 18
Theodore Roosevelt, after long trip abroad,
will land on native shores today. PAOE 1
Watchman has struggle in New York with
robber. PAOR 2
Six thousand detectives, policemen mil sol
dier* to watch Roosevelt on his return.
PAOB 3
House passes reform rule to end "smoth
ering" of bills In committoes, PAGE 2
Chinese crew on English ship mutinies,
fight white men, jump overboard and one
Is drowned. PAGE 3
FOREIGN
"World missionary conference hears letter
from Monslgnor Boinomelll, bishop *of
Cremona. PAG E 3
MINING AND OIL
Nest of nuggets from La Paz placer, Yuma
county, Arizona, goos $20 to the yard.
PAOE 6
Monte Carlo Bonanza cleans up $500 from
trial run. PAOE 6
Assurance of government that operators will
be protected restores confidence In West
side field. PAGM 6
Midway Northern Is near the oil on lease
In West Side of Kern. PAGE 6
PATTEN AND OTHER BIG
COTTON BULLS INDICTED
Big Market Operators Charged
with Violating Trust Law
NEW YORK, June 17.—The govern
ment came out in the open today in its
attempt to prove that manipulating tho
cotton market is against the law.
James A. Patten of Chicago, Maurice
S. Rothschild, Frank B. Hayne, Wil
liam P. Browne and Eugene Scalei
were indicted today for alleged viola
tion of the Sherman act In connection
With the recent bull pool in cotton.
Bail was fixed at $5000 each and the
defendants were given three days to
qualify.
The indictments were returned by a
special federal grand jury lato today
and handed up before Judge Hough In
tin- federal circuit court. For three
others indicted who were not present
in court nor represented by counsel
hench warrants were issued. They are
Sydney J. Herman, Robert M. Thomp
son and Ch/irles A. Kittle.
LOS ANGELES GIRL WRITES
WITH BLOOD; TAKES POISON
(Special to The Herald)
SANTA BARBARA, June 17.—De
spondent because she could not win
the love of Benjamin Abraham, a mar
i-iiMl man, Ethel Carson, a !3-year-old
Los Anvil's girl, wrote two farewell
letters In blood she had drawn from
her arm and then drank poison.
While Abraham and his wife wore
attending a band concert, Miss Carson,
who, It Is believed, came nere today
from Los Angeles to kill herself, en
tered the house.
A.s Abraham and his wife entered
the house on their return the girl
swallowed the poison and threw her
self into his arms.
It Is thought she will recover.
SATURDAY MORNING, JUNE 18, 1010.
Roosevelt Looms Up Larger to Myriads Gathered in
New York Than Big Steamship in Which He Sailed
-mmmmmmmmm^^ Ml Ji Jl.y _i«i*«f»pww«^f<j«| iii w^, „.."f!?...""
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ife'l^l^ -LLIMI W V Tfci i 1>
m ■■ w^ flu DMB^^b.
i 9 ffi H B& .f^ ; .
OCEAN LIVER KAISEHIN AT7OCSTB VICTORIA AT TOP, A>'D THEODORE
ROOHEVELT. AT LEFT HELOW IS CORNELIUS VANDKRBILT, CHAIRMAN OF RE
CBITIO.V COMMITTEE WHICH WILL GREET FORMER PRESIDENT.
2100 AT WORLD'S
LARGEST BANQUET
Monster Feast Given Here Last
Night by State Societies
Breaks All Records
FACTS ABOUT BIGGEST
BANQUET EVER HELD
Two thousand one hundred persons at
tended It, 300 more than were at largest
previous banquet.
Every state In the Union, also Canada
and Alaska, were represented.
Two hundred and fifty waitresses were
kept busy supplying the banqueters. '■>
Pennsylvania had the largest represen
tation, 200 present; Massachusetts was
next with 150. . -.'. ,
Forty members ]of the Massachusetts
State society attended dressed In colonial
costumes.
Tin- banquet was "llquorless and alno
smokeless." ■ '
With approximately 2100 persons
present, representing every state in
tho union, Canada and Alaska, the first
annual banquet of the Federation of
State Societies was held in Hambur
ger's cafe, Eighth and Broadway, last
night.
As expressed by the toastmaster, the
Rev. Baker P. Lee, It was the largest
banquet ever held in the world, and
the fact it was conducted without any
miscalculation was another tribute to
the Los Angeles method of carrying
out affairs.
Three hundred waitresses wore em
ployed to cater to tho throng and fifty
delegates from the Native Sons and
Daughters' association volunteered
their .services as ushers.
The mammoth dining hall was beau
tifully decorated, wreaths of cedar
pine, interspersed with small electric
lights, being festooned from the chan
deliers. The decorations were such as
to remind one of a mimio fairy wood
land, and were a striking testimonial
to the activity of the associate mem
bers, who sought to show their appre
ciation of the fact that the various so
cieties had come together and that tho
reunion would be an annual affair.
The floor managers of the Hambur
ger store volunteered their services,
and, dressed In immaculate white flan
nel suits, directed the vast throng to
the place of assembly and won the
praise of all by their courteous? treat
ment of strangers and others, who
Journeyed to Los Angeles to attend
the first annual banquet of the Federa
tion of State Societies.
CHEER STATE SONGS
Long tables were arranged in the
banquet hall, and at the head of each
table was the insignia and banner of
each state of the Union.
When the orchestra of tho First Con
priKational church started the first
number of the program the banqueters
arose and cheered wildly. State after
state was remembered by the oichestra
and snatches of songs appropriate to
the various societies were played and
greeted with bursts of enthusiasm.
The real enthusiasm broke loose when
the members of the Massachusetts so
ciety entered the banquet hall. Thirty
five of the members were dressed in
Colonial style, the women with pow
dered hair, the men in knee trousers
ami wearing white wigs.
Miss Pearl Davis of Sherman, dressed
to represent the Goddess of Liberty,
led the members, and to the accom
paniment of a Colonial fife and drum
corps the 150 members from the Bay
State marched into the banquet room
and took seats opposite the Pennsylva
nia delegation.
The banquet marked the anniversary
of the battle of Bunker Hill and the
death of General Warren. The stirring
sound of the fifes and drums aroused
the entire gathering as the Massachu
setts delegation marched in, and they
received a real ovation.
Although the other societies played a
prominent part, it was really a Massa
chusetts night, and the members of the
Hay State association made it known in
no uncertain terms that it was at the
battle of Lexington and Concord the
shot was fired "which was. heard
around the world," and proclaimed the
independence of the American colonists.
A spirit of good nature pervaded the
atmosphere, and every person present
regarded the affair as a happy family
reunion.
The invocation given by the Rev.
Charles 10. Locke was brief but pointed,
and he took occasion to say he hoped
(Continued on Page Xulxteeu)
HEWITT QUITS TO
RUN FOR SENATE
Will Become Candidate in Five
cornered Contest in the
Thirty-Eighth Dist.
Following several conferences, and
as a result of the Influence broug-ht to
bear by the Lincoln-Roosevelt league,
Leslie R Hewitt, city attorney, an
nounced last night that he would be
come a candidate for the Republican
nomination to the state senate from the
Thirty-eighth district. Mr. Hewitt will
resign as city atorney within the next
three w#eks and will begin an active
campaign to defeat George L. Sanders
and H. S. Q. McCartney, the two regu
lar Republicans, who already are
w.Mi-- ng a strenuous campaign for the
nomination in that district.
Running against Hewitt in the Thir
ty-eighth district, besides Sanders and
McCartney, are Martin Bekins, the reg
ul<ir Democratic candidate, and Henry
McDonald, who is claiming to be a
Democrat, but has been denounced
by the party leaders as a political pre
tender.
I-HOGRESSIVB REPUBLICAN
Hewitt has been in the city attorney's
office for twelve years, having been an
assistant attorney for a number of
years prior to his election as city at
torney. He has resided in Los An
geles thirty-four years, and Is known
as one of the most progressive Repub
licans In the county. He is a member
of the Lincoln-Roosevelt league and
expects to secure the indorsement of
that organization at its meeting today.
Mr. Hewitt haa taken an active part
In the harbor and power plant develop
ment of Los Angeles, and several times
has done effective work at the state
legislature in securing the enactment
of laws beneficial to the southland.
In addition to his work as city attor
ney, Hewitt is a member of the new
charter revision commission.
ATTORNEY FOB HARBOR
Besides making his campaign for the
state senate, Hewitt expects to serve
the city as an attorney for the Los
Angeles harbor board, which office will
pay him about $6000 a year. As Mc-
Cartney and Sanders are both known
to be machine men, Hewitt's friends
predict he will have no trouble in se
curing the nomination to the senate,
and because of McDonald's trickery in
cornering the petition signatures In
this district, which he believes will
shut out Martin Bekins, the league
members say Hewitt is assured of
election. Hewitt's entry into the con
test promises to produce a lively skir
mish at the primary olcctlon, and will
make the fight not only a five-cornered
one, but the most interesting, perhaps,
of the entire campaign.
When questioned last night as to who
probably would bo his successor,
Hewitt refused to venture a prediction. '
It Is believed, however, that Guy Eddy !
is in line for tho appointment.
FORMER SPEAKER IN RACE
FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR
STOCKTON, June 17.—Former Speak
er Robert L. Beardslee, who repre
sented San Joaquln county three terms
in the assembly and was chairman of
the ways and means committee of the
last legislature, formally announced his
candidacy for the Republican nomina
tion for lieutenant governor this even
ing.
BIG STEAMER ON FIRE
AT WHARF AT SAN DIEGO
Chemicals Used on Flames, but
Alaskan Still Burns
■ SAN DIEGO, June 17.—Fire was dis
covered In the after hold of the Amer
ican-Hawaiian '■ steamer Alaska, lying
at ' the Oriental whWf, early this
evening.
The steamer had arrived from Salina
Cruz and docked at 4 p. m. How long
the-fire had been in progress is'not
known." The local fire department was
notified and three chemical engines re
sponded. ' It was not deemed safe to
use water because of a quantity of cal
cium carbide in th,e cargo.
-Late tonight the chemical engines
were still at work. No estimate can
be made of the loss, nor as to how soon
the flames can be extinguished.
AEROPLANE RECORD FOR
HEIGHT AGAIN BROKEN
Brookins Soars 4503 Feet and
Makes Glide of Two Miles
When Motor Stops
INDIANAPOLIS, June 17.—Walter
Brooklns, In a Wright biplane, broke
the world's aeroplano record for alti
tude here today, when he soared to a
height of 4503 feet, according to % the
measurement of Ac altimeter.
His motor stopped as he was'descend
ing and he ma3e a glide of two miles,
landing in a wheat field.
Brooklns started at the Indianapolis
speedway at 6:30 p. m., and flying in
wide circles, reached his highest alti
tude forty minutes later. The biplane
seemed to pause for several minutes
and then began a slow descent, sweep
ing five miles east of the speedway
In Its downward course.
The previous altitude record was
4384% feet, which he set last Monday.
PRESIDENT WHO LOOTED
BANK READY TO RETURN
BELLINGHAM, Wash., June 17.— H.
J. Welty, formerly president of the
Home Securities bank of Bellingham,
who disappeared two days before the
bank cloged last February and for
whose arrest in connection with the
wrecking of the institution a reward
of $1000 had been offered, has notified
Prosecuting Attorney Livezy througli
business friends that he is on his way
to Bellinghnm, where he will sur
render an! plead guilty to the charges
and assist in straightening out the
tangle in the bank's affairs.
The reward offered will bo with
drawn. The prosecutor and receiver
of the bank declined to give Welty's
whereabouts biyftnd saying- ho has
been beyond extradition. Welty is
charged with using the bank's funds
to finance various land company en
terprises. The. bank failed for (300,000,
and is expected to pay depositors about
■i 0 per cent of their claims.
SEN. ALDRICH AT BEDSIDE
OF FEVER STRICKEN SON
NKW YORK, June 17.—Richard S.
Aldrlfih, son of Senator Aldrich of
Rhode Island, Is ill of typhoid fever
at the Presbyterian hospital in this
city. It was said today that no com
plications had set in and that the
patient's ultimate recovery is expected,
although his condition Is regarded as
serious. Richard Aldrich was gradu
ated from Yale with the claai of '06.
His Illness has brought his father to
New York.
FAIR CIGAR DEALER IS
HEIR TO LARGE FORTUNE
MUSKOGEE, Okla., June 17.—Miss
Cordelia Wallace, an attractive girl of
18, employed in a olgar store here,
was notified by attorneys of Monroe,
La., yesterday that she Is sole heir
to the estate of a great aunt, Miss
Cordelia Pottf, who died at her plan
tation near Monroe recently. The value
of the estate is estimated at about
$70,000.
She says she expects to continue
selling cttfurs.
•"si \( IT I' 1 ('i >I»I • DAILY 2c ON TRAINS «p.
1'• •-' VJIJIJ KJXJL ±l^rj. SUNDAYS sc. ON TKAJNS lOe.
ARIZONA CERTAIN TO BE
ADMITTED IS BELIEVED
All Indications Point to Accept
ance of Statehood Bill
in the House
WASHINGTON, June 17.— Every in
dication tonight points to the accept
ance of the senate statehood bill in the
house, and the final passage of that
measure, probably tomorrow.
It is practically assured that the
house will concur in the senate bill.
The intluence of President Taft has
been strongly exerted on the house
committee having this matter In
chaise. Mr. Hamilton of Michigan,
author of the house bill, has been
standing out strongly against accept
ance of the senate bill, but it is be
lieved he will yield.
Mr. Hamilton's principal objection
to the senate bill is that it provides for
the setting aside of a million acres
of public lands in each territory for
the payment of certain railroad bonds
of a few counties. These bonds, Mr.
Hamilton believes, should not in justice
to the people of the territories be liqui
dated in the manner and to the full
extent contemplated by the senate
bill.
Another objection that Mr. Hamilton
urges apainst the senate measure is
that under its provisions the two terri
tories will not bo granted statehood for
two and a half years, while under the
house bill they will achieve it In less
than one year.
Mr. Hamilton received many tele
grams today from Arizona and New
Mexico expressing confidence in him
as a friend of statehood and urging
him tn do all in his power to bring
about statehood at this session.
MRS. MORSE WITH HUSBAND
AT PRISON TO AVOID SALE
NEW YORK, June 17.—Mrs. Charles
w. Morse is In Atlanta. Ga,, where her
husband is a federal prisoner because
she wished to be away fi-om New York
when the auctioneer commissioned to
sell her household goods, valued at
(300,000, went to the Fifth avenue home
to make Inventory of everything in
the house preparatory to the sal",
whii h will take place June 2.'i. Many
of these are treasures collected by
Mrs. Morse and her husband In Eu
rope and America, and have sentimen
tal as well as intrinsic value.
FIGHT IS POSTPONED
OVER OKLAHOMA CAPITAL
GUTHUIK, Okla., June 17.—Because
of inability to secure a special federal
judge to hear the case today. Judge
J. H. Cottnal here postponed to Mon
day, June 20, the hearing of the ap
plication of Guthrie for a temporary
injunction restraining the slate execu
tive officers from transferring the state
records to Oklahoma City or transact
ing the state's official business there.
Ralph Campbell of Muscogee has been
assigned to the case.
$2,000,000 RECOVERED
WASHINGTON, June 17.—Richard
Parr, the customs deputy at New York
who materially assisted the govern
ment in recovering over $2,000,000 in the
sugar underweighlnß frauds. Is to re
.ceive a reward of uoo.ooo.
QcENTS
T.R. AFTER LONG
STAY ABROAD, IN
SHADOW OF HOME
Former President, Happy and
Fat, Comes Through Fog
to New York
REFUSES TO TALK POLITICS
Interviews of Such a Nature Ac
credited to Me Are False,
Says Intrepid Hunter
[Associated Press]
6 a. m. —Due at Quarantine on Kais
erin Ausiif-ite. Victoria.
7:4.1 a. m.—Revenue cutter Manhattan
hearing friends and relatives takes him
under the American flag.
8:15 a. m.—Leaves family aboard the
Manhattan, transfers to revenue cutter
Andrnscoggln bearing official reception
committee.
0 a. m.—Water parade, up Hudson to
Fifty-ninth street and return begins.
11 a. m. —Sets foot on American soil
at the battery.
11:15 a. m.—Welcome by Mayor G»y
nor.
11:30 a. m.—Replies to Mayor Gaynor.
13 to 1:20 p. in.—l-and parade to
Fifty-eighth and Central park.
3 p. in—Luncheon with friends and
relatives.
3:»0 p. m.—Leaves for Oyster Bay by
special train.
1180 p. in.—RecelTed by neighbor* at
Oyster Bay.
KAIfIBJUX AUGUSTE VICTORIA, by
Marconi wireless to JSagnponack, L. 1., June
18.—At 12:50 this morning the steamer
Kuisrrin Auguste Victoria, on which Theo
doora Koosevelt is a passenger, was about
II.) miles from the Ambrose channel light
ship.
Owing to the heavy fog the vessel was
proceeding at reduced speed, but should
pass Fire island about 4 o'clock, and be
abreast the Sandyhook light ship at 6 a. m.
At 7:45 tomorrow morning Theodore
Roosevelt will be delivered over Into the
hand** of his fellow countrymen, barring the
accidents l(.M>.-.'vHt'.s good luck has always
dodged.
Once the first private citizen of the coun
try U under an American flag there will be
gin the national welcome planned for him.
The downtown crowd today war* swelled by
thotibunds of out of town visitors, governors,
Iniled States senators, congressmen, cabinet
members and political clubs.
Individual pilgrims are here from all dis
tricts, even distant Alaska. Spanish-Anieri
can war veterans will be In line in.the pa
rade.
KAISERIN AUGUSTE VICTORIA,
by Marconi Wireless to Siasconset,
Mass., June 17. —The Katserin Auguste
Victoria is slowly approaching New
York through thick fog and with her
whistle blowing constantly.
Theodore Roosevelt, tired after a
strenuous day in disposing of his volu
minous correspondence, was happy to
night over the prospects, of two months'
quiet at Oyster Bay.
He is somewhat stouter than when ho
emorged from the jungle, but his face
is still bronzed.
He admits that the weeks of travel
and banqueting have tired him, and
sayfl lie would not care to undertake a
hard walk.
Col. Roosevelt tonight gave out the
following interview:
"I have been away a year and a
quarter. While I enjoyed Africa most,
1 enjoyed Europe a very great deal. In
fact, [ fail to see how any one could
have had a more interesting or more
pleasant trip than I have had.
"I wish to express my deep appre
ciation of the more than generous cour
tesj and hospitality with which I was
treated by the people and rulers of the
countries through which I passed. Of
course I am very glad to get horns.
API'KEC'IATES MANY KINDNESSES
"I appreciate deeply the kindliness of
a multitude of friends who have asked
me to speak in different places, and
hope they will understand It is simply
a physical impossibility for me even to
consider accepting.
■'I shall not speak for more than two
months, and then will speak first at
the John Brown celebration at the
Cheyenne frontier gathering, at a con-
Bervatlon congress in St. Paul, and pos
sibly at one or two other places.
"I shall have nothing whatever to say
In the immediate future about politics
and will hold no Interview whatever on
the subject with anyone.
"Anything purporting to be an inter
view with me that may appear cur bo
safely set down as an invention.
"I take this opportunity of acknowl
edging with the heartiest of thanks the
numerous marconigrams and letter
greetings which I received in London
before starting, and which it has been
impossible to acknowledge. I need not
say how deeply I am touched by these
kind messages, and I am sure the send
ers "ill understand that my failure to
answer all of them is due simply to the
fait that they are so numerous that it
would bo an absolute physical Impossi
bility to answer them all."
PLANS VISIT TO BLACK HILLS
Mr. Roosevelt plans a trip to the
Black Hills to visit Seth Bullock before
his speech in September at the nation
al conservation congress in St. Paul.
Col. Roosevelt is in the dark as to
the preparations for his welcome in
New York tomorrow, but will place
himself in the hands of the welcoming
committee. He thinks he has solved
the problem of what shall be done with
former presidents. He says he has
done things for himself thus far and
has had a splendid time.
Col. Roosevelt tonight expressed
pleasure at having received wireless
dispatches from the populace of Sias
conset village, from the Republican
convention in Oklahoma, from Father
Curran of Wilkesbarre and from
Missis. Morrtssey anil Dolan, the la
bor loaders.
Theodore Roosevelt will be guarded
during the celebration of his home
coming tomorrow as carefully as If ho
(Continued on Sms» Ilire<4

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