OCR Interpretation


Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, July 08, 1910, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-07-08/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

TO MAKE STRIKE
FIGHT TO FINISH
San Franciscans Promise Aid,
Even if It Takes Ten
Years to Win
TENTS COMING FOR A CITY
Spring Tells of Provisions of the
City's Proposed Ordinance
to Stop Picketing
Unlimited financial support until tho
striko is won, oven If It takes ten years,
1b tho promise local union men re
celved iiiHt evening from organized Im
bor uf t'alifornia through J. A. Kelly,
president of the Central Trades coun<
ell of San FrancllCO; Andrew J. Gal
lagher, secretary of the lame organiza
tlon, and o. JI. wiiitinori', secretary of
the California State Building Trades
council, nt a masi meeting lioid In la
bor temple.
The San Francisco labor leaders
came to I,os Angeles yesterday to as
sist in any way possible the local i
strikers. All day labor headquarters
were besieged by strikers eafrer to talk
with the northern men and to learn
Sail Francisco's attiude toward tho
local .situation. When the representa
tives from that city made their ad
dresses last evening, promising more
than was hoped for, the local union
ists expressed confidence that they will
win.
THE TENT CITY
The establishment of a tent city
within a. few miles of Los Angeles,
win re strikers will move with their
families for the summer months, and
which will be supported by organized
labor, is planned. This question was
not taken up last evening, but Stuart
Reid, International organizer and
leader In the local fight, announced
that the tents would be here early
next week and that as soon as they
arrived camp would be pitched and
occupied.
Tho auditorium of the Labor tem
ple was filled to overflowing last oven
ing, not only hy strikers themselves,
but by members of their families and
outsiders. Bert Ingle, president of the
local trades mimcll, was chairman of
the evening and the first speaker he
Introduced was Andrew J. Gallagher of
San Francisco.
The northern mnn outlined the local
strike situation from its inception, and
compared it with the one successfully
carried through by the unions in San
Francisco In 1902. He urp:ed the So
cialists, as .a party, to stand with the
unions in tho local fight If it gets into
pOlitlCl.
President Kelly, In speaking of the
support which the local strikers might
expect from the north, said:
WHAT KF.TXY SAYS
"The fight must bo kept up, and we
of the north realize it. We will fur
nish the munitions of war; you will do
the fighting. Do not think of giving in.
Stand together. We will send you
money and provisions In unlimited
quantities, so have no fear of hunger
and starvation. We will find enough
money to finance this fight to a vic
torious finish if it lasts ten years. And
we won't have to furnish it all, either.
From every union In the United States
you may expect contributions to con
tinue this strike.
In a measure, State Secretary Whlt
more's speech was along the same
lines, and he promised support, not
only from the bay cities, but from the
state In general.
Fred J. Spring, attorney for the
strikers, made a short talk, principally
in regard to the ordinance before the
council in regard to picketing. He ex
pressed himself as being confident that'
the ordinance would not pass, but said
that if It did, he believed that by exer
cising the referendum Its provisions
would be set aside by the people of
Los Angeles.
Members of the Employers and
Founders' association denied yesterday
that they were being inconvenienced
now by the strike. They asserted that
they are operating all their plants
without difficulty.
DURATION RECORDS ARE
BROKEN AT RHEIMS MEET
Aviator Stays in Air More Than
Two and a Half Hours
BETHANY PLAINS, Rheims, July 7.
—M. Ollslegern today ■ broke the rec
ords for duration and distance at the
aviation meeting In progress here. Ho
remained in the air two hours, thirty
nine minutes and thirty-nine seconds
and covered a distance of 15S 35-100
miles. During the speed contest Leon
Moran, the French aviator, covered
twenty kilometers (12.42 miles) in 14:42.
Hubert Latham and H. Labouchere,
in the distance contest, circled the field
round after round together.
During one of the flights, Weymann,
an American aviator, fell. He was un
injured, but his machine was wrecked.
M. Petrowski of Russia also met with
an accident, being precipitated to the
ground by the rush of air from tho
motor of M. Klnef of Belgium, who
passed within fifteen feet of his ma
chine.
AVIATOR WHITE FAILS TO
MAKE 105-MILE FLIGHT
LONDON, July 7.—Graham White,
who was beaten by the Frenchman,
Paulhan, in the contest for a flight
from London to Manchester, left the
Crystal palace today for a flight to
Bournemouth, a distance of 105 miles,
where an aviation meeting is being held
in connection with the eentennary cele
bration. An accident to the propeller
forced White to descend after a brief
flight. Tho ae-.'oplane was damaged In
the descent.
TO BUILD NEW DEUTSCHLAND
FRANKFORT, July 7.—The director
ate of the Passenger Airship company
has decided the Zenpelln Vl.' now at
Frlederichshafen, bo transferred to
I laden-Baden to carry out the program
for passenger trips during the sum
mer. A substitute for the destroyed
Deutschland will be constructed as
quickly as possible
PIONEER WOMAN DIES
SHASTA, July 7.—Mrs. AVilliam
Daniels, S4 years old anrt a resident
<>f this Stale since the pioneer days of
1849, died at her home here yesterday
afternoon at 5:30 o'clock.
She wus a native of England but
came to California with her parents
during- the early days of the gold rush.
Mrs. J.B. Millard, Who Heads List
of Patronesses for Orphans' Outing
VENICE PLANS DUSTLESS
AUTO RIDE FOR ORPHANS
Picnic at Seaside Resort Prom
ises to Be Event in Lives
of Participants
OCEAN PARK, July V—When the
800 orphans from Los Angeles come to
picnic at Venice next Tuesday their
lungs will not be filled with dust if the
board of trustees of this city can pre
vent it. The street superintendent has
beau Instructed by the board to sprin
kle the roads over which the great
cavalcade of 250 automobiles will travel
the night before so that the dust will
be thoroughly settled.
Advertising Manager Fred K. Mc-
Carver of the Abbot Kinrey company
has arranged for the line of machines
to proceed north to Marine street when
they arrive in the city. Then, led by
the Venice band, they will move south
to Venice on the broad concrete prom
enade which will be dedicated to the
use of the young visitors for this pur
pose. Those arranging for the success
of the picnic here continue to make
preparations for entertainment of the
orphans that the latter will not soon
forget.
The children will be In charge of
Mrs. J. B. Millard of Los Angeles, who
planned the outing.
TAFT PLANS EXTENSION
TO TEN DAYS' VACATION
Yacht Mayflower Will Be Used on
President's Trip
BEVERLY, Mass., July 7.—President
Taft is going to extend the ten days'
vacation, which he began yesterday, by
taking a ten days' cruise on the yacht
Mayflower, beginning July 18. The
president's present vacation Is not up
until July IG, so this will leave only
Sunday, July 17, Intervening.
Accompanied by the members of his
Immediate family, by his brother,
Horace D. Taft, and by as many
friends as the limited quarters of the
Mayflower will accommodate, the presi
dent will sail up the north coast. He
will stop for a clay or two at Bar Har
bor and may drop in at several other
resorts and points of Interest. The
golf sticks will be carried along and
whenever an attractive looking set of
eighteen holes appears on the horizon
the Mayflower will anchor forthwith.
Commander Snowden Is In command
of the Mayflower. There is a chance
that the little Sylph may trail along
in the wake of the Mayflower, but this
has not been determined.
The president played golf this morn
ing.
ZELAYA MAY OFFER TO
WITHDRAW HIS GUNBOAT
WASHINGTON, July 7.—From the
state department the report was given
out today of rumors reaching it that
former President Zelaya has offered to
have the Venus withdrawn from Nica
ragua waters on certain conditions.
Tiiis would be the first admission
from Zelaya, if the rumor prove true,
that he had any control over the
armed vessel which has been plying on
me eastern coast of Nlcaiagim.
The conditions which the rumor said
Zelaya had named were that protec
tion be given to his personal estate in
Nicaragua, which Is reported to be
very large, and that he be recompensed
$50,000, the first payment made on the
Emery claims, owned by Americans
and adjusted in an agreement between
the United States and Nicaragua Just
before the uprising in the Central
Americun country.
WILL RECOVER $350,000
WASHINGTON, July 7.—The Catholic
university of America will recover
$350,000 from the bankrupt estate of the
late Thomas E. Waggaman, Its former
treasurer, who owed the Institution
$900,000 when he wus adjudged bank
rupt In 1904. A compromise to this end
was reached with H. Rozler Dulaney,
trustee for the bankrupt, today.
WANTS TO SELL HIS BODY
OAKLAND, July 7.—Henry Henls, 80
years old, today sought to sell t<l the
receiving hospital, his body, to be
claimed by them nftcr death. The aged
man Is without money or friends, and
hopes by disposing of his body to gain
sufficient funds to make his last days
comfortable.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: FRIDAY MORNING, JULY 8, 1010.
BALLINGER TO MAKE
TRIP OF INSPECTION
Secretary of Interior Will Visit
Indian Reservations and'
Irrigation Projects
WASHNIGTON, July 7.—Secretary of
the Interior Ballinger left today for a
trip of inspection westward, which may
cover a period of several months. He
was accompanied by E. C. Finney, as
sistant to the secretary, and a .stenog
rapher. During his absence he will
visit several reclamation projects, In
dian reservations and national parks.
Mr. i;allinger's itinerary includes vis
its to tho Fort Belknap and Blackfoot
Indian reservations in Montana and
probably to the Flathead reservation in
tho same state. He will inspect the
Irrigation projects on these reserva
tions.
After visiting the agencies he will go
to Seattle and from there will make
several trips to reclamation projects
and national parks to inspect condi
tions.
The board of army engineers desig
nated to examine the reclamation pro
jects and advise upon the expenditure
of the $20,000,000 issue of certificates
of indebtedness probably will take up
its duties some time prior to Au
gust 1.
The board will expedite its field work
as much as possible and will be ready
to report to the president early in the
Call, First Assistant Secretary Frank
Pierce will act as secretary of the in
terior during thfe absence of Mr. Bul
linger.
EXPECT GREAT RESULTS
RUSSO-JAPANESE PACT
St. Petersburg Paper Declares
Two Nations Should Agree
(Bpaolal to The Herald)
ST. PETERSBURG, July 7.—The
ttovoe Vremya in a leading article to
day expressed the belief that the
Russo-Japanese convention would ac
complish great things. The Vremya
considers it a foundation for durable
peace in the far east, serving as a bar
rier against encroachments of outsiders
in that sphere, adding that neighborly
relations relieve Russia and Japan of
the burden of heavy armaments, en
abling Russia to complete the Amur
railroad and continue colonization on a
vast scale.
The Vremya declares the situation
created by the convention is unfavor
able to Korea, China and America and
the Central European powers in so far
as their policies are based <>n a contin
uation" of misunderstandings between
Russia, China and Japan. It declares
that Secretary Knox's Manohurlan
proposal was instrumental in hasten -
ing the consolidation of the conven
tion. It ascribes to the same cause
the Insertion of the clause for joint ac
tion of the contracting powers toward
propositions disturbing the status quo.
The Vremya recalls that Mr. Knox en-
tered into the preliminary negotiations
regarding the lagun railroad without
Russia's knowledge anrl obtained Jap
an's theoretical consent, which was
embarrassing to Russia.
COLWATTERSON'SSONIS
HELD TO THE GRAND JURY
KINGSTON, N. V., July 7.—Swing
Watterson, son of Colonel Henry Wat
terson, the Louisville editor, waived ex
amination today before Police Judge
Rowe at Baugertiei on a charge of
shooting Michael J. Martin, a saluon
keeper. He was committed to jail to
await the grand jury's action on a
charge of first degree assault.
SECRETARY OF TREASURY
DEPARTS FOR VACATION
WASHINGTON, July 7.—Secretary
of the Treasury MacVeajfh left the
city tonight lor the summer. He goes
first to Phoenlxville, Pa., where he
will speak tomorrow at the Old home
week celebration. After that he ex
pects to visit his brother, Wayne Mac-
Veagh, at Bryn Mawr, and then go to
Dublin, N. H., his summer home.
CRIPPLE RUN OVER; DIES
SACRAMENTO, July 7.—While sit
ting on a spur track inside the city,
Charlei Kelly, a cripple mppoaad to
be a resident of Freeport, wag last
night run over and fatally Injured by
tt Southern Pacific switch engirfe. Ha
was taken to the receiving hospital,
where he died an hour later.
NEW YORK DIAMOND
TRADE IS IMMENSE
Metropolis Consumes More Than
One Half Total Stone Im
port to Country
PRICE DOUBLED IN 9 MONTHS
German Producers Have Advant- j
age Over Other Operators in
South African Fields
f AB.sociat^'l Prwal
XI^W YORK, July 7.— New York city j
takes more tivin one-half of the entire
diamond production of tin- world, ac- i
cording to the statement received in the
Maiden Lane district here from Henry
\v. Dledrlch, American consul general
at Antwerp,
This country paid at tin' docks last
year more than 146,000,000 for precious
Stones of all kinds, and of, this amount
nearly $45,000,000 was paid in New
York. The:- totals break all records.
The diamonds brought in were valued
:,t 88,000,000. Nearly three-quarters of
thesi ivere in cut stones.
in. drlch also sent the New York dla- j
mond trade the first definite report on
the new diamond fields in the German I
colony in South Africa, where more
than $60,000,000 lias been sii.'lit in de
velopment. The German r.'.lncs have
been turned over to a German syndi
cate which has its cutting factories in
Antwerp and New York.
Though, a few large stones have been
found in the German South African
mines, ranging from five to seventeen
carats, the average weight thus far is
one-third of a carat. Only one or two
shipments of the rough stones have
been made to New York, as diamond
cutters here object to cutting stones of
less than three-eighths of a carat in
weight, but lar^e quantities of these
small stones, after being cut in Ant
werp and Amsterdam, have been sent
to New York for the use of jewelry j
manufacturers in this and other cities.
The yield of the diamonds in the Ger
man colony has increased to 60,000
carats a month, and the quality has
also Improved so that the price per
carat is now nearly double what it was
nln.' months ago. The cost of produc
tion in diamond fields of the German
colony.is light, 50 cents to ?3 a carat as
the stones are taken from the sands
and surface grounds. This gives an ad
vantage over the companies operating
the mines in British colonies where the
mines have been dug to a depth of a
third to a half mile and the cost of
production ranges from $4 to $3 a
carat.
JAPANESE TO ATTEMPT
EVASION IN SEAL CASE
Boats Seized Within Limits of the
Pribyloff Rookeries
VICTORIA, B. C, July 7.—Japanese
newspapers received today contain ex
planations of the grounds on which
Japan fs basing her claim for damages
on behalf of the owners of the sealing
schooners Ten Yu Maru and Kaisci
Maru, seized by United States revenue
cutters in Bering sea last year and sold
following confiscation by the American
govern rnent.
The Jiji Shimpo says the contention
of the Japanese government is that the
action of a small boat cannot reflect
on the vessel to which it belongs, while
the United States holds that the boat
is part of the schooner and the
schooner is liable to seizure and con
fiscation for its offenses.
The two sealers were seized because
small boats from them were found
within the prohibited limit off the
Pribyloff seal rookeries.
COURT FINES COTTON
KING FOR CONTEMPT
Judge Orders Daniel Sully to Pay
State $3800
WHITE PLAINS, N. V., July 7.—
Daniel Sully, long known as the "cot
ton kins," was declared in contempt
of court today by justice Mills of the
state supreme court and ordered to
pay a line of $3800.
The case grew out of Sully's failure
several yean ago when William Mar
mon Black, a judgment creditor, ob
tained a court order restraining Sully
from paying out any money until the
suit of Black had been settled. Black
contended that Sully had committed
contempt in paying $4600 to Sully's wife
after the order had been Issued. Sully
said the payment represented his salary
of $100 a month for a little less than a
year.
COULDN'T WHIP A CANARY
BUT BREAKS HANDCUFFS
Takes Five Policemen to Hold the
Slender Prisoner Down
NEW YORK, July 7.—Andrew Brlc
cini, who Is so slender and small that
he looks us if he would be a bad loser
in a buttle with a husky canary bird,
gave an exhibition in Jefferson Market
police court last night which put to
shame the efforts of the stage "hand
cuff kings." Brieelni, who had been
arrested on a charge cf trying to kill
his wife and baby, coolly snapped in
twain a pair of handcuffs which had
been placed on his wrists. Another
pair was put on him and he broke
them, too, with ridiculous ease, where
upon five policemen jumped on him and
held him down. He will be held for
observation as to his sanity.
CLOSE WESTERN PART OF
HARBOR OF PORT ARTHUR
' VICTORIA, July 7.—ln connection
with the recent opening of Port Ar
thur, the Kamikura Maru brought
news yesterday that the eastern part
of the harbor where the largest titr*
ivss and the docks are situaterl will
remain cloned for commercial purposed
only the western part of the harbor
being opened. It is proposed to open
the harbor and cut a new entrance
through Tigers Tail promontory.
vs«Bh. Yes, Style That Is Becoming
J^*a^^ <^ -^i^ Is the all-important study of the
?^l^P o^# C^V high-salaried cutters, tailors and
\^J| -f^r designers in our stores every
// 7*^3L: *^^ where. It is the one purpose of
fliff km^^^\ ourworld wide organization to
"^SiM^^W % spare no cx P snse »but to turn
Ik out the best Messed men on
I^^ the face of the earth.
■ LI I A Few.Unclaimed Suits at Half
Wfi^M~#=^ Price If fey Fit You '
■ MB S^2r^^ Sails to measure
fill viffff A Thousand Styles JlL^m&Jr6
If You Consult Your Own Interest—You Will Investigate Our System
English Woo/en Mills Lfy
137-139 South Spring St., Near 2nd—Open Evenings
WEALTHY BROKER APPLIES
FOR PEDDLER'S LICENSE
Keeps in Readiness to Follow the
Push Cart Again
NEW YORK, July 7.—The chief of
the mayor's license bureau and the
mayor's secretary are still wondering
today why a man attired in the
height of fashion and bedecked with
diamonds should want a push cart
peddler's license at the rate of $1 a
year.
B. Chenkin, who presented a neatly
engraved card showing him to be a
real estate broker with money to loan
on mortgages, applied for the license
yesterday.
"What do you want with a push
cart license?" asked the astonished
chief of the bureau.
"Well, I don't push the cart myself
any more," was the broker's reply,
"but one never knows what may hap
pen, and I want it renewed. I've had
one for eighteen years."
The license was refused and Mr,
Chenkin went away declaring he
would take the matter into the courts.
CHAUTAUQUANS GATHER IN
YOSEMITE FOR CONVENTION
Former Governor Folk Among
Speakers at the Session
TOSEMITE. Cal., July 7—Four hun
dred Chautauquans and half as many
delegates to the State Sunday School
association gathered in convention at
the pavilion here today. Bishop W.
M. Bell presided. Major W. AY. For
syth, Sixth tTnited States cavalry, su
perintendent of the Yosemite National
park, made the address of welcome to
the visitors. The afternoon was de
voted to organization work and prep
arations for the next ten days of tlio
meeting that is to be held,
Former Governor Folk of Missouri is
scheduled to speak tomorrow night,
His subject will be, "Educational .Mat
ters and the Natural Beauties of Yo
semite Valley."
Assemblyman Drew of Fresno has
arranged v joint debate between Gif
ford Pinchot and Judge Frank 11.
Short. The subject will be, "Conser
vation."
IAPANESE TROOPS AND
FORMOSANS IN BATTLE
VICTORIA, B. C, July 7.—Heavy
lighting has occurred in Formosa In
connection with Japan's "little war"
with the Formosan natives near Qu
ciran. June 15 a number of native
bands combined and surrounded the
Japanese troops, who extricated them
selves v.ith a loss of sixty-two killed
and wounded. Three battalions of in
fantry and a battery of artillery were
hurried to the scene from Taipch and
the natives were dispersed with much
loss, the casualties on the Japanese
side totaling seventy-eight in killed
and wounded.
THROUGH RATES REDUCED
WASHINGTON, July 7.—The inter
itate commerce commission today ob-
tamed a reduction In through freight
rates to Winston, Salem and Durhum,
N. C.i from Riianokc and Lynchburg,
Va. It amount! to about 9 rents a
hundred pounds on elans freight and
from 4 to 8 cents a hundred pounds
on hay, grain unil pucklng house pro
ducts
ADVISE COMPTROLLER TO
CHECK UP SMALL BANKS
CHICAGO, July 7.—The national
bank examiners of the sixth district
closed a two-days' semi-annual meet
ing in the federal building after mak
ing some drastic recommendations to
the comptroller of the currency rel
ative to methods of checking up on
country banks. In a resolution adopted
by the examiners the comptroller is
advised to make strict investigations
of the country banks and adopt new
regulations for controlling their re
ports. Some country banks, it was
maintained by the experts attending
the meeting, have been guilty of
evasions of the national banking laws
by borrowing money from city banks
that the exact state and extent of
their liabilities In their published
statements may not be shown to the
people.
The comptroller is advised to re
quest all country banks to make under
oath full and specific statements ot
their liabilities and assets.
HERMIT WILLS ESTATE TO
CHURCH IN THE HOLY LAND
Newspaper Man Once Friend of
Carnegie Dies
PITTSBT'RG, July 7.—The will of
Nicholas Dale, a former newspaper
mnn who had lived for years a hermit
like life on sixty-five cents a week,
as lie boasted, was filed today, direct
ing that $1350 which he had saved be
forwarded to the Holy Land to the
Sorrowful Mother and Blessed Virgin
church erected 1500 years ago in the
path of the cross.
He wrote that he had long desired
that all his worldly goods "be left in
the last footsteps of our Divine Lord
on his last journey while yet In tho
flesh and blood."
As a writer he was once well known
hero for his intimate acquaintance
with the steel industry and its lead
ers, including Andrew Carnegie.
NOTABLES ATTEND FUNERAL
OF THE DUKE D' ALENCON
DREUX, France, July 7.—The Duke
D'Alencon was buried today in Or
leans in the chapel beside his wife,
who was burned in the charity ba
z;iiir fire of 1597. The King of Bui
garifti representatives of the several
bourn of Spain, Portugal and Bel
gium and members of the French
Bourbon family ware present.
The Duke D'Alencon was a second
son of Louis, Duke D'Nemours, who
died in 189G, and a grandson of Louis
Philippe, king of Fiance. He was
born in 1844 and his elder brother is
claimant to the French throne.
TWO CASES KEEP CORONER
AT BAKERSFIELD BUSY
BAKERSFIELD, July 7.—While
the coroner was gone after the body
of William Kohne, who dropped dead
at 11 o'clock this morning, the body
of Martin Conner was fished from a
ditch two blocks from the business
eentiT of town. Kohne had only one
leg and bad gold pencils and shoe
strinßs here for several years for a
living. He is said to have a wealthy
brother in Saoramento. Conner WM ■
pioneer and well known in the county.
It is thought he fell Into the ditch in
the darkness early this morning.
EXPERIMENTAL EVOLUTION
IN INFANCY SAYS TOWER
Gives Results of His Experiments
with Potato Bugs
CHICAGO, July 7.—Fifteen years of
experiment with potato bugs has con
vinced Prof. William L. Tower, biol
ogist of the University of Chicago,
that environment causes variation of
species. Prof. Tower in a lecture yes
terday before summer students of the
university told the results of his re
search in Arizona and New Mexico.
"This theory has long oeen held, and
I feel that I have proved it without
chance of controversy," said Prof.
Tower. "I took three species of potato
bug to the southwest. I put them in
different parts of the country and in
time each section produced a different
type. The outcome of these experi
ments has convinced me that experi
mental evolution is still in its in
fancy."
MINING MAN PUTS GIANT
POWDER IN MOUTH; IS DEAD
NEVADA CITY Cal., July 7.—Fred
Marcotte, sr., who owns several min
ing claims in the vicinity of Washing
ton, this county, early yesterday
morning walked from his cabin in
what is known as God's country to
the Ether mine, lay down in front of
the boarding house of that property,
placed a stick of giant powder In his
mouth and set it off with a match.
No reason is known for the suicide.
NINETEEN STORES BURNED
MINOT, N. D., July 7.—Fire today
destroyed the business portion of Dcs
Lacs, near Mlnot, burning nineteen
st. ins. The loss is more than
$100,000.
Pure Water
The Most Satisfactory and Most
Healthful for Summer Drink
ing. It Should Be Dis
tilled Water
During the heated term one Is apt to re
sort to all kinds of cooling beverages.
Borne of them are puru and wholesome,
other! aro not.
They should be taken with the greatest
discrimination. But the best and most
wholesomo drink of all is PURE WATEK.
Pure, wholesome water is "soft" water —
that Is. it Is entirely free, from mineral im
purities.
Our city water is of an alkaline nature. It
contains considerable amounts of minerals—
and these are not healthful, as the body is
unablo to assimilate them.
You should drink PUItE water—Puritas
Distilled Water. Purltas is "soft," whole
some, sparkling, healthful. Not only does it
quench the thirst, but it tends to keep tho
body sweet and clean.
Puritai is twice distilled and aerated'with
pure ozone.
It Ii so carefully bottled that it reachei
you with all its wholesome purity intact.
It is most inexpensive—»s gallons cost but
40c delivered within the old city boundary
lines. At outside points the cost is a trifle
more, owing to the long haul. Regular Puri
tas customers purchase coupon books, thus
securing Puritas at a discount. When you
telephone ask us about these.
If you want pure, wholesome beverages,
order Puritas Sodas. These are sold every
where there are good things to drink. If
you want them In your home telephone us
Home 10061; Sunset Main 8191. l<oa Angeles
Ice and Cold Storage company.
3

xml | txt