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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, July 10, 1910, Image 21

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-07-10/ed-1/seq-21/

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PRESBYTERIANS DEDICATE
NEW LONG BEACH CHURCH
Services to Be Held This Morning
at 10:30 o'clock
IvONO BEACH, July 9.—The new
First Presbyterian church, Just com
plntcd and furnished at the corner of
Sixth street and Locust avenue at a
cost of $125,000, will be dedicated to j
morrow morning at 10:30 o'clock. The
Rev. Mark A. Matthews, pastor of
the First church of Seattle, will de
liver the sermon.
The church covers an area of 90 by
150 feet and is built of artificial lime
stone. The church has more than 800
members. The Rev. O. H. L. Mason
is pastor. The building 1 was started
during the pastorate of the Rev. Joslah
Sibley.
PRAYS FOR DELIVERANCE
FROM COURT'S SENTENCE
LONO BEACH, July 9.—The Rev.
Benjamin Gold, an old minister, ./ell
on his knees and prayed for deliver
ance this morning after Justice Under
wood had fined him $."0, with an al
ternatlvo of fifty days in Jail, for cru
rlty to animals. The preacher was ar
rested for driving two old and feeble
niuli s to his wagon. The wagon Is
plastered with scriptural quotations.
Ho could not pay hia fine and went
to Jail.
REFUSES TO PLACE BAN
ON PRIZE FIGHT FILMS
LONG BEACH, July 9.—The council
last night laid on the table a request
from the Parent-Teacher association
that the Jeffries-Johnson pictures be
prohibited In this city. The city fath
ers said it was understood the Reno
films would not be used by any local
picture men anyvay, and that such an
ordinance might do away with the pre
sentation of any boxing contest pic
tures.
LONG BEACH ITEMS
LONG BEACH, July 9.—The body of
Mrs. Sarah Wilson, wife of Jehu Wil
son of 619 East First, street, was
brought here today from Whlttier,
where she died yesterday after a brief
illness. She, was stricken with paraly
sis after going to Whlttier to attend
a church meeting. She was 80 years
old. ' , r'
Mrs. Rebecca Hunter, 40 years old,
died yesterday at her home, 1035 Myrtle
avenue. She was the wife of Melville
Hunter. They came here three years
ago from Indiana.
The city council last night passed an
ordinance putting the buying of sup
plies for the various commissions in
the hands of a purchasing committee,
but making the committee appointive
by the president of the council. Presi
dent Mohrenstecher probably will ap
point the finance committee to this
duty. The dlscus3ion led to a warm
tilt between Mayor Windham, who in
timated that the councilman seemed to
distrust the various commissions, and
Councilman Wollbrlnck, who said it
was simply a case of differing opin
ions. .", . . " . '■ , . '
■ | •_•-« : '■ -"■
WHAT IBOLATI.ON COSTS POPE
The consistency of the popes in cling
ing to their self-imposed isolation In
assertion of their policy is impressive,
for it entails their refusal 'of the tri
bute which the kingdom of Italy la
willing to pay out of respect to their
spiritual character. Every year the
Italian parliament votes an appropria
tion of $645,000 to be placed at the dis
posal of the pope to maintain his dig
nity, and to bo expended generally for
the maintenance of his court. Every
year the pope as regularly refuses to
receive his allowance lest Its accept
ance should negative his claim to'be a
temporal prince in . his own capital.
This process of appropriation and re
jection has been kept up ever since
1871, when parliament guaranteed to
the pope and his successors forever the
Vatican and Lateran and Castel Gran
dolfo, and voted the first allowance.
The aggregate of these appropriations
Is now in exoess of $25,000,000, all of
which is held subject to the pope's or
der. —Boston Transcript.
i, . »
DINNER
A good dinner is a work of art; so is
the selection of the time to eat it. In
Charleston people dine at 3 In the aft
ernoon or thereabouts, supposedly be
cause some time in the long ago that
suited the school children, or because
there were such large families in thoso
days that it took the cook that long to
get the necessary quantity cooked. In
Mobile they are glad to dine at any
time, although some of the older and
richer families have regular dinners
every day. In New Orleans those who
dine go to the restaurants. In fact,
without its eating pjaces New Orleans
would not last a day,, and half the town
would bo bankrupt, However, it Is per
tinent to reniark that some of the best
cooks in the world are down in the
metropolis, and they have a way of
cooking ordinary potatoes that makes
them taste lik* orie of Bob Taylor's
promises. — Charleston News and
Courier.
* « »
DUE FORMALITY
At one of fthe hotels in Washington
several members of con&ress made
themselves conspicuous by callinK to
one another across the table. "Will
the gentleman from Maine pass me
the butter?" "Will the gentleman from
pass me the salt?" etc, etc..
There was a gentleman present who
was exceedingly annoyed by their con
versation, and, turning to the waiter
ut the back of his chair, he politely
requested, "Will the gentleman from
("N Africa pass me the butter?"
yL —Judge.
Long Beach, Queen of the Beaches
Domestic Airships Delight Thousands
Of Pleasure Seekers at Long Beach
IP >: ■ ■■i
;. = ,^,;.....,.,■. . ,1
rB Long Beach pike, the famous
"pay streak," "midway," or what
ever you want to call It, which at
tracts pleasure seekers from every part
of Southern California every day In
the year, has a new attraction. More
over, It's an attraction such as no other
Bummer resort in the world can boast.
It is the invention of two Long Beach
men, A. F. and A. T. Smith.
Captain R. L. Bisby smiles every
time ho looks at his famous spiral way,
and all Long Beach has been talking
about this domestic, eat-out-of-your
hand airship voyage. It looks rather
risky, the little torpedo-shaped car
circling round and round the tall steel
tower above the ocean waves, but ex
perts who have examined the Bplral
way pronounce it fully as safe as any
thrill-producer on the market.
HAIRDRESSER WORKS
'RICH AUNT' SWINDLE
Frenchman Succeeds in Marrying
Rich Young Woman and
Then Deserts Her .
PARIS, July 9.—A hairdresser has
succeeded In perpetrating a clever
swindle at Lille by pretending to be
the heir to a great fortune. His ex
ploits resemble thome of Mme. Hum
bert on a smaller scale.
The hairdresser, who is BO years of
age, established himself In Lille some
months ago. He had neither money nor
good looks, but his manners were plau
sible, and he started his tonsorlal es
tablishment on the strength of a myth
ical Inheritance of two and a half mil
lions, which he expected to get on the
death of an aged aunt. .
He then announced his wish to mar
ry, and Lille society paraded its most
beautiful heiresses for him to choose
from. He selected a charming young
lady of twenty-five who was very
rich and very beautiful. Then he,con
fided to a friend—M. Mathieu, . who
was to be his best man— he was
short of ready money, and Mathieu
lent him $300. . .„ i■' ■.
The marriage took place last Thurs
day, and the bride and bridegroom left
for Paris. Mathieu went with them.
After a few days Mathieu and the
bridegroom were to call on the bride
groom's aunt, so that the latter might
be repaid his $300. But on the day
when the visit was to have taken place
the hairdresser had vanished. .
Then It was found 1 that both the
fortune and. the aunt were mythical.
The discomfited Mathieu has taken the
bride back to her parents. .
♦-•-« —
INSECT WHICH BITS ON ITS EGGS
Family matters, In the case of in
sects, usually mean only the depositing
of eggs in suitable situations for the In
dependent development of the offspring,
the parent insects often dying before
the young appear. The earwig, how
ever, provides a remarkable exception
to the general rule, for it sits upon Its
fifty or more eggs until they are
hatched, Just as a bird would do; and,
moreover, if the eggs get scattered, It
carefully collects them together again.
In the early months of the year, when
digging the soil, female earwigs may
frequently be found together with their
batch of eggs. At the slightest signs
of danger the young, that usually como
from the eggs, huddle dose to their
rnothor, hiding beneath her body so far
as it will cover so large a family.—
Strand Magazine.
DIKTY*BMEAR3
"How can you *go around," demand
ed his wife, "with tobacco juice all
over your face?"
"This isn't tobacco Juice," responded
the candidate mildly, "It's molasses.
I've been kissing the babies."—Wash
ington Herald.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: SUNDAY MORNING, JULY 10, 1010.
THE SPIRAL WAY
Four cars are used, and all after
noon long the whirring of the wheels
and the laughing of the passengers can
be heard. The trip is a bundle of
thrills. Four passengers ran be ac
commodated In each car. A little shove
and the steel chain grabs the airship.
You feel yourself being lifted, clear
of the platform and up, up, up, until
you can look down on the long pier
and the crowds on the beach. A swift
dip and the voyage is on. Beginning
rather slowly, the little airship soon
is circling round and round the big
tower at a safe speed. Far beneath
lies the beach, while on either side is
no visible support. Unless you look
up the trip is a bona fide airship voy
age. A dozen or more times does the
car circle the big tower, and finally
is brought to a stop at the end of the
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■ -
NATIONAL BANK OF LONG BEACH
LONG BEACH has many features of
which she is very proud, and not
the least of these are her banks.
Nothing more clearly shows the re
markable and substantial growth of
Long Beach than Its numerous strong
banking institutions. As the oldest and
largest of our city banks, the National
Bank of Long Beach affords the best
illustration of this growth. It was
organized in June, 1896, as the Bank
of Long Beach, with a capital stock of
$25,000. Jotham Bixby, one of the best,
known pioneers of Southern California,
was its first president, and P. E. Hatch
its cashier. Long Beach had then a
population of 1200 and was purely a
summer city. Seven years later (1903)
it was converted into a national bank
under the name of the National Bank
of Long Beach, and its capital in
creased to $100,000, whl£h has since been
increased to $150,000. During these four
teen years it has made a steady
growth, always maintaining its posi-
ONE WAY OF KILLING THEM
He had besought the pharmaceutical
chemist to give him something with
which he might kill moths, and the
pharmaceutical chemist had supplied
him with camphor balls; but the next
day he was back again, holding some
of the fragments of the balls within
his hand,
"Are yez the same young man phwat
sold thim things to me yisterday?" he
roared.
"I am," replied the pharmaceutical
chemist composedly. "What's wrong
with them?"
"Phwat's wrong with thim?" repeat
ed the Irate purchaser. "The idea ay
sellin' thim things to kill moths or
anything else! Sea here 1 If yez can
show me the man that can hit a moth
wid a single one ay thim I'll say nuth
in' about the orniments an' lukln'-
Klass me an' the missus broke!"—
Answer .
long incline. "Oh!" you gasp, invol
untarily, and look back at the top of
the tower, many feet above you.
Although Captain Blsby has had his
spiral way In operation but a short
time, its fame has spread all over the
south, and the trip is made dally by
hundreds of persons. The tower stands
at the east end of the "pike," directly
off the end of Pine avenue. At night
the dome on the top of the tower,
brilliantly illuminated with electric
lights, revolves rapidly, and the flash
ing of the lights may be seen for miles.
Without question the spiral way has
been one of the biggest business get
ters ever placed on the pike. Despite
the cool weather, it has been a boon
to Long Beach, and the merchants of
the Queen of the Beaches are loud In
their praise of the spiral way and Its
daring builder.
tion at the forefront of banking insti
tutions, while the great growth of
the city has caused seven other splen
did banks to be added to its institu
tions. Its deposits are now more than
$1,150,000, while Its affiliated institu
tion, the Long Beach Savings Bank
and Trust company, also has deposits
of more than $1,000,000, and the banks
of the city as a whole have a total of
more than $4,150,000.
The present officers of the National
Bank of Long Beach are: P. E. Hatch,
president; Jotham Bixby, first vice
president; George Bixby, second vice
president; E. E. Norton, cashier; Wil
liam M. Cook and L. C. Powell, assist
ant cashiers. The rapid and substan
tial growth of this bank and also of
the city of Long Beach may be largely
attributed to the energy and public
spirit shown by Jotham Bixby and P.
E. Hatch, whose lives and means have
been so freely given for the city's de
velopment.
GERMAN ARMORED AUTO
Vice Consul General Charles A. Ris
dorf of Frankfort notes the announce
ment in a German publication of the
construction by an engineer at Lauf
fen of a combination war automobile
and war motor boat for the use of the
army. The transformation can be
quickly effected and the motor in
stantly connected with a screw pro
peller. The armor allows free loco
motion, even on difficult land, and can
be removed and changed to shield the
crew from all sides. The conductor Is
able to drive ,and steer the car In
every position—even lying on the
floor—and In both directions, forward
and backward, without being obliged
to turn. The car shows many advan
tages, the principal one being the pos
sibility of crossing rivers and lakes
Independent of bridges. Trials are be
ing made by experts.—Consular Re
ports.
Long Beach Realty
Dealers Optimistic
Rice and Patterson Installed in
Ocean Front Office and Pre
dict Great Future for City
T. F. Rice and J. W. Patterson, than
whom there nre not two better known
real estate dealers In Long Beach and
who have been associated In business
at the Queen of the Beaches for the
past seven years, have opened an ele
gant office on the ocean front.
Although both Mr. Rice and Mr.
Patterson were Interested In tracts at
Huntlngton Beach several years ago,
both realized the possibilities of Long
Beach and both prospered with the city.
"I have seen the most remarkable
growth in Long Beach and an Increase
In real estate values which reads like
a chapter from Jules Verne," declared
T. F. Rice as he glanced at the ques
tioner. "Every city sees several
"booms." and then of course comes a
corresponding slump In values. We
have passed through such a stage,
and real estate today Is Just beginning
to wake up. The next twelve months
undoubtedly will see great activity In
all kinds of property. There Is, how
ever, no question In my mind but ivhat
real estate in Long Beach Is a good
buy today. I believed this years ago
and made money. Moreover, those who
buy today will not have to wait long
for their profits."
The new office of Rice and Patterson
Is located on Ocean avenue, and from
the windows a wide expanse of ocean
may be seen, ever changing in shade
and color. Although centering their
attention on Long Beach property, both
Mr. Rice and Mr. Patterson are heav
ily Interested In Orange county cej
ery lands.
SUBJECT VATICAN TO
FRIENDLY CRITICISM
Latin Monopoly in Political Affairs
of Holy See Causes
Dissatisfaction
ROME, July 9.—The triple difficulty
iii which the. Vatican is Involved at
the present moment—with Germany,
with Spain and with Portugal—has
drawn attention to the lack of knowl
edge of other countries which has for
some time past been characteristic of
those who conduct the political affairs
of the Holy See. It is pointed out by
friendly critics that the great mistako
of the Vatican under the present
regime has been to concentrate all
power In the hands of the Latin ele
ment alone, and to take no account of
the Teutonic and Anglo-Saxon nation
alities, which "Latins" can only imper
fectly understand. Of the twenty-two
cardinals permanently resident in
Rome, twenty are Italians and the
other two Spaniards; of the seventeen
cardinals created by Plus X, all but
one have been "Latins."
Now, for a church which has to deal
with men of many races, this almost
complete exclusion of the non-Latin
representatives is considered unfair.
Naturally, under such circumstances,
the Vatican authorities take narrow
views and are accordingly surprised
when an error of tact suddenly creates
a. storm. In secular governments a
minister who has made bad mistakes
has to resign; but Cardinal Merry del
Val, despite the criticisms of his pol
icy by other Roman Catholics, goes on
unmoved, and he and Cardinal Vives y
ruto direct affairs as before. Whether
the Vatican has gained by their meth
ods, so different from those of Car
linal Rampolla, is another question.
It is thought here that America
should make a strong and Insistent
demand for two cardinals in the sacred
college.
♦-•-♦
HIS HAPPY IDEA
Blankson's medical man told him
that it would be necessary to consult
a specialist, but Blankson's soul was
filled with gloom at the prospect of
parting with the fee.
"What do you think he'll charge
me?" he asked.
"Five guineas for the first visit and
one guinea for every subsequent one,"
was the reply.
Subsequently a happy idea by which
he might avoid the payment of the
initial five guineas struck Blankson.
Dashing into the specialist's consult
ing room, he exclaimed breezily, as he
held out his hand, "Well, doctor, here
we are again!"— London News.
MERRY.GO.ROUND
Coming across the Revere Beach
ferry yesterday were two men whose
antics attracted considerable attention.
The younger would step around to the
right side of his companion and within
a minute the elder would make a cor
responding shift. At last the elder
man became irritated.
"Say,' what are you trying to do
shifting round like this?" he demanded.
"I'm deaf in my left ear and was
trying to get where I'd hear well," the
younger replied.
"And I am blind in my left eye and
wanted to see what wa3 doing," said
the other.—Boston Journal.
WHERE SHE FOUND COMFORT
At a prayer meeting held in the
backwoods of Rhode Island, testimonies
were requested, and a very old woman
tottered to her feet.
"I want ter tell this blessed com
pany," her voice quivered, "that I have
rheumatiz in my back, rheumatiz in
my shoulders, and rheumatiz in my
legs, and rheumatiz in my arms, but I
hey ben upheld and comforted by the
beautiful Bible verse, 'Grin and bear
It.' "—Lippincott's.
The 4000 ;
Disappointed I
Bathers of July 4th
Can Now Be Accommodated
Repairs have been completed by the
Long Beach
Bath House I
America's Finest Bathing Establishment and the ']
Mammoth Plunges are again filled with invigorat
ing Salt Water.
Surf Bathing Better Than Ever
Take Pacific Electric Cars
From Sixth and Main
LONG BEACH
SANITARIUM
Battle Creek Sanitarium Methods
SPFPTAI $12.80 per week upwards. Finest and Best Equipped In- .
OrC'tiinii stltutlon West of Battle Creek. Every Luxury and Com-
SUMMER. tort. Descriptive Booklet Free.
. RATES XV. RAT SIMPSON, Manager. Ismg Beacb, Cal.
We have a number of
Summer Cottages
at Long Beach for sale and rent. One snap near Ocean Front
at $3800. Modern. Terms. $45 month income. Get off Long
Beach cars at Second street, walk one block south to 258 East
First street.
Security Realty Co.
258 E. Ist. . Home 8341.
FOR SALE
Barber's Shop, Pays 15%
147 American Avenue, Long Beach.
LOOK UP THIS GOOD BUT— chairs, modern; good business.
Must make change on account of health. Call on or address
147 AMERICAN AVENUE, LONG BEACH, CAL.
For Sale —Fine Home Site
in breezy Long Beach—Box2oo— Ocean avenue
Pavement Clinker Brick, Retaining Wall. Exclusive Neighborhood.
The Best Buy in Long Beach.
RICE & PATTERSON, 201 E. Ocean Ave.
Home 265. Sunset 3711.
$^ *B^ tact We can plare you on 610 acres of state
| rJ i-|» land for SI.•:."• per acre, clone to rall
jj ~J road; good land. See us at once for th*
"*• * *"^ above. We have several fine buys In
. vacant and Improved properties here.
ACT .A. Cr C Wiseman & O'Reilly
115 West Ocean avenue.
HOTEL ARLINGTON
Located on the bluff overlooking the bath house. Has steam heat, hot
and cold water and telephones in every room, ice water in every hall,
automatic elevator service; in fact, everything done for the comfort and
pleasure of our guests, even to a beautiful sun parlor on the roof, show-
Ing the grandest ocean and land view on the coast.
. Reasonable prices prevail, including all the comforts of a home. A
fine cafe In conjunction will be opened July 15. Write for our prices.
F. A. PARKER, Proprietor.
WE HAVE
A Good Home
On W. Thirty-sixth plare, 1...-. Angeles,
to exchange for Long; Beach residence.
Will pay difference.
John H. Betts & Co.
141 East Ocean avenue.
"SOUTH
PASADENA"
SPECIAL BARGAIN
8-room modern home. Fine lo
cation. For a few days only.
Clements & Ustick
125 W. Ocean Ave., Long Beach.
Home Phone 704.
JV
Portuguese Bend
Via San Pedro
Take Crescent Line steamer Camlguln
for Portuguese Band, round trip fl, In
cluding ride In glass-bottom boat over
marine gardens. Fresh fish dinner. 25c.
Every day. Boat leaves San l'edro at 10
a. m. and returns at 5:45 p. m. Tickets
at office at entrance to Long Beach pier,
near the fountain. Take the 9:30 train
at Salt Lake station. Return at 6:13 p.
in The *l rate Includes transportation
from Long Beach and return, fare from
San Pedro 75c.
Phones—Sunset 1316; Home 1322.
Apartment Site
A Snap—Will Earn 15 ixt cent. ,
IRVING MILLER & CO. /"*
125 West Ocean Avenue _^
9

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