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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, July 18, 1910, Image 1

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M Mill I; Mil I lilLvlil. O\J KjlljlV 113 ['BR MONTH
TAFT SATISFIED
THAT OHIO NAME
OWN CANDIDATES
Declines to Mix in Affairs of State
or Discuss Choice
i of Men
MUM ON PLATFORM PLANKS
Administration Leaders Strong in
Belief That Garfield Will
Not Land .
[Associated Press]
BEVERLY, Mass., July 17.—Presi
dent Taft today stated with striking
emphasis the position he is taking on
Republican state platforms and can
didates. The president does not think
he should be called on to willc Hhe
party declarations in the different
commonwealths or to name men for
any of the elective offices. A presi
dent. it was Intimated, has a pretty
big job on his hands when lie under
takes to fulfill all the pledge* In the
national platform and to bring con
gress around to the same way of
thinking.
As to planks in state platforms In
dorsing the administration the presi
dent feels that unless they can be writ
ten on What he has said and done
■ince taking offire, nothing he could
add In ■ personal way would help
matters out.
The Ohio conferences the lost three
daya have .served to bring out the
president'! attitude. He \\:is informed
of the general tenor of the platform
to be adopted at tho Columbus con
vention "the latter part of this month,
but he did not go into the details of
plunks.
KVM ON CANMDATKS
Under no circumstances would the
president express an opinion as to can
didates. The flght this fall in Ohio,
it i.s generally acknowledged, will be a
hard one, but Mr. Taft feels a con
vention made up 3f 1300 delegates can
be trusted to choase its own candi
dates In its own way. Mr. Taft has
been told none of three avowed can
didates, Caraml Thompson, Warren G.
Harding and O. B. Brown, has a ma
jority of the votes. This has led to
the opinion that a compromise can
didate must be found.
. The friends of James K. Garneld are
hopeful the delegataj may turn to him.
but the state leaders who are friendly
to the administration and who will
write a strong indorsement of Mr. Taft
and all his acts in the platform de
clare Sir. Garfield cannof be-- nom
inated. The only other candidate
much talked of is Representative Nich
olas Longworth. it is said, however,
.Mr. Longworth much prefers to re
mnin in congress, . and It will take
great pressure to .get him into tho
state fight '
CONFBRS WITH TAFT
Judge Reynold Kinkaide of Toledo
passed an hour or more with the presi
dent today. Judge Kinkaide was
strongly urged for the gubernatorial
nomination some weeks ago, but let it
be known he preferred his place on tho
state bench. Senator Hurton is com
ing tomorrow, Senutor Dick is still
lure and Wade H. Ellis, chairman of
the Ohio executive committee, Is within
a few minutes' ride. They all expect
t<, have a final word with Mr. Taft to
morrow.
The president today consented to
make three speeches in Maine—at East
port, Bangor and Rockland —during his
ten days' cruise in the northern waters.
The Maine elections are held Sep
tember 12.
Mr. Taft will speak at Eastport next
Tuesday, at Bangor on Saturday and
at Rockland on Tuesday, the 26th.
Senator Lodge of Massachusetts
lunched with the president today.
There was an amusing incident In
Beverly this morning as the president
was about to enter the First Parish
Unitarian church. Gulseppe de Ven
cemo, recently naturalized, became ex
cited over seeing the president and set
off a firecracker, There was some ex
citement among the watchers near
OuIMPPC, but the man was not mo
lestod.
DEMANDS DELEGATES BE
GIVEN FAIR TREATMENT
Gov. Hay Hesitates Before Send
ing Representation to Con
servation Congress
SEATTLE, July 17.—Gov. M. F. Hay
today declared that, he received positive
assurance that until the Washing
ton delegates will be accorded fair and
courteous treatment he would decline
to appoint any representative! to go
from this state to the national conser
vation congress to be hold in St. Poul
this summer.
Governor Hay said that last year
Federal Judge Cornelius H. Hanford,
who was appointed a delegate to the
congress which met in Seattle, received
discourteous treatment from the other
delegates because he read a paper crlt-
Iclling the conservation policy advo
cated by the congress and expressed
himself as favorable to lesn .stringent
regulations.
ROOSEVELT INTENDS TO
PASS RESTFUL WEEK
OYSTER BAY, July 17.—Ex-I'resi
dem Roosevelt went to church today.
Mrs. Roosevelt and Archie were with
him.
This week Is to b« a quiet one ;» t
Bagamore Hill. Few visitors nnd no
political conferences are expect.,i. col
onel Koo.sevelt bopefl to put in most
of the time wrltini; speeches for his
western trip. The only Interruption!
now cm the program are his visits to
his editorial office in New York on
Tuesday and Friday.
I
LOS ANGELES HERALD
INDEX OF
HERALD'S NEWS
TODAY
fOcUKUUK
r.on Angeles anil vicinity—Cloudy Monday)
moderate south wlnilH; showers In niomi
t»ltiH. Mn\iiiiiiin temperature yesterday 91
degrees; minimum, 66.
LOS ANGELES
Hell appeal* to state patriotism. PAGE 5
Temple Baptist church wolcomes Rev.
Jiurdotto home after tour o( orient.
I'AOK 11
Guileless fool called savior ot race.
PAQI 12
Polos celebrate historic victory at
Grunwald. I'Aiiß 1:!
Minuter says no wrong In Sunday beach
. trlj> after church. PAGE U
Capt. Lehnhauson betdns duties as Dlx- ,'
on'fl successor. I'.VOK 13
Man kills wife, shoots sister-in-law, at
tempts suicide. i . PAUE 3
Asks police to find his wife and babies.
PAGE 3
Freak showers drench Southern Cali
fornia towns. PAGE 3
Masked hlßliwayman robs victim of
watch and »118. I PAGE 3
Fender saves man from death beneath
car wheels. PAGE 3
H. A. Greeley halted by policeman's •
shot.t; locked In city prison on charge
of violating speed laws. PAGE 3
Thieves loot lockers and rooms at Y. M.
C. A. PAOE 12
Socialists Indorse strikes and condemn city
council. PAGE 5
Editorial and letter box. PAOE i
Politics. PAGE , 5
Bports. PAGES 6-7
riaßSlHod advertising. PAGE) 11
Society. , PAGE 12
Mining and oil fields. PAGE! 9
Shipping. , PAGE 9
Theaters. PAGE 3
SOUTH CALIFORNIA
Custom receipts at Redondo Beach
total "|IB,OOO for past 1 month. PAGE 10
Itenerant preacher who has thrice es*'
ruiieil Jail is taken In Irons to New
Mexico to answer indictment. PAGE 10
A. B. Chubblc's skull fractured by fall
from rapidly moving motorcycle at
Long Ufeach. PAGE 10
Homeopaths leave Pasadena, declaring
themselves well pleased with meet
ing. .. PAGE 10
Three negroes wreck auto In Riverside;
one arrested. . PAGE 2
COAST
Conductor killed In wreck of freight
train near Redding. PAGE 2
Son of Uoyd Osborne, novelist, un
earths treasure in vacant San Fran
cisco lot. PAGE 1
Seven Injured In auto crash; one may
die. PAGE 3
EASTERN
Speaker Cannon none the worse for heat
' prostration; ready to continue speeches
In Kansas. PAGE 2
NaKol and Wlckersham to start for
Alaska today. PAGE 3
Folk addresses 3&00 at Chautauqua meeting
In Albany. • ••' ■ ,- • PAGE 2
Taft satisfied that Ohio delegates •• will -
choose good candidates. - PAGE 1
Navy department starts thorough Investiga
tion Into cause of defective armor being
I found on American battleships. PAGE 1
i Sixteen supporters of Mrs. Stetson dropped |
by board of directors of Christian Science
church. PAGE 1
Train Is wrecked by Chicago mob and score
of persons Injured during riot. PAGE 1
Newport In throes of war for Bocial su
premacy. PAGE 3
UNITED STATES GROWS
OWN FRUIT AND NUTS
Bananas, Figs, Cocoanuts, Wai
nuts and Almonds Still Im
ported Largely
WASHINGTON, July 17.—The United
States is beginung to supply for its
own use fruits and nuts which a few
years ago were practically all imported.
This applies particularly to such fruits
as oranges, prunes and raisins. Ba
nanas, iigs, walnuts, cocoanuts and al
monds are still largely imported.
Twenty years ago the imports of
fruits and nuts were more than five
Umea as great as the exports, the for
mer being valued at $21,000,000, while
the latter were only $4,000,000. During
the last lisCal year, however, the im
ports of this sort had increased to $36,
--000,000, while the exports had gone up
in valuo to $li), 000,000.
In 18W there were Imported $2,000,
--00 worth of oranges and the same year
less than $10,000 worth were exported,
while more than $2,000,000 worth were
exported last year, as compared with
about $1,750,000 worth in 1900. As to
prunes, $1,750,000 worth were import
ed In 18110, but less than $50,000 Worth
came In last year, whereas the exports
of this fruit Increased from $l,<itio,ooo
In 1900 to $4,000,000 last year.
On tho other hand, the value of the
banana •, almonds, walnuts and cocoa
nuts imported increased during the last
two decades, $6,000,000 worth of ba-
c riming to thU country n> ec
pared With JU',OOO,OOO during thr List
lUcal year.
.WRECKERS DITCH TRAIN;
ONE KILLED, TWO INJURED
FORT WORTH, Texas, July 17.—
TCngirieor 1). R. Camp was killed, Fire
man Percy Hamilton fatally scalded
and Fireman Kagle severely injured
when the, engine drawing a southbound
Frisco train went into the ditch one
mile west of Tolar tonight.
Railroad ofllcials report that the
wreck was due to train wreckers, a
clamp having been fastened to the
I rails on a sharp curve.
The passengers escaped Injury.
PARALYSIS KILLS CHILD;
HOME UNDER QUARANTINE
TOPEKA, KaK., July 17.—Roilin
Meyer, li-year-old son of H. E. Meyer
ot' this-: city, died of infantile, paralysis
tonight. The child had been ill nine
days. Death was caused by suffocation
brought on by tile disease. Ir was the
second death from paralysis hero this
season.
Tin' local board of health had taken
the precaution to quarantine the house
of the child's parents, and a private
funeral will bo held.
MONDAY MORNING, JULY 18, 1910.
TRAIN IS WRECKED
BY CHICAGO MOB;
2 SHOT; 8 INJURED
Riot Between Picnickers and the
Crew of Train Develops Into
a Pitched Battle
NUMEROUS ARRESTS MADE
Carload of Special Police Is Re
quired to Quell the Dis
turbance
[Associated Press]
CHICAGO, July 17.— T. E. Mulvlhi;!
and Patrick Haley were possibly fatal
ly shot, eight other men were seriously
injured and a ten-coach excursion train
was wrecked by a mob in a riot at
Columbia Park on the Santa Fo rail
road, west of Chicago, late today.
A dozen of the wounded, including
Miilvihill and Haley, wero brought into
Chicago aboard a fast train and taken
to a hospital. Officials of the^Santa
Ke meantime rounded up a carload of
special police who were rushed out to
Columbia Park. The police discovered
that the first section of the excursion
train upon which the trouble started
had been so badly wrecked that it was
impossible to move It. A number of
arrests were made.
The trouble occurred at the end of
the annual picnic given by the em
ployes of a largo Chicago brewing con
cern. The train to bring the picnickers
back to the city was made up in two
sections. A majority of the passen
gers wanted to rido in the first sec
tion. After the first section had been
filled tho crowds continued to attempt
to get aboard. At this Juncture, It Is
said, a trainman drew a revolver and
attempted to drive back those nearest
him. A rush followed and the train
man fired.
Tlie crew of the first jectlon of the
train were driven into tne woods near
the park as the mob began to hurl
stones and clubs.
AERONAUT HAS NARROW
ESCAPE AT SAN DIEGO
Jumps from Flaming Balloon as
It Goes Up in Air
SAN DIEGO, July 17.—An aeronaut
known as Prof. Nemo had a narrow
escape at Ocean Beach today l'rum
making an ascent in a blazing balloon.
The huge bag- had been inflated and
some of its moorings cut, and Nemo
was Just .stepping upon the bar when
flames burst out from the side of the
balloon. He sprang back and made a
vain attempt to extinguish the names,
badly burning his hands and arms In
the effort. An instant later the balloon
shot up into the air to a great height.
There it burned until it collapsed and
fell to the ground. The balloon was
flred by a spark from the furnace with
which it was inflated.
CURRY'S AUTO RUNS OVER
EMBANKMENT, IS REPORT
Man with Candidate Says No One
Seriously Hurt
SACRAMENTO, July 17.—L. A. Nor
ton, clerk in the office of Secretary of
State Curry, who is on a tour with
Mr. Curry in the latter's campaign of
the coast counties in the interest of his
candidacy for the Republican nomina
tion for governor, yesterday telephoned
his wife from Eureka that the party
had met with an automobile accident.
Worried, Mrs. Norton today communi
cated with her husband by telephone
and was told that no one was seri
ously hurt by the accident. A report
that cannot be traced is to the effect
that the Curry automobile went over
an embankment.
RIVAL POLISH LABOR
BODIES CLASH IN RIOT
CHICAGO, July 17.—Two regiments
of Polish Turners, the Polish National
Alliance and the Polish Falcons Alli
ance, rival semi-military organizations
dashed here today at a celebration of
the five hundredth anniversary of the
battle of Grunowald. Company I of
the Seventh regiment, Illinois National
Guard, participating in the celebra
tion, separated the men and prevented
a crowd of sympathizers of both fac
tions engaging in a general riot.
The Polish Falcons Alliance was or
ganized a year ago by former members
of the national alliance, and there has
been much rivalry between the two.
SPANISH CONSUL'S WIFE
DROWNS WHILE BATHING
GULFPORT, Miss., July 17.—Mrs.
Joseph Dellorens, aged 20 years, wife
of the Spanish consul at QuWport, was
drowned and sever il other members of
the yachting party of which she was
one were rescued with difficulty while
bathing at Ship island, near here,
today
.mis. Delloreni and her swimming
partner, William Hutchins, were caiftht
by the undertow. After using every
effort to save his companion Hutchins
was rescued in an unconscious condi
tion.
CROPS DAMAGED IN SECOND
KENTUCKY RAINSTORM
LEXINGTON, Ky., July 17.—Another
disastrous ralnstom, accompanied by
lightning, swept over central Kentucky,
doing- heavy damase to the wheat, to
. iiihl corn crop*. Telephone an.!
telegraph wires are down in much of
tii. i.hie inn section. Near Blue Lick
Bprlngs, Henry Work and his grand
ion uriv caught in the Hood and the
buy was drowned.
Defective Armor on North Dakota and
Utah Starts Big Naval Investigation
t
OUST ADHERENTS
OF MRS. STETSON
Christian Science Church Drops
Sixteen from New
York Body
BOSTON, July 17.—Sixteen of ~the
practitioners who were identified with
and supported Mrs. Augusta .Stetson
in her controversy with the First
Church of Christ. Scientist, in New
York clt/, have been dropped from
membership by the board of directors
of the mother church in Boston, ac
cording to a statement made today by
Archibald McLellan, one of the Bos
ton directors. Director McLellan said
he was not able to give their names.
"I can only say they were the prac
titioners who were most prominent in
their support of Mrs. Stetson," de
clared Mr. McLellan.
MOVE OF MOTHER CHURCH
RATIFIES N. Y.'S ACTION
NEW YORK, July 17.—The action
taken by the mother church in Boston
today is final ratification of the action
taken by the First church in this city
on April 3 last. At that time fifteen
members and practitioners were
dropped from the institution. The
names of those dropped as given out
at the time are as tollows:
Mrs. Kate Y. Remer, Mrs. Mary H.
Frohman, Mrs. Sybil M. Huse, Miss
Antoinette Ensworth, Mrs. Augusta
Aikman, Miss Mary R. Pinney, Miss
Margaret Duncan, Mrs. Katherine B.
KUpatrick, Mrs. Anna H. Holden, JJ,rs.
Leletitla Green, Miss Jesse T. Colton,
Arnold M. Blome, Mrs. Stewart C.
Rowbotham, Mrs. Amelia S. Row
botham and Miss Mary R. Parson.
ILLINOIS CANDIDATES
EAGER TO FILE PAPERS
SPRINGFIELD, 111.. July 17.—Eager
to be the first to file their petitions
with the secretary of state, fifty as
pirants for legislative honors are In
the city tonight. Many of them have
their representatives stationed at the
door oi the office of the secretary,
awaiting- the opening of the office in
the morning.
Priminent among the arrivals today
was I.:'e"O'Ncll Browne, minority lead
er of the house, who prophesied that
he would be renomlnated and re-elect
ed, despite the bribery charges made
against him in connection with the
plectlon of William Lorimer to the
United States senate.
PROTEST GETS AMERICAN
PRISONER BETTER CELL
MANAGUA, Nicaragua. July 17.—
William B. Pittman, tlio American en
gineer who was captured by the
Madrlz I forces near | Blueflelds and
brought here, 'la now confined, in a
Commodious oell. When Pittman ar
rived under escort a few days ago,
he was placed In a dirty cell less than
klx feet square. Consul Ollvares en«
tered a vigorous! protest at the in
■tance of the American government
and the prisoner was transferred to
better quarters.
■It is reported here that President
Mudriz is soon to namo a cabinet.-.
NOVELIST'S SON
FINDS TREASURE
Louis Osborne Unearths Mining
Stock in San Francisco
Sand Lot
SAN FRANCISCO, July 17.—When
little Louis Osborne, 8 years old, the
son of Lloyd Osborne, novelist, and
stepson of the late Robert Louis Ste
venson, armed himself with his midget
shovel and went out on a sand hill near
his home here to dig yesterday he had
visions of finding a treasure. This is
not an unusual thing for the lad, for
he has not heard his father's illustrious
stepfather talked about without get
ting some of the spirit of adventure of
the author of "Treasure Island" fixed
in his mind.
The lad stopped digging, because his
shovel had encountered an obstruction.
Tested carefully, the thing that re
sisted proved to be metal. Then Louis
dug more furiously than ever.
In a few moments the lad unearthed
a metal box. And, sure enough it con
tained treasure. Opening it, the lad
found 2600 shares of valuable mining
stock, some deeds to city property,
other valuable papers and several
empty ring boxes.
Of course the boy did not realize
the value of the property, but he knew
the papers must be worth a great deal
or they wouid not have been placed in
such a secure box. So he hastily car
ried his find to hts mother, who turned
the property over to the police.
The papers belong to Augustus F.
Tmbrie, a wealthy man whose house is
closed and who is out of the city.
Police think robbers have ransacked
the Imbrie residence and after taking
money and jewelry from the box
buried it.
In the meantime young Osborne is
developing into one of the most en
thusiastic sand hill explorers in his
neighborhood.
INCORPORATE CHRISTIAN
FOUNDATION FOR UNITY
Clergymen and Laymen Will Es
tablish New Plan
NEW YORK, July 17.—Twelve
clergymen and twelve laymen of the
Episcopal church have just incorpor
ated the Christian Unity Foundation,
which hopes, "by the operation of the
spirit of God, the various Christian
bodies may be knit together in more
evident unity in the essentials of faith
and -practice and In one organiz life."
Among the incorporators are: Bishop
Doane of Albany, Bishop Greer of New
York, John Stlness, former chief jus
tice of Rhode Island: Bishop Anderson
of Chicago, Rear Admiral Goodrich,
U. S. N., and Colonel Charles William
Lamed. U. S. A.
ST. VINCENT'S STUDENT
LOSES LIFE IN RIVER
JIEDDING, July Gerald Q. Yen
nedy of San Francisco was drowned In
Trinity river, near Lewlstown, yester
day. The body was recovered. Ken
nedy was 20 years old and a student
In St. Vincent's college at Los An
'■geles. , . \ .
SINGLE COPIES: %S&&Z3XgSJS liam
" WX AAJO . BLXUAXS 80. ON IR-UNB 10c
PROBE DEFECTIVE
ARMOR ON SHIPS
Navy Department Fears Flaws
Will Be Round in Many of
Uncle Sam's Battlers
[Special to The HeraM]
"WASHINGTON, July 17.—The navy
department has announced that it will
probe to the bottom the recent start
ling discovery of defective armor plate
on the two American Dreadnaughts,
North Dakota and Utah. Fear was
expressed today by department offi
cials that the investigation instituted
by Secretary Meyer will reveal defec
tive plate on several others of the big
ships of Uncle Sam's navy. It is stated
that the investigation will be a most
thorough one, ultimately extending to
an overhauling of practically all of the
armor-clad vessels of the navy.
The North Dakota is already in com
mission and is supposedly the greatest
and fastest warship afloat, but naval
experts get small comfort out of the
fact that the defective plates on the
vessel have already been replaced at
the Charlestown, Mass., navy yard.
The Utah is even a larger vessel than
the North Dakota and is still building
at Camden, N. J. The defective plates
were discovered while other armor was
being laid on the vessel.
It is claimed by experts that the de
fects were of a nature that would have
lost 50 per cent of the protective value
of the defective plales had the delicts
not been discovered.
Although several conferences have
been held by experts and department
officials during the past few days the
responsibility for the defective armor
has not yet been fixed.
MARINE CORPS WILL BE
GIVEN REORGANIZATION
WASHINGTON, July 17.—That the
marine corps faces certain reorganiza
tions as the result of pronouncement
by a court of inquiry that a spirit of
insubordination reigns throughout the
service seems to be the prevailing
opinion of naval officers on duty at
the department. The serious condition
of the service was held to be due
primarily to too long terms of service
by officers without changes of assign
ment. The question of reorganization
prQbably will be considered this week.
GERMAN WORKERS SPEND
MORE THAN THEY MAKE
WASHINGTON, July 17.—An annual
deficit of $9.98 in the cost of living of
families of wage-earner." and salaried
persons in Germany was revealed in
an investigation by the imperial ita
tletlcal office of that country, accord
ing to a report in the possession of the
department of commerce and labor.
The inquiry was made in Germany
in 1907 and 1908, 852 families being in
cluded in the canvass.
The average annual income of these
families was $521.72, while the average
annual expenditure was $531.70.
Of the average expenditure $242.17, or
45.5 per cent, was for food and drink;
$95.50, or 18 per cent, for rent and
maintenance of dwellings, 12.6 per cent
for clothing, laundry, etc., 4.1 per cent
for heating and lighting and 19.S per
cent for miscellaneous purposes.
ONLY HEAVY RAINS CAN
SAVE CANADIAN FORESTS
CALGARY, Alberta, July 17.—Forest
fires are assuming alarming' propor
tions. They are raging in several placea
In he foothills country of the Rookies
southwest of here and unless heavy
rains fall immedlaely millions of dol
lars' worth of standing timber will be
los.
Fire-is raging southwest of Priddis
today. Chief of Dominion Fire Rang
ers Marghar left Calgary Saturday
night for Priddis with a gang of 100
men.
UNVEILS MONTCALM STATUE
VAUVERT, France, July 17.—M.
Doumorgue, minister of education, to
day unveiled a monument to Mcnt
calm, erected by public subscription
by France and Canada, near his birth
place, chateau de Leandiac. A dele
nation from Canada and the Canadian
agent in Franco, Hector Fabre, were
preaent at the ceremony. A replioa of
this mi luinv.'nt will uc- .'ft up In
Uucbec,
CENTS
BIG R. R. STRIKE
HANGSIN BALANCE;
DECISION TODAY
Both Sides to Controversy on the
Pennsylvania Line Hopeful
of Quick Settlement
ALL HINGES ON CONFERENCE
Preparations for Walkout of 15,
-000 Men Are Going
Steadily Ahead
f \ isoclaii 'l Press]
PHILADELPHIA, July 17.—Hop*
that the conference tomorrow bei
the members and their committee and
General Manager Meyers of the Penn
sylvania railroad would make a strike
Impossible was expressed today hv A.
B GarretHon, president of tne Order o*
Railway Conductors, and W. G. Lee.
head of the Brotherhood of Railway
Trainmen.
Mr. Lee declared his belief that tho
ten-hour standard for which the men
ask could '"' I'ut Into effect by tho
company without sacrifice.
The Pennsylvania officials appear
hopeful that tomorrow's conference
may end in an understanding:, avert
ing the threatened strike, hut never
thele 3 they are continuing prepara
tions to cope with B walkout.
RAILROAD MEN OF FRANCE
CALL A GENERAL STRIKE
Companies Refuse to Consider
Further Negotiations
PARIS, July 17.—A general strika
has been decided upon by the central
committee of the National Railroad
ers' union. Alter a meeting tonight at
which this decision was taken th»
strike committee was instruced to rush
arrangements and give the signal for
a general walkout as soon as possible.
It was announced that the railroad
companies have refused o consider fur
ther negotiations.
The members of the union demand,
an increase in wajes and other conces
sions.
RAILWAY MEN'S BALLOTS
ARE IN FAVOR OF STRIKE
MONTREAL, July 17.—The counting
of the strike vote taken by the Grand
Trunk and Central Vermont conductors
and trainmen was concluded today,
and, according to Vice President Mur
dock of the trainmen, it shows that
of the 3000 votes cast on the Grand
Trunk and 350 on the Central Vermont,
less than fifty men; voted against tho
strike. An appointment has been made
by the cimmittee with President Hayes
of the Grand Trunk for noon tomor
row, when the result of the vote will
be communicated to him.
The committee of the Grand Trunk
telegraphers also finished counting a
strike vote, which, it is said, shows 90
per cent of the men in favor of going
out inless the company grants their
demands.
FORMER JUDGE GARROUTE
DIES AT BERKELEY HOME
Well known Jurist Had Been in
Retirement During Last
Twelve Years
BERKELEY, July 17.—Judge Charles
Henry Garroute, formerly an associate
justice of the California supreme court,
died suddenly here today.
During the last twelve years Judgra
Garroute had lived In retirement. His
services on the supreme bench began
in 1890. He was associated on the
bench with Justices Van Fleet, Mc-
Farland and other well known jurists.
His first legal work was done in Yolo
county, where be was born.
The judge is survived by a wife anil
two daughters, Mrs. Grace G. Howa
of Han Francisco and Mrs. Amy R.
HaskeU of Palo Alto.
WILL FIGHT STREET CAR
BONDS IN BAY CITY
News of United Railroad Suit
Leaks Out
SAN FRANCISCO, July 17.—That the
United Railroads brought suit in Judgo
Van Fleet's branch of the federal court
List Friday, asking an injunction to
prevent the municipal authorities from
disposing of Geary street car Una
bonds has Just become known. The en
tire proceedings is veiled and the con
tents of the complaint and the con
tentions made have not been made
public.
Municipal authorities, however, are
going ahead with their plans for build
ing the line. A new $240,000 issue of
bonds has been decided on and ar
rangements are under way to let con
tracts for the necessary equipment to
build tha lino as soon an money to
meet tho bills is obtained.
SHtPPARD BREAKS RECORD
NEW YORK, July 17.—Molvln W.
Shepherd of the Irish-American Ath
letic club broko a world's record which
had stood for thirty years when he ran
1000 yards at Celtic park today. Ho
made the distance in 2:12 2-5, clipping
three-fifths of a second from the mark
established by Lou Myera,

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