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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, July 20, 1910, Image 2

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Bathing Suits
For the Whole Family
For the sake of appearances: for the sake of economy, and
—most important of all—for the sake of CLEANLINESS,
you should have a bathing suit of your own. The expense
needn't be much—probably not more than you'd pay for
renting suits during a week's stay at the beach.
Men's all-wool Suits—some with short sleeves—s2.so, $3.00
and $3.50. (Rlftht of Mnln Kntranee)
Boys' all-wool Suits—22 to 34-inch sizes—$1 to $3.
(Main Floor, Hear)
Women's Bathing Suits $3.50 to $20.
Women's Bathing Caps 35c to $1.75.
Women's Bathing Shoes 35c, 50c, 75c. <2<t *>«<", r"r<»>t>
Girls' Bathing Suits $1 to $5.
Children's Rubber Caps 25c to 50c. OWfc Floor, Rear)
335-239 South Broadway 234-344 S. Hill St.
U.S. SIGNAL CORPS HEAD
DECLARES FOR AIRSHIP
General Allen Says Forces With
out Aircraft Would De
serve Defeat
NEW YORK, July 19.—Any nation
which sent an army Into ths field for
actual lighting today without a com
plement of air machine*—aeroplane*
and dirigible balloons —would not be
properly equipped and would deserve
defeat.
This is the conclusion reached by
Gen. James Allen, chief signal officer
of the United States army, after an
exhaustive, study of the pros and cons
of army aeronautic!. General Allen,
whose position makes him head of mil
itary air navigation In this country,
is in New York on ii brief bill
visit.
"The equipment of no army is com
plete today without air machines," he
said in an interview given oui today.
•■.Many Improvements doubtless win be
made sunn, but even with their pn
capacity air machines can perform ser
vlcea of the greatest value.
"Two years ago, when experiments
were started at Port Myer, air navi
gation was considered lmpractli
by many, it is now an accomplished
Germany and France have taken
the lead In aviation because these gov
ernments have granted large appro
priations for the work, We asked con
gress for $200,000 two years ago and
1500,000 last year, hut nothing was ap
propriated. ' Bul the development of
air machine? in this country will con
tlnue because private Interests are
taking up the problem with Increas
cioasing enthusiasm."
HOSPITALS ESTABLISHED
GARDEN CTTY. v 1., July 19 in
emergency hospital has been estab
Jlshed on' the aviation field here with
physicians and nurses in constant at
tendance. The hospital is Intended
merel;- for field dressing purposes end
to give any first medical aid that may
be necessary In the event that an nvl
ator or a spectator is injured. The
hospital will be retained throughout
the international meet this fall.
MAN OVERCOME BY HEAT
IS FROZEN TO DEATH
Prostrated Ironworker Is Packed
in Ice
NEWARK, X. .7., July 19.—Frozen to
death in mid-July, with the tempera
ture hovering around on degrees, was
the fate yesterday of Paul SO]
tin em] an iron founTlry of Flor
ence, _\.' J. Sorrento was overcome
by tin; Intense heat of his work an.l a
physician advised placing ice about his
head.
I took the advice too
literally ami placed large cakes of lee
about his head, neck and limbs. Be
coming alarmed a .■ later the
young man's family recalled the physi
cian, v. i ■: ■ . Ltient had
been dead some time. Examination
showed that too much Ice had actual
ly frozen the man.
AGASSIZ' NEPHEW IS
DEAD IN SWITZERLAND
NEW YORK, July 19.—Word was
received in this city today of the
death In La ■ ' tzi rland, of
Oeorgea A i ■ of Liouis
Agassiz, i
siz was B coloni in the Swiss army
and one of tl
thorltles of Swltzei lan I. Lll
tlngrulshed uncle, Col.
fund of the natural
a famous collectioi •■! butterfil s, ii"\v
in the Lausai
Col. Agassis! v. n ■ , i •
Eugenic Eilshiml i rk.
$10,000 JUDGMENT FOR
ALIENATION SUSTAINED
JBFFERSON Cl: Mo., July 19.—
The supreme court tod.iy tainod the
judgment of tho Barton county court
which save A. H. Fill i of Joplin $1»,
--000 damages against Budd M. Kolunson,
a wealthy mine owner of JopHn, for
alienating the affections of Mr*. Puller.
Fuller was the private retary ol
Robinson.
BANKERS WILL DISCUSS
CURRENCY- ASSOCIATION
New York Financiers Will Meet
at Clearing House to
Hear Plan
NEW YORK, July 19.—Within a fort
night a meeting of national bankers
will be .ailed at the New York i tearing
c to hear the details of a plan for
the formation of a national currency
association, along the lines provided in
the Aidrirh-Yreeland law, as suggested
recently by Secretary of the Treasury
MacVeagh. It Is regarded probable
that this action by the New York banks
will be followed by the establishment
of similar associations by the national
hanks of other cities and stat>';.
According to members of the bankers'
committee, Secretary MacVeagh's eus
-n meets with general approval
and indorsement. It is not believed,
however, that there is any groat like
lihood .such a system will be called
Into use within the present foresight
Of any one. But the opinion appears
to be that the general Rood of such a
system for the steadying effect its ex
istence would have could not be over
estimated.
The law provides for the Issuance of
additional bank notes In time of emer
gency by an organization of ten or
more national bunks, having a capital
of $:>,oof\noo.
NARROWLY ESCAPES DEATH
FROM FUMES OF PAINT
Sailor Locked in Cellular Double
Bottom of Ship
Nl-:\V YORK, July I!'.—After being
imprisoned in the cellular double bot
tom of the battleship Connecticut in
tin' Brooklyn navy yard Cor nearly a
day, Alexander Wyrick. a seaman on
the ship, is a 1 the naval hospital over
come by exposure to the fumes of the
fresh paint
Wyrick had been at -work in the
compartment cleaning and painting,
ills companions answered the' mess
call at supper time and the manholes
<,i the; compartment were closed. His
absence was overlooked until the next
day, when men wire sent into the
between the outer and inner
Bhells of the ship to search for him.
is thought to be dead when a
companion found him unconscious in a
newly painted compartment, but vig
orous work whi ■ dragged from
his cram; rs and brought on
deck result' d in some, signs of life.
ORDERS SIXTEEN HINDUS
SENT BACK FROM SEATTLE
WASHINGTON, July 19.— Sixteen
Hindus who applied for admission to
country at Seattle were today or
dered deported by Acting Secretary
Cable of the departmi nt of commerce
and labor. The steamship which
brought them will bo compelled to bear
the expense of their n turn.
Investigation tl at the Hindus
w.'re Illiterate, could not speak the
English langui little money,
iging between $20 and $25, and
were of poor physical condition. A
number of them said they believed In
imy.
TWO ARE FOUND DEAD IN
ELECTRIC POWER HOUSE
TRINIDAD, Colo., July 19. —Thi
bodies of Roy Keller, sup< rinti ndent
Delagua Power plant, and Miss
Elizabeth Bennett, 18 years old, to
a Keller is said to have been en
,i to mamrry, w• re Found on the
floor of thi power plani late yei ••
it is supposed thai Mini Bennetl ac
inled Keller to the plant while
de some repairs. While it
\\i rk a live wire is thought to
killed him, and tho Rirl mot a similar
fate In attempting to render him as-
COXSWAIN ENDS LIFE
V VLiIjEJi >. Cal., July 19.— Despond
ent because «l ill health, J. A. Nelson,
coxswain of the cruiser California,
committed Bullc.de by hanging aboard
that vessel late yesterday at tho Mare
, Inland navj yard.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: WEDNESDAY MORNING, JULY 20, 1910.
BIG SHAKEUP OF
MARINE OFFICERS
FOLLOWS INQUIRY
Many Members of Headquarters
Staff Are Transferred to
Distant Stations
WASHINGTON LIFE IS BLAMED
Great Men of Corps Shifted About
and Commandant May
Lose Place
[Associated Press]
"WASHINGTON, July 19.—As a con
sequence of tho report of the court of
inquii'.v that unsatisfactory conditions
existed in the marine corps largely as
the result of many officers having been
in AVashington too • long, members of
the headquarters staff, with only a few
exceptions were today ordered to new
post* in different parts of the world.
Col. Charles T. Lauchhelmer, head
quarters adjutant and inspector, who
requested the appointment of the court
of inquiry, was ordered to the Phil
ippines and Lieut. Col. Henry C.
Haines, his assistant, was directed to
assume charge of the adjutant's of
fice. >
Col. Frank L.. Denny, headquarters
quartermaster, one of the candidates
for the position of commandant of the
corps upon the retirement of Gen.
George F. Elliott in October, was or
dered to San Francisco for duty. He
will be succeded here by Lieut. Col.
Charles L. McCawley, his second as
sistant, while his first assistant, Lieut.
Col. Thomas C. Prince, was ordered
to the Philippines.
MAY CHANGE COMMANDANT
Another officer who was censured as
a result of the inquiry was Col. Charles
A. Doyen, who was detached from duty
at Annapolis and ordered to the Bre
merton navy yard in Washington.
Just what, if anything, has happened
to General Elliott, commandant of the
corps is a matter of uncertainty. The
changes ordered today were the result
of a letter from Acting Secretary Win
throp to General Elliott.
Mr. Winthrop directed General El
liott to make the changes. The con
cluding- paragraph in his letter reads:
"You will inform Col. William P.
Biddle that, being the senior line of
ficer on duty in Washington, he has
been temporarily designated to act
for the commandant in his absence
until further notice."
The selection of Colonel Biddle to act
for the commandant is interpreted by
some officers as meaning his selec
tion iis the permanent successor to
Q ineral Elliott.
ADJUSTMENT OF EASTERN
FREIGHT RATE EXPECTED
Settlement to Be Agreeable to
All Concerned
AVASHINGTON, July 19.—An adjust
ment of the eastern freight rate sit
uation probably will be made Boon.
The settlement, it is said, will be satts-
I tory alike to the interstate com
merce commission, the railways and
shippers. The plan involves a volun
tary suspension for several months by
the" railroads of the advanced rates.
Chairman Knapp of the interstate
commerce commission hud a con
fen nee today with a committee repre
senting tin eastern trunk lines and
the roads of the Central Traffic as
sociatlon concerning the suspension of
the rates, which are effective Au
gust 1.
i W( ek it was announced that the
y of the commisson was to sus
pend such important tariffs as made
in. reases pending an inquiry by the
commission.
To lac ilitate the work of the com
mission in this regard the committee
of the railroads discussed the subject
With Chairman Knapp.
The committee was headed by C. C.
McCain, chairman of what is known
as the trunk line committee of New
York city.
HUNDRED INJURED IN
IRISH RAILWAY WRECK
Coupling Breaks, Runaway Cars
Crash Into Passenger Train
DUBLIN, Ireland, Julq 19.—Four
teen persons were injured In an acci
dent "H the Groat Southern railway at
Ftoscrea In the northwestern part «t
Tlpperary county today. None wits
killed.
Several cars of an excursion train
on tin; road broke away from the loco
motive, and, running down an Incline,
crashed Into a passenger tram.
Many persons Jumped from the run
away cars and tumbled down the em
bankment. About 100 persona were in
jured, most of them slightly. A sen
of the Injured were brought hero for
medical treatment.
it is thoug-ht that none reci
fatal injuries, and the casualties would
have been fewer bad tin- excursionists
clung to their seats instead of taking
chances of leaping before the coin lon
occurred. The heavily loaded , excur
sion ears gathered momentum rapidly
on the down grade, and the Impact
with the train ahead gave the occu
pantl a tremendous up.
WITNESSES FROM MANY
PLACES WILL TESTIFY
CHICAGO, July 19.—Witnesses from
.• City, Boston, Portland, Me., At
and Bavanna, Qa.i waited Imj i
tii ally in the, federal building lure all
day long while the special Brand jury
which Is hearing the so-called bei f
trust investigation examined books of
the Natiional Packing company. When
land jury adjourned for the day
. itnesses were t<> i. i to be i n hand
;, ii,morrow.
RESULTS ALMOST READY
WASHINGTON, July Rhode
Island in be the first state to know
its total population, revealed by the
thirteenth census. The announci menl
for the entire state Ih almost ready
and may be made public tomorrow.
Special effort by the census office was
made on account oi some local ro
uuiiements.
MAN IN MYSTERIOUS
SHOOTING CASE DEAD
Suspect Dies Before He Is Tried
on Charge of Assault
WHITE PLAINS N. V., July 10.—
Arthur Brady, who was the center of a
curious mystery some two weeks ago,
is dead at his hone in K.iiordah near
here of locomoter ataxia.
On the 13th of last month Hrady was
found helpless ii> his wheel chair, a
revolver at bis feet and his wlfo on
the floor nearby, shot through one arm
and the body. The woman MUd her
husband had shot her, but he said she
had shot horself.
After an investigation the police
ordered b warrant sworn out tot
Brady, charging felonious assault, but
because of his illness It was never
served, ills wife will recover.
WANT 2000 MEN
ON THE AQUEDUCT
Call Issued for Miners, Mechan
ics and Laborers to Work
on Big Ditch
Two thousand men are wanted on the
aqueduct. This call for help was is
sued, yesterday by the aqueduct de
partment, and the men would be put
to work today if it were possible to get
them. The demand for men includes
common laborers, miners and mechan
ics.
The aqueduct department has no fear
that it will not be able to obtain the
miners and mechanics, but there is a
stringency in the market for common
laborers, as a railroad has just recently
taken 1000 of the unemployed.
Applicants lor work are instructed
t" call at the aqueduct headquarters,
on the seventh floor of the Central
building, or they can apply at Mojave
or any place along the line of the
aqueduct. Transportation will be fur
nished as far as Mojave at least, and
maybe farther.
The call for 2000 able-bodied men is
the largest demand for labor that has
pver been made in Los Angeles. When
these men are put to work William
Mulholland, chief engineer of the aque
duct. expects that about live miles of,
conduit will be constructed a month.
He said yesterday that it will probably
be a month or more before the perfect
working organization that prevailed on
the aqueduct previous to the reduction
of the force could be resumed.
MICH WOBK IS IK>NE
About 1000 men have been kept at
work during the recent stringency in
the money market, but even with the
"000 the aqueduct wants now the work
ing force will not be as large as it was
before the reduction in May. At that
time about 380n men were employed
along the big ditch.
But Mr Mulholland said yesterday
that as so, ,n as the 2000 men can be put
to work the full force of fifty camps
will be in operation, which was the
number before the reduction.
Positive assurance that the money to
finance the work of the aqueduct will
be forthcoming was contained in mes
sages received yesterday from the bond
buying syndicate and the New York
Life and Metropolitan insurance com
panies. The insurance companies will
each take $Fifto,ooO of the bonds, and tho
bond syndicate $530,000 at on. c. and try
to dispose of another half million.
Nearly half of the work of building
tho aqueduct has been done, for 102 of
the total 213 miles have been con
structed The rest of the work is
mostly the simple problem of laying
the big ditch, as nearly all the tunnel
ing has been done. Of the forty-three
miles of tunnels to be. constructed, 36.4
miles had been completed July 1. leav
ing but 6.6 miles to be done. The work
that has been done is as follows: Tun
nels, 192,418 feet; covered ditch. 284015
,■,,■!• open ditch, 16,4«0; ■iphon, 8688;
canals, 62,41-J, and flumes, 466 foet
UNIONS DETERMINED TO
REMOVE PICKETING BAN
(Continued from Page One)
the Union Labor temple auditorium
last night, Job Harriman, another
union attorney, sail:
"You strikers are up against the
enemy now, you are up against the
sham bayonets of the antl-plcketlng
ordinance. The enemy know that you
had them whipped. They knew that
they could never get men to take your
places if you got to them first to tell
them the truth of the situation Ihe
ordinance is a war measure. It is up
to you to test it."
Harriman advocates the plan of
filling the jails with violators of the
law and clogging the courts with tnals
of arrested pickets. If Harriman s
advice to the strikers is carried out,
picketing vi" so on, and then, as a
„. U lt of the arrests which would fol
low the city will be embarrassed with
the'expense of Jury trials by the score.
ARREST TWO VIOLATORS
OF PICKETING ORDINANCE
Prisoners Plead Not Guilty and
Released on Bail
Two- arrests, the first made under
the ordinance prahibltlng picketing In
tho streets, which was put into effect
two days ago, were made yesterday.
E P. Kreamer was the first violator
of the ordinance to bo arrested. He
was arrested by Patrolmen Toomey
and O'Brien at 461 South Main street
and taken before Police Judge Cham
bers. Ho was released after pleading
not guilty and depositing $20 cash ball
to assure his appearance in court this
moon at 2 o'clock.
Following Kreamer's release, K.irl
SchUltzer, a striking brewery worker,
was arrested In North Main street by
Patrolman Dortch. He pleaded not
guilty to the charge when taken Into
court and his trial was set for this
afternoon at 2 o'clock. Ho is at liberty
on (20 bail.
WELLESLEY PRESIDENT RESIGNS
hostdn, July io.—Miss Carolina
rd, tor eleven year.s president of
uvin -hy college .uid ons <>( the 11 i
known educators In the country, s
resigned on account of poor health.
The resignation has been accepted with
regret.
PASSENGER TRAINS
ARE KEPT MOVING
Freight and Suburban Traffic on
Grand Trunk Line at
Standstill
BOTH SIDES ARE CONFIDENT
Offer of Minister of Labor Sug
gesting Settlement Cold
ly Received
[Assnrlntril Press]
MONTREAL, July 19.—The end of
the llrst twenty-four hours of the strike
Of conductors, trainmen and yardmen
on the Grand Trunk system finds both
sides confident of victory. The com
pany succeeded in keoping lts through
passenger trains moving.
Vice President Fitshush of the Grand
Trunk said tonight that when the mails
and passenger trains are moving with
out friction the freight business will
be moved.
"This is not going to be a strike of a
day or two," said Mr. Fitzhugh. "The
company went into it knowing what it
was facing, and is determined to see it
through to the end. It cannot afford
to lose."
Vice President Murdock of the train
men's union said they had never ex
pected to tic up tho passenger service
and pointed out tho non-operation of
freight trains and suburban trains as
proof that the men had cause for sat
isfaction over the results of the first
day of tho strike.
Members of tho union claim to have
information that members of their
organization in the United States will
not handle freight cars or passenger
coaches turned over to their roads by
the Grand Trunk.
So far tho only attempt made at
settlement has been the offer of the
minister of labor to do anything pos
sible to secure peace by arbitration.
The offer of mediation was coldly re
ceived.
"We aro the arbitrators now, de
clared the strike leaders.
There has not been the slightest
disorder in Montreal.
Vice President Murdock announced
tonight that 350 men had been added
to the strikers by calling out men em
ployed on the Wabash, which has run
ning lights over the Grand Trunk
tracks from Windsor to Niagara Falls.
FREIGHT TIED UP ON
THE WINDSOR DIVISION
Eighteen Hundred Employes of
Grand Trunk Are Out
DETROIT, July 19.—The calling out
of the trainmen and conductors on the
Windsor-Niagara Falls division of the
Wabaah system has resulted In a com
plete tleup of freight traffic on the
Windsor end of the line. Passenger
trains are being moved with some
delay.
Division Superintendent J. d. Sim
said tonight that only Canadian train
men were affected, and the employes of
the Wabash system west of the Detroit
river were in no way concerned in the
dispute.
Tonight it was estimated that at least
1800 employe* of the Grand Trunk in
Michigan have itruck or are out of
work as a result of the strike. .
With the exception of a few minor
disturbances, reported from different
points in the state, the flrst day of
the Grand Trunk strike in Michigan
was unmarked by violence.
Graver trouble is expected when at
tempti are made to move the freight.
The first local outbreak.' occurred
today, when a brakeman on a, Port
Huron-Detroit train was struck,in the
face while standing In the train'vesti
bule. Two of his teeth were knogked
out and his face cut badly. The police
drove back the crowd.
FIGHTS AT NIAGARA
NIAGARA FALLS,-N. V.. July «.—
{Sympathizers with the Grand Trunk
strikers made a demonstration in front
of the Union station tonight. Depot
M istr-r Smith was beaten and is in
charge of a doctor, and Conductor
LewaU, who came in on a train about
9 o'clock, was struck in the face and
knocked down.
MOTHER SAVES SON
FLINT, Mich., July 19.—A brakeman
on a westbound Orand Trunk passen
ger train which passed through Flint
this morning was threatened by strik
ers here. Just as they were mounting
the car steps the brakeman's mother
stepped onto the platform and shouted
that before they could touch her son
they must deal with her. Then the
train pulled out.
RENEW AGREEMENT
SAN FRANCISCO, July 19— Thfi
working agreement entered Into by the
iron workers and their employers last
May for a period of sixty days expired
yesterday, but was renewed for thirty
day* more, conditions remaining un
changed.
RAILWAY INCREASES PAY
LOUISVILLE, July 19.—Four thou
sand Louisville shop employes of the
Louisvillo & Nashville railroad were
given a surprise today when they
opened their pay envelopes and found
therein an unsolicited increase of 8
per cent.
ROCKS THROWN BY BOYS
SHORTEN BALLOON TRIP
Aeronauts from Hamilton, Ohio,
Land in Illinois
ANNA, 111., July 19.—George Howard
and Walter Collln* aeronauta of Cin
cinnati, piloting the balloon Drifter,
which ascended at Hamtlton, 0., at
7:40 o'clock lost night, landed at Mount
Pleasant, 111., eleven miles smith of
here, ai 6:1B o'clock this morning. The
descent m made without mishap.
The pilot* had planned to remain in
the air moro than two days.
The two balloonlsts arrived hero this
afternoon. They said that boys throw
ing rocks from a building at Hamilton,
0.. whure the crowd had assembled to
witness the aicent and christening of
the aerostat, struck the gas bag and
torn a hole In it.
Tho gas escaped Blowly and tho bal
loonist! were forced to land in less
1 i.i ti twelve hours after starting. The
distance of the flight was 280 miles.
- AMUSEMENTS^ _^
WOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER Mnhar"s?xS
THE BIG SCREAM
THB FAMOUS BURBANTC,STOCK COMPANY PRESENTS WILLIE COLLIER'S FARC!
CAUGHT in the RAIN
TRICES 25c, 60c, 75c. MATINEES BATURDAY AND SUNDAY, 10c, S6o, JOO.
NKXT WEEK—"AT THE WIIITK HORSIS TAVEKN."
HAMBURGER'S MAJESTIC THEATER wSSt^nmk
MATINEK TODAY _^^
VIRGINIA HARNED
Supported hy her own brtlllan company. InolndfM WILLIAM COURTJENAY In th»
! AN AMERICAN WIDOW" . , ;:.
riUCEa-25c, 50e, 7Sc, 11. MATINEK.s W BDNBSDAT and SATr Rr>AT-26c, 10c. 750.
' NEXT WEEK—"THE SBC ONP MM. TANQDBBAT."
Ipayln. partlcu.ar ftlV QM(I<S VlllC I I'rosentlnß alwaya th»|
Payln« rartlcular at- V H IQGVI 1C ■•»« European andj
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| ladle, and children. | FOSrrlVCt< Y lAsr WEEK OF .
VESTA VICTORIA England's Foremost
VESTA VICTUKIA Singing Comedienne
The Mermaids I ' I Grigolati's Aerial Ballet
Maud and Gild?. Flnney. j Tdr*Hnm* 'BlrtttrtUM and Dov«*
Donald C&, Carson MatinCC Warren & Blanchard
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Lewis M'Cord <& c°- c^voiy H Frankhn & Standards
■•w'lnn.ng onW.ndT Daj Tho Living Rubber Balls.
Zertho's Canines I 1 Orpheum Motion Picturej
Comedy E Dng t Show bHT Koe 7ge MATujBEg DAILY. 10c. 880, »oc.
Lomedy^not^anow^^^ snp 75g MATINEES OAILY. ioc. 2Eo, 50c.
G nA . Tn DrD A MrkTTQTJ* MATINEBS Saturday nnd Sunday.
RAND OPERA HUUOi2« I»hone»— 1967; Homo A 1067.
TONIGHT AND AIX WEEK—A GENUINE lUT.
P ™i™.ir cft <^q Missourians
racing ulay.
POPULAR PRICES PREVAIL FOR THIS STERLING MELODRAMATIC BUCCBSS,
mOS ANGELES THEATRE
d^aaS^S^u^VAUDE VILLE
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ELAbC/U 1 JHiliA 1 MATINEKB Tomorrow, suiurriuy, Sunday
LAST WEEK of this great play , -
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NEXT WEEK-Th. Shuberts- biggest laughing success, "BILLY." Seats now on sale.
OLYMPIC THEATER Coolest Ventilated
LYMPIC THEATER Theater la Los Angeles.
AI,PHIN * FABGO OFFER "IT HAPPENBD IN RENO," WITH JULES MKN
PEL and BLOSSOM SEBLEY—IO big singing and dancing novelties. 10c, 50c, 860.
_„„,,, /-. A T?t? /"»tJ AMT AWT ~ THIRD AND MAIN STB.
LEVY'S CAFE CHANTANT s 8:30 »nd 10:30 daily.
The FLORENCE TRIO, grand opera voealitts In costume; th. GREAT MAKA- •
RENKO TROUPE gypsy singers and dancers; KITTTE STEVENS, character cos
turn, dance?; JEANETTE YOUXO-Cantatrlce, and KAMMERMEYER'S ORCHESTHA.
Bac-ctjatt T),.;;;. /-•„__♦ I c-imie Schedule for baseball games of
ASEBALL—Pacific Coast league the PacUlo Coast leacue , begm
nlng July 18 and ending July 24: BACRAHKNTO VS. VKRNON, Tuesday, July
■19 Wednesday, July 20, Thursday. July 21, Friday, July 22, Saturday, July 23.
Sunday July 14 a. m. and r- m. Friday afternoon and Sunday morning games played
at Vernon. All other games played at Chutes Park Oamcs called at 2:SO r-. m. and
10:30 a. m. Ladles free every day except Saturday, Sunday and Holidays. Kids day
Saturday. ,
ACCUSED BREAKER OF
HOME SHOT TO DEATH
Salt Lake Tragedy Reveals That
Woman Was Married to
Both Men
SALT LAKH, Utah, July 19.—Arthur
Sheppard, a scene painter of Salt I^ake,
Ogden and San Francisco, was shot and
killed by John Jones, an Oregon Short
Line postal clerk, early this morning.
The shooting was witnessed by a
woman who claims that she was mar
ried to Sheppard, but admits that she
had previously married Jones and had
never been divorced from him.
Sheppard and the woman came from
Ogden on the midnight train. Jones,
who had followed them, approached
Sheppard as he stood in front of the
hotel opposite the Oregon Short I,lne
depot, and began shooting a revolver
The woman screamed and pleaded WIM
Jones to spare Sheppard's life.
For answer Jones stepped closer to
hla victim and blew out his brains.
Jones was arrested and the woman was
also taken into custody as a witness
At the police station Jones said he had
killed Sheppard because Sheppard had
broken up his home.
MONTANA RANGES ARE IN
BAD CONDITION BY DROUTH
WASHINGTON, July 19.—Stock on
ranges in Montana outside the national
forests is in a critical condition be
cause of drouth, according to a tele
gram received by Associate Forester
Potter from Chief of Grazing Adams
at Missoula. The dispatch from Mr.
Adams Justifies the appeal made a few
days ago to the forest service by
sheep growers of Montana for tho
use of the Bear Teeth and Absaroka
national forests for grazing. To meet
the emergency the number of sheep
already admitted to these reserves will
be increased to the limit tho woodlands
can accommodate without injury.
Reports to the forest service indicate
the western ranges have suffered from
the unusually dry season and that the
cattle situation is serious. Potter to
day said the forest service is grant
ing all requests for tho use of tho
national forests that can be mot with
out injury to the forests.
AMBASSADOR TO VATICAN
WILL RETURN TO SPAIN
MADRID, July 19.—The government
today confirmed the report of the Im
mediate return to Spain of Marquis
Bmlllo de Ojeda, Spanish ambassador
to the Vatican, because of ill health.
The ambassador had been engaged in
Rome with the negotiations over the
revision of the concordat, but a few
days ago was obliged to suspend his
exchanges because of sickness.
FIRES STILL BEYOND CONTROL
WASHINGTON, July 19.—The forest
fires which have been raging for sev
eral <iays over the Cover d'Alene In
dian reservation and national forest
in Idaho, are not yet under control,
despite the combined fire lighting
forces of the bureau of Indian affairs
and the forest service. A telegram to
the forest service today reported that
there are nine distinct fires.
REAL STORY OF YOUNG
SHOOTING IS TO COME
Coroner Says Certain Persons
Can Tell Much More of
Chicago Tragedy
CHICAGO. July 19.—"1 don't think
the real story of the shooting of Mrs.
Emma Young by Charles W. Rlgdon
and the suicide of the latter last Fri
day has yet been told," said Coroner
Peter M. Hoffman last night. "And
there are cortatian persons who can
tell much that' has been left unsaid.
We will get to the bottom of the af
fair if possible."
Many conflicting statements have
been made by all parties in the case.
Mrs. Young declared yesterday that
Kigilon shot her and killed himself
because ho was jealous of two men.
One of them, she laid, in John C. Fet
zer, millionaire, in whose office the
shooting took place, and the other Is
S. W. Tannor, clerk in a downtown
hotel. Both men dented her story to
Police Inspector Gavin that she feared
that Rigdon's original intention was
to murder both her and Fetzer. Hho
said she was afraid to fro and meet the
man alone and for that reason she
took her half-sister, "Mary Theresa
Turner," with her to Fctzer's office.
"Mrs. Youn;r assured me that Rig
don's discovery that she had written
a letter to Mr. Fetser was the imme
diate cause of the tragedy," Inspector
Lavin said. "She also insisted that
Rlgdon had threatened to tako the life
of Fetzer a day or two before the
shooting and that Fetzor had sent her
word, 'For God's sake, see Rigdon
and straighten this out.'
" 'I was afraid to meet Rigrlon alono
In Mr. Fotzor's offices after I had
agreed to go there,' the woman said,
'so I took my sister with me. When
T <r<lon came In I showed him a let
ter and old him he had been perse
cuting mo."
"That was about all that was said as
far as she was able to tell," concluded
the police official. "She laid that Rig
dori remarked, 'Well, I suppose that
you don't -want anything further to do
with me,' dropped his head in his
hands and then reached for his gun
in his desk and began to shoot at her
and her sister as they ran out of the
room and Mrs. Young fell. He turned
the revolver to his own head and fired."
WIDOW'S DEATH ENDS TRUST
OF NIEDRINGHAUS ESTATE
GRANITE CITY, 111., July 19.—8y
the death of Mrs. Mary Niedrinfchaus
at her summer home at Jamestown, R.
1., yesterday, the $7,000,000 estate of her
husband, the late William F. Nied
ringhaus, will revert to her four sons
and six daughters, to he divided among
them. William F. NiodririghauH died
July 13, 190 S. He was the founder of
Granite City as an industrial com
munity, and his estate consisted chiefly
of stock in a manufacturing concern
and real estate hero and in St. Louis.
His will directed that a trust company
be formed to manage the estate. The
four sons were named as directors of
the company. The trust company wbb
ordered to pay Mrs. Niedilnghaus $20,
--000 a year from the Income of the
estate. The death t>f Mrs. Niedring
haus ends the trust.

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