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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, July 22, 1910, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-07-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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BIGAMY CHARGE
DISCLOSES GIRL
WIFE'S MARRIAGE
John S. Barter Learns of Wed
ding of 17-Year-old
Daughter
HUSBAND IS UNDER ARREST
Charge Victim's Mother Was
Aware of Man's First
Marriage
Through the arrest of her husband of
less than two months in Denver yes
terday on a charge of bigamy, the mar
riage of 17-year-old Hazel Barter, for
merly of 557 Gladys avenue, has become
known to her father, friends and rela
tives living here. According to news
received hero yesterday, she was mar
lied to Albort S. lyes, a mining man of
lily, Nev., said to be worth over $100,
--000, in Golden, Colo., on June 11, and
since that timo has been living with
him in Denver.
The marriugo was a surprise to all
the young woman's friends and rela
tive's hero, but was entered into with
the consent and approval of her moth
er, Mrs. Jennio Barter, who accompa
ni.-il her daughter from this city to
(iolden, although the mother knew at
the time, it is stated, that lyes was al
ready married and had a child 11 years
old.
Tin- father of the girl, John. S. Barter
of 3U5V4 South Spring street, did not
know of the marriage last evening, nor
did intimate friends of the family. AH
are at a loss to account for the affair,
and particularly for the strange action
on the part of Mrs. Barter.
IS MVSTHKV
Mystery surrounds the departure of
Miss Barter and her mother from Los
Angolas. The report was current among
the neighbors and close friends, who
were well acquainted with the family,
that Mrs. Burter had recently married
a man named Stanhope and was liv
ing in Los Angeles. AH were equally
certain that the daughter was with her
mother, although no one seemed to
kimu where either could be found.
It in believed that Miss Barter first
met ivea In this city, and the two be
e .line interested in each other. Accom
panted by the mother, thoy are Bup
poaed to have gone to Golden together
uud to have been married there, with
the latter's consent. Mrs. Ives No. 1,
however! discovering the treachery of
her husband, yesterday secured evi
dence enough to warrant having Ives
arrested in Denver, wliore he had taken
No, 2 to live.
Whether Mrs. Barter, or Stanhope,
is still with her daughter or has re
turned to this city could not be learned
last evening. At the address she gave
friends, no one who had ever even
heurd of her could be found.
Miss Barter was formerly employed
as an operator by the Sunset Telephone
company here. She also assisted her
mother in conducting a lodging house
at 557 Gladys avenue, and was well
known In that neighborhood. She was
a pretty girl, with engaging manners,
and whs a general favorite. The^tteory
is held by many that both she and her
mother were dazzlod by Ives' wealth.
A MIKE OWNER
Ives, who is well known throughout
Nevada and Colorado, is owner of the
Redbird group of mines near Ely and
a Btockholder and director in several
other mining companies. He not only
has a wife living, but an 11-year-old
daughter, and when arrested yesterday
is said to have made the statement that
Mrs. Barter was fully aware of these
facts before his marriage to Miss Bar
ter took place, but insisted on having
the ceremony carried out.
PROMINENT MINING MAN
CHARGED WITH BIGAMY
In Custody at Denver—Married
to Hazel Barter
DENVER, July 21.--On complaint
sworn to by Special Officer J. S. Phil
lips of the Juvenile courts, Albert I.
IVM, B well-known mining man, who
owns large mining intercuts !n Ely,
Nev., was placed under arrest on the
charge of bigamy.
Ives is charged with marrying 16
--year-Old Hazel Barter while he had a
Wife and an 11-year-old daughter liv
ing Th<> marriage is alleged to have
taken place at Golden, Colo., June 11,
uii'l the charge is made that the
mother of the girl, although acquaint
ed with the fact that Ives was al
ready married, accompanied Ivea and
her daughter and witnessed the cere
mony.
Offloor Phillips said today that the
Rirl would bo sent to the detention
home.
NEW YORK TO ESTABLISH
SUFFRAGE CLUB HOUSE
NEW YORK, July 21.—Plans are
under way here for the establishment
of the first woman suffrage club house.
The backers of the scheme are said to
include Mrs. Clarence Mackay and
other wealthy members of the Equal
Franchise society. The club house, ac
cording to the present plan, is to be
located In a $100,000 mansion on Madl
.son avenue, across the street from the
residence of J. Plerpont Morgan. Tho
house WBS formerly the home of the
] ite T. Henry Mason, a copper miner,
who died a tew years ago.
PRINCE MAY SHOOT IN ALASKA
WASHINGTON, July 21. — Princo
Nicholas De Ghlka of Koutnanla called
at the agricultural department today
and obtained a permit to shoot game
In Alaska. The prince la in search
of specimens - for the museum at
Ruchar<>^*
LOS ANGELES HERALD
INDEX OF
HERALD'S NEWS
TODAY
FORECAST
For T-os Angeles and vicinity: rioiuly
and threatening, Frlilny, with thunder
storms in th« mountains ; light, west wind.
Maximum temperature jr«Lrr<luy, 83 de
crees; mininium temperature, 63 degrees.
LOS ANGELES
Fourtoen-ycar-old liny testifies against
George JO. Flgueroa, charged wltb wlfn
murder. PAGE 4
Wilmington residents nwnlt decision In
school grade controversy. PAGE 6
City board ot equalization reduces assess
m™t of L. A.-P. railway and Edison
companion. r-" I'AGE 8
Harbor frontage proves to be valuable
property.' PAGE 8
Fred Horning, arreßted in San Franrlsco,
refuses to discuss cane. PAGH 9
Los Angeles harbor commission to domaml
lower distributive rates. I'A'JK 9
Bale of (GOO.OOO In aqueduct bonds Is
clinched. - PAGE 9
Temperance union hears child training dis
cussed. PAGE) 9
County Superintendent of Schools Keppel
urges equal suffrage. PAGE 13
St. Patrick's parish festival proves success.
PAGE 13
Good Government leaders deny plan of In
dorsing ticket before primary. PAGE 13
Citizens to lose votes unless registered be
fore July 27. PAGE IS
Conrey Is boomed to eucceed Judge Tag
gart. PAGE) 13
Women sliow great Interest In legislative
affairs. PAGE IS
HlKamy charge discloses marriage of girl
wlfe. PAGE 1
Personal. PAGE D
Theaters. . : PAGE 6
Boclety and clubs. PAOB G
Building permits. PAGE 6
Shipping. PAGE 6
Citrus fruit report. PAGE 7
Markets and financial. PAGE) 7
Sports. " PAOES 10-U
Editorial and Letter Box. PAGE 12
Politics. PAGE 13
City brevities. PAGE 13
Marriage licenses, births, deaths. PAGE 14
ClasstOcd advertising. PAGES 14-15
SOUTH CALIFORNIA
Two men, lost on desert, barely reach
refuge. . (•'/>• PAGE 1
Bentlmcnt evenly divided on Pasadena
school bond question. PAGE 14
Attorney end building promoter of San Ber
nardino is missing. „. PAGE 14
Baptists at Long Beach plan much work
and many outings during assembly ses
sions. PAGE 14
Venice shooting gallery proprietor refuses to
take out license; Is arrested. PAGE 14
Court scores woman tor causing arrest of
Mark Thompson. PAGE 14
Judge West at Santa Ana admits In evi
dence dying statements made by Mrs.
Bkally. PAGE U
Secretary of Philippine commission reports
great progress. PAGE 18
Corps* of woman afloat oft Bristol pier.
PAGE 2
COAST
Fires In north and northwest s»«tep forests,
lay villages In ashes and threaten lives.
:-!7. ..page 1
Brigadier General Maus estimates Idltarod
output at $200,000 a year. PAGE 2
Pullman company to fight tax board in
courts. "- PAGE 3
To set aside day for downtrodden father.
PAGE 5
Ancient Order of Hiberlans convenes In
Portland, Ore. ■-.. PAGE 11
Carl Dunbar Bishop admits robbing China
and Japan fast mail train. PAGE 2
EASTERN
Kxploslon In big gun at Fortress Monroo
kills eleven soldiers. PAGE 1
Ockerson ready to stem ravages of the
Colorado river. PAGE 1
Will reduce rations to ralso Indians to
independence piano. PAGE 2
Priest who seoks aid of Roosevelt Is
guarded. PAGE 2
Weather observers man route for avia
tors from New York to Chicago. PAGE 2
President Taft to address Maine vil
lagers. PAGE 16
Western Federation of Miners may boy
cott Hearst. PAGE 3
Cleveland Is chosen for next dentists'
convention. . PAGE 3
Relatives declare Mrs. Anna R. Sholes.'
held In Detroit on robbing charge Is
innocent. PAGE 6
Arrest Chinese disguised as negro.
PAGE 9
Canadian Paeiflo and Its trainmen reach
agreement on wage schedule. PAGE 11
FOREIGN
French p\>llce now think Dr. Crippen has
taken refuge in Ropubllu ot Andorra.
PAGB 16
Powerful group of international bankers
buy up Oklahoma oil properties.
PAGE 1
D. W. McKay, American, was Jailed In
Mexico on trivial offense. PAGE 1
Japan waging war against natives in
Formosa. ■ PAGE 2
China delivers reply to announcement
of Russo-Japanese convention. PAGE 2
Domestic worry cause of Cornfrathlls'
suicide. PAGE 3
Diplomats decide to make Prince Ed
ward benedict. PAGE 3
MINING AND OIL
Bureau of mines makes no provision for
rescue Btatlons In southwest. I'AGEJ 6
Bonnie Clare maohlnery is about ready
to atart. PAGE 6
Crown Oil company options stock to
rich Kansas man. PAGE 6
BIG SCANDAL PROMISED
IN FLOUR MILLS COMPANY
LONDON, July 21.—At a meeting of
the directors of the Pillsbury-Wash
burn Flour Mills company limited
today the report and accounts for the
year wore presented and adopted after
a stormy session. R. H. Glyn, chair
man of the board, who presided at the
meeting, referred to the "appalling loss
of $4,000,000," as shown by the report.
John Mac Donald Henderson, member
of the house of commons, declared that
he was prepared to find the money in
Ills own pocket to probe to the end a
situation of affairs which Director
Cloutte characterized as "one of the
greatest company scandals of modern
times."
Tho Pillsburjr-Washburn Flour Mills
company of Minneapolis went into the
hands of a receiver in 1908.
POSTMASTER FOUND DEAD
SALT LAKE CITY, July Jt—While
the postoffice inspectors were search
ing several states and Mexico for
Joseph W. Ashlelgh, postmaster at
Troplco, Utah, Ashleigh's body was
lying in an Inaccessible spot within
four miles of his hone,
lie disappeared May 15, when the
postal authorities began the Inveatlga
tion tit a $2"Mt) shortuKo in his office.
Recently one of his uncles was
troubled with a persistent dream in
which he suw Ashloieh's body.
FRIDAY MORNING, JULY 22, 1910.
DEATH OF RAWN
COINCIDENT WITH
BIG RY. SCANDAL
Plot to Incriminate Road Presi
dent May Be Bared by
Probe
ATTORNEYS IN CONSPIRACY
Second Bullet Is Found in Ashes
in Fireplace of
Home
[ Associated Press]
CHICAGO, July 21.—Whether Ira O.
Rawn, president of the Monon road,
was killed b- a burglar in his home
at Wlnnetka last Wednesday, or
whether, as is stated by the chief of
police, ho committed suicide, railroad
men declared today his death occurred
on the eve of what may be one of tho
greatest scandals In railroad history.
Questions asked Rawn at a hearing
July 7 in the Illinois Central car re
pair qfLse all were planned, it Is said,
by attorneys, with the intent to in
criminate Rawn as responsible for tho
losses to the road.
Rawn, It is doclarod, knew of the
purpose of counsel for the road, and
had sought by every legal means tv
delay the progress of the examination.
Twice on personal pleas, he had ob
tained postponement but the last ef
fort for delay had failed and the ex
nmlnatlon was to have been continued
Tuesday.
TO PUSn I'lliiHi;
His death will not cause any halt
in the inquiry, stated Walter L. Fish
er, one of tl.e attorneys in charge of
the Inquiry.
"It Is a civil inquiry to determine the
amount of money Involved," he said.
"The questions were asked Mr. Rawn
nt the prior sessions to lay a founda
tion for facts ultimately to be brought
out."
For the first time since the death,
the air of secrecy was lifted from the
Rawn home late today, and newspaper
men were summoned. Upon their ar
rival announcement was made that a
second bullet, the absonce of which
added to the appearance of suicide,
had been discovered.
The bullet was found, accor-Jing to
C. F. Hately, who Is conducting the in
vestigation, In the ashes of a fireplace.
Samuel jr. Greely, president of the
village board of Wlnnetka, also tele
phoned Assistant Chief of rolico
Schuetler here, asking him to detail
two men to aid the investigation. A
representative of the private agency,
the men from which yesterday were re
pulsed at the Rawn house, also was
summoned to aid in the investigation.
A new theory as to the means by
which Rawn was shot to death was
suggested late today from the office of
the private detective agency engaged
by the Rawn relatives to investigate
the death.
The opinion was expressed that Mr.-
Rawn met his death as the result of
an accident, and that in fact but one
shot had been fired, and that from the
revolver held by Mr. Rawn.
"It 1b likely that Mr. Rawn heard
some noise in his home, and, revolver
In hand, descended the stairs in search
of an Intruder," said an officer of the
detective agency. "When near the bot
tom of the stairway, I believe he stum
bled, and the revolver was discharged.
"This would account for the fact
that only one shot was heard by neigh
bors, and that there was no trace of a
robber in the house. Mrs. Rawn,
knowing ho descended in search of a
burglar, and then finding him dead,
likely assumed he had been shot by a
burglar, when the death more probably
was caused by the accidental discharge
of his own revolver."
VJLLAGE BOARD PRESIDENT
AGAINST MURDER THEORY
CHICAGO, July 21.— S. H. Greely,
president of the Winnetka village
board, late tonight issued a statement
when he had completed his personal
investigation of the death of Mr. Rawn,
upon which he had been working since
the mystery was first reported.
Mr. Greely intimates in no uncertain
fashion his belief that there was no
Intruder in the Rawn residence when
Mr. Rawn'a death occurred.
REDUCED INSURANCE
HARTFORD, Conn., July 21.—1t was
ascertained at the offices of a local in
surance company today that Ira G.
Rawn, president of the Monon rail
road, a few days ago reduced the acci
dent insurance policy carried by him
from $50,000 to $10,000. No reason was
given for the reduction.
INSURED FOR $100,000
NEW YORK, July 21.—Insurance
brokers here estimate that Ira G.
Rawn held policies calling for the pay
ment of fully $100,000.
ENTIRE BLOCK WIPED OUT
BY FIRE IN TACOMA
TACOMA, July 21.—Fire in the up
town business district this morning
wiped out nearly a block of small jtores
and damaged a number of residences.
A strong wind was blowing and the
firemen had a hard time getting the
fire under control. The blaze started in
the stables of the Eagle Transfer com
pany on South X street, and nearly all
of tho horses, between fifty and
seventy-five in number, are thought to
have perished. The loss is estimated
at between $25,000 and $50,000.
TO BEGIN INVESTIGATION
OF GORE BRIBERY CHARGES
OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla., July 21.—
J. MeMurray of McAloster was in con
ference hero today with his attorneys
preparatory to the opening of the in
vestigation of the Oore charge! <>f brl
ticry ;it Muskogei August :i. He Is
anxious that the Investigation bogln at
the. earliest possible date, and said he
had no knowledge of a contemplated
postponement when the committee
convenes.
Ockerson Ready
to Stem Ravages
of the Colorado
Names Conditions Under
Which He Will Attempt
to Check Big River
WASHINGTON, July 21.— J. A.
Ockerson of St. Louis, a member of tho
Mississippi river commission, today
conferred with officials of the interior
department in regard to taking charge
of the work of controlling the Colo
rado river, which threatened serious
damage to life and property in the
Imperial valley, California.
Congress appropriated $1,000,000 to
meet the situation, and on the recom
mendation of Gen. William L. Mar
shall, consulting engineer to the
secretary of tho interior for the
reclamation service, the president
selected Mr. Ockerson to ascertain the
extent of the danger and assume
charge of the measures to avert it.
Today Mr. Ockerson made known the
terms under which he will accept tho
position, and these were submitted to
the president for approval.
AMERICAN JAILED;
OFFENSE TRIVIAL
D. W. McKay Charged Only with
Cutting Gate in Wire
Fence at Tia Juana
SAN DIEGO, Cal., July 21.—D. W.
McKay, whose arrest at Tl:\ Jnann and
suhseqnent removal to Ensenada has
been brought to the attention of the
state department at Washington, was to
day released on ball at Ensenada. ac
cording; to advices received by hl» at
torney, J. E. Wadbun, of this city. '■
[Associated Press]
SAN DIEGO, July 21.-^Tames B.
Wadham of this city, who acted as at
torney for D. W. McKay at Tia Juana,
made this statement to the Associated
Press today:
"The facts, as I understand them,
which are foundded on statements
made to me by D. "W. McKay, Mrs.
McKay and Albert Arguello, the prose
cuting witness, are as follows:
"Mr. McKay went to Tla Juana Hot
Springs for the benefit of his wife's
health, who is troubled with rheu
matism. The springs are located about
three miles below the boundary line
from Tia Juana, and for the last year
she has passed much of her time at the
I springs and Mr. McKay has traveled
back and forth to his business. Mr.
McKay has purchased or entered fnto
agreement for purchase, with several
of the heirs, of their Interests In tho
■Tia Juana springs.
CUTTING OF FENCE
"Mr. McKay and Mrs. McKay claim
that Mr. McKay asked permission to
cut a wire fence on this property and
put In a gate. Mr. Arguello denies
that Mr. McKay asked the permission.
But the facts are that Mr. McKay did
cut a wire fence and put in a wire
gate; that Mr. Arguella went to Tla
Juana and swore out a warrant, on
whifch Mr. McKay was arrested. He
was thrown into Jail at Tla Juana the
morning of Saturday, July 16, but Mrs.
McKay did not know of his incarcera
tion until about 12:30, at which time
she telephoned to me. I Immediately
went to Tia Juana and found that Mr.
McKay was being examined by the
authorities. I made an appeal that.
Mr. McKay be released on bonds which
had been offered in any reasonable
amount by the Merchants National
bank of San Diego; the authorities re
fused to consider the matter, stating
he could not be released on bonds until
the testimony on the hearing was sent
to Ensenada. In consequence of which
Mr. McKay stayed In Tia Juana In
jail until the afternoon of the 18th.
GOES UNDER GUARD
"I am informed that Sunday, July
17, he was moved into pretty good
quarters and was allowed to go In and
out of the door when he saw fit, but
that Sunday night he was returned to
his tlungeon and locked up, the guard
stating that he did not propose to take
any chances. We offered to take Mr.
McKay to Ensenada in an automo
bile and take the guards with us, but
this was refused, although Mr. McKay
was permitted to go in his own wagon
in charge of two officers, who, I be
lieve, rode on horseback. I am told
that Mr. McKay was handcuffed, but
I do not know as to this positively.
However, I have received advices from
Ensenada to the effect that Mr. Mc-
Kay has been released on bail."
MINISTER CREEL WIRES
TIA JUANA ABOUT CASE
Ambassador Wilson Given In
structions to Act
MEXICO SITY, July 21.—The de
partment of foreign relations at the
suggestion of the American ambassa
dor has asked by telegraph for infor
mation relating to the arrest and im
prisonment at Tia Juana, Lower Cal
ifornia, of D. W. McKay, a wealthy
America, resident of San Diego.
McKay is alleged to have run afoul
of the Mexican authorities through
tearing down a portion of the bound
ary fence on an estate he had pur
chased.
Ambassador Wilson, anticipating the
arrival of the instructions from Wash
ington, which reached him today, had
already taken the matter up with
Foreign i.iinister Creel on a communi
cation from Lob Angeles signed by sev-
er;il prominent residents of that city.
McKay's offense, according to the
understanding of the ambassador from
the meagre nuts In his possession, is
alleged to constitute trespass, which
under the construction of the Mexi
can law, li ■ crime, not a civil offense,
and is punishable by imprisonment.
FIRES SWEEPING
FORESTS MENACE
TOWNS IN NORTH
Three Hundred Canadians Fight
ing to Save Doomed Vil
lage of Sandon
MARBLE, WASH., IS BURNING
All Buildings at Napoleon Mine
Near Bossburg Are De
stroyed
r Associated Prcsal
SPOKANE, July 21.—Tho town of
Marble on tho Columbia river, about
ten miles south of the Canadian boun
dary, is said to be burning. The town
is surrounded by fire and Its destruc
tion is expected. Indians bring news
to Bossburg that all the buildings at
the Napoleon mine, five miles west of
the town, have been burned.
Dispatches from Nelson, B. C, state
that 300 government fire fighters are
working frantically to save the town
of Sandon from destruction. The flames
have already crept within one mile of
the place, and should the wind come
up the town will be doomed.
Valuable timber in the Sloan and
Arrow Lake districts has been de
stroyed, as have several ranch build
ings and crops.
Fires around Nelson have not yet
been extinguished, and the city Is en
shrouded in dense smoke. Some fear
is entertained regarding Kaslo creek
district. The government has sent a
detachment of 150 men to check the
flames.
WOMEN AND CHILDREN
ARE RESCUED BY TRAIN
Villages in Northwest Are Lain
in Ashes
WINNIPEG, Canada, July 21.—Latest
reports from Sandon, in the Kootenai
district, state that the town is in immi
nent danger. Women and children left
this morning on a rescue train.
Three Forks, reported burned, Is still
in existence, but surrounded by the
fire. The total destruction of White
Water and McGuigen is confirmed.
Fire fs now closing In on the Rossland
center mines.
At Kesora, Ont., 100 miles east of
here, bush fires are within a mile of
(Continued on l'age Two?
LOST ON DESERT
TWO NEAR DEATH
Mem with 111 Horse on Hands.
Reach Refuge After Great
Suffering
[Special to The Herald]
SAN BERNARDINO, July 21.—
George Hamer and Roy L. Davis ar
rived here today after a terrible ex
perience crossing the desert and moun
tains. For 12 hours they were without
water, the mercury standing ;it 130.
The hot blasts of wind blowing from
Death valley added to their sufferings.
The men started from Furnace creek
Monday, driving a covered wagon.
They figured on making certain water
holes on the way, but in the night
Tuesday lost their bearings, and
camped during the morning hours in
the very heart of a desolate waste,
being compelled to stop in order to
doctor a sick horse.
At 9 o'clock that morning they con
sumed their last drop of water and
started for the mountains, having re
sained their position on the desert.
The heat and the illness of one horse
made progress slow, and it was not
until 9 o'clock that night that they
finally reached a waterhole.
The two horses were ready to drop.
Their tongues were hanging from their
mouths, their eyes were .sunken and
it was with difficulty the men could
restrain the animals from plunging
into the water hole. Both men also
suffered, and were ban ly able to water
the horses. This duty performed and
their own thirst being quenched, the
men threw themselves down on the
open desert and slept.
The mountain climh proved a try
ing one, the heat waves ascending to
the summit, and relief was not ex
perienced until they had crossed Cajon
pass and were half way down the
west side of the mountains.
IMPERIAL VALLEY DEATH
TOLL NOW NUMBERS SEVEN
Residents Succumb to Heat First
Time in History
IMPERIAL., July 21.—Seven victims
have been claimed by the intense heat
and high humidity of the last three
days in the Imperial valley. They
were:
H. A. Carlson at Silsbee.
A. J. Ansell at Imperial.
Mexican laborer at Imperial Junction.
John Harrington, William Kaiser and
\v. B. Shannon ai El Centra.
Unidentified man at Holtvute.
This is tile lir.st instance in the his
tory of the valley where residents have
succumbed to hpat. Tho deaths are
charged to the extraordinary humidity.
S I NfiL.il] COPJ F.S • KAIF-Y 2r. ON TK VINS -,r.
OJ-I^ VJJ-i-i-i \J\JX. IIjO. SUNDAYS sc. ON XKAINa lOn.
UNITED STATES AND
ENGLISH CAPITAL TO
FIGHT STANDARD OIL
SAMUEL IXTERMTER BKLOW SIR
WKKTMAN PEARSONS
OKLAHOMA OIL IN
HANDS OF BANKS
Powerful Group of International
Financiers Spend $20,000,
--000 for Control
[Special to The Herald]
LONDON, July 21.—Samuel Unter
myer, on behalf of a powerful group of
international bankers, has closed a deal
for the purchase of a large Interest in
securities of oil producing properties
in Oklahoma. The transaction involves
an exchange of $5,000,000 in cash and
$15,000,000 in securities.
Mr. Untermyer when he was seen at
the Ritz hotel prior to leaving for
Brussels on his way to Carlsbad ad
mitted the correctness of this informa
tion, but refused fuller particulars be
yond .saying that the concern was in
dependent and the plans involved lay
ing a big pipe line. He would admit
mi intention of fighting the Standard
Oil, saying that there was plenty of
room for both.
.Mr. Untermyer also said tile deal was
made on the joint account of London
and New York interests. "We have
settled our plans," he declared, "and
shall go straight ahead with them. It
is a gigantic scheme, involving tremen
dous interests."
It is understood that the same group
of men who made large fortunes In
California fields are back of the present
enterprise. Sir Wettman recently made
a trip to the United States and de
clared he was shadowed all the time
by detectives in the employ of the
Standard Oil company. He expects to
return to the United States within the
next month.
SUBMARINES GIVEN TESTS
IN HARBOR AT SAN DIEGO
Pike and Grampus Fire Torpe
does While Submerged
SAX DIEGO, July 21.—The sub
marines Grampus and Pike nred their
lirst torpedoes today and were given
t'oir first diving tests since they came
into these waters.
The test was made in the bay be
tween San Diego and Coronado.
Tlie Pike, In command of Lieutenant
K. B. Crittenden, was the first to bo
tried. After a few minutes maneuver
ing, the Pike was trimmed and ready
tor the dive. Then, slowly the sub
marine slid beneath the surface of the
water, only the periscope and the top
of the coning tower being visible.
While in this position the first tor
pedo was fired. Its course through
the water as It traveled in an easter
ly dire' ion at about twenty-four
knots an hour, could be traced by a
long string of disturbed water which
was left in its wake.
The Grampus, commanded by En
sign J. Poldin, gave an almost Identi
cal performance. Commander Rich
ardson, the "commodore" of the tor
pedo fleet, declared the tests very
satisfactory.
MRS. I.W. HELLMAN SAVES
HER HOME FROM FLAMES
Wife of Banker Prevents Spread
of Fire at Country House
OAKLAND. July 21.—The bravery
and cool headedness of Mrs. I. W.
Hellman, Jr., saved the magnificent
country home of Banker Hellman from
destruction by flro this morning when
flames swept a power and uiigiiu house
on the estate two miles east of San
Leandrb, causing a loss of $50,000.
When the tiro was discovered the
woman ordered the malo employes to
gather at the scene of tho tire and
after lending in a call for apparatus
from MelroM, ran to tho blazing build
ing and organized the men. Pushing
here and there Mrs. Hellman di
rected them to confine their efforts to
preventing the spread of the flames.
CENTS
EXPLOSION OF BIG
COAST GUN KILLS
ELEVEN SOLDIERS
Artillerymen Meet Death While
Firing Rapidly at Tar
get Practice
HfGH OFFICIALS PRESENT
Injured Men Do Heroic Work to
Prevent Greater Dis
aster from Powder
[Associated Press]
FORTRESS MONROE, Va., July 21.
—Eleven men of the coast artillery are
dead tonight as the result of the blow
ing out of a breech block in one of
the big guns while the fort was en
gaged in target upractiee this morning.
A half dozen others are in the post
hospital, one of whom may die.
The cause of the explosion is not yet
definitely determined, although aboard
of inquiry was appointed immediately
after the disaster by order of the war
department in Washington.
The toll of death, it 4s belipved, would
have been larger had it not been for
the heroism displayed by the officers
and men in the battery. The wounded
forgot their hurts and aided the unin
jured In stamping out the burning
powder that threatened the charge for
a second shot.
THE I>EAD
SERGT. HARRY G. HESS of Phoen
ibus, Va., gun commander.
CORPORAL CHARLES C. ADKINS,
address unknown.
CORPORAL ALBERT BRADFORD,
Dorothy, W. Va.
PRIVATES A. J. SULLIVAN of Per
kins, Ky.; ROY DUFFY, Kenova, W.
Va.; H. A. ADEY, Brandonville, "VV.
V.; C. W. KING, Dayton, O.; JOHN
W. CHADWICK, Tazewell, Term.; AL
BERT W. SMITH, New York; JUDD
K. HOGAN, Meyer, 0., and JAMES H.
TT'RNER, Ripley, Term.
The explosion occurred in Battery De
Russy, No. 1 gun doing the damage.
The gun was in charge of Capt. James
Prentice, who had with him Lieuts.
George P. Hawes, jr., and George L.
Van Deusen. Lieut. Hawes had prom;
forward from the breech to examine
the range wheel when the charge was
exploded. He was thrown down and
momentarily stunned, but otherwise;
uninjured.
Hight m<»n were killed outright, their
bodies lying scattered around the em
placement.
Capt. Prentice and Lieut. Hawea
foresaw a further sacrifice of life if the
other charge! caught from the smol
dering sparks, and the two sent out n
call Cor surgeons while they attacked
the flames with their bare hands.
Capt. Prentice reached the emplace
ment first, and pushing his way through
the smoke and sparks he carried out a
hag of powder. He then was joined
by Hawes, and the two completed the
task of avoiding a further explosion.
Meanwhile Lieut. Van Deusen lay
beneath the gun, his leg broken in two
places. He was in great agony, but
when his brother officers sought to re
move him he would not permit them to
touch him.
SHOWS COURAGE
"See to the men first," he said, and,
propped against the gun carriage, he
aided In directing the work. Corporal
Humphreys and Sergeant Brinkley, a
gun pointer, also distinguished them
selves. The former's head, body and
arms were filled with pieces of flying
concrete that had been blown from
the emplacement. In spite of his pain
ful wounds, he rushed to his dead and
wounded comrades, extinguishing their
burning clothes and then hurrying to
the nearby emplacement for water.
Sergeant Brinkley was close to the
breech when It blew out. He was
hurled over the right standard, and
when he regained consciousness he
found himself hang-ing by one arm
from the railing of the sighting plat
form. Although severely bruised and
suffering from the shock, Brinfeley de
clined to go to the hospital or permit
surgeons to examine him until they
had assisted his comrades.
Col. C. P. Townsley, commandant of
ths fort, promptly ordered an Investi
gation.
"It is evident," he said, "that the,
explosion occurred during 1 the insertion
of the breech block into the breech of
the gun and before It had been rotated
and locked in place. The safety de
vices on the gun are Intended to make
a premature discharge impossible.
Just how they failed to operate prob
ably never will be known. Every
member of the detachment who could
have explained it was killed."
The inquiry, however, Is to be thor
ough. Assisting in the Investigation
are some of the leading" officers of the
army who were present at the time of
the explosion. Among them are General
Crosier, chief of ordnance of the army;
General Carter, assistant chief of staff;
General Murray, chief of coast artil
lery, and General Bixby, chief of engi
neers.
The fatal accident occurred while
practice at floating targets, whleh were
built to the proportions of battleships,
was going on. The firing was con
ducted as nearly as possible under
battle conditions, and was on a more
pretentious scale than ever has bet n
attempted before.
CARBON MONOXIDE GAS
THOUGHT TO BE CAUSE
Officers Declare It Highly Dan
gerous in Rapid Fire
WASHINGTON, July 21.—Lieutenant
George L. Van Duesen, who was In
jured at Fortress Monroe, was appoint
ed to the artillery less than a year ago.
He formerly had been an officer in tho
eighteenth Infantry, but resigned and
was reappolnted to tha army from
civil life.
In the absence of any report from an
official investigating board, officers of
the coast artillery can only compare
the explosion to some similar ones that
have occurred in the navy.
The majority, however, appear to
believe the explosion was caused by
(Continued an Pag* Tw<;

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