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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, July 25, 1910, Image 1

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tor,, xxxvii.
MMIU.II 207
PRICE: 50 CENTS g_»°^SS_?
BRYAN IN FIGHT
FOR HIS POLITICAL
LIFE IN NEBRASKA
Great Commoner to Battle with
Allied Opponents on Floor
of State Convention
WILL APPEAL TO DELEGATES
Struggle Hinges on County Op
tion and Indorsement of
Candidates
[Associated Press]
GRAND ISLAND, Nebr.. July 24.—
Democrats of Nebraska will lipid their
platform convention ln this city Tues
day and It promises to be of greater
Interest than any gathering v of the
kind .held in this state for many years.
That there will be a contest to secure
a county option plank in the platform
Is admitted by every leader ln the
Democratic state organization and
that contest will -be carried on by
leaders who heretofore have agreed
in every way on what Democratic plat
forms should contain. .William J.
Bryan, for the lirst time since lit;
took up the leadership of -he Democra
tic party, will be opposed by lormer
associates Within his own state.
The fight for and against county
option has become an open* one. Mr.
.Bryan and his friends are actively en
gaged in an attempt to secure a
county option plank, while Congress
man Hitchcock of Omaha and Mayor
James C. Dahlman, also of that city,
supported by Governor ghallenberger,
are equally active in an effort to se
cure a declaration against such a
plank. • ' .
. The situation Is considered an un
usual one, because thu men who at
present are most actively opposing Mr.
Bryan were formerly his strongest
supporters. This condition, considered
with the fact that tho campaign for
the selection of a state ticket and tho
recommending of a candidate for
United States. Senator has taken on
many different angles, has given Im
petus to a political struggle In Ne
braska seldom If ever before witnessed.
FIGHTS FOB COUNTY. OITIOX
Congressman Hitchcock has been for
several' months an avowed candidate
for United States Senator. He has
stated-his position as being opposed to
county option until the people of the
state, under an Initiative and referen
dum law, shall declare specifically for
it.
There is littlo doubt that the.anti
county option men will present such a
plank and that it will bo heartily op
posed by Mr. Bryan and his friends.
Mr. Bryan has always been given a
place on the resolutions committee
when he attended state conventions
and his policies have always prevailed
In the writing of platforms. That ho
will bo accorded the •nine courtesy of
appointment at Tuesday's convention
la generally admitted, although it Is be
lieved there will be an overwhelming
majority opposed to him on the ques
tion of county option.
it is now apparent that he will carry
the fight to tho floor of the convention,
and there will make a plea- for a
straight county option plank. Six
hundred of the 800 delegate., to the
convention are either instructed or are
known to be opposed to such a plank
and extreme interest centers on what
effect Mr. Brian's speech on the con
vention floor will have on the majority.
OPPOSES FORM I. It FIUKM>S
Kiehard L. Metcalfe, associated with
Mr. Bryan in the publication pf the
latter'! paper, announced his candi
dacy for United States senator at the
last moment, in opposition to Congress
man Hitchcock. He lias received the
unqualified indorsement of Mr. Bryan.
Both Bryan and Metcalfe were former
ly employed by Hitchcock. All three
have been closely associated in the
political world until now. There still
remains In Nebraska a considerable
number of Democrats who called
themselves the "gold wing" of tho
party four years ago. and who have
never become reconciled to Mr. Bryan's
leadership. These men have become
strong partisans with the leaders who
are opposing Mr. Bryan at this time
and have made the cause of Congress
man Hitchcock and his political asso
ciates their own They openly declare
that the tlnt_>' has come when Mr.
Bryan should step down and out as
leader of his party and aro directing
their efforts to that end. Throe candi
dates are making a fight for the guber
natorial nomination. They me Gov
ernor Shallenbergor, Mayor Dahltnan
of Omaha and W. R. Patrick of South
Omaha, a rnembTr <ir"t.io last legisla
ture. Patrick is the Bryan candidate;
Governor Shallenberger is making Ids
campaign^oll his two years' record In
office and Mayor Dahlman, who stands
squarely for "personal liberty," is
making a particularly strong fight
against county option. The primaries
occur August 2, a. week after the con
vention. ' ' ' '
■ Another Important state issue is the
question of the removal of the state
capltol. I 'V-
NEBRASKA REPUBLICANS
READY FOR CONVENTION
Local Option Question May Halt
Program
r
LINCOLN, Neb., July 24.—The Re
publican state convention will meet
In Lincoln Tuesday, July 26, and .will
be composed of 855 delegates. The pre
liminaries are completed by the selec
tion of" Senator Norris Brown as tem
porary chairman.
An effort will be made by the or
ganization to have Brown made per
manent chairman, but it is believed
that 'the "insurgents" will oppose this
and will push (Congressman Norris lor
the place. They will attempt to do
this as an Indorsement of Mr. Norris'
Course In congress. This is likely'to
hrlno- a clash between the supporters
Olfc, ....... _,_.-..--.-.. _ —.._ *-_ —
(Continued ua I'aga Fire)
LOS ANGELES HERALD
CONGRESSMAN LLOYD
OF MISSOURI, WHO
IS IN LOS ANGELES
»■• '■j*'xsfiS_W'
ri,
rW^rwMimSwmlr
NOTED DEMOCRAT
IS HERE ON TOUR
Congressman Lloyd of Missouri
Pleased with Situation in
Southern California
■'"
Congressman James T. Lloyd of
Missouri, chairman of the national
Democratic congressional committee,
arrived In Los Angeles last evening
from San . Francisco, for a two days'
survey of the local situation. Los
Angeles Is one of . the stopping off
points' in a western tour by Mr. Lloyd,
in which he hopes to become intimate
ly acquainted with western political
conditions.
When seen last night, Mr. Lloyd de
clined to give Ids opinion on the lo
cal situation, assigning as his reason
that the object of his visit is purely
to look and listen and to lend his ser
vices as soon as it Is Indicated to him
how they may be best extended. In
Los Angeles Mr. Lloyd will carry out
the general plan of his trip, to make
very close observations with a view
to using them to aid in future mold
ing of national Democratic policies.
Speaking upon the outlook for
Democracy In the next house, Mr.
Lloyd said that it is the general na
tion wide impression among both Dem-
(Con tin on race Five)
INDEX OF
HERALD'S NEWS
TODAY
FORECAST
I,oi» Angeles ami vicinity Fair Monday ;
light went wind. Maximum temperature yes
terday 79 degree*; minimum GO.
LOS ANGELES
Boy slightly Injured though falls forty
feet. PAGE 3
lowa association plans excellent outing
to be held at Alamitos park. PAGE -
Motorman Jammed between cars; Inter
nal injuries fearod. PAGE 3
Los Angeles to construct a municipal
storehouse. . PAGE 3
Frank M. Bell. slayer of Attorney
Wldaman, encouraged by members of
family; do-sn't fear outcome. PAGB 3
Congressman Lloyd of Missouri ln Los
Angeles on tour. PAGE 1
Patrolman T. S. Miller routs Japanese
in Oorce fight. , PAGE 2
Shipping. PAGE 10
Editorial. PAGE 4
Politics. PAGE 5
Theaters. PAG!. I
Mining and oil fields. PAGE I
Personals. PAGE -
Sports. PAGES. 6-7
Classified advertising. PAGE 10
SOUTH CALIFORNIA
San Diego man arrested In San Ber
nardino on a oharge of Impersonating
officer. PAGE 10
Now Mexico man swimming on wager is
rescued by life guard when he sinks
near pier at Ocean Park. PAGE 10
Pasadenans discuss defeat ' of school
bonds. • • page 10
Railroad commission answers Long
Beach chamber's Question on switch
ing rales. . PAGE 10
COAST
Cabinet officers leave for Alaska to in- .
vestlgato conditions there. PAGE 2
Charred body of aged woman found;
believed sho committed suicide by lire.
PAGE .
SSlgtiteU persons injured when work
train organs, Into passenger cars on
electric road near Portland. PAGE 1
EASTERN
Ohio Ile.iublleun leaders and delegates
ara assembled tor convention at Co
lumbus. PAGE 3
Attorney admits being in touch with
man auspeeted of stealing bonds from
' RuMO-Chin-HS bank; paper may bo
, returned. ' * PAGE 2
Stein shipyard interests purchase gov
ernment yacht Hornet. PAGE 2
Well known cowboy character and little
girl shot by ranchman; motive for
crime not known. PAGE 2
Pickpockets-operate in crowd which
greeted president at Bar Harbor, Me,,
in day night. PAGE 1
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Mackay on their
way to London to aid cause of Eng
lish suffragettes. PAGE 2
Rioting strikers attempt, to' derail a
Grand Trunk train. PAGE 1
Bryan will light for his political life on
. floor of Nebraska convention. PAGE 1
FOREIGN
Scotland Yard now believes Crippen and
companion sailed from-Antwerp' for
Montreal on steamer Montrose. PAGE 2
Steamer with 'Hi passengers aboard
sinks off Korean coast; forty land In
life boats, and it is believed others
will be rescued. PAGE 1
MINING AND OIL
California oil may be used In Mexico.
page l
Warner company at Whlttier sells hold
ings iii Savage ranch. PAGE I
Company organized .to develop larg*
holdings at Signal. ■•;,- PAGE .
Kin Tint., mine at Silver City, N. M.,
sold. ..-;• PAGE »
MONDAY MORNING, JULY 25, 1910.
STEAMER SINKS
ON KOREAN COAST;
206 ARE MISSING
Forty Passengers Land in Life
Boats and Tell of the
Disaster
WARSHIP HURRIED TO SCENE
Believed 146 of Those Who Were
on Vessel Are Adrift and
' May Be Saved
(Associated Press)^
TOKIO, July 24.—The Tetsurel Maru,
plying between Kobe and Dalren, sank
last night off Chindo, Korea. Tho
steamer had 240 passengers aboard.
Warships have been sent to the rescue.
Direct reports from Chindo state
that two of the Tetsurel's lifeboats
landed forty passengers, who tell of
harrowing scenes when the befogged
vessel struck. Six lifeboats were
launched and filled with passengers.
There was no panic and everything
was carried off in the most orderly
manner. .
The captain and a majority of the
crew were- unable to leave the steamer.
Six first class passengers were saved,
including W. Cunningham, the British
vice consul at Osaka, as well as thir
teen second class passengers. Of the
rest, 105 third class passengers and 59
soldiers were taken off In boats,, and
there Is reason to believe that these
beats either reached land or were
picked up by the warships.
The Tetsurel Maru was of 2100 tons
register. She was built at Nagasaki
and was owned by tho Osaga Shoson
Kabushlkl Kaisha.
FOREST FIRES GAIN
HEADWAY IN MONTANA
Fighters Make Little Headway
Against Flames; Lolo Na
tional Forest in Danger
MISSOULA, Mont., July Today
brought distressing news from the
many crows of Are fighters that have
been sent out from the Missoula head
quarters of the forest service, near
western Montana. The smoke of a
number of fires within plain sight of
the city made the day cloudy and the
heavens glowed tonight. From the
Flathead forest, many miles to the
north, a heavy pall of smoke is sweep
ing over the foothills toward Missoula.
From, the Blackfoot canyon, east of the
city, comes word of more new fires,
and from the Bitter Root forest, south
and west, four new fires are reported
today, all bad and one serious.
The worst is near Stevensvllle, where
a steady fight has met with but little
success. Three more fires were re
ported In the Bitter Root valley today,
all south of Hamilton. The fire nearest
to Missoula is gradually eating its way
to the Lolo national forest. •
FIRE FIGHTERS HAVE TO
FIGHT FLAMES ON PRAIRIE
FORT COLLINS, Colo., July 24.^-A.
force of thirty-five men left hero today
in automobiles to light a forest fire
which is raging on Stove Prairie at
the head of Buckhorn and Redstone
creeks, twenty miles west of here. Ac
cording to reports received here, the
fire has already destroyed considerable
timber and is sweeping Into the na
tional forest reserve.
RAINS ENABLE RANGERS
TO GAIN CONTROL OF FIRES
WINNIPEG, Man., July 24.—Heavy
rains have brought all forest fires in
the Slocum district under control of
the fire rangers. Three million dollars
is the rangers' estimate of the loss in
that district. " i
LONG FIGHT ON STEAMER
MOMUS AGAINST FLAMES
SAVANNAH, Ca,, July 24.—A brief
message caught by the United Wire
less station here tonight indicates that
the fire on the steamer Momus, bound
for New Orleans, was more stubborn
that at first supposed and that lt was
finally extinguished, shortly after noon
today, after burning during most of
yesterday and all of last night. Evi
dently her machinery Is not damaged,
as the message reads:
"Fire extinguished at. 12:15 o'clock
this afternoon. Full speed for New
Orleans." ...
ia pi. Risk of tho Mallory liner Ala
mo, which arrived here today, reported
that yesterday morning the Alamo's
operator picked up the wireless. "S. O.
S." of the Momus and immediately of
fered to take off the passengers and
transfer them to Mobile. Within a few
minutes he received a message of
thanks, but advising that the Camus
■was standing by and taking off the
passengers. ■ '
It is believed hero that the Momua
will be able to resume her voyage to
New Orleans under her own steam, the
last messages Indicating that the- fire
was practically extinguished.
CYCLONE IN ITALY KILLS
60 AND INJURES HUNDREDS
"MILAN, July 24.— list of dead
in the cyclone which yesterday swept
over the district northwest of Milan
has increased to sixty and the Injured
number several hundred. The material
losses are estimated at many millions.
Assistance has been sent to the vil
lages which suffered most severely
from the storm, but there are many
homeless to be taken cure of.
Freight Cars Tied Up on Grand Trunk
R. R. at Port Huron; Strikers in Confab
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THIEVES WORK AT
TAFT'S RECEPTION
Crooks Pick Pockets of Farmers
Who Come to Meet the
President
BAR HARBOR, Me., July 24.—Dur
ing the reception to President Taft
last night pickpockets operated ex
tensively and a number of persons
lost their valuables while almost li
the act of shaking the president's
hand.
j Chief of Police Drummey of Ells
worth, was busy late last night and
today recording complaints from people
of losses of pocketbooks, watches and
other articles of Jewelry. It seems
that a band of thieves, four men and
a woman, arrived at Ellsworth Just
before tho president got there and
plied their trade with unusual suc
cess. The crowds which thronged
Hancock hall to hear the president
speak, and which pushed eagerly for
ward to shake his hartd when the re
ception began, were the special ob
ject of tho attack.
When the hall was cleared out three
leather wallets stripped of money and
papers were found on the floor. It Is
estimated the thieves got away with
several hundred dollars ln the aggre
gate, although the Individual losses
did not go above $150. Among the vic
tims were a number of farmers who
had driven many miles Into tho city to
see and hear the president.
PKESIIH-NT'S A2»KIJ'. ItKTTKIt
The president left Ellsworth this
afternoon after his visit to Senator
• Hale and went by special train to
Mount Desert ferry, where he boarded
the Mayflower, which headed for Bar
Harbor and the sea. Tho course from
here lies southward, and a slow run
will take the president to Islesboro,
where he is due to land at 10 o'clock
tomorrow morning.
Mr. Taft's - strained ankle, after a
night in compresses, was improved to
day and his limp seemed less painful
than on yesterday. All danger of ser
ious consequences from the injury ap
pears to have passed, and while the
president may have to give up golf
for a few days, the plans for the re
mainder of the cruise, which ends next
Thursday afternoon at Beverly, will
not otherwise be. Interfered with. At
Ellsworth the president and his entire
party attended services at the Con
gregational church. . . .
TO VISIT ItOCKPORT
Just before leaving Ellsworth the
president was driven to Mr. Hale's
camp at Branch Pond for a plato of
old-fashioned New England clam
chowder.
Leaving Ellsworth, the president
seemed in the best of spirits and de
clared his ankle was getting better all
the time. The Mayflower stopped at
Bar Harbor on her way out for the
mail at 5:80 p. m. and sailed at 6:30
p. m. for Dark Harbor, Islesboro. The
party, after visiting different points In
Islesboro, will go to Rockport tomor
row noon for luncheon . with A. P.
Chatfleld of Cincinnati, who has a sum
mer homo there. . _
COLQUITT NOMINATED
FOR GOVERNOR OF TEXAS
Though He Is Anti-Prohibitionist,
Submission Carries '
DALLAS, Tex., July 24— The count
of votes in the Texas Democratic
primary election, which has been pro
ceeding today, has not materially
changed tin estimate made last night.
Oscar B. Colquitt, anti-l'rohihitionist,
has been nominated for governor by a
plurality which will probably reach
60,000.
Cone. Johnson and William Poindex
ter, the Prohibition "candidates, are
practically tied for second place.
The proposition to submit to the
people a prohibition amendment to the
constitution carried by about 20,000.
This presents the anomalous situation
of an anti-Prohibitionist being nomi
nated by a party demanding the sub
mission of a prohibition amendment,
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PRESIDENT .C. M. HAVES OF GRAND
TRUNK RAILROAD .
CAR REPAIR SCANDAL
INQUIRY TO REOPEN
New Evidence in Death of I. G.
Rawn to Be Introduced
at Inquest
CHICAGO, July 24.— Attorney Mur
ray Nelson, representing the railroad
company, announced here today that
the Illinois Central car repair scandal
inquiry, in which Ira G. Rawn, was
to havo been an important witness,
will be reopened here Tuesday. Al
though investigation of the mysterious
death of the former.Motion president
at his summer residence In Winnetka
last Wednesday is being pushed by
private detectives, police and repre
sentatives of Insurance companies,
there -were no. developments today.
However, it Is understood new evi
dence of importance will be presented
at the coroner's inquest next Wednes
day. — ■
- - -
$250-000 LOST AND FiVE
FIREMEN HURT IN FIRE
Explosions Start Blazes in Four
Cincinnati Plants
CINCINNATI, July 24.—Two explo
sions early today wrecked a manufac
turing plant at Central avenue and
Findlay street, starting a conflagra
tion that destroyed three adjoining
plants. Five firemen .were burled by
falling walls and were taken out seri
ously injured.
The combined losses by the Ore are
estimated at $250,000.
The first explosion occurred In the
plant of the Cincinnati Ball Crank
company and is supposed to have re
sulted from natural gas. The detona
tion was heard from a distance of
more than a mile. Other plant- badly
damaged were the Century Printing
company and Cincinnati Lithograph
ing company. "
While the firemen wore working on
the fire in the plant of the Ball Crank
company the walls buckled and fell,
burying five of the firemen under a
mass of plastering and red hot bricks.
.m.m
NEW HEAT RECORDS SET
IN EAST; FATALITIES FEW
Temperature in New York Rises
to Maximum of 94 Degrees
NEW YORK, Jab' 24.— Although this
wag the hottest day of the year here,
with a maximum temperature of 94,
there were only wo deaths and less
than a dozen prostrations, The hu
midity reached a maximum of S3.
CI\TI W. _'. .PI _<'<«!• DAILY 2c. OX TRAINS ,V.
lis LitJ VvV-U.J-JL.r3. SUNDAYS 80. ON TRAINS 1-a.
EIGHTEEN INJURED
IN TRAIN WRECK
Work Train Crashes Into Pas
senger Cars on Electric
Railway in North
__________ . *
(Associated Press)
PORTLAND, July 24—A head-on
collision between a work train and an
eastbound electric train at Boring, a
station twenty-five miles east of here
on the Cazadero division of the Port
land Railway, Light & Power company,
resulted ,in the. Injury of eighteen per
sons, four seriously. The accident oc
cured late yesterday, but the remote
ness of the place enabled the suppres
sion of the news until late today, when
some of the Injured arrived in this j
city. -
Those seriously hurt are: Mrs. A.
Miller, Dover, Ore., leg cut and back
bruised; Mrs. A. B. Alspaughe, Als
paugh. Ore., bruised and cut; Geopafe,
Cazadero, body crushed; Nicholas
Young, motor driver on passenger car,
cut and bruised about head.
All of the injured are expected to
recover. None of the work train crew
was hurt.
According to passengers on the Caza
dero car, the work train was observed
about 100 yards ahead, coming up a
slight grade. The driver of the pas
senger car is said to have stopped his
car and whistled, but without effect on
the work train, which continued Its
approach with, It is asserted, undimin
ished speed.
The passengers, taking it for grant
ed that the work train intended to halt
as had their own ear, kept their seats
until the work train was almost upon
them. The Impact was terrific, the
two cars being wedged together as if
welded into one. No explanation of
the accident has been obtained from
the work train crew, which was de
clared by the passenger train crew to
have no business on the main line at
the time the accident occurred.
SOUTHWEST TO HAVE HOT
WEEK, SAYS FORECAST
WASHINGTON, July 24.—This week
will be one of high temperature
throughout the greater part of the
country east of the Rocky mountains
and In the extreme southwest, accord
ing to the forecast of Willis 1.. Moore,
chief of the weather bureau. The gen
eral pressure distribution over file
North American continent and the ad
jacent oceans indicates ;>at this condi
tion will prevail. A disturbance is
threatened in the northwest Monday
or Tues^-y. There" arc no indications
of general rain for the week.
CHICAGO HAS HOTTEST
DAY IN NINE YEARS
CHICAGO, July 24.—Today was the
hottest day iii Chicago In nine years.
The weather bureau thermometer on
the street level registered 102 degrees
at 3 o'clock in the afternoon. The
thermometer at the government weath-
er station on the federal building regis
tered 97 degrees.
FIVE DEATHS DUE TO
HEAT IN PHILADELPHIA
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., July 24.—Five
deaths were reported today as being
due to the heat here. The maximum
temperature for the day was 92 de
grees at 4 o'clock. A breeze from the
southwest lowered the humidity from
82 this morning to 64 tonight.
HEAT CAUSE OF TWO
DEATHS IN PENNSYLVANIA
PITTSBURG, July 24—Seven people
met death by drowning In different
parts of Western Pennsylvania today.
Two deaths were Charged also to be
due partly to the heat and one sui
cide. The weather bureau promises
no early relief from the almost un
bearable weather.
DICKINSON AT MANILA
MANILA, July Jacob M. Dickin
son, the American secretary of war,
who arrived here yesterday from Kobe
on the steamer Siberia, received his
official welcome today. The secretary
reviewed the local garrisons.
ks' CENTS
RIOTING STRIKERS
MAKE AN ATTEMPT
TO WRECK TRAIN
Engineer Notices Turned Switch
Signal in Time to Prevent
Derailment
| GRAND TRUNK OFFICIALS FIRM
Management of Railroad Takes
View That Time for Arbitra
tion Has Passed
Mil ri! BEND, Imi.. July 24.Strikers
attempted to derail eastbound passenger
train No. 8 Ibis afternoon nt Olivers, the
first station nt which Grand Trunk east
bound trains stop in passim* through
South Bend. The engineer of the train
noticed the turned .witch signal in time
to stop his train and thereby probably
prevented injury if not loss of life to the
passengers.
Hinting in the local yards began last
night and has been spasmodic today.
One man, 3, l-'reel, of this city, was seri
ously wounded by John Tack of Battle
Creek, Mich., an employe of a private
detective agency assisting; the railroad.
Four others were arrested.
(Associated Press)
MONTREAL, July 24.—The attempts
of MacKenzie King, minister of labor,
to effect a settlement of the Grand
Trunk strike have fallen through, at
least for the present, the Grand Trunk
management taking the view that the
time for arbitration has passed and all
that the company requires in order to
resume the full operation of the road
is the protection lor its new men to
which It is legally entitled. The mes
sage conveying this information to Mr.
King was sent tonight and read:
"Your message of 23rd received.
While as you know, from the many
conferences urging your action before
the strike took place and from our
offer repeatedly urged upon the com
mittee, we were desirous of arbitration
and so avoiding tho existing trouble,
time for such action has now passed,
and it is only necessary that we should
have the protection to which we are
entitled to enable us to resume the
full operation of the Charles M.
Hayes."
TO HEOI'KN SHOPS
Coupled with this announcement of
the company that the time has passed
for arbitration comes the statement
that on Monday the shops of the en
tire system will be reopened, that in
structions will bo Issued to agents
once more to take freight and that way
freights will be put on and the mani
fest freight service increased. In ad
dition to this it is announced by the
officials that some of the former em
ployes who went out on Monday last
are reporting for work.
The answer of Vice President Mur
dock to this is:
"We are perfectly satisfied with the
way things are going, and if It is to
be a fight to a finish I do not know
that I could suggest an Improvement
under existing conditions from our
point of view. As matters stand the
traveling public is being fairly well
taken care of. while freight Is tied up.
The report of A. Kennedy of the en
gineers' brotherhood to us is that only
10 per cent of the Grand Trunk en
gineers are on their regular runs, the
remaining 90 per cent being idle."
Despite Mr. Murdock's assurance,
misgivings are beginning to develop
among the men, who see the positions
they once held threatened by the
progress the company is making. This
was shown at tin- meeting of the men
today, and the suggestion was plainly
made to the leaders that action was
necessary in order to hold the strikers
together.
GOVERNOR DECLINES
TO CALL OUT MILITIA
INDIANAPOLIS, July 24.—Governor
Marshall tonight declined to send
troops to South Bend upon a request
by message from the superintendent of
the Grand Trunk railway. The gover
nor told- the railway official to
apply to the sheriff of tho county for
assistance, saying th^t in the event of
that official falling to do his duty
action would be taken by the gover
nor. Later a message came from Sher
iff Orr, in which he told the governor
that trains were moving and that ha
could handle the situation.
GRAND TRUNK STARTS
TORONTO FREIGHT TRAIN
TORONTO, Out., July 24.—The claims
of the Grand Trunk railroad that mat
ters are assuming better shape wan
borne out today by the arrival and
departure of four freight trains front
Toronto. Crews have been secured to
run all passengers, mixed and way
freight trains, and eight of the latter
will start tomorrow for London, To
ronto, Stratford and Niagara Falls. A
passenger train entering Brockvllle last
night was derailed, the company
claims, by strikers. No one was In
jured.
STRIKEBREAKERS AND
SECTION HANDS CLASH
SCRANTON, Pa., July During a
rlot at Carbondale tonight between,
strike breakers and striking section
hands of the Delaware & Hudson rail
road one man was shot. The men at
work were attacked by the strikers:
and fully 200 shots were exchanged,
one of them striking James Ciccone,
probably fatally Injuring him. Thi
state police are under arrest.
CANCEL ALL PASSENGER
TRAINS AT SOUTH BEND
SOUTH BEND, Ind., July 24—Ad
passenger trains to and from South
Bend ware cancelled tonight, the
burning of freight cars and the.stall
ing of another freight train in the west
yards .causing the company to close all -
operations in this vicinity.

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