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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, August 01, 1910, Image 13

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ELECTION BALLOT
AN PARTY
Assembly District, August 16, 1910
! &* «q«are District, August 16, 1910 whom you
•C) in Jthe square at the RIGHT of the name of the person for whom you
j write his name in the blank space provided for that purpose. To vote for
t >r or electors in the blank space or spaces provided therefor.
COUNTY
TP-,
for .
Justice of the Peace,
Cahuenga Tp. Vote for One
Justice of the Peace,
Redondo Tp. Vote for One
Constable,
Antelope Tp.
Vote for One
Constable,
Malibu Tp.
Vote for One
i*
L, F. WKLLS.
GARFIELD A. CARTER.
JOHN J. CARPENTER.
\
Justice of the Peace,
Calabasas Tp. Vote for One
Justice of the Peace,
Rowland Tp. Vote for One
Constable,
Azusa Tp.
Vote for One
Constable,
Norwalk Tp.
Vote for One
HUGH N. WELLS.
WM. I. HAMBLIN.
Justice of the Peace,
Catalina Tp. Vote for One
GILBERT T. MrlNTT'RFF.
Constable,
Lankershim Tp. Vote for One

!■■
Justice of the Peace,
San Antonio Tp. Vote for One
Justice of the Peace,
Chatsworth Park Tp.
Vote for One
Constable,
Ballona Tp.
Vote for One
Constable,
Pasadena Tp.
Vote for Two
Justice of the- Peace,
San Gabriel Tp. Vote for One
WALTER C. AUSTIN.
i
FRANK .1. BARTON.
FERD TKTZLAFF.
H. F. NEWELL.
Justice of the Peace,
San Fernando Tp.
Vote for One
Constable,
Belvedere Tp.
Vote for One
JAMES SHIPLEY.
Justice of the Peace,
Compton Tp. Vote for One
J. IT. BARCLAY.
H. GOTTLEBER.
THOMAS WALTER EDWARDS.
Constable,
Puente Tp.
Vote for One
justice of the Peace,
San Jose Tp. Vote for One
Constable,
Burbank Tp.
Vote for One
i.
ustice of the Peace,
Downey Tp. Vote for One
Constable,
Redondo Tp.
Vote for One
BRASTUS BARNES.
CHARLES W. CATLIN.
*
LEE STANCH FIELD.
;.
fi
Justice of the Peace,
El Monte Tp. Vote for One
Justice of the Peace,
San Antonio Tp.
Vote for One
Constable*,
Cahuenga Tp.
Vote for One
Constable,
Rowland Tp.
Vote for One
J
CHARLES L. BYAM.
Justice of the Peac<,
Fairmont Tp. Vote for One
THOMAS V. CASSIDY.
Constable,
Calabasas Tp.
Vote for One
City
for Four
Constable,
San Antonio Tp.
Vote for One
fc;,
Justice of the Peace,
Gardena Tp. Vote for One
Justice of the Peace,
Santa Monica Tp.
Vote for One
GEORGE MORRISON.
Constable,
Catalina Tp.
Vote for One
ELLIS BASHORE.
J. R. ROMINES.
C. F. BAYHA.
JOHN T. WHALEY.
Q. EDWIN BROWN.
Justice of the Peace,
Lankershim Tp. Vote for One
Constable,
Chatsworth Park Tp.
Vote for One
justice of the Peace,
Soledad Tp. Vote for One
Constable,
San Fernando Tp.
Vote for One
I. C. IJAMS.
JOHN S. PILCHER.
i
J. F. POWELL.
P. L. LOPEZ.
Justice of the Peace,
Lexington Tp. Vote for One
Constable,
Compton Tp.
Vote for One
v
Justice of the Peace,
South Pasadena Tp.
Vote for One
Constable,
San Gabriel Tp. Vote for One
fl
CHARLES SOWARD.
WILLIAM J. DAVIS.

i;5
B. F. PARKER.
GEORGE W. GLOVER.
for One
Justice of the Peace,
Long Beach Tp. Vote for Two
HENRY IL, PEARSON.
Constable,
Downey Tp.
Vote for One
i>
WILLIAM S. BRAYTON.
Constable,
San Jose Tp.
Vote for One
&■
STEPHEN H. UNDERWOOD.
Constable,
Los Angi
Constable,
El Monte Tp.
Vote for One
FRANK O. BLANKER.
1'eace,
Vote for Four
THOMAS W. WILLIAMS.
for One
JOSEPH A. BONTTT.
WILLIAM M. BOYLES.
Constable,
Fairmont Tp.
Vote for One
Constable,
Santa Monica Tp.
Vote for One
FRANK P. COCHRAN.
i
i for One
Justice of the Peace,
Los Nietos Tp. Vote for One
S. H. JACKSON.
TOI1IAS B. HARRIS.
HENRY C. HAYE3.
Constable,
Gardena Tp.
Vote for One
N. D. ELLIS.
JOHN JOHNSTON.
Constable,
Soledad Tp.
Vote for One
|
Justice of the Peace,
Malibu Tp. Vote for One
GEORGE W. LYONS.
Constable,
Lexington Tp.
Vote for One
ELMER S. CRISFIELD.
CHARLES E. RICE.
a
for One
»i
SHELDEN O. RICHARDSON.
Constable,
South Pasadena Tp.
Vote for One
;■';
Justice of the Peace,
toorwalk Tp. Vote for One
i
CHARLES R. THOMAS.
Constable,
Long Beach Tp.
Vote for Two
* - • ■
1 for t
ROGER A. WOODBTJRT.
WILLIAM H. JOHNSTON.
. ]
GEORGE H. ATTSTIN.
Justice of the Peace,
Pasadena Tp. Vote for Two
WILLIAM L. HAWKINS.
Bji
Delegates to County
Convention Vote for
MATNARD B. BUTLER.
EDWIN E. WILLIAMS.
t
HENRY H. KLAMROTH.
H. M. WILSON.
ROBT. W. McDONAX-D.
»
Constable,
Los Nietos Tp. Vote for One
I;
Justice of the Peace,
Puente Tp. Vote for One
R. B. WAT.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING; AUGUST 1, 1010.
EASTERN EDUCATOR TO
DELIVER LECTURE HERE
Dr. Burton, Friend of Mark
Twain, Scheduled to Speak
on the Drama i
Dr. Rlcha; ' Burton, a well known
cistern educator and lecturer, arrived
in Los Angeles Saturday evening from
Berkeley, where he has been conduct-
Ing a class In modern drama in Uni
versity of California summer school.
Dr. Burton will open a class along
similar lines this morning at Cumnock
school, 1500 South Figueroa street. He
will give lectures every Monday, Wed
nesday and Friday for the next two
weeks on contemporary English and
American drama.
It is possible that during his stay
Dr. Burton will also deliver a number
of lectures, possibly on the drama
"Chanticleer" and on Mark Twain.
Mr. Burton was personally acquainted
with the deceased humorist. While in
the city Dr. Burton will make his
headquarters at the Hershey Arms.
RIOTS FOLLOW TRIALS
OF CAMORRA PRISONERS
ROME, July 31.— exciting Cam
orra trial has been proceeding for the
past twenty-two days at the Lucera
assizes. An enormous iron cage, in
appearance something like a chicken
run, had been specially constructed In
court in order to stock seventy-six
prisoners at once. All of them arc
Camorrlsts belonging to the local se
cret criminal societies of San Severo.
They were defended by ten lawyers,
and there were over a hundred wit
nesses.
Many of tho charges could not bo
proved owing to the intimidation of
witnesses, who in cases of this kind
are always fearful of a ruffianly ven
detta. Nevertheless the tribunal con
demned several ringleaders to ten
years' confinement. Such scenes of
savagery broke out among the con
demned and their relatives and follow
ing In the town after the president
had delivered sentence that three com
panies of soldiery and a hundred cara
binleri who had been drafted into the
town for the occasion to reinforce the
local police proved none too many for
preserving . order. Special measures
were also taken against a general out
break which had been plotted at the
jail.
Shipping News
SAN PEDRO. July 31.—Arrived: Steamer
aanta Rosa, from San Diego: steamer Watson,
from Seattle; steamer Whlttler, from San
Francisco; steamer Grays Harbor, from Wil
ipa; steamer Helen P. Drew, from Greenwood;
iteamer Daisy Mitchell, from Grays Harbor;
steamer Lakme.
Sailed: Steamer Santa Rosa, for San Fran
cisco via Redondo Beach and Santa Barbara;
iteamer J. B. Stetson, for Portland via San
Francisco; schooner Mlndora, for Everett;
iteamer South Coast, for Casper via San Fran
:isco; steamer Whlttler, for Ventura.
MISCELLANEOUS NOTES
Tlie steamer 'Whlttler, Captain Seaman,
loaded a partial cargo of crude nil for the
I'nlon Oil company upon arrival here today
from San Francisco and sailed for Ventura.
After discharging a cargo of ties here today
at the Salt Lake wharf, the steamer South
Coast, Captain Olsen, sailed today for Fort
Bragg to reload.
The steamer Santa Rosa. Captain Harris,
arrived today from San Diego anil, taking
passengers and freight, proceeded to San Fran
cisco via Redondo Beach and Santa Barbara.
With all passenger accommodations sold out
several clays' in advance tho steamer J. B.
Stetson, Captain Sears, sailed today for Port
land via San Francisco.
The schooner Mindora, Captain T*arsen, sailed
today for Puget Sound and will reload a cargo
of poles at Everett for Charles Wels & Co.
The steamer Watson, Captain Griffiths, ar
rived today from Seattle via San Francisco,
and will sail for return Tuesday with pas
sengers and freight for the Alaska-Pacific
Steamship company.
The steamer Grays Harbor. Captain Anflnd
sen, arrived today from Willipa with 420,000
feet of lumber and Is at the Salt Lake wharf.
The steamer Helen P. Drew, Captain Gitn
derson, arrived today from Greenwood with
325,000 feet of lumber for the San Pedro Lum
ber company.
Two steamer schooners arrived from Eureka
this morning with lumber cargoes and pro
ceeded to Wilmington to discharge. The
Lakme, Captain Malgren, has 700,000 for the
Consolidated Lumber company, anil the Des
patch, Captain Carey, 650,000 feet of redwood
for the Pacific Lumber company.
The steamer Daisy Mitchell, Captain Devltt,
arrived today from Grays Harbor and Is at the
Southern Pacific wharf with 650,000 feet of
lumber.
The Alaska-Pacific company's steamer Ad
miral Sampson has gone into dry dock at San
Francisco for repairs to her port propeller.
Her port gear became disabled before she left
port here, and she limped into San Francisco
Using her starboard propeller only. An exam
ination showed that bolts at the coupling shaft
hai become loose. The steamer Buck man of
the same line is also in dry dock at Seattle
for two new propeller blades in connection
with experiments being made to determine her
speed and fuel consumption under different
conditions.
The steamer Heaver will sail tomorrow from
Portland for this port on her regular schedule.
An examination there has disclosed that she
was uninjured last week by being grounded
for two days at the mouth of the Columbia
river.
MOVEMENTS OF STEAMERS
Steamers carrying passenger* are due from
northern porta via San Francisco and from
southern ports direct as follow*:
ARRIVE
Roanoke, Portland Aug. 1
Watson, Seattle Aug. 1
Klamath, Portland Aug. 1
Centra , Aberdeen Aug. 2
President, Seattle Aug. 2
Chelalis, Aberdeen Aug. 3
President, San Diego Aug. 4
Hanalel. San Francisco Aug. 5
Santa Rosa, San Francisco Aug. 6
Beaver, Portland Aug. 6
Santa Rosa, San Diego Aug. 7
Buckman, Seattle Aug. 7
Geo. W. Elder, Portland Aug. 8
Governor, Seattle Aug. 9
Bear, Portland Aug. 11
Governor, San Diego..., Aug. 11
Hanalel, San Francisco Aug. 11
Santa Rosa, San Francisco Aug. 12
DEPART
Coronado, Aberdeen Aug. 1
O. C, Llndauer, San Francisco Aug. 2
Roanoke, Portland Aug. 2
Watson, Seattle Aug. 3
President, San' Diego Aug. 3
President, Seattle Aug. 4
Centralla, Aberdeen Aug. 6
Hanalel,. San Francisco Aug. %
Santa Rosa, San Diego Aug. 6
Beaver. Portland Aug. 7
Santa Rosa, San Francisco Aug. 7
Buckman, Seattle Aug. 9
Geo. W. Elder, Portland Aug. 9
Governor, San Diego Aug. 10
Governor, Seattle Aug. 11
Bear, Portland Aug. 13
Hanalel. San' Francisco Aug. 13
Santa Rosa, San Francisco Aug. 13
ARRIVALS AND DEPARTURES
SAN FRANCISCO, July 31.—Sailed: Brook
lyn, Ban Pedro; Chehalls, San Pedro; Fore
City, San Pedro.
TIDE TABLE
(Tides are placed In order of occurrence).
Aug. 1 12:44 7:3» 11:53 6:14
0.1 3.8 2.6 6.8
Aug. 2 1:37 8:28 12:51 7:08
0.7 4.0 2.5 6.6
Aug 3 2:20 9:10 1:42 7:50
1.1 4.2 2.4 6.8
Aug. 4 3:01 9:48 2:27 1:40
1.3 4.3 2.3 6.8
Aug. 6 3:37 10:23 3:07 8:21
1 2 4.4 2.1 6.6
Aug « 4:13 Ifiifil 3:49 10:03
0.9 4.5 I 2.0 6.8
Aug. 7 4:43 11:28 4:111 10:43
. 0.5 4.C . 2.0 1.8
In the Mines and Oil Fields
STANDARD'S CUT IN PRICE
WILL NOT AFFECT MARKET
Few New Contracts Are Made
and Ninety-Cent Oil
Is Limited
SAN FRANCISCO, July 31.—A num
ber of small contracts have been Signed
with consumers at 90 cents a -barrel,
but no transaction of any importance
along this line has taken placo since
the Standard made the cut from $1 a
barrel.
Tho market situation Is looking better
every day. Some consumers continue
to hold on making contracts with the
marketers. Of course they anticipate
lower prices, and naturally with that
idea they defer signing up. They are
driving a bargain. "If there is going
to bo any cheap oil wo want it," is the
way they talk.
A close analysis of the situation leads
to the conclusion that the consumer
is not going to get oil any cheaper than
he is now getting It on daily deliveries.
It is not at all sure that within a short
time he can do as well in contacting,
as now.
This can be depended upon: The
output of the California oil fields is not
going to be given away in the future
as it has in the past. There will be no
more foolishness indulged in playing
with the valuable product as was car
ried on a few years ago by W. S.
Porter and John Baker, jr., when these
men had the Associated and Union re
spectively back of them. Such will
never again occur to the oil business
on this coast. There is a different set
of men at the head of the big market
ing concerns now. They will either get
a live price for their oil or It will re
main unsold. Common business sense
is to be exercised—that most effective
force In the law of self preservation—in
the future of marketing oil.
One of these fine days the oil market
situation will bo cleared, and cleared
naturally. It will not be done by any
questionable methods.
INCOME PROPERTY WILL
BE SOLD BY THE SHERIFF
COALINGA, July 31.— a recent
judgment received from the superior
court In favor of the J. F. Lucey com
pany the personal property of the In
come Oil company will be sold at a
sheriff's sale on August 4 to satisfy
the judgment.
The Income was indebted to the
Lucey company to the amount of over
$3700 and to the Associated Supply
company for $1200. The accounts were
placed together in the attachment of
the property and it will all be sold, in
cluding bunk and cook houses, as ar
rangements had been made whereby
the buildings would not revert to the
owner of the land.
The Income started out as one of the
most promising companies promoted
by local capital, and although every
one familiar with the field knew that
the wells.would be shallow. It was con
ceded that enough oil could be pro
duced to make it a paying proposition
on account of the shallow depth and
small expense of drilling. The promot
ers wore all men well known locally
and- highly respected, but trouble with
the first well and a lull in the sale of
shares In undeveloped properties had
the effect of putting the company into
financial difficulties.
No. 1 well was drilled into the oil
sand, but it was found that the water
had not been entirely shut off, and it
was an Impossibility to do anything
further with it. Another hole was
started, but had only spudded in when
work had to be suspended for lack of
capital.
Although there Is quite a lengthy list
of the property advertised for sale it
is not believed the whole will bring
over $1500.
STRONG INDICATIONS
GOLDFIELD, July 31.«— Indications
for ore on the Weber lease on the
Booth are strong at present in the
heading of the crosscut which is be
ing driven from the shaft at a depth
of 250 feet. A new vein has been
opened about sixty feet from the shaft
exposing what will probably be a large
body of quartz, somewhat oxidized
and carrying iron sulphides. The fact
that the quartz Is appearing in the
form of nodules and shows strong wa
ter and chemical action gives it the,
appearance of being ihe best prospect
that has yet been opened in this lease.
No assays have yet been secured, so its
gold contents are not known.
SANDS SHOW GAS
MeKITTBICK, July 31.—At a depth
of 3050 feet in the Carnegie oil fields,
on section 9, 31-22, North Midway is
in brown shale intermixed with streaks
of sand showing gas, which bubbles up
through the water continuously. The
same conditions existed in the Coin fori
several hundred feet before the oil
sand was reached and the manage
ment of the Carnegie feels greatly en
couraged over the prospects of get
ting a good well.
NEW BRITISH COMPANY
COALINGA, July 31.— The Coallnga-
British Oil company, which Is affiliat
ed with and under the same manage
ment as the British Consolidated Oil
corporation, is the name of the con
cern which has taken over the property
of the Wabash Oil company in this
field. On several occasions It has ap
peared In print that the property was
sold to the latter British oil company.
WILL SPUD IN TODAY
KERN RIVER, July 31—The Kern
West Side Oil company is rigging up
on the northeast quarter of section 34,
28-27 and will spud in about August
1. The company has 200 acres in sec
tion 34, two miles to the west of any
development, and Is working on the be
lief that the Kern river sands extend
In that direction.
SHOULD RECEIVE $1 BOND
George Adams, the prominent Eng
lish oil expert, expressed to Bavestock
& Staples when he visited them last
May his opinion that California oil op
erators should receive $1 a barrel at
the well when they were able to place
the oil where it could be delivered to
the markets of the world.
PRINCESS CEMENTS OFF
SANTA MARIA. Ju.y 31.— Prin
cess OH company In Foxen canyon ce
mented off the surface water at 1100
feet. This well is located near the
apex of the anticline that runs south
east from the Cat canyon producers
and the location is said to bo very
promising.
OLINDA LAND GOES AFTER
LIGHT OIL AT FULLERTON
Well Is 1660 Feet on Property
Adjoining Puente Holdings.
Other Holes Planned
FULLERTON, July 31.—The Olinda
Land company is down 1680 feet on
its No. 5, which is in light oil territory
adjoining the Puente property In the
Olinda section, about a mile from its
other wells, which produce a heavy
fuel oil. The well is an old on*', drilled
to about 2000 feet and then ruined by
careless workmen. It is being re
drilled and will go through to the
bottom of the oil strata in this section
from 2300 to 2500 feet.
Another old well right by this was
also ruined in the early days by the
loss of a string of tools. Heavy gas
pressure caused the hole to sand up
and froze the tools fast. In the effort
to extricate them another string was
lost and the hole had to be abandoned,
but such was the gas pressure on tho
light oil encountered that It continued
to flow small quantities of oil some
time after suspension of work. The
oil tested 32 gravity.
If this experience is not repeated in
the new wells tho company will have
practically two fields, one producing a
very low gravity fuel product ranking
with the very best, the other giving
the opposite extreme, a refined prod
uct that is not found in most California
fields.
PATS EIGHTH DIVIDEND
The company's total holdings are
2700 acres. Not all of this is oil land,
but It is safe to say that a thousand
acres may be expected to prove such.
The eighth dividend of $10,000 was
paid July 1, making a total capitaliza
tion of $2,000,000. Payments are at the
rate of one-half per cent quarterly.
All other funds are going into develop- -
ment. Two strings have been operated
continuously for some time and a third
rig Is about ready to spud. Hereafter
three strings will be kept in operation.
One or two offers to purchase *aye
been received from time to time, but
no price has ever been put upon the
property and the owners are not show
ing the slightest disposition to sell.
Manager Bailey says that the price
will probably be much higher than any
one will be likely to pay.
STRIKE OF SILVER IS
MADE AT TOMBSTONE
TOMBSTONE, Ariz., July 31.—John
Rainey, who recently secured a lease
on the old Honeycomb mine in this dis
trict, has made a rich strike In gold
and silvef and averages in the neigh
borhood of $200 a ton. The ground of
this mine extends over the recent cave
in on Toughnut street, near the fire
house. The strike was made in this
cave-In in the old stope, from which
over $1,000,000 In ore was extracted in
the early days of the camp. .
The workings of the stope extend
many thousand feet under the vicinity
of the Russ hotel and the depot grounds
and it was about three feet under the
floor of the old stope that Mr. Rainey
encountered a ledge of rich ore, carry
ing horn silver.
The ledge is about four feet wide,
and It is estimated by those who are
familiar with the rock and have
worked in the mine that it is of the
same character as that extracted in
the early days, and that with further
development it will net Mr. Bainey on
an average of $100 a day.
GOLDFIELD OIL COMPANY
RESUMES DRILLING WORK
GOLDFIELD, July 31.—After work
ing for five months to recover a string
of tools and a 19-foot length of 4%
--iich casing from the bottom of the
well, the Nevada State Oil company
tu-s at last succeeded in its efforts
a -I resumed drilling. The tools were
pulled out of the well about a
month ago and the casing was recov
ered last Monday. The casing shows
that the last twenty feet of the hole
was crooked, which caused the diffi
culty in pulling out the pipe.
When the hole was cleared it was
then filled up for about twenty feet
with small rocks, which will aid In re
drilling and straightening it. This
work will necessarily proceed slowly
and cautiously until the danger point
is passed and drilling will then pro
ceed more rapidly. J. T. Minchen,
manager of the company, Is as confi
dent as ever of eventually striking oil
in commercial quantities and is also
greatly relieved of the burden of anx
iety which he has faced during the
long period of difficulties that has now;
been overcome.
RIO YAQUI MEETS
BISBEE, July 31.—The stockholders
of the Bio Yaqui Arizona Copper com
pany held a special meeting Thurs
day. An offer was made by a local
man representing eastern capital for a
small part of the company's holdings,
hut was not considered at the meet
ing.
A letter from a representative in the
east which said a consolidation with
two other big properties was pending
and might be brought about soon. That
representative will be in Bisbee in a
few weeks and then there will prob
ably be something done which will be
of much Interest to the stockholders.
THE WEATHER
LOS ANGELES. July 30, 1910,
Tlme.|Barom.|Ther.|Hum| Wind]Via!Weather.
s"a. m.| 29.92 I" 60 \~H~ I I Cloudy"
sp. m.| 29.88 I 63 | 72 | SW | 9 | Clear
Maximum temperature, 77.
Minimum temperature, 60.
FORECAST
For California, south of the Tehachapl; Fair
Monday; overcast in the morning; light south
wind.
For San Francisco and vicinity: Pair Mon
day, with light fog In the morning, light
south wind, changing to brisk west.
For Santa Clara valley: Fair Monday;
somewhat warmer; light north wind.
For Sacramento valley: Fair Monday; some
what warmer; light south wind.
For San Joaquin valley: Fair Monday;
continued warm; light northwest wind.
DECLINCD WITH THANKS
"Are you fond of etchings asked
the young man who had taken the
hostess' pretty niece from the country
down to supper.
"As a general thing, yes," she an
swered, looking up Into his eyes with
an engaging frankness that threat
ened havoc to his heart: "but," she
added hastily, as he started to say
something pretty, "not any tonight,
thank you; it Is rather late. A small
piece of jelly will be sufficient."—Tit
iilU.
.. . ":- ' ' ' ' ■
13

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