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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, August 02, 1910, Image 1

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FIRE WIPES OUT
ENTIRE VILLAGE;
MENACES FOREST
Blaze Starts in Saw Mill and
Sweeps Away All Town
Buildings
FIGHT IS ON TO SAVE TREES
People Forced to Abandon Prop
erty to Save Their
Lives
(Associated Press)
ALBANY, Ore.. Aug. I.—The entire
village of Hoover, tho eastern termi
nus of the t'orvallls & Eastern rail
road, flfty-eeven miles cast of Al
bany, was probably destroyed by lire
late today. The loss is over $100,000.
No report direct from the stricken
town has been received since 6 o'clock
this evening. At that hour the big
daw mill, lumber yard, hotel and
several dwellings, had burned and the
fire was still spreading. The town
was reported doomed. Not a building
WM expected to remain.
The town is without communication
by telephone or telegraph, and no fur
ther reports can be obtained. The fire
started in a hot box at the saw mill
at * p. m. The flames quickly en
veloped the entire plant and the wind
drove them Into the lumber yard.
Sparks communicated the Are to other
buildings and practically the whole
village was soon ablaze. No lives have
been reported Inst, but people were
forced to abandon their property to
save themselves.
Trenches are being dug around the
town to prevent the Are spreading into
the rich belt of timber adjoining.
SPANISH ENVOY TO
VATICAN LEAVES
Papal Nuncio Remains in Madrid.
Pope's Officials Issue a
Statement
(Associated Press)
ROME, Aug. One hour after pre
senting the note of Premier Canelajas
to the Vatican officially announcing
that Marquis tie Ojeda had been called
to Madrid for a communication "for
tin' government," the Spanish ambas
sador to the Vatican left Rome. This
was early this morning. As yet no
retaliatory measures have been taken
by the church, and Monslgnor Vico still
remains in {Madrid as papal nuncio.
The statement Issued by Premier
Canelajas yesterday bearing on the
controversy between the church and
the state has been carefully perused
by the Vatican officials. They assert
that that part of the statement In
which It Is declared that the holy see
intended to concede to the Spanish gov
ernment less than what was agreed to
in 1904 Is without foundation in fact.
It is Canelajas, they declare, who now
wants greater concessions than those
of 1904, on the plea that they were
granted to the then Premier Maura
and that Cnnelajas believed them to
be at that time insufficient.
PRESS AIDING PREMIER
IN HOUR OF TURMOIL
Merry del Val's Telegrams Rouse
Opponents
MADRID, Aug. With Catholics
In Rome expressing hope that Don
Jaime, the . Carlist pretender, may
raise the standard of revolt, and the
Catholics of the Blscayan provinces
rising In insurrection, and with the
Socialists In Spain threatening disor
der, the Imparclal, which has hitherto
been unfriendly to Premier Canelajas,
ranges itself on the side of the govern
ment in the pending conflict with the
Vatican. \
The liberal press In general con
tinues staunchly to support the cabi
net, which has been left a free hand
to carry through its policy by the de
parture of King Alfonso and tha queen
for England.
Especial Indignation is expressed at
the telegram of Cardinal Merry del
Val, the papal secretary of state, In
dorsing the attitude of the Blscayan
Catholics, who threatened to precipi
tate civil war and in telegrams to the
Vatican placed their lives and property
at its disposal for the conflict.
SAYS BREAK HELPS
PROGRESS IN SPAIN
NEW YORK, Aug I.—Apropos of the
present conflict between the Vatican
and the Spanish government, Norman
Hapgood of Collier's Weekly, who has
just returned from a trip through
Spain and other parts of Europe, said
of Industrial conditions in Spain:
"They are improving, but the wider
the split between the government and
the Vatican becomes the more rapidly
j they will improve. New. methods both
of business and agriculture have been
introduced, particularly In southern
Spain, and the country would forge
ahead If it could shake off clerical in
fluence. But the government has a
tidy little fight on its hands in its
effort to do so. King Alfonso is a pro
gressive, all right, but the queen moth
er is a reactionary, and she wields a
powerful influence."
KINO ALFONSO LEAVES SPAIN
SAN SEBASTIAN, Spain, Aug. I.—
King Alfonso and Queen Victoria hit
today to pay a visit to the royal family
in England. They will stop at Ram
boulllet, France, to visit President Fal
lleres of the French republic on the
way.
LOS ANGELES HERALD
INDEX OF
HERALD'S NEWS
TODAY
FORECAST
For I.ns Angeles ami vicinity—Fair Tues
day) cloudy la morning | light south wind;
possibly showers In mountains. .Maximum
temperature yesterday, 111 degrees j mini
mum, A_£
LOS ANGELES v.
Mrs. Nora Dan/ord wins her own can* on
demurrer to Mrs. Smith's suit. PAGE 4
Catholics begin annual celebration of the
Portiuncula Indulgence In city churches.
, paos *
Collectors of power companies accused of
receiving money under repealed ordinance.
, •. . PAGE 4
Los Angeles bonks agree to pay taxes on
new loans. I'AfJK 9
Patrolman stops runaway horse in un
usual manner. PAGE 0
lions niiKcji of Nordhausen, Germany, re
calls experience as passenger on Mumup.
PAGE I
Lou Angeles postofflee receipts show In
crease. PA filC 9
Courts enjoin city from interfering with
Durbln's garbage collections. PAGE 9
Captain Leeds, harbor engineer, seriously
111 at Santa Monica. , PAOE 1
Colegrove's board of trade asks city coun
cil to cancel franchise of Los Angeles-
Paclflo railway. PAGE 8
John P. Steele and O. H. May quit same
placa In police department. PAOE 8
Police commission Issues ultimatum to
applicants for liquor permits. PAOE 8
John R. Htutzkl arrested on ' charge of
threatening to kill W. P. Summers.
I'AOE 13
Restaurant proprietors take exception to
criticism by City Health Ofllcer Pow
ers. PAGE 8
Osteopath* seek recognition at County hos
pital. PAOE 4
Society and music. PAOE &
Mining and oil fields. PAGE 6
Shlpplifg. PAOB 6
Citrus fruit report. PAOE 7
Building permits. PAOB 6
Markets and financial. PAOE! 7
Sport* _ PAGES 10-11
Editorial mV Letter Box. PAOE 12
Politics. PAOE 13
City brevities. PAGE 13
Personals. PAOE 6
Marriage licenses, births, deaths. PAGE 14
Classified advertising. PAGES 14-15
Theaters. PAGE 4
SOUTH CALIFORNIA
Report of ''officers shows Christian
church property In Southern Cali
fornia and Arizona Is worth J791.827
PAGE 14
Conductor H. L. High, of San Bernar
dino, gets left arm crushed In effort
to prevent train's derailment. PAGE 14
Venice plans big auto parade. PAGE 14
Thomas Cavanaugh of Redondo Beach fears
missing 15-year-old son has been shang
haied. PAGE 5
Former policeman and peddler accuse Ocean
Park police chief of withholding city's
money. t I'AOE 5
Arguments begin In case of Skelly, on
trial for wife murder at Santa Ana.
PAGE 5
EASTERN
Government will reopen Alaska coal
land cases. . PAGE 8
Board of Highway Commissioners will
ask sale of $525,000 bonds. PAGE, 6
Fire wipes out Hoover, an Oregon
village. PAOB 1
Charles 11. Mover Is re-elected presi
dent of the Western Federation of
Miners. . PAGE 1
Murdock In Kansas City address tolls
of expose of torpedo scandal. PAGE 1
Brockton millionaire to enter Harvard
to receive education early poverty de
nied. TAGS 1
President Taft announces that his
speeches In the future will bo few and
far between. PAGE 2
United States treasury has 733.057.
cash on band. PAGE 2
FOREIGN
Spanish ambassador to Vatican leaves
Homo. PAGE 1
Dr. Crlppen arraigned In Quebec court
and says he la ready to return to
England to fight extradition. PAGE 1
Army life In Philippines unveiled by j
courtmartlals following suicide of lieu
tenant. ";«•'• PAGE 3
MINING AND OIL
Santa Fo brings In gusher near Mari
copa, said to rival Lakeview. PAGE 6
Government favors oil for use by navy
Superior and Arizona mine In ter
lor. PAGE 0
Inspiration ' backers will finance Lake
Superior and Arizona mine in Ter
ritory.^ PAGE 6
FORMER GOVERNOR WILL
TAKE PLACE OF DANIEL
C. A. Swanson Appointed to Fill
Term in Senate
RICHMOND, Va., Aug. Governor
Mann today signed a commission ap
pointing former Governor Claude A.
Swanson of Chatham to succeed the
late John W. Daniel in the United
States senate. The appointment is for
the unexpired term, which will end on
March 3 next.
There was practically no opposition
to the selection of Swanson. He was
serving as a member of congress when
he was drafted by the Virginia Dem
ocrats a few years ago to run for
governor. He will be a candidate for
the full term to succeed himself.
Both Mr. and Mrs. Swanson are
prominent socially In Richmond and
Washington.
THINK CASHIER HAS A
PART OF MONEY HIDDEN
Books of Brokers Fail to Show
Loss of $500,000
NEW YORK, Aug. The. theory is
advanced by attaches of the district
attorney's office that Erwln Wider,
cashier of the local branch of the
Russo-Chlnese bank, who disposed of
$500,000 of the bank's ' funds in Wall
street speculation, has a large sum of
the bank's assets secreted somewhere.
This theory Is based upon examina
tion of the books of all the brokerage
firms with which Wider Is said to have
done business. It is reported that
while stock purchases have been
charged up against Wider, the total
found by, the district attorney's office
will not amount to more.than $200,000.
However, the authorities will renew
search for the missing money and
securities. ;; ■'t--:<\.-., .; ;>■;■
TUESDAY MORNING. AUGUST 2, 1910.
INSURGENT TELLS
OF TORPEDO BOAT
SCANDAL EXPOSE
Murdock Says Congressman Lil
ley of Connecticut Was
Hounded to Death
SPEAKER CANNON IS FLAYED
Investigating Committee Turned
Attention to Worrying Him,
Not Probing Case
(Associated Press)
KANSAS CITY, Mo., Aug. Victor
Murdock closed his primary campaign
today with a speech delivered from the
barony of the Y. M. C. A. building In
Kansas City, Kas. Ho talked of Speak
er Cannon and the national house of
representatives, dwelling at length on
the purchases' of submarine boats
made by tho United States.
Men who controlled congress, ho said,
purchased eight submarines when the
naval committee had asked for only
four.
"Let me tell you of Lilley," he said.
"Lilley was a congressman from Con-
necticut. One day, on Pennsylvania
avenue, he said to me, 'Great heavens,
what will the people do with this crowd
11' they ever get on to them?'
"He began to look around. Down in
the basement of the "White House, hid
away in little cubbyholes, he found
electric lights in obscure holes, where
no human foot had trod since the
electrician had put them there.
"He went on the committee on naval
affairs. There is a boat company that
manufactures submarine torpedo boats.
It has but one customer, and that is
Uncle Sam. The navy department
asked for four of these torpedo boats,
but congress gave it eight.
"Lilley thought there was something
wrong and he began to watch. Every
man said drop it— leave it alone. But a
special committee was appointed, and
then it soon developed that It was not
Investigating the submarine boat com
pany, but it was hounding Mr. LUlley
to death.
"The people of Connecticut elected
him governor, but he went down to his
grave pursued by a figure. The night
he died his last words were: 'Take it
away; don't let it touch me.' "
IOWA INSURGENTS WILL
NOT IGNORE PRESIDENT
To Indorse Taft on Progressive
Measures Only
DES MOINES, lowa, Aug. I.—Presi
dent Taft will not be ignored in the
platform of the Republican state con
vention which will be held here next
Wednesday. I His administration will
bo Indorsed, is as far as it has car
ried out the pledges in the platform of
1908."
This was determined upon at a snug
little meeting of leaders today. Among
those present was "Job" Lane of Dav
enport, who declined to serve on the
resolutions committee, thereby clear
ing the political atmosphere material
ly. George C. Curtis of Clinton, will
represent the second district on the
platform committee. This is said to
mean that the majority report of the
committee will fully. represent the
views of the insurgents, Cummins and
Dolllver. Thus the convention, In
which the progessive majority is
placed at 250 votes, will be spared the
trouble of substituting a minority re
port for the adverse majority.
Senator Cummins circulated freely
among his friends in the hotels to
night. Among these it was stated that
every act of the insurgent delegation
would be indorsed and that efforts for
harmony would not go to the length
of Indorsing President Taft on matters
where he and the Independent progres
sive Republicans have been at vari
ance.
BURGLAR HITS WOMAN;
SETS HOUSE ON FIRE
Masked Marauder When Discov
v ered Causes Blaze
RIVERSIDE, Aug. I.—Fire destroyed
the home of Mrs. Annie M. Cummins
at the corner of North Orange and
Santa Ana streets at 1 o'clock this
morning. Mrs. Cummins states that
she heard some one moving about on
her screen porch and called twice to
him without eliciting a response. She
then lighted a kerosene lamp for the
pupose of investigating. As she stepped
out ont on the porch a man wearing a
black mask knocked the lamp from her
hands. The burning oil was scattered
over the porch floor, which was soon
ablaze.
A flre alarm was sent in and the auto
chemical was sent out. By the time it
arrived, however, the entire house was
a mass of flames. Practically nothing
was saved. The house was valued at
$1500 and contents $500.
A black mask was found this morn
ing in an orchard near Elliotta, be
lieved to have been the one worn by the
man' who had the encounter with Mrs.
Cummins. •■•"...-''
LIEUT. COM. HENRY BAKER
GETS PUBLIC REPRIMAND
WASHINGTON, Aug. Lieutenant
Commander Henry T. Baker, on duty
at the Bremerton navy yard, Washing
ton,, was today reduced fifty-five num
bers and a public reprimand sent to
him by the navy department as the
outcome of a conviction by court-mar
tial on a charge of uttering a false
hood.
MILLIONAIRE WHO IS
TO ATTEND SCHOOL
AT THE AGE OF 45
'■tft ljjtf J
x
i
g.-* ■,■■■■■ ...... .>,,...,,., .w.-^ib^.iii.nfjtA
HAS RICHES; WILL
SEEK EDUCATION
Daniel Field Will Enter Harvard
to Gather Learning Early
Poverty Denied
BROCKTON, Mass., Aug. I.—Though
he has millions at his command, Dan
iel Waldo Field, aged 45 years, who
has made a fortune in the manufacture
of shoes, feels the need of education
and has just completed plans for en
tering Harvard. Field ir. his boyhood
days felt the pinch of poverty and an
extensive education , was through this
circumstance denied him.
Field will be the oldest student in
the university, but he hopes to fra
ternize with his collet j mates of more
youthful years.
Even though he has great means,
Field realizes his need of more edu
cation. What learning he has was ac
quired through contact with the world
in business circles.
"I realize," said Field, "that there
are many finer things of life that I
am unable to appreciate because of
my restricted education. It Is my pur
pose to fit myself to enjoy these things
which my wealth will give me access
to.
"It seems rather strange for a man
of my age to be going to college, but I
want to be put on a footing with my
college mates. I do not want my
wealth to prove a bar to my entrance
lp*o tlie fraternity which exists among
all college mennot the Greek letter
variety the fraternity of good fel- I
lowship." ,
SAN BERNARDINO GAS
CO. SUES FOR MILLION
Suit Grows Out of Bankruptcy
Proceedings
SAN BERNARDINO, Aug. I.—A suit
for damages in the amount of $1,000,000
was filed today by the San Bernar
dino Valley Gas company against the
Home Gas and Electric company of
Reldands, W. R. Cheney, A. Gregory,
J. P. Dostal, C. S. Chestnut, Pacific
Light and Power company, San Ber
nardino Gas and Electric company, the
First National bank of Redlands, H.
B. Duncan, W. M. Campbell, P. H.
Moore, L. Crulckshank, W. G. Kerck
hoff and A. C. Balch, charging that
they conspired to wreck the financial
standing of the San Bernardino Valley
Gas company, to destroy its business,
embarrass it in the conduct of its bus
iness, to prevent it from securing
money by the sale of bonds and plan
ning to take control of one or all of
the plants of the plaintiff company.
This suit is the result of the Involun
tary bankruptcy proceedings which
the defendants caused to be brought
against it before Judge Wellborn in the
United States court.
The San Bernardino Valley Gas
company Is a combination «£ all the
lndep:ndent gas companies In the val
ley, and includes San Bernardino, Red
lands, Colto.i and Corona. It was the
original plan to take in the Riverside
company, but this was never pur
chased.
SUIT FILED HERE
The Home Gas and Electric company
of Redlands filed an involuntary peti
tion in bankruptcy with the clerk of
the United States district court yes
terday against the San Bernardino Val
ley Gas and Electric company of Los
Angeles.
WIDOW CLAIMS SHE IS
VICTIM OF SWINDLERS
Accuses Architect of Fraud in
$35,000 Investment
NEW YORK, Aug. I.—An explosion
is promised In the trial of Harney
Wiley Corbett, a well known architect,
and his associate, John Qualey, a pro
moter, who are accused by Mrs. W. T.
Bull, widow of the eminent New York
surgeon, of swindling her out of $35,
--000, which she says she gave them for
investment in an asbestos company.
While arguments were being heard
today on a writ of habeas corpus,
Qualey Jumped up and called to Charles
L. Craig, counsel for Mrs. Bull:
"Craig, why don't you tell the whole
thing? It will all come out soon, and
it's going to be a big scandal."
"Tell anything you want to," re
torted Craig.
Corbett was formerly a resident of
San Francisco. /
MOYER ELECTED
TO PRESIDENCY
OF THE W.F.O.M.
Incumbent Wins Fight to Retain
Leadership of Big Labor
Organization
OTHER OFFICERS ARE CHOSEN
Butte Scores Victory in Contest
Over Meeting Place of the
Next Convention
(Associated Press)
DENVER, Aug. I.—The Western
Federation of Miners selected Butte,
Mont., as the next meeting place and
elected the following officers:
President, Charles H. Moyer, Den
ver; vice-president, C. E. Mahoney,
Denver; secretary-treasurer, Ernest
Mills, Denver; executive board,
Charles Tanner, Jerome, Ariz.; Roy
Cameron, Mullen, Idaho; J. C. Lowry,
Butte, Mont.; Jerry P. Shea, Park
City, Utah; William Tracy, Lead, S.
D.; William Davidson, Ontario, Can
ada; P. L. Ashley, Chicago; Yanco
Terzich, Nome, Alaska.
Practically all the business of the
convention has been disposed of, so
that with the session tomorrow, when
President Moyer will outline future
policies, final adjournment will be
taken.
Moyer was re-elected by a large ma
jority.
There was little opposition to the re
election of, Charles F. Mahoney of
Butte as vice president, but strong
opposition developed against the reten
tion in office of Ernest Mills as secre
tary-treasurer, and the result of this
vote was not known until tonight.
Butte had a runaway victory in. the
contest for the next convention.
The three actions accomplished by
the convention which are regarded as
having been of the most importance
are the unqualified indorsement given
to the fight being carried on in support
of the locked out miners in the Black
Hills mines, the strong indorsement
of President Moyer and the progress,
made toward affiliation with the Amer
ican Federation of Labor.
THIRTY THOUSAND MINERS
TO BE CALLED ON STRIKE
Negotiations with Southwestern
Operators Ended
KANSAS CITY, Aug. I.—Negotia
tions between coal miners and oper
ators of the southwestern territory,
which have dragged along over a
period of exactly four months, were
brought to an end today. A general
strike order will be issued immediately,
according to George Manuel, secretary
of the Missouri district, and 30,000 or
more miners who have not worked
since the expiration of the old contract
April 1, will be formally on strike.
The conclusion of negotiations came
after the miners had been in session
the greater part of the day and had
waited for the operators to agree to
their proposition to hold a joint ses
sion, at which a wage scale based on
what is known as the Cincinpati de
mand could be discussed.
Conference committees had been pro
posed by the miners to meet such con
ference committees as the operators
chose to appoint, but the operators
held that by agreement neither the
operators nor miners could demand a
Joint meeting and would make no con
cessions to this request of the miners.
Of the number of miners affected by
the strike order about 9500 are in Kan
sas, about 8500 in Missouri, 9000 in
Oklahoma and about 3000 in Arkansas.
Some 5000 in Texas, though in another
district, will be Indirectly affected by
the strike order, and this, too, will
have an indirect bearing upon the
miners in Colorado and other western
states.
At present there are a number of
"independent" mines in this territory
that from the beginning have paid the
wage scale asked and at these mines
there has been no cessation of work.
They employ about 2800 men. Em
polyes of these "independent" con
cerns will not be asked to discontinue
work.
LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERS
MAY CALL BIG STRIKE
CHICAGO, Aug. I.—Rpresentatives
of locomotive engineers of fifty-six
1 iroad systems west of Chicago met
here today to consider plans which
may result in a general demand for
higher wages. Warren S. Stone, the
grand chief of the Brotherhood of Lo
comotive Engineers, is in charge of the
conference, which represents about
25,000 men. Delegates declared it
would take several days before a uni
form schedule would be agreed to, af
ter which the schedule will bo present
ed to the roads.
EASTERN MILL WORKERS
RECEIVE WAGE ADVANCE
FRANKLIN, N. H., Aug. I.—The
'wages of thousands of paper mill
workers in New Hampshire, New York
state, Vermont, ' Maine and Massa
chusetts were advanced an average of
5 per cent today by the International
Paper company. The raise was one
of the conditions of the agreement
which ended the protracted strike in
several states last spring.
LOS ANGELES COMPANY'S
TREASURER IS ARRESTED
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. I.— On a
warrant charging him with obtaining
money under false pretenses, George
11. Maxwell, treasurer of a Los Angeles
manufacturing concern, was arrested
here today at the, instance of one of
the stockholders of the company.
CT\ T_PT Ii 1 PiMUIT.'C' DAILY So. ON TRAINS Be.
nlilljfJUlJ \al\ tl. 1 l^~ . SUNDAYS Be. ON TRAINS to*
WESTERN FEDERATION
PRESIDENT AGAIN
CHOSEN FOR OFFICE
CHARLES 11. MOVER
HARBOR ENGINEER
IS SERIOUSLY ILL
Lieutenant Leeds Is at Beach
Home Suffering from Lung
Trouble
SANTA MONICA, Aug. I.—Lieut.
Charles T. Leeds, United States en
gineer in charge of the Los Angeles
office, is seriously ill at the Gray
Gables apartments on Ocean avenue.
Instead of enjoying his vacation in a
regular • beach way. Lieutenant Leeds,
who came .here with his wife and two
children teh days <#go, is confined to
his bed, and for several days a phy
sician and nurse have been in close at
tendance. Although not out of dan
ger, his condition is improved, and his
physician expresses the opinion that he
will recover.
Soon after coming to the beach to
spend his annual vacation in relaxa
tion from his work in the interests of
Los Angeles harbor. Lieutenant Leeds
was taken sick with an affection of the
lungs. It is understood to have been
the result of an abscess on one of his
lungs breaking while he was attending
to an errand at Los Angeles last week.
Since then he has been unable to
leave his bed and has suffered a num
ber of hemorrhages. For a time Lieu
tenant Leeds' life was in great danger,
and heroic work on the part of those
in attendance has enabled him to sur
vive the crisis. Mrs. Leeds is con
stantly at her husband's bedside.
Dr. F. J. Wagner of this city, who
has been in attendance during Lieu
tenant Lcds' illness, said tonight of his
patient's condition:
"Lieutenant Leeds has just passed
the best twenty-four hours since he
has been ill. I consider his condition
serious, but his chance for recovery at
this time is good. There is no im
mediate danger."
LOS ANGELES OSTEOPATH
PERFORMS LORENZ SURGERY
Demonstrates Bloodless Opera
tion Before Convention
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. I.—The
fourteenth annual convention of the
American Osteopathic association was
Inaugurated today with a demonstra
tion of the famous Lorenz operation
performed by Dr. Harry W. Forbes of
Los Angeles upon 8-year-old Vera
Sternemann of Oakland, who was born
with an acute dislocation of the hip.
The demonstration of the bloodless sur
gery feat that was so successfully per
formed by Dr. Lorenz of Vienna upon
little Lollta Armour, daughter of the
Chicago packer, several years ago, was
witnessed by more than 500 delegates
to the convention seated |in the ball
room of a local hotel.
Dr. Forbes' skill in the performance
of the operation was applauded by his
audience. The condition of the pa
tient will be watched carefully and
dally observations '•will be made by ex
perts in order that a detailed report
of the case may be made for the study
of osteopaths.
Dr. F. C. Plckler of Minneapolis,
president of the association, was In the
chair at the opening of the session. Dr.
M. F. Hulett of Columbus, Ohio,
national treasurer, and Dr. 11. L.
Chiles of Orange, N. J., national sec
retary, assisted Dr. Pickler In opening
the convention.
A reception and ball were given to
night to the visiting doctors and the
members of their families.
The first business meeting will be
held tomorrow morning.
TO USE PASSBOOK SYSTEM
IN POSTAL SAVINGS BANKS
Committee Decides Coupon Meth
od Too Complicated
WASHINGTON, Aug. I.—The long
established passbook system used in
ordinary savings institutions will be
adopted for the government postal
savings banks. The committee that
has been perfecting the plans for the
postal banks had been considering
what is known as the coupon system
for postal banks deposits, but has now
decided that while having some ad
vantage that system might produce
complications.
According to the coupon system de
positors would receive with each de
posit a slip representing their deposit,
together with a coupon for the amount
of interest that would be paid on their
money. The committee decided there
were many objections to flooding the
country with millions of deposit slips
with coupons attached, many of which
would represent values of only a few
cents. v,y:;
CENTS
CRIPPEN READY
TO RETURN AND
ANSWER CHARGE
Police Plan to Win Confession
from Miss Leneve, His
Companion
REMANDED UNTIL AUGUST 8
Crowds Surround Palace of Jus
tice in Quebec to See
Prisoner }
NEW YORK, Aug. I.—ln a signed dis
patch from Quebec, which will be print
ed here tomorrow. Sirs. Fred titnett,
of Rosclle, N. ,T., who was a close per
sonal friend of Mrs. Hawley Crlppen
(Belle Elmore), writes that she lias po
sitively identified as Belle Elmore's, the
diamonds taken from Dr. Crlppen and
Ethel Leneve. when arrested.
(Associated Press)
QUEBEC, Aug. Probably not be
fore August 18 will Dr. Hawley H.
Crippen and Ethel Claire Leneve be
taken aboard a transatlantic liner
ound for England, there to stand trial
jointly accused of murdering a woman
believed to have been Belle Elmore.
The criminal la— of the British pos
sessions established this today when
the haggard dentist, whose flight end
ed so dramatically on board the steam-
er Montrose yesterday morning, was
arraigned before a magistrate and re
manded until August 8. The girl was
too ill to appear, but If her condi
tion improves she may be brought into
court tomorrow.
Crippen will not fight extradition. Of
the girl's attitude less is known. She
is still broken in body and spirit, al
ternately shaken with sobs or silently
morose. Her relatives in London are
beseeching her by cable to tell all and
the Quebec police are treating her with
a gentleness rarely accorded a pris
oner, even though a woman.
CROWDS SEE CIUPPEN
Forced through a curious crowd,
Crippen was taken today before the
provincial court of special sessions,
where he was formally questioned as
to his identity and notified that he
was under arrest for the murder of
an unknown woman. Remanding him
to August 8 was purely perfunctory,
as he and his companion, under the
fugitive offenders act, must remain
here at least fifteen days. On August
8 he will likely be remanded again
until the 15th, and the first avail
able vessel for England will not de
part until three days later.
By that time another detective from
Scotland Yard will have arrived, bring
in.;; a formal application for extradi
tion, although this application prob
ably will not be necessary, in view of
the accused man's declaration that he
will raise no obstacles to hi 3 return.
Although Cripf -n was the center of
attention when arraigned, perhaps the
most interestinng development of the
day was the extremely liberal treat
ment of Miss Leneve by the police.
Like Crlppen, she is accused of mur
der, but the girl today enjoyed the
freedom of the houso of Chief of Po
lice McCarthy.
OCT OP-JAIL
When taken from jail today It was,
announced she had been taken to a
hospital, but this proved to be Incor
rect. She is back in Jail tonight under
the care of a physician, but visitors
to the chief's house say they had a
glimpse of her walking about In the
yard for a breath of air, under care
ful but unobtrusive surveillance.
Many people believe the police are
so markedly lenient with Miss Leneve
not only because they pity her plight,
but also because they believe she
Is Crippen's dupe and that she may
turn against him on the witness stand.
This is the course her relatives in Lon
don are urging her to take, as several
cablegrams received today made ap
parent.
Crippen occupies a cell In the pro
vincial jail on the heights east of the
city, overlooking the St. Lawrence
river. He might ask to have the
American consul notified or seek an
attorney to Insure that he gets fair
treatment. The United States consul
here is Gebhart Will Rich, a former
resident of Milwaukee and St. Paul.
Rich said today that while he stood
ready to give Crippen all consistent
assistance, he had had no application
to do so and expected none. In fact,
he added, he saw no way In which he
could better the situation of the pris
oner in any way.
DEW RESTING
Inspector Dew is resting here after
his labors, an object of curiosity of
residents and to the tourists that
throng this queer old French city at
this time of the year, and the envy and
admiration of the local police.
A London dispatch says Miss Le
neve's relatives have retained counsel
here to defend her. but on this point
the police have received no official In
formation.
Crippen seemed utterly discouraged.
but so far as can be ascertained, ho
has let nothing slip that can be used
against him when he comes to trial.
Tlie police pin their Hopes upon Miss
Leneve, but following the wishes of
Inspector Dew they declare they are
making no effort to obtain confessions
and are not subjecting either prisoner
to anything approaching the "third de
gree."
Such efforts would be contrary to
British police methods.
Following the receipt of instructions
from Scotland Yard today. Inspector
Dew visited the courthouse and con
ferred for some moments with the
judge. Then he held a whispered con
ference with the Canadian detectives,
after which the latter hurried away
to the Jail. A report that they had
gone after Crlppen filtered through the
mass of humanity that extended in
every direction from the palace de
justice, high on the historic plains of
Abraham.
PRISONER ARRIVES
Presently the detectives with Crlppen
drove up to the courthouse in a car
riage and fought their way through the
crowd to the Judge's chambers. Crip
pen was brought at once to the bar.
(Continued en l'»*» T<**)

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