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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, August 13, 1910, Image 1

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COLUMBUS POLICE
MUTINY; GUARDING
OF CARS REFUSED
Thirty-Five of 140 Men of Night
Watch Rebel at Order
of the Mayor
DEPARTMENT DISAFFECTED
City Executive Makes Obnoxious
Command Under Pressure.
Little 111 Feeling Shown
OOMFMBCB, Ohio, An«. 12—Tber.
wan persistent rioting tonight In con
nection with the street car strike, twen
ty-three persons befog injured. A mutiny
In the police department, due to tlie re
fusal of one-fourth of the night force to
ride on cars, uk Mayor Marshall f ordered,
reduced the number so that all cara
could not be manned. '
Stone throwers lay In wait for ears
without guards, and pelted the crews
unmercifully. A score of carmen were
Injured.
There was little shooting, but 'the
troublemakers were more ruffianly, drag
ging crews from cars In several In
stances. Seventeen arrests were made.
It was announced at the company's
offices that a lockout had been decided
upon, effective at 1 o'clock Monday
morning. ,
The police are seeking John F. Uray,
leader of Imported carmen, on a charne
of shooting two women and a child In
front of their homes.
(Associated Press)
COLUMBUS, 0., Aug. 12.—Thlrty
flvi' out of 140 members of the night
police force rebelled 'tonight when
called on by Mayor Marshall to bourtT
street cars in an effort to catch per
sons attacking cars with stones, bricks
and bullets.
The mutineers. Mayor Marshall an
nounced, will be dismissed from tho
I nice tomorrow.
The mayor called only on regular
policemen to assume the duty on cars.
One hundred and thirty-seven special
policemen, engaged especially for riot
duty during the strike, were not drawn
on for this service as they were as
sl^:icd to places where trouble was
expected.
Included In the thirty-five mutineers
a l' some of the oldest men on the
fo.ee.
Until today Mayor Marshall had
withstood pressure brought to bear by
officials of the Columbus Railway &
Light company to put officers on cars.
City ollitials and members of tho
chamber of commerce joined in urg
liik the mayor to take this step and
he consented, although he said he did
not favor the plani^
MAYOR CHANGES POUCV
Within a few hours his change of
policy became known to the police and
there was widespread dissatisfaction.
This reached a culmination at roll call
this evening. The mayor began to
make assignments and those"~ in re
bellion stepped out of the ranks.
There was little ill feeling expressed,
although one policeman took off his
coat and asked the mayor to don It
and then board a car.
As reasons for their mutiny, some
said they had been warned by gro
cers and butchers that if they rode on
cars they would be refused provisions.
Others said they had belonged to
unions, and others that they might
wisli to join at some future time.
After having been told they had to
obey orders, two officers, who at first
rebelled, stepped back into line.
The mayor said he would man the
fifty cars the company expected to
operate tonight.
SPANISH STRIKERS STONE
TRAIN AND INJURE CREW
MADRID, Aug. 12.—The striking min
ers of Bilbao, capital of the province of
Biscay, are resorting to violence. Dur
ing the night they stopped a mineral
train and stoned the crew. Several
trainmen wore Injured.
The strikers then marched to the Al
corta mine, but were driven back by
troop 3.
A dispatch from Bilbao says artillery
has been mobilized.
ASSERTS DEMOCRATS WILL
BE IN CONTROL OF HOUSE
NEW YORK, Aug. 12.—Democratic
National Committeeman Roger C. Sul
livan of Illinois, who is in New York,
"looking over the ground," is alarmed
over the national dearth of Democratic
presidential possibilities.
"Just as present there seems to be a
strange lack of aspirants," he said. "Of
course, Ohio Is backing Harmon and
New Jersey is grooming Woodrow
Wilson for the candidacy. But these
are the only two possibilities I have
heard suggested, unless it be Senator
Bailey of Texas. Bryan, of course, is
out of it, though I presume he will
try. But I doubt if lie can command
the delegates from his state In the next
national convention."
Mr. Sullivan expressed complete con
fidence that the Democrats will con
trol the next house of representatives,
and, that Champ Clark would be Can
non's successor as speaker.
PURSE SNATCHER SUSPECT
IS KILLED BY POLICEMAN
SACRAMENTO, Aug. 12.—A man
giving his name us Charles Brown, sus
pected of being the purse snatch cr who
Iwis brutally beaten and robbed tlire •
101111:11 at ni^ht during the week, was
shot aiicl fatally wounded early this
evening by Patrolman George Mulley
when lie ;iiiiinpted to escape arrest.
Brown died in tlio county hospital lute
tonUlit.
LOS ANGELES HERALD
INDEX OF
HERALD'S NEWS
TODAY
■V ' FORECAST .
Los Angeles and vicinity—Fair Saturday)
light north wind. Maximum temperature
yesterday 80 degrees) minimum, SI) degrees.
—— •
LOS ANGELES
W. E. Stewart attempts to dash out his •
brains and slash his throat in re
ceiving hospital. • * PAGE 4
Jacob C. Seeley wealthy Michigan res
taurant owner, shoots his wife and
ends his owd lite. JAIII 0
Timothy Spellacy wins victory In suit
filed against him by C. S. Young. PAGE 8
Carl Schultier,' brewery worker, found
t guilty on charge of picketing. PAGE 8
Judge McCormlck halts struggle of at
torneys for Southern Commercial com
pany's stockbook. : . [ PAGE 8
Mrs. Annie M. Wentworth of Latin sues
Mrs. M. Vann for slander. I'AGB S
City council In special session approves
dales of aqueduct bonds, amounting
to 11.543.679. ;,v PAGE 9
Police think Vorrath. Blameso daylight
" pawnshop bandit, may have foreign
criminal record. PAGE 9
Llrrcoln-Roosevelters rally at Blanch
ard hall tonight. . .. PAGE 13
Local branches of state societies of
Indiana. lowa and Tennessee to hold
picnics today. •. «J ■ PAGE 16
Long delay In serving warrant in case
' of Earnest Llghtfoot case charged to
machine polities. - PAGE 3
Pacific Electric to make changes in sta
tion. \ PAGE i
Machine malcontents to steal Demo
cratic nominations through large stay
at-home vote.. » , PAGE 18
Churches. . PAGE 5
Mining and oil fields. PAGE 6
Building permits. PAGE 6
Shrpplng.- PAGE 6
Citrus fruit report. PAGE 6
Markets and financial. PAGE 7
News of the courts. PAGE 8
Municipal affairs. PAGE 8
Sports. PAGES 10-11
Editorial and letter box. PAGE 13
City brevities. • PAGE 13
Politics. , - PAGE 13
Marriage licenses, births, deaths. PAGE 14
Classified advertising. j PAGES 14-15
SOUTH CALIFORNIA
Tustln girl cyclist collides with wagon
and sustains severs bruises. PAGE 14
Managers of Pasadena hotels preparing
for winter tourists. PAGE 14
Long Beach holds first trial of man on
charge of violating anti-plcketlng
ordinance. PAGE 14
Woman writes San Bernardino coroner
asking word of missing brother. PAGE 14
COAST
N. Y. Ilcrald-Oregonian party fails to
make ascent of Mt. McKlnley. PAGE 3
San Francisco and San Diego fair com
mittees hold conference. -I PAGE 3
, / —•■
EASTERN
ThiVty-nve Columbus policemen rebel at
mayor's order to protect street - oars
from strikers. , - • r ■• • -PAQE-1
Senator Brlstow at Milwaukee riddles
reply of Senator Aldrlch on rubber
schedule. . <_ PAGE 1
Train near Rochester. Ind..' strikes an
auto, and chauffeur, woman and three
guests killed and two seriously In
. jured. ■-;■ ■ ' ' PAGE 1
Gore Investigation at Sulphur, 0k1a.,7
show Indians were- charged fees
amounting t\ 15,000.000. PAGE 1
Civil' service commissioners decide to
give local secretaries power to make
appointments to branches In the U. S.
army. PAGE 2
Plans proposed by governor of Colorado
opposed by state senators. PAGE 3
Postmaster general expects that postal
banks will be In operation by Novem
ber. . - ■ '..'-:' PAGE 3
Mayor Gaynor shows no symptoms for
worse and la expected to recover. PAGE 2
President Taft to readjust political cir
cle with elimination of Aldrich. Can
non and Balllnger. . PAGE 2
Gen. Wood orders troops to fight forest
tires which threaten towns and cities
in the northwest. PAGE 3
Joseph Wendling reaches Louisville, Ky., - .
after long chase across continent. PAGE 3
FOREIGN \
Bohemian peasants mob Americans fol
lowing auto accident. \ PAGE 2
American aviator. J. Armstrong Drexel, ..
makes world record for altitude at
Lanark. Scotland. PAGE 9
MINING AND OIL
It fs proposed the Standard and Asso
ciated Join Independent agency. PAGE 0
Oil fields about Tamolco active. PAGE 6
Local organization of former Goldfield
mine will drill for oil In Arnold dis
: trict. - PAGE 6
PARACHUTE FAILS TO
WORK; AERONAUT KILLED
Balloonist's Head Torn Off at
Asbury Park
NEW YORK, Aug. 12.—"Benny"
Prinz, a young balloonist, met death
this afternoon at the close of the avia
tion meet at Asbury Park, N. J. In
making a double parachute drop the
second parachute failed to open, and he
fell more than 2000 feet.
As the swaying body neared the
ground it struck the limb of a tree and
tlio boy's head was transfixed on the
limb.
As it struck the ground the headless
body was crushed into an unrecogniz
able mass.
Prinz was 26 years old and a daring
balloonist.
FINANCIER SUFFERS A
STROKE OF PARALYSIS
BE KALB, 111., Aug. 12.—C01. Isaac,
L, Elwood, who for years has been as
sociated with John W. Gates and other
prominent financiers of Chicago and
New York, is under the care of a
specialist at his country home. He has
not been well since the death of his
wife last month.
It was said today his condition has
taken a. turn for the worse. He is re
l,<n-tc'd In a state of nervous collapse
and that he suffered a stroke of par
alyili,
K. J. Ellwood, a son, arrived yester
day from his summer home at Harbor
view. Marblehead. Mass.
SATURDAY MORNING, AUGUST 13, 1910.
TRAIN HITS AUTO;
FIVE KILLED AND
2 BADLY INJURED
Hostess and Five Guests Hurled
from Machine Near Roch
ester, Indiana
CHAUFFEUR ALSO LOSES LIFE
Car Containing Joy Riders at
Staten Island Turns Turtle.
One Dead, Two Dying
(Associated Press)
LOGANSPORT, Ind., Aug. 12.—Five
persons were killed and two were ser
iously injured when a southbound pas
senger train on the Lake Erie &
Western railroad struck an automobile
at a crossing a mile east of Roches
ter, Ind., at 6 o'clock tonight.
The dead:
Mrs. Jjhn Keck, Logansport.
Mrs. John Eckert, 45, Logansport.
Miss Agness Eckert, 18, Loganspott.
Miss 1 na Wagnor, Indianapolis.
Charles Lambert, 40, chauffeur, Lo
gansport.
The injured are Carl Bucher, Lo
gansport; Miss Louise Eckert, Lo
gansport.
The party . was en route to Lake
Manitou when the accident occurred.
The automdblle belonged to John Kech,
a brewer of this city, and the mem
bers of -the party were Mrs. Kech's
guests.
Mrs. Kech died at the hospital at
Rochester at 9:30 tonight.
TWO MEN MEET DEATH WHEN
AUTO PLUNGES INTO RIVER
Open Drawbridge 40 Feet Above
Stream Causes Tragedy
BELLINGHAM, Wash., Aug. 12.—C.
B. Sterling, a commercial traveler of
this city, and Edward L. Rowland of
Anacortes, went to their deaths in the
waters of thf Skagit river at Mount
Vernon at midnight, August 9, when
an automobile in which they had start
ed from that city for Anacortes plunged
through an open drawbridge to the
river, 40 feet below. Nothing was
known of the tragedy until last even
ing, when the two men were missed
and it was accidentally learned that
the drawbridge had been opened to
let a steamer through just before mid
night Tuesday night.
On dragging the river, the canopy
top of an automobile was raised last
night and today an automobile, iden
tified as Rowland's machine, was lift
ed from the river bed. The bodies
were not recovered.
Sterling's widow lives near Los An
geles. Rowland leaves a wife and
three children at Anacortea. Row
land was formerly sheriff of Skagit
county.
AUTO OVERTURNSvONE MAN
DEAD; 2 DYING; 2 INJURED
Joy Riders Hit Obstruction at a
Forty-Mile Clip
NEW YOR*:, Aug. 12.—A 60-horse
power automobile, which was making
better than forty miles an hour in a
midnight joy-ride across Staten Is
land, early today, hit an obstruction
in the macadam road, near the little
town of New Brighton, and turned up
side down.
Of the five passengers, all men, one
was killed outright, and two were
fatally injured, while two received less
serious hurts.
The dead' man, who was driving the
car, was identified as John Lang, an
insurance broker, living nearby. His
fellow passengers, according to the
police, were friends whom he had in
vited to a speed trial by moonlight.
Two of them received fractures of the
skull and internal injuries, from which
they will die.
ALASKAN VOLCANO IS
AGAIN IN ERUPTION
Ashes Cover Decks of the Steam
er Corwin at Sea
SEWARD, Alaska, Aug. 12.—The
steamer Corwin arrived from Nome
today with the report that Mount
Shlsaldln, the highest volcanic peak
in the Unamik islands, i.s again in
eruption. Early in Juty Shisaldin was
very active, but after a short time the
erupton ceased.
Officers of the Corwin say thaty when
they passed the island a few days
ago the volcano was more active than
during the former eruption. A great
column of fire shot high into the air
and a vast volume of smoke poured
from the crater. The snow, which at
the time of the previous eruption had
not melted far from the crater, has
entirely disappeared from the sides of
the mountain.
Long before the Corbin approached
the island she was covered with white
volcanic ashes.
RENO JUDGE TO HEAR
McKIM CASE TODAY
RENO, Nev., Aug. 12.—Mrs. Margaret
McKim's suit for divorce against Dr.
Smith Hollis McKim of, New York will
be heard tomorrow before Judge W. H.
A. Pike.
The physician's time to answer to
the complaint or make appearance ex
pired yesterday, and Mrs. McKim's at
torneys asked for and were granted to
day permission to file a default. It
in not likely that Dr. McKim will be
represented at the trial. J
INDIANS FLEECED
OUT OF MILLIONS
BY LAND AGENTS
McMurray and Associates Stood
to Realize $5,000,000 Fee
from Aborigines
$750,000 ALREADY PAID FIRM
Investigation of Charges Made by
Senator Gore Develops
Gigantic Sensation
(Associated Press)
SULPHUR, Okla., Aug. 12.—Lawyers
expense acccrants, running as high as
»300,0UU, a single fee already paid
amounting to $750,000, and contingent
fees still pending that would aggregate
about $5,000,000, figured in the investi
gation of the Indian land office af
fairs by tne special committee ap
pointed by the house of representa
tives today.
It was pointed out that the Indians
never had received large amounts of
raone.- due them without having to
"come [.cross" in the shape of fees,
anJ though they employed lawyers on
yearly salaries, extra fees were con
stantly paid for the employment of
special counsel. The special fee of
$750,000 was paid several years ago to
J. F. Mcjiurray and his law partners
after they had prosecuted what are
known ..j the citizenship cases, while,
it is stated, they kept off the rolls 30,
--0/K claimants who wanted to parti
cipate in the claims against the gov
ernment.
By the winning of this suit, it was
explained the value of the- property
to the Indians who remained on the
rolls was enhanced $16,000,000, on a
basis of $5000 for each of the 32,000
claimants kept off. The sale of the
property and the division of the pro
ceeds Is still being fought for by the
Indians.
This testimony developed in the ex
amination of George F. Scott, a Choc
taw. Scptt was active in securing
signatures for the McMurray contracts
to promote the approval of which by
congress, Senator Gore charges that
May 6 he was offered a bribe of $25,
--000 or $50,01.0.
McMurray's contracts, Scott testified.
If carried out in their entirety would
dispose of about $58,000,000 worth of
property, which on a 10 per cent "attor
ney's fee" basis would result in a net
profit to McMurray and his associates
of $5,000,000. This fee, according to
Senator Gore and members of the com
mittee, who interrogated the witnesses,
would be paid for services that the gov
ernment already had promised to give
the Indians without cost.
Scott also showed in his testimony
that the cost of employing McMurray
would be in addition to the $30,000 now
paid annually to regular attorneys.
Scott's contention was that the attor
neys on the regular salary were not as
active as contingent fee attorneys.
Scott appeared after his name frequent
ly hart been mentioned by previous wit
nesses.
It was he who testified he had sent
telegrams to Washington urging the
approval of the contracts. He had been
working for McMurray with no writ
ten or verbal agreement, he said, as to
sharing in the foe, and had induced
many Indians to sign. He worked In
this respect among the Indians despite
the opposition of Green McCurtaln,
chief of the Chactaws.
In one telegram to Richard A. Adams,
an attorney at Washington, he referred
to Vice President Sherman and Senator
Curtis of Kansas as "understanding
better than anyone else what the In
dians wanted."
Questioned as to what he meant by
that, Scott said he understood that Mr.
Sherman and Senator Curtis long had
been familiar with Indian affairs, and
he thought they were the ones to be
applied to, notwithstanding it had been
shown that both Mr. Sherman and Mr.
Curtis had protested against the io per
cent fee. They thought it too high and
unnecessary
Before becoming connected with Mc-
Murray, Scott was treasurer of the
Choctaw nation.
A number of Indians testified to hav
ing signed telegrams sent to Washing
ton approving McMurray's contracts.
McMurray also has been at nil the
sessions of the investigation. He may
be put on the stand within a few days
to relate what he knows concerning
what inducements, if any, were made
to the Indians before they signed the
contracts.
IDAHO SENATOR STOPS
THE PLAYING OF 'DIXIE'
Heyburn Declares It Out of Place
• at Republican Meeting
SPOKANE, Aug. 12.—Senator W. R-
Heyburn of Idaho dislikes "Dixie."
He created a sensation at tho recep
tion given to Congressman T. R. Haraer
at Wallace, Idaho, last night by stop
ping the orchestra while the musicians
were playing tho popular strain. Con
gressman Hamer had just finished his
address, and the orchestra hail started
a medley of well known airs. About
the sixth number in the medley was
"Dixie." The senator leaped to his
feet, strode across to the musicians
and cried out:
"This is a Republican meeting. We
want no such tunes here."
The amazed musicians stopped imme
diately. The senator strode back to his
seat. After a moment of silence Mayor
Hanson arose and closed the meeting.
'GLAD TO SEE YOU,' WIRES
ABRUZZI TO MISS ELKINS
BASLE, Switzerland, Aug. 12.—The
duke of the Abruzzi arrived here Au
gust 9 from Italy and registered at the
Hotel Three Kings as Signor Sorrento.
He left Wednesday for Baden Baden,
after sending the following telegram
to Miss Kutlierine IClkins, who, with
her mother, has be.'li passing several
months on the continent:
"Shall be (lad.to t.ee you. lam ar
riving this evening.
(Signed) "ABRUZZI."
Some Startling Figures
Setting Forth Extravagances
of District Attorney
Expenses of Fredericks' Office Are
Shown by Official Records to Have
Almost Doubled in Three Years
IN its last two issues The Herald has published fac sim
iles of claims made out in the district attorney's office
in favor of his brother, but not in his brother's full
name, so that the beneficiary under the claims could be
identified. The Herald knows that the district attorney's
brother drew from the county of Los Angeles nearly $500
in this way.
The district attorney has taken sufficient notice of the
information concerning the management of his office which
The Herald has been furnishing the voters of the city to
publish what he calls an "explanation" in the two other
morning papers of the city. In this "explanation" he claims
that his brother, who was "an eminent physician in the
east," undertook this work "as a patriotic duty, only asking
that, if possible, his name be kept from publication, as he
was starting his professional career here at that time and
did not want to start it as a detective, even in so worthy a
cause."
It appears that the district attorney's brother received
nearly $500 from the county of Los Angeles within a period
of about two months for discharging his "patriotic duty,"
and it also appears from the district attorney's explanation
that he was starting his professional career here at that time
as a private detective.
If he was able to overcome his repugnance for the work
performed to such an extent as to receive the usual reward
for it, it is somewhat surprising that he was not also able
to overcome that repugnance sufficiently to receive this re
ward in the usual way prescribed for the making out of
claims against the county.
CITIZENS AND VOTERS WILL PROBABLY
THINK IT COMES WITH POOR GRACE TO SAY
THAT HE WAS PERFECTLY WILLING TO ACCEPT
THE USUAL PAY FOR SERVICES WHICH HE
WOULD NOT PERMIT HIS NAME TO BE CON
NECTED WITH.
As for the district attorney's explanation that "Our
work would soon end if we did not use some concealment
in these matters," a sufficient reply would seem to be that
in the detective force of the city of Los Angeles, which is a
good deal larger than that of the district attorney's office
and has much more important work to do, the chief of polite
does not find it necessary to permit his detectives to draw
their salaries under assumed names.
Amazing Facts Shown by Records
But the facts showt\by The Herald will probably appear
more significant in the light of certain figures concerning
the expense of running the district attorney's office which
The Herald has collated.
FROM* THE REPORT OF THE AUDITOR OF LOS
ANGELES COUNTY FOR THE SIX MONTHS END
ING JUNE 30, 1906, IT APPEARS THAT THE COST
OF RUNNING THE DISTRICT ATTORNEY'S OF
FICE FOR THAT PERIOD WAS $19,008.
For the purpose of comparison, we would also call at
tention to the fact that the same report shows that the cost
of running the 1 nine departments of the superior courts for
the same period, including the salaries of nine superior
judges, was $22,670.75.
The total cost of running the sheriff's office for the same
period was $13,234.61.
THE AUDITOR'S REPORT FOR THE FIRST SIX
MONTHS OF 1909 GIVES THE TOTAL COST OF
RUNNING THE DISTRICT ATTORNEY'S OFFICE
AS $35,181.54.
The total cost of running the TWELVE DEPART
MENTS of the superior court is given as $33,191.68.
The total cost of running the sheriff's office for the same
period is given as $19,341.47.
We thus see that while within three years the cost of
running the superior courts with the number of su
perior judges increased by 33 1-3 per cent, had increased
less than 50 per cent, and the total cost of running the sher
iff's office had increased less than 50 per cent, THE TOTAL
COST OF RUNNING THE DISTRICT ATTORNEY'S
OFFICE HAD INCREASED MORE THAN 85 PER
CENT.
Costs More Than 12 Superior Courts
FURTHER, THE REMARKABLE FACT IS
SHOWN THAT IT COST FOR THE FIRST SIX
MONTHS OF 1909, $2000 MORE TO RUN THE DIS
TRICT ATTORNEY'S OFFICE THAN IT DID TO
RUN ALL OF THE TWELVE DEPARTMENTS OF
THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THIS COUNTY, AND
NEARLY DOUBLE WHAT IT COST TO RUN THE
SHERIFF'S OFFICE.
One remarkable item of the district attorney's expendi
ture for the first halt of 1909 is shown by the auditor's re
.port as "Special detectives $7039.43." For running the
sheriff's office the auditor's report shows the salary of sher
iff.and detectives $15,002. Or, to put it another way, the
district attorney's office spent for special detectives almost
50 per. cent as much as was expended by the sheriff's office
in the salaries of the sheriff and all of his deputies.
In connection with the claims for payment shown for
his special detective work we would like to ask the district
attorney two questions:
First—ls it not true that at the request of Walter Parker
he has placed members of Mr. Parker's political machine on
his payroll as detectives simply for the purpose of making
places for them ?
Second —Is it not true that detectives paid by the county
money have been employed about his private business?
The Herald will gladly publish the answers of the dis
trict attorney to these two questions, at the same time re
serving the right to publish certain information which it has
upon these matters, and which, whether the district attor
ney answers the questions or not, it proposes to use in its
own good time.
CJTXTr^T Ih 1 i 'ni>l • PAir.v tc. on trains So.
JSIJN L*-L<lil L/WIIIjO. SUNDAYS 8«. ON TRAINS lOn.
BRISTOW RIDDLES
ALDRICH'S REPLY
ON RUBBER TRUST
Senator Delivers Address at Mil
waukee Answering Framer
ALL PRICES ARE ADVANCED
Shows That Trust Did Not Need
Added Duty for Protec
tion of Industry
MILWAUKEE, Aug. 12.—Senator Jo
seph L. Bristow of Kansas, in his
speech here tonight, which he stated
was in reply to the letter of Senator
Nelson W. Aldrich, defending himself
against the charges of the Kansas sen
ator relating to the tariff on rubber,
launched into the subject by saying:
"Senator Aldrich declares the Inter
continental Rubber company is not a
trust, and at the same time admits
that it is a holding company."
Senator Bristow then took up Mr,
Aldrich's declaration that neither he
nor his family had profited directly
nor indirectly by the tariff on manu
factured rubber, saying:
"Yet he admits he is producing mil
lions of pounds of crude rubber per an
num, selling it to American manufac
turers, and that he increased the duty
on their products when they did not
need it for protection."
Then referring to his own speech at
Wintield, Kas., on July 9, Senator Bris
tow declared Mr. Aldrich took exception
to his remarks on the rubber duty e»
pecially.
"He ignores the other features of my,
speech," Mr. Gristow said.
ORGANIZING COMPANIES
Going Into the question of organiza
tion of the Inter-Continental Rubber
company. Senator Bristow quotes from
his own speech, saying the Inter-Con
tinental Rubber company was organ
ized in New Jersey January 29, 1903,
and that the Continental Rubber com
pany of America was organized in New
Jersey January 5, 1906, and further
that Mr. Aldrich says "the first two
companies named were subsidiary com
panies of the Inter-Contineiital Rubber
company and that it owned all , their
stock and that they were organized for,
the sake of convenience." *
Mr. Bristow asked "How could they
bo subsidiary companies of the Inter-
Continental and organized for its con
venience, when both of them were or
ganized before it was?"
Senator Bristow's speech, In part,
follows:.
"Mr. Aldrich declares the Inter-Con
tinental Rubber company Is not a trust
and at the same time admits that it is
a holding company that controls nu
merous subsidiary organizations that
were organized for the purpose of
handllnng the crude rubber business in
various parts of the world.
"He says that he! nor his family has
profited directly or indirectly by tho
tariff on manufactured rubber; yet, ho
admits that he is producing millions
of pounds of crude rubber per annum,
selling to American manufacturers, and
that he increased the duty on their
products when they did not need it for
protection, and when they already had
control of the American market and
were exporting manufactured rubber;
that is, he increased the duty, enabling
manufacturers to advance the price to
American consumers, and admits that
they did advance the price, yet he says
that he nor his family has not profited
directly «r indirectly.
"He admits that dividends had not
been paid before the consolidations of
the various companies into one, and
that after the consolidation enormous
dividends were paid, as stated in my
speech.
"In my speech at Winfleld, Kas., July
9 I criticised the tariff bill, referring
especially to duties on lead and lead
products, cotton cloth and woolens,
especially referring to duties on cotton
cloths and manufactured rubber. I
said those duties were fixed, not in the
interests of the people, but in the in
terest of certain trusts, combinations
and speculators.
VI 11 KM II s EXCEPTIONS
"Mr. Aldrich, in a signed statement,
takes exception to my remarks on tho
rubber duties. He ignores the other
features of my speech. He also made
a number of sarcastic references to
myself and other Republican senators
who saw fit to vote in the interest of
our constituents, rather than as Mr.
Aldrlch wanted us to. His opinion of
myself and the other senators is of
little consequence, but I desire to call
special attention to some of the state
ments of Mr. Aldrich, made in hia
explanation. He says: 'It is true that
an Increase in the rate took place in
paragraph 403, which includes certain,
manufactures of India rubber with
other items, and it is true that I am
a stockholder and director in the In
ter-Continental Rubber company; but
none of tho other statements referred
to contains a single element of truth."
"Now what were the other statements
L made.' I stated that the Continental
Rubber company was organized under
th.3 laws of New Jersey, January 29,
1U03; that the Continental Rubber com
p.Li.v of America was organized under
the laws of New Jersey, January 5, 1908,
and that the Intercontinental Rubber
company was organized under the ]aw 3
of New Jersey, December 6, 1908.
"Now. Mr. Aldrich says the llrst two
companies named were subsidiary com
panlea of the Intercontinental Rubber
company, and that it owned all of their
stock, and that they were organized
for the sake of convenience. How
could they be subsidiary companies of
the Intercontinental Rubber company,
and organized for its convenience, wheD
both of them were organized before it
uas-one of them almost three year*
before?"
FOND L.U L.AC, Wis., Aug. 12.—A.
a. Crane, giving his home as Milwau
kee, attempted today to rob the Coles
Savings ln.k. It.' was pursued by citi
zens through the streets,-firing his re
volver as he fled, and was finally cap*
tured by W. J. lloth, a Chicago travel
ing man. „.-;:
CENTS
of the Schedule
(Associated Press)
HID NOT NKKI» HUTY
ATEMPTB TO ROB BANK

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