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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, August 16, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-08-16/ed-1/seq-2/

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*\s£r^Bosm D*yGoodsSkk
The Fall stock of "Trefousse" Kid Gloves ready now.
You can buy them In no mther Los Angeles store. ..
We close Saturdays at 12:30 until Sept. Ist. ,
■ ■ - (IVVVVVVVVVVVW**" .
Towels Reduced
ACTUAL reductions—not make-believe
mark-downs from fictitious valuations.
20x39-inch soft all-line huck towels, 25c; regularly 30c.
23x51-inch fancy stripe Turkish —very fine and soft—
30c each; regularly 40c.
. 23x45-inch bleached Turkish bath towels of good weight,
; hemmed, 25c; regularly 35c.
19x38-inch hemmed huck towels — a half-linen fabric of
serviceable qualityl2|c each; regularly 15c.
27x43-inch diamond checked Turkish towels, hemstitched,
and with pink or blue borders, 50c; regularly 65c.
*'.--*' •' ■ ■ '
Women's $ Children's
Hosiery ■ .
Price-cuts that will surprise good judges
; of hosiery values:
50c a pair for women's black silk lisle stockings of the 75c
quality; double soles, heels and toe.
Women's white embroidered lace lisle stockings of the $1
grade at 75c.
Children's tan and black stockings of the 20c quality for 15c
Odds and ends of children's 25c and 35c white, black and
tan stockings now 20c or 3 for 50c.
! » ■
■\ i (Main Floor, Rear.).
J. W. ROBINSON CO.
235-239 So. Broadway 234-244 So. Mill Street
Our New Exclusive Victor Talking
f Machine Department Now Open
' Pay us a visit. Buy your next record here. ■■ ■ , . ■, ;
Beyond any question we now have the. largest, most convenient, best
furnished department in the city. It is on the main floor. .
. | We. have always made a specialty of Victors, believing them to be the
■ best—both as to the artists who made the records and the machines them
selves. ' The fact that we have had to enlarge twice -speaks well for our
judgment.
Give us a call—easy payments—everything in stock all the time.
It pays to trade with a Big Organization.
\\C. /lift crT OUT AND JdAUj OTHER STORES
,TCIO"^J.O _ „ ''-.-; San- Francisco, Oakland,
~ , riea.e . mall me Catalogue San Diego, San Jose, Sac.
Vk/\lltn ot Motors. rnmento, Kurrka, Phoenix,
l3UUt.il „ El Paso. Portland, I(<-<1
-—, i >amo lands, San Bernardino,
KfftJlflWflV A.l*™.. *'lintß Barbara, Imperial,
DlUaUWdy Addre lluntlngton Beach.
________________________________________________
BEQUEST OF $400,000
GROWS TO $7,000,000
Relatives Contest Will of New
Yorker Which Leaves Mil
lions to Charity
NEW YORK, Aug. 15.—1t was eight
years ago when John Master-son i
a. retired New York business man, an
nounced that ho had made a will leav
ing the majority of his estate for the
founding of a home for convalescent!
in New York. He estimated that the
fund then invested in stocks, bonds
and real estate would amount to nearly
$400,01
When he died a year ago the real
and securities had increased in
and It was announced that the
fund would probably reach $5,000,000.
Relative! contested the will u-nd the
ii:ih been In the courts ever since.
A ■ ision regarding the will lias Just
been rendi red and the trustees now de
. after a careful appraisal, that
the foundation la worth mon than
$7,000,000.
The real estate Investments have
proved particularly wise, and it Is be
lieved with the exercise of oare in
marketing them the total lund may
reach nearly $7,00(1,000.
Nothing yet has licen done toward
building the homo and the sito even
has not been seld ted.
FIND UNIDENTIFIED BODY
SEWED UP IN GUNNY SACK
MISSOULA, Mont., Aug. 15.— The
body of an unidentified man, sewed up
in a gunny sack with tho arms pro
truding from the is discov
er d today on the Zimmerman ranch,
near Bonner, Mont.
Tho coroner and county attornf-y an:
making an investigation. Thi ippo
nitlon li that a. murder was committed
in the vicinity and th.it tho victim's
body was being dragged to the river
by the slayer when the latter was
frightened away.
FILIPINO INDEPENDENCE
NOT NEAR, SAYS TAFT
Strenuous Week of Political Con
ferences Scheduled for
the President
BEVERLY, Mass., Aug. r>.—This
was the one off day in what promises
to be a big week, politically, in Bev
erly. President Taft had but two en
gagements. Tomorrow Senator Crane,
who baa been on an automobile tour
through New Hampshire and Vermont,
will be here.
Tin? president told Leonard Oaorloa,
a former governor of one of the Philip
pine province!, that ho might vl»lt the
Philippine islands during ld.s term of
office, Mr Osorios asked the president
when he thought independence would
be granted to the Filipinos. Mr. Taft,
it is said, made answer in the same
way he spoke while in the islands. He
■aid Independence would not come
with the present generation, nor with
the next, but that the third genera
tion might enjoy It.
Judge J. D. Woodmansee of Cincin
nati, an old friend of the Taft family,
was the president ■ second caller,
Judge WOOdmanAee said he felt sine
the Republican! were going to win
In Ohio, but It would take a thorough
campaign of education to bring suc
cess.
"Education as to what?" waa asked.
"The tariff," came the quick reply.
37 DEAD; 58 WOUNDED
ROYAN, Franco, Aug. 16. Thirty
i dead and .18 wounded have been
recovered from tho wreck of the Bor
deaux excursion train which yester
, rashfil Into ;i freight train nt
Baujon while runniiiK at a speed of
50 miles iin hour. Six cars of the ex
cursion tfain wero telescoped. Tho
accident was caueed by a misplaced
switch.
ll'k •• »»»y i" incurs m wirgaln In a a»4
»utomobl)«. throu«h want advertising, a* It
<U'd to bo— (till U-to ■•euro a hor»
And cDTlwa.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: TUESDAY WORKING, AITGtJST 16, 1910.
EXPOSE METHODS
OF LAND SHARKS
TO LOOT INDIANS
Probers Told That Fees for Sale
of Redskins' Land More
Than Property Brings
CONDITIONS ARE SCANDALOUS
More Testimony Given Regarding
Fat Contracts Obtained
by Lawyers
(AMOctettd Frpss)
SUI,PHfR. Okie,, Aug. 16.—Details
of a scheme by which "land grabbers,"
organized systematically to etlflch
themselves at the expense of minor
Indians, were related at the
Blotial Investigation into Indian affairs
today.
In one instance it was asserted that
the cost of disposing of the property
of one 18-yeMr-old Indian was $207")
more than flip property brought, and
the condition which permitted this and
similar deals was declared to be "a
disgrace to Oklahoma."
Hearing that the scheme prevailed
generally, Representative rhilip P.
('ampbell of Kansas, a member of the
investigating committee, had put on
the stand James Yarborough, a Chick
ns.nv Jndian hy intermarriage.
"Do you call this sort of thing graft
ing or Just plain stealing?" asked Mr.
Campbell after the witness had related
the circumstances.
CAULS I^AWS A SCANDAL
"Well, the people down our way think
it is a scandal that the laws permit
such a thin?, and we think it is time
that congress takes notice of it. The
probate court at Durant allowed the
guardian to sell for $2800 a tract of
1000 acres of what is known as allotted
land owned by an Indian 18 years old.
The guardian then put in a claim on
the proceed*, The claim included $SSO
for acting- as guardian. $1650 for im- |
proving the land, $500 for a barn, $60 |
for posts, $250 for fences, $6S for wit
ness fees and more money for other
purposes. It was found when the deed
was closed that the child owed his
former guardian $2075, and now the ;
guardian is threatening to have prop
erty of the child sold in order to get
the $2075.
"I know of another case in which 325
acres were sold for an Indian child
and when all the claims were paid the !
child got $350. In another Instance j
$1500 was obtained for 200 acres, but
the child pot only $120. In other words,
the children of deceased Indians in this
state, where are located one-third of
all the Indians in the United States,
are systematically being robbed of the
estates allotted them by the govern
ment. The property is sold at prices
dictated by the land robbers. The chil
dren are robbed at both ends—at one
end by their guardians, and at the
other end by the purchasers."
COURTS ALLOW 08481
"Do you mean to say that, such
things are countenanced by the pro
bate courts?"
"Yes, they go on with the full knowl
edge of the judges. Thousands of
acres of property thus are taken from
the Indians and thrown into the hands
of white people. The Indians are get
ting poorer and the land grabbers
richer."
Most of today's testimony was given
By the witnesses for the defense. J. F.
McMurray, whose 10,000 contracts al
lowing him a 10 per cent attorney's
fee for the sale of $30,000,000 worth of
Indian land caused the present inves
tigation, sought to show that a large
percentage of the signers were still In
favor of his terms. A dozen Chicka
saw Indians testified they were willing
to increase the fee if it would result in
the prompt sale of allotted lands held
in trust by the government.
Thomas B. Crews, an attorney of
St. Louis, testified that he had con
tracts with 700 freedmen, or negroes,
who claim Indian blood,. or claim to
be descendants of former slaves of In
dians. These freedmen state they
were wrongly kept off the citizenship
rolls. On the basis of his contract Mr.
Crews said he would be allowed a 35
per cent attorney's fee. A citizenship
right is estimated to be worth $5000.
The 700 claimants, if successful in liti
gation, it was said, would ' acquire a
claim on the government of about
$3,500,000. The attorneys' fee involved
would be $1,226,000, It was estimated.
HAD CONTRACTS WITH NEGROES
Mr. Crews said he also had contracts
with about 100 negroes who desire to
take advantage of the right to par
ticipate In twenty acres of land at an
appraised valuation in addition to the
twenty acres given them as freedmen.
Under contract ho is to furnish the
cash to purchase and Is to receive in
return one-half of the land.
In another set of contracts, he said,
about 1200 Choctaw Indians in Missis
sippi want to get enrollment here on
a 25 per cent basis.
Cub Roam, an Indian, testified that
he had been prevented from securing
the position of delegate to Washington
for the Choctaw tribe because he was
opposed to the MeMurray contracts.
Roam declared he had protested to the
Indians that a 10 per cent foe to Mc-
Murray would be too high, and that
the government already had promised
to sell the land without expense to
them. It would, therefore, he fcaid,
amount to giving McMurray $:j,000,000
for doing what the government could
perform without McMunay's aid. For
taking this view, he said, ha Was not
allowed to represent the Indians at
Washington.
Couglass H. Johnston, chief of the
Chlckasaw tribe, Mas in favor of tho
contracts, he, said.
W. H. Paul, a. Chlckasaw, told of
having' received a Share Of $4!)0u for
getting the McMurray contracts signed.
Attorneys for McMurray put on wit-
In favor of the. contracts.
POSSE SCOURS WILDERNESS
FOR SUPPOSED MURDERERS
RATON, N. M., Aug. 15.—A sheriffs
is still scouring the wild, rooky
section southwest of hare In search
of the two Buppoaed Montenegrins who
yesterday killed Tony Tomlch, a coun
tryman i" this Oity and fled.
The gill, Petra Perovich, over whom
tin- tragedy is thought to have occur
red, was brought here today but sin
speaks little English and the authori
ties thUB f;ir have been unable to ob
tain any information from her.
it is supposed the men who slow
Tomich diri mi !>■ cause tho latter was
about to marry tin- girl, the charge
being that the vrw recently held as
a white slave in Chicago.
ACTING MAYOR OF
NEW YORK DURING
GAYNORS ILLNESS
; -'' SB
JOHN PIRROY WTOHBLL
NEW YORK, Aug. 15.—John Purroy
Mitchell, president of the board
of aldermen of New York city
and acting mayor, was elected on the
fusion ticket at the last election.
He was to have taken Mayor Gay
nor's place while the latter was away
and should the mayor die will assume
the reigns of government until a suc
cessor is chosen.
GAYNOR STILL ON
WAY TO RECOVERY
Doctors Say He May Leave Hos
pital for Adirondacks
in Two Weeks
JTETV YORK, Aug. "Midnight—
the mayor has been sleeping since the
last bulletin.
- "(Signed) ARIJTZ,
"BREWKR."
The following: bulletin on Mayor Gay*
nor's condition was timed 9:80 o'clock
last evening: but was not Issued until
after 10:30 o'clock:
"There has been much improvement In
the mayor's condition today. Ho Is tak
ing nourishment well, has been com
fortable and has rested from time to
time.*'
(Associated Press)
NEW YORK, Aug. IB.—Mayor Gay
nnr's progress toward recovery from
the bullet wound inflicted by James J.
Gallagher was uninterrupted by any
untoward symptom today. Surgeons In
attendance predict that he will be able
to leave the hospital for the Adiron
dack! in two weeks and be back at his
desk at the city hall, if he desires,
within a month.
Rufus Gaynor, his son, is eVen more
optimistic. "We all aspect my father
to be able to leave St. Mary's hospital
in ten days," he said.
"And it would not be surprising if
the physicians were to release him
within a week.
•His condition today is very encour
aging and we will look for rapid re
covery."
Father and son discussed briefly to
day the incidents of the shooting, but
the mayor carefully refrained from
asking the name of his assailant or
hia motive. He explained the circum
stances of the tragedy as he has re
membered them, and remarked at no
time did ho lose consciousness.
BUYS TOYS FOB ORPHANS
After the conversation he sent Rufus
to New York to purchase toys for or
phans who are invaiid wardmates in
St. Mary's hospital with the wounded
mayor.
Detectives are carefully investigating
the rumor that Gallagher was the tool
of others who sought to take the may
or's life, but so far not a shred of evi
dence to support this has been found.
Gallagher reiterated that he acted en
tirely alone because he thought he was
the object of persecution by city offi
cials.
It was learned today that the mayor
was Inoculated with tetanus anti-toxin
as a safeguard. No sign of blood
poisoning In any form has developed
and no announcement has been made
when, if at all, an operation to re
i over the bullet will be performed.
Among the messages of sympathy
received today, was one from the Aber
nathy boys, Louis and Temple, dated
Guthrie, Okla. It read:
"Just returned from ranch and
learned you had been shot. W« are
sorry. Hope you soon get well,"
WILL NOT PERMIT MOVING
PICTURES OF SHOOTING
NEW YORK, Aug. 15.—The New
York police have taken stops to pro
vent the exhibition here of any mov
ing picture reproductions of the shoot
ing of Mayor Gaynor.
It was learned today that the police
commissioner has issued orders to in
spectors, captains und patrolmen to
watch all moving picture theaters
within their jurisdiction for announce
ments of such reproductions and also
to notify the proprietors and managers
of such places In advance that any
reproduction of the shooting of Mayor
Qaynor will not be tolerated.
The police of several other cities
have indicated that they will take sim
ilar steps, it is said
PACKERS' RECORDS GONE;
JURY ASKS EXPLANATION
CHICAGO, Aug. 15.—The United
States grand Jury here investigating
the Chicago packers devoted the day
to an effort to learn whether certain
stenographers' notebooks of Armour &
Oa had been destroyed by employes
of the corporation after they had been
ordered produced.
It was in connection with the de
struction of these notebooks that Al
fred H. Urion, chief counsel for tho
Ing houses, was ordered to show
why he should not be cited for con
tempt of court.
BELIEVE GIRL TOOK LIFE
SAX FRANCISCO, Aug. I.").—The
body of a drowned sirl found y
day on the shore of Lake Blerced in
this city, was identified today ai that
of Miss' Anna IMor.son, sister of Mlks
Clarice Plerson. bead nurw of the
city and county hosi>ital. The police
believe that she committed suicide.
STATE TO ASSIST
1915 EXPOSITION
Expect Governor Will Call Special
Session of Legislature to
Consider Bonds
ASK $5,000,000 FOR PROJECT
Legislative Favor Will Enable
California to Outbid
New Orleans
v •■ ! ' v> '--,"•' "■ •/■'.-■
(Associated Press) ]...
SACRAMENTO, Cal., Aug. 15.-GoV
ernor Oillett will undoubtedly call a -
special session of the 'state legislature
to take . action upon' the i question of
Issuing $R,009,000 bonds to assist In se
curing the Panama-Pacific internation
al exposition in 1915 for" California and
San, Francisco. At least that •is ■ the
way he feels at this time. He will,
give the matter thought tomorrow and
decide Wednesday. ... . i \ .
The governor is in receipt of a letter
from the Panama-Pacific International
exposition" management of San Fran- I
Cisco, in which he is asked to convene
the state legislature In extra • session ,
for the purpose of passing an amend
ment -to the state constitution, to be
voted at the election in November, witn
the cibject of bonding the state for
$5,000,000 to support • ■ th» proposed I
world's fair in 1916. • • ;
The amendment will provide for an
annual state tax of 4 cents on the $100 j
for five years.
If the electors of California subscribe
to It by voting favorably on the resolu
tion it will place California in a posi
tion to outbid New Orleans for the
fair. • '
LOUISIANA TO ■ ACT . • )
The state legislature of Louisiana is
in session, having met today for the
purpose of bringing before the voters
of that state the necessity of making
the exposition a state affair and giving
authority to the officials of that state
to Issue bonds In support of their
claims. ' .
According to the letter from Director
General R. B. Hale of the San Fran
cisco committee, all • expenses of the
special session of the California legis
lature will be paid by that committee
and' the state will not be called upon
for a dollar. • ■■' ; '
In order that the state shall have
the disbursement of this great sum,
it is proposed to have the governor ap
point a commission which shall have
complete charge of all expenditures
and the closing up of all details of
the work of the exposition. ;
Another thing that will be voted on
if U.J legislature meets will be a
change in the San Francisco charter,
allowing that city to increase its bond
ed indebtedness, as it Is close to the
limit at this time. This will be done
to permit that city to become more
liberal with the exposition fund U
necessary.^^E* support , ;
San Francisco business men have
pledged the sum of $7.500,0000. 'Mie city
is bunded for $5,000,000 more, and with
the $5,000,000 to be raised by state tax
ation there will be the sum in the ag
gregate of $17,500,000 to be presented
to congress when it meets next Decem
ber, if the constitutional amendment Is
made.
The governor today said:
"I am inclined to believe that the
whole state is so intensely interested
in gotting the Panama-Pacific Interna
tional exposition for San Francisco on
account of the great good It will be
to the state, and to the whole Pacific
coast, for that matter, that there will
be no objection to the calling of an
extra session of the legislature. We
want to be ready when- congress con
venes to show it that we have the
money. It Is a question of money. We
want to appear In Washington with a
sum of money so large that New Or
leans will quit. It will take a big
amount, and we want to "be there with
the goods.'
WORLD WATCHING US
"The canal will soon be completed
and the eyes of the world will be upon
us and upon San "Francisco. We don't
want to be bumped off the map by
New Orleans.
"The exposition people say they will
pay for the expense entailed by the
meeting of the legislature in extra
session, and the state will be to no
expense whatever. The legislature can
convene, a resolution calling for an
amendment to the state constitution
by which the entire state may be bond
ed In the sum of $5,000,000 be adopted
and the whole work done In three or
four days at tho outside. This amend
ment can then b<i submitted to the vot
ers of California at the next election in
November and they then can pass
upon It.
"If the legislature does this the ex
position will become a state affair,
and thiß will insure sufficient money
to carry on the work. The legislature
of the state of Louisiana is in session
today to do what It is asked for by
Now Orleans, and we want to be pre
pared for any emergency bidding:, and
have enough to secure the prize."
LOUISIANA TO RAISE BID
FOR 1915 EXPOSITION
BATON ROUGE, La., Aug. 15.—
Convened In extra session to consider
a proposition for raising $6,500,000 in
support of an exposition to be held in
New Orleans in 1915 to celebi'ate the
completion of the Panama canal, mem
bers of the Louisiana general assembly
gathered here today.
A joint resolution was passed at the
recent regular session of the general
assembly proposing a constitutional
amendment for a tax of $4,000,000. Sev
eral days ago it was suggested that
thi.s amount be incteused to .$6,500,000
and Governor Sanaers called an extra
legislative session to consider it.
BUSINESS MEN WILL AID
IN CLEANUP OF CHICAGO
CHICAGO, Aug. 15.—-Tomorrow is set
aside by city officials as the day for
a general "cleanup."
„ "In view of the extended drouth
which Chicago has experienced during
the last few weeks," said Mayor Busse,
"I believe that this year's cleaning
day should be participated In by every
ablebodled citizen In the city. In some
sections of the city conditions are not
as they should be, but if the citizens
help tho street department it will be
a great aid."
"Every prominent business man in
the city is In favor of this matter of
a 'cleaning day,' " said B. J. Mullany,
commissioner of public works, "and
I expect a number of millionaires will
be out on the streets sweeping up
the debris which has accumulated dur
ing this warm spell."
■ ; „ AMUSEMENTS
MOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER "near™.®™:
Election Returns
will be announced from the stage at the Burbank tonight. N Don't
stand around the streets and wear out your shoes. Come in, be
comfortable, hear the returns and see the best show in town
m, m ii rat -^ \r ' 1
The Talk of New York
Prices, 25c, $oe, TEc. Matinees Saturday and Sunday, 10c. 2tc, 800. . . >-
; Next . —"Salvation Nell." Return of A. Byron Beasley. 1
I ess .•.•?KX'.,.d Vaudeville |r™?:=Lr
Indies and children., . I American attraction*.
Edwards Davis & Co. \ f—~~ 1 Marion Murray & Co.
"The Picture of Dorian dray.' "The Prlma Donna's Honey
- James Thornton Matinee Sienor Travato
"Songs and Sayings.' . ... Eccentric Violinist.
Imperial Musicians Today* Pringle & Whiting
Tweh'e Soloists. . "Breaking Into Vaudeville. 1
> Zoo Circus '' v Jolly Fanny Rice
Prof. Apdale's Animals. • ■• -Miniature Mimic Stag*}.
...i , ; . . ORPHriIM MOTION IMCTIRKS
i."'.-' EVERY NIGHT 10c. 2.".c. 50c, 760. MATINEE DAILY 100. 25c. 50c.
BUI * crn TUPAWD Brlasoo-Blßckwnoil Co., Proprs. anrt Mere.
ni^rta^U ltia,t\iaiX%. MATINEES Thursday, Saturday, Sunday.
'. TONIGHT AND THIS WEEK ONLY— Belaico company presents LILLIAN
,--.--. RUBSKLL'S comody success, I
[ «* Widow's Might
A lattlins fine comedy, the very sort of a play that will entertain you and make you
' laugh. • •
BELASCO PRICE*— He, 600 and 75c. Matinees. JBo and 50c,
NEXT WEEK — Hoyt's great piny. "A CONTENTED WOMAN." Seats sellln*.
mos ANGELES THEATRE
&*£m&aJm%ir¥A UDE VILLE
Mildred StOller, Met» & I WAtSON, HITTCIIINOS . I 4 RIO Brothers, Weber A
Meti, The Laugh-O-3cope I & EDWAKIM. I Weber, Exccla & Frank*.
Popular 'prices—loc. 20c and 30c. _
/""* RAND OPERA HOUSE Matinees Today and Sat.
• A "',.,"" ot The Fatal Scar „
T ABOR TEMPLE AUDITORIUM
Grand Benefit
For the wives and babies of the men on strike. A MONSTER VAUDEVILLE TRO
liit.VM. three hours' solid fun mid enjoyment provided by n host of talented artists.
LABOR TEMl'Llfl AI'DITOWITM. »40 Maple aye.. Ang. 18, H p. m. Doors open 7 p. m.
MASON OPERA HOUSE " w- T- £%££:
WEEK AUG. MATINEE SATURDAY —OPENING ATTRACTION
FOR SEASON 1910-1911—FREDERICK THOMPSON PRESENTS
THE SPENDTHRIFT
By Porter Emerson Brown, with DORRI9 MITCHELL and a notable cast of player*.
PRICES 50c TO $1.50. SEAT SALE THURSDAY 9 A. M.
COMINQ—MISS HENRIETTA CROSMAN. .
LPW'Q PAT?TC fHAMTANT third AND main STB.
ROGERS, STEWART & EI.WOOD, the three Klnm of Harmony; 808 AL
BRIGHT, the Man Melba; LA SOLITA. Spanish Dancer, assisted by E. ORTIZ;
ALBERT GREEN, basso contante, and KAMMERMEYBR'B ORCHESTRA.
OLYMPIC THEATER o^jj-jgwjg-g
ALPHrN AND FARGO OFFER "THE SAUSAGE MAKER," with OLLIE MACK
AND JULES MENDEL. TEN Bill SINGING AND DANCING NOVELTIES. 10c, 200
and 25c. , ' ' . ■ ■ '■ ' ■ ■ ■ •' ■ '■■ -' '. '
T.R. AND GRISCOM
MUM AFTER TALK
Conference Held to Further
Cause of Harmony
in the Party
(Aas.aated Fret*)
OYSTER BAY, Aug. 16.—N0 tidings
of the conference between Theodore
Roosevelt and Lloyd C. OriHcom,
chairman of the New York Republican
county committee, have been sent to
the public.
The county chairman is known to
have been the bearer of a message from
President Taft and it was generally
supposed that the message was sent
in the hope of obtaining Colonel Roose
velt's outspoken support In a move
to obtain harmony with the Republi
can party. But when Mr. Griscom went
away after a talk which lasted most
of the clay the only thing he was will
ing to speak about was the New
York state situation. He said Taft
and Roosevelt were in full accord
in that regard.
In spite of Colonel Roosevelt's ret
icence, it is believed hero that he has
mapped out a program which does not
include, for the present at least, a def
inite indorsement of the Taft admin
istration. Thore is good ground for
the belief that the visit of Mr. Gris
com today on his return from Bever
ly has not caused him to alter his
opinion.
GRISCOM RETICENT
Mr. Griscom was not anxious to
make it appear that he had come to
Sagamore Hill us an emissary from
the president. He not only wald that
the president had not sent him, but
added that Mr. Taft did not know to
day's conference was to be held.
''How do the views of the president
and Mr. Roosevelt coincide in refer
ence to national politics," Mr. Griscom
was asked.
The county chairman replied: "I did
not discuss national politics to any
great extent with President Taft."
"Are they agreed as to the New
York state situation?"
"Ye 3, I have discussed candidates
and platforms and the whole New
York state situation with both of
them and their views coincide."
Mr. Griscom said that no names had
been mentioned prominently for the
gubernatorial nomination, although a
good many had been considered.
T. R. TO VISIT SOUTH
NASHVILLE, Term., Aug. 15.—For
mer President Roosevelt and Gilford
Plnchot are among those who will at
tend the meeting of tho Brotherhood
St. Andrew in this city Sept. 23 to
Oct .2.
ABUTMENT COLLAPSES ON
LABORERS; TWO KILLED
WATERTOWN, N. T.. Aug. 15.—
While a gang of between iKty and
seventy-five Italian laborers were at
work today excavating for a raceway
in the bed of Grass river, at the foot
of the 300-foot concrete dam that is
being built a mllo above Massena, the
huge abutment, nearly forty feet high,
tollupsed. Two bodies have been re
covererl. It is believed the bodies of
several other laborers are buried un
der the concrete.
MITCHELL SCORNS
PLATFORM HONORS
Former President of Mine Work
ers Declines Seat at India
napolis Convention
(Amoclated Press)
INDIANAPOLIS, Aug. IB.—John
Mitchell, former president of the United
Mine Workers, who appeared in the
convention of the organization today,
did not stampede the delegates for an
indorsement of the Illinois strike as
was predicted by many. Mitchell, after
his few words this morning, when he
refused to take a seat on the platform,
took no part in tho convention.
"I am here as a delegate only," he
said. "I have no preconceived notions
as to what I shall do, but it will be
for the beat Interests of tho miners."
Mitchell represents the Spring Val.ey,
111., local.
ll.nis MAY BE DEPOSED
The first hint that an attempt would
be made to depose Lewis came durinp
a heated discussion between President
Walker of Illinois and Delegate Hagen
of Kansas. Hagen accused Walker of
telling the Illinois delegates that an
attempt would bo made to force
through the compromise so that the
delegates of the southwest would get
the benefit of the strike assessment.
Walker denied the charge, and Lewis
ordered both to their seats, saying that
the minors would go home better or
ganized than ever.
"Yes, and we'll have a new president,
too," shouted a delegate.
"No you won't have a new president,
either," replied Lewis.
The roll call by districts to obtain
expressions on the amount of tHe as
sessment to be levied for the strikers
was to be completed this afternoon,
and Lewis announced that he would
take the floor in the morning and
show that some of the delegates,
especially President Walker, had made
mistakes in expressing their senti
ments.
COMPLETE FIFTH LAP IN
488-MILE AERIAL RACE
Magnificent Weather Favors the
Cross Country Contest
AMIENS, France, Aug. 16.—Favored
by magnificent weather, the competi
tors In the great cross-country aero
plane race of 488 miles arrived here
today, completing the fifth lap of
4!l 6-100 miles from Doual without in
cident. Lc Blanc and Aubjrun, who
alone remained in the contest for the
$25,000 prize, were accompanied by Lie
Oagnieux.
Le Blanc increased his lead in the
contest, covering the distance in one
hour 16 minutes 29 seconds, Le Gag
nleux taking 1 hour 23 minutes and 51
seconds, and Aubrun 1 hour 24 minutes
12 seconds. Le Blanc's total time for
the five laps thus far completed is
10 hours 16 minutes 49 seconds; Au
brun'.s 11 hours 26 minutes 67 seconds.

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