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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, August 17, 1910, Image 14

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1910-08-17/ed-1/seq-14/

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14
Late News from the Neighboring Towns and Cities
PASADENA
On i tmyomirmt—
>«■■ phono
■■mill 4MT.
OFFICE, 8» WEST COLORADO STREET. PhoaM t«M.
WANT HEAVY TEAMING
ON MARENGO AVENUE
Petition Circulated to Throw the
Boulevard Open to Busi
ness Traffic
PASADENA, Aug. 17.—An effort will
be made today by interested taxpay
ers to persuade the city council to re
peal the ordinance which classes Ma
rengo avenue, one of the city's show
places, as a boulevard and prohibits
heavy teaming on the thoroughfare.
A petition containing 200 signatures
has been prepared for presentation to j
the council, declaring that there Is a
widespread belief around the city that
the ordinance is illegal and unfair;
that the character of the street, run
ning, as it does, north and south I
through the city from end to end, I
should make it a public thoroughfare
open to all alike, and that the closing
of the thoroughfare is class legislation
and works an Injustice to the Inhab
itants in some part of the city.
This action Is the outcome of several
arrests made early in June for viola
tion of the ordinance. J. R. Bradley,
a driver for the Pasadena Milling com
pany, was arrested on June 9 and his
case taken under advisement by Jus
tice McDonald until July 6. Following
the arrest of Bradley, drivers for the
Pasadena Ice company, the Simons
Brick company and several orange
growers were brought Into court and
action deferred pending the outcome of i
the test case.
H. M. Cole, outside superintendent
for the Orange Grove association and
spokesman for the other interested
firms, stated yesterday that their at
torney has appeared on several oc
casions ready to proceed with the case,
but that they have received no satis
faction and that the petition to the
city council was decided upon as the
best manner In which to bring the
Issue to a conclusion.
According to Mr. Cole, the enforcing
of the ordinance necessitates a haul of
two miles farther for those of the
southeast section who want to reach
the business district, and owing to the
fact that the thoroughfare was open to
all traffic for twenty years before
being closed to heavy teaming he says
the ordinance should be repealed and
the cases thrown out of court to save
expensive litigation for all concerned.
WILL ASK COUNCIL TO
HASTEN BOND ELECTION
PASADENA, Aug. 17.—The board of
trade directors met last evening and
passed resolutions to be presented to
the city council today formally rec
ommending the plans for an Intermedi
ate bridge to span the arroyo from
Colorado street west, as agreed upon at
a joint meeting of the board of trade
bridge committee and the city council
Monday afternoon. The council will be
asked to push the matter to the point
of calling a bond election as soon as
possible. It is said the first step will
be to take the question up with the
county supervisors and ascertain what
portion of the estimated $150,000 the
county will appropriate for the struc
ture.
The directors appointed a committee
to arrange for the entertainment of the
Whittier board of trade when that body
passes through Pasadena on September
i) on Its trip to Mount Lowe. A com
mittee was appointed to work In con
junction with a committee from the
Pasadena Medical society to arrange
for a Pasadena Day for the entertain
ment of delegates to the meeting of the
American Medical association in Los
Angeles next June, and authorized the
secretary to write to the national li
brarians Inviting them to hola their
1911 convention In Pasadena.
NAZARENE CHURCH CAMP
MEETING OPENS TODAY
PASADENA, Aug. 17.—The annual
campmeeting of the Church of the Naz
arene of Southern California will open
today and continue until August 28, on
the new campmeeting grounds adjoin
ing the college campus of the Hugua
ranch at Kast Washington street and
Hill avenue. Rev. C. B. Jernigan, Naz
arene evangelist from Oklahoma, will
conduct the services, assisted by Dr. F.
P. Bretee of Los Angeles, Rev. J. W.
Goodwin of Pasadena and others. Over
100 tents have been erected to accom
modate those who wish to spend several
days at the meeting. Services will be
held in a large tent on the campus.
Dedicatory services for the Nazarene
college; will be held on Wednesday,
August 24. The college will open Sep
tember 19 with Miss Cora Snidor In
charge. Foundations have been com
pleted for the college dormitory and
plans are progressing for the other col
lege buildings to be erected on the site.
A ranch house Is being used as an ad
ministration building pending the con
struction of the proposed new structure
to take care of the business in con
nection with the $1,000,000 group of na
tional educational buildings to be erect
ed by the University of the Church of
the Nazarene.
PASADENANS PREPARE FOR
SEVENTH ANNUAL PICNIC
PASADENA, Aug. 17.—Today will be
a busy one tor Pasadena housewives
and others who are preparing for the
seventh annual Pasadena picnic -to be
held tomorrow in Long Beach. Owing
to the special transportation rates and
reduced prices for the beach conces
sions made for this occasion, many
Pasadenans who otherwise might be
deprived of the opportunity are af
forded a chance to "take the family"
to the beach for an outing, and it Is
estimated that over 8000 will be in at
tendance tomorrow at the picnic.
Lunch baskets are being resurrected
and put in shape to be filled for to
morrow's journey. The picnic com
mittee furnishes free coffee, lemonade
and Ice cream, but the picnickers are
required to furnish cups and spoons,
The closing committee of the Mer
chants' association has requested all
places of business to close tomorrow
PASADENA CLASSIFIED^
PASADENA SHOE HOSPITAL
MK.VB BEWEL» 3OLES AND HEELS, |1|
ladlM", Me. 164 N. FAJR OAKS AYE. 8-1-lmo
Ctrrnlatlon D«pt.
Home IMZ.
Sonut 1740
for the occasion, the day being de
clared a civic holiday by Mayor
Earley.
THROOP MAKES IMPROVEMENTS
PASADENA, Aug. 17.—Dr. James A.
11. Scherer, president of Throop Poly
technic institute, recently returned
from a month's outing in northern
California and Oregon, announces that
work of installing the machinery in
the new Throop building on East Cali
fornia street is progressing favorably
and the registration to date gives
promise of a good year to come. Prof.
R. W. Sorenson, formerly of Pittstleld,
Mass., and Prof. Charles H. Tick
lighter, recently of the Florida uni
versity, who have been selected for
positions on the engineering faculty,
have been superintending the setting
of the machinery.
YAW TEACHES 'NEWSIE'
PASADENA, Aug. 17.— "Shorty"
Brandenburg, Pasadena newsboy pro- |
tege of Ellen Beach Yaw, returned i
yesterday from Covina, where he has j
been studying music under the noted
singer, who predlots wonderful results
from the strong tenor voice of the ]
■'nowsie" if properly trained. He is I
proudly showing a letter from hisj
teacher commending his progress. He
will continue his lessons with his
teacher until she goes on her concert
tour in the fall, when he will rehearse
his lessons until her return to her
winter home in Covina.
OPEN TOURNAMENT TRACK
PASADENA, Aug. 17.—Beginning
next week and until Labor day, the
track at Tournament park will be
open on Monday, Wednesday and Fri
day evenings from 5 to 7 o'clock to
motorcyclists who are going to enter
the Labor day races and who wish to
practice for the occasion. The sports
committee of the Pasadena Labor Day
association met last evening to arrange
details of the day's sports for the cele
bration on September 6, and they
promise an Interesting list of events,
which will be free to the i public.
CANADIANS PLAN OUTING
PASADENA, Aug. 17.—Former Can
adians of this city are preparing for
the annual summer outing of the state
society to be held at Echo park, Los
Angeles, on August 30. Sports on land
and In water are being planned to en
tertain the members who attend.
SANTA ANA
Offlc* Slfl N. SyfjMitom
Www nine SIS; Sowm* Btaek TO.
SANTA ANA DESIRES TO
BUILD CONVENTION HALL
Organizations Ask the City Coun
cil to Submit the Ques
tion to Voters
SANTA ANA, Aug. 16.—1n order to
accommodate conventions that may be
brought to Sant<-# Ana the chamber of
commerce, the Merchants & Manufac
turers' association and the Church fed
eration want the city to vote |40,000
bonds and build a big convention hall.
The request that the bonds bo sub
mitted was made by the three organi
zations at the meeting of the city coun
cltl last night. Further discussion is
to take place at a meeting to be held
Thursday evening. The councilmen
stated that they expect to submit a
number of other Important bond mat
ters, and they are afraid that the vot
ers will think an additional $40,000
will be too much to meet their appro
val.
The trustees Instructed the city clerk
to advertise for park sites or from
10 to 25 acres. Should It develop that
advantageous purchases can be made,
the city will buy property to be used
at some future time for park pur
poses.
WILL HOLD SERVICES AS
MEMORIAL TO RIDGEWAY
VENICE, Aug. 16.—Memorial servi
ces will be held at the Sunshine rest
room on the Ocean Front next Sun
day night for John H. Rldgeway of
this city, who was drowned yesterday
while attempting to assist In the res
cue of Miss Bertha F. Hartnal of Pas
adena from the surf. Rldgeway was
an active gospel worker here.
No trace has been found of the body
of Rldgeway, which was carried out
by the tide yesterday. A member of
the life saving corps has been stationed
on the beach to keep constant watch
for the body, which is expected to be
cast up by the waves in the next two
or three days.
FILL THREE VACANCIES
IN REDLANDS SCHOOLS
REDLANDS, Aug. 16.—Three of the
vacancies In the Redlands schools
caused by resignations of teachers dur
ing the summer months have been
filled by the school trustees by the ap
pointment of C. L. Paxton to the de
partment of physics in the high school,
Clarence W. Hardy to be assistant in
manual training in the new polytechnic
high school and George Mansfield of
Fullerton to be principal of the Lin
coln grammar school.
Mr. Paxton is from Helena, Mont.,
is a graduate of the University of
Michigan and has been touching in the
Montana state normal. Mr. Hardy Is
from Oshkosh, Wls., and is a graduate
of the Hackley training school.
STEALS FRONT WHEEL
OF OFFICER'S BICYCLE
KKDLANDS, Aug. 16.—Policeman
Walter Thomas of the night force is
looking for a clever thief who had the
nerve to rob a bluecoat.
Last night the officer rode to his
work on a bicycle. leaving It loaning
,t the Jail building. He law It
several times during the night, his beat
Including the territory surrounding the
Jail, but early in the morning when ho
wan ready to ride home lie found some
one had taken the front wheel from the
blcyelo and tarried it away, leaving
the frame and rear wheel for the or
flcer.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: WEDNESDAY MORNING, AUGUST IT, 1910.
LONG BEACH
CIRCULATION lIttI'AKTMKNT
4 l-la* st. Horn* 280; Sunaet MIL
CORRESPONDENT
nonit. 483; Sun«ot 1151.
DUNNED BY CREDITORS,
MERCHANT TAKES LIFE
Commits Suicide When Told to
Assign Stock or Store
Closed by Sheriff
LONG BEACH, Aug. 16.—"You'd
better assign, or somebody will close
you up," said one of William I. Mc-
Caslin's creditors to him early this
morning in the new store opened by
McCaslln at 1854 East Fourth street,
! July 1. With tears in his eyes the
| merchant turned away. Walking to
the platform in the rear of his store
he fired two shots from a revolver into
the left side of his chest and fell in
a passageway between the platform
! and the firm's auto delivery wagon.
McCaslin died in the Seaside hospital
at 10 a. m., two hours after shooting
himself.
When asked at the hospital why he
had attempted suicide, McCaslin said,
"They drove me to it." It is thought
he referred to his creditors.
McCaslin leaves a widow. A brother,
James McCaslin, of Redlands, is vis
iting In this city and was notified
shortly after the tragedy. McCaslin
was about 38 years old. Three years
ago a store which he owned at the
corner of Elliot street and Klnta ave
nue was destroyed by fire and was a
total loss. Later he and C. D. Whaley
owned a store at 1854 East Fourth
street. He opened the store where
he committed snicide on July 1.
McCaslin had been despondent re
garding his debts for several days. S.
Spickard, a business partner of the
dead man, and Ray Brainard, a clerk,
were In the front part of the store
when McCaslin shot himself. S. H.
Lynn, 239 Kennebec avenue, whose
home is close to the store, and William
Schaetzel, a boarder at the Lynn
home, said this morning that yester
day at the same hour as that at which
the shooting occurred they heard two
shots fired, apparently at the same
place. They believe that McCaslln at
tempted to kill himself then or was
practicing with the revolver, which
! had long been in disuse.
WAGON RUNS OVER MAN,
INJURING HIM SEVERELY
Motorcyclist Struck by Auto; Foot
Injured—Chauffeur Smashes
Thumb Cranking Car
LONG BEACH, Aug. 16.—Edward
Hastings, aged 67, who formerly lived
at the Monterey apartment house in
Los Angeles, and now lives at the
camp of the Oil Macadam Paving com
pany, by which he is employed as a
brakeman, was knocked down and run
over by one of the company's wagons
this afternoon. His hips were cut ana
bruised, and he suffered Internal In
juries. He was taken to the Seaside
hospital. His Injuries are not believed
to be fatal.
P. S. Howell of 1900 American ave
nue, while riding his motorcycle near
Los Alamltos today was struck by an
automobile, which caught on a pedal
of his machine. The pedal was ripped
off and Howell's foot was severely In
jured. He was thrown heavily to the
ground. The automobile did not stop
to aid the man or inquire about his
injuries.
Krle Gerard was Btruck on the right
hand by the back-firing crank of his
automobile this afternoon. His thumb
was mashed.
PETITION OF STRIKERS
IS PRESENTED BY MAYOR
LONG BEACH, Aug. 16.—Mayor
Wind ham today carried a communica
tion from the Craig shipyard strikers
to John F. Craig, asking that Mr.
Craig grant the concessions the union
men asked at the time the strike was
declared. Additional concessions were
asked, Including the replacing of all
Japanese laborers with white men
within thirty days, the reinstatement
of all former employes and new ar
rangements with the piece workers as
tp their wages. A nine-hour day until
next May was asked, after which time
an eight-hour day is desired.
Mr. Craig prepared an answer in
which he stated that he considered the
demands as coming from San Fran
cisco unionists. He said he could not
grant the concessions asked for but
that he would be willing, as before,
to discuss reasonable concessions with
his workmen.
UNCLE OF MAGAZINE MAN .
DIES IN LITTLE ROCK, ARK.
LONG BEACH, Aug. 16.—Mrs. A. C.
Grube has received the sad news of
the death of her uncle, James C.
Chappie, a retired merchant of Little
Rock, Ark. His death wa.s BUdden and
occurred at the home of his son Earl in
Huntlngton, N. Y. He was an uncle
of Joe Mitchell Chappie of the National
Magazine of Boston, Mass.
He spent last summer in Long Beach
with his family, and had Just written
that he expected to return next sum
mer. Apoplexy caused his death. Mr.
Chappie was a thirty-third degree-
Mason.
WOMEN SLIDE DOWN BLUFF
LONG BEACH, Aug. 16.—Sensation
al as any slide of life was the sudden
descent of the ocean bluff near the
foot of Locust avenue today Dy Mrs.
Augustus Brallch of West Ocean ave
nue, and her friend, Miss Mildred Mil
ler of Palms. The women were stand
ing near the edge of the bluff, watch-
Ing the strollers along the strand, when
the earth crumbled under them and
they slid down the steep blurt. They
landed on thoir heads 25 feet below.
Neither was injured.
LONG BEACH, FOR JOHNSON
LONG BEACH, Aug. 16.—The elec
tion here today was comparatively
quiet. It wni forecasted (his evening !
that the town had given Hiram John
son at least several hundred majority, j
A full vote was not cast. The Lincoln- ,
Rooievelttra had a good organization
and had a number of automobiles at ,
work early. There was little If any
show of organization on the part of
the regular Republicans.
LONG BEACH ITEMS
LONG BEACH, Aug. 16.—Mrs. C. N.
Buckler, owner of the $100,000 building
destroyed by fire In El. Paso, Tex.,
Sunday, when the mayor and two fire
men lost their lives, was a guest at
the Virginia at the time. On receipt
of a messa*," regarding the fire she
left hurriedly for her home. She Is
said to have received an annual reve
nue of $20,000 from the building, but
to have carried only $30,000 insurance
on it.-
J. F. McGarry, a local capitalist, had
a prolonged fight early this morning
with four dogs which attacked him
While he was returning to his home
after a dip in the surf. He was clad
only In a bathing suit and it took vig
orous action to save his bare legs from
severe Injury. He escaped with slight
scratches, which a physician cauter
ized.
At a conference held last night the
Rev. George Lehigh of Indianapolis,
Ind., informed the pulpit committee of
the Baptist church he would notify
them definitely by September 1 wheth
er he would accept the call to the lo
cal pastorate.
The residents of the seventh want
put In circulation today a petition
asking the council to call an election
to vote a special tax levy for retain
ing the municipal band and purchas
ing a $20,000 -ark in the seventh ward.
John Btrnie, who recently completed
an aeroplane northwest of this city,
will make a second test of the con
trivance on receiving a new 80-horse
power engine from Los Angeles • Sep
tember 10. •■•■■■
« ■ »
OCEAN PARK
Circulation, A. 3. Yager, cor. Surf and
Trolleyway. Phone Home 4303.
7orrrßpondent, Home 4381; Sunset 791.
CITY ELECTRICIAN IS
OUSTED BY TRUSTEES
Ocean Park Department Head Is
Dismissed for Lack of
Economy
OCEAN PARK, Aug. 16.—Charles
Groesbeck, city electrician, building
and plumbing inspector, has. been re
lieved of his position by the city board
of trustees. In taking this action it
was stated by Trustee Howard S.
Lorenz that Groesbeck has not "made
good" in following the plan of the
board of trustees to observe the strict
est economy. Provision has not yet
been made by the board to nil the
vacancy. Groesbeck will serve until
September 1.
Trustee H. B. Eakins today asserted
the belief that the Edison Electric
company is back of Groesbeck's dis
missal. He said that Groesbeck, who
is his partner in the operation of the
Venice garage, has conducted the af
fairs of his office financially to the
benefit of the city, and for this reason
the electrical company has suffered a
loss in business and has its "knife out"
for Groesbeck.
In refuting this charge, Trustee
Lorenz, who is employed by the elec
trical company and voted for the
measure ousting Groesbeck, declared
that the inspector agreed to perform
the work of his office for a salary of
$100 a month. Instead of this, Trus
tee Lorenz said, Groesbeck hired an
assistant at the rate of $3.50 a day,
which has been paid for some time by
the city. Trustee Lorenz scouted the
idea that his company was Interested
in the action of the trustees. Trus
tee Eakins did not know of the con
templated dismissal of his business
partner until it was brought up at the
board meeting. He was alone in voting
against the measure.
ERECTS HEADSTONE TO
CAT WHICH SAVED LIVES
Monument Placed on Grave of
Feline Which Aroused House
hold During Fire
NEW YORK, Aug. 16.—1n memory of
Tabby, a cat who nve years aso saved
the lives of Melville W. Smith, a
newspapec editor of 1130 Halsey
street, Brooklyn, his wife and three
children, a small granite headstone was
erected yesterday over the pet's grave
in the rear of the Smith home.
Tabby had Just passed his fifteenth
birthday when on Monday he was
killed by a Halsey street trolley car.
His death was witnessed by Mr. Smith,
who tried to rescue his pet from the
wheels of the oncoming car. The cat
had been deaf and nearly blind lor a
year, and neither heard nor saw the
approaching trolley.
It was on a cold winter night in 1905
that Tabby endeared himself to the
members of the Smith household. While
all were sleeping soundly a coal flew
nut of the grate in the kitchen stove,
setting fire to the woodwork. Tabby,
on his cushion near the stove, discov
ered the danger and ran upstairs to
the bedroom of Mr. Smith.
Leaping on the bed, the cat pulled
at the covers and meowed so lustily
that Mr. Smith was awakened. Ky
that time the house had filled with
smoke. Groping through the hallway,
Mr. Smith, after arousing his wife, as
sisted the three children from the
house.
"If it hadn't been for Tabby we
should have been suffocated," Mr.
Smith often said.
BOTH KINDS OF LUCK
Excited Son— Ye've hooked a graund
big one this time, father.
The Angler—O, aye! I expect the
fish is a 1 richt, but I'll feel mlchty
relieved when I get that half-a-croon
fly safely out o' his mouth. —SI. A. P.
HIMSELF INCLUDED
Herr Pastor —I've made «evn peo
ple happy today; I've just married
three couples.
Friend—But that's only six pe(»ple.
Herr Pastor—Well, how about my
self ?—Slmplicissimus.
SANTA MONICA
Circulation —Home 4711) Snnnrt W(ll.
Correspondent—Horns 43111; Sun»rt 791.
CITY TO COLLECT ON
BOND OF RALPH BANE
4
Santa Monica Council Orders the!
City Attorney to Proceed j
*
Against Indemnifies . !
SANTA MONICA, Aug. Mayor T. {
H. Dudley has recommended to the I
, city council that immediate action be
taken to recover about $22,000 from the ;
) Aetna Indemnity company, which i
: bonded Ralph Bane, defaulting city
' treasurer and tax collector. City At- '
torney Taft will prepare to collect the I
. amount from the bonding company, I
which has notified the city authorities
j at various times that the money will |
: be paid, but has so far failed to turn j
ov*r the cash to the city.
When Bane disappeared, last April, i
he confessed in a letter to a friend
here that he had embezzled a large ]
part of the city's funds. Investigation '
by experts, who worked on his books j
for several weeks, disclosed the amount .
missing to be in the neighborhood of
$22,000. Ths Aetna Indemnity company
j gave bonds for Bane In the sum of
1525,000.I $25,000.- . _ i
SALT LAKE RAILWAY TO
GIVE SERVICE TO VENICE
SANTA MONICA, Aug. 16.—1t was
learned here today that the Salt Lake
railway has made arrangements to sell
tickets and check baggage from points
along its system through to Santa
Monica, Ocean Park and Venice, be
ginning September 1. Arrangements
for handling baggage over the lines
of the Los Angeles Pacific railway
have not been made.' Baggage checked
here will be carried from Los Angeles
in automobile trucks. Citizens of the
beach cities have long sought recogni
tion at the hands of the steam rail
roads In regard to through traffic and
the Salt Lake is the first of the big
systems to adopt this plan.
ENLARGING HIGH SCHOOL
SANTA MONICA, Aug. 16.—Because
of the steadily increasing enrollment in
the Santa Monica high school, the
board of education has been compelled
to provide two additional rooms, and
these are being furnished In anticipa
tion of the opening of the fall term of
school. It is expected that the num
ber of first year students In the high
school will be 20 per cent larger than
last year.
Fall of Dog*
It is reported that police dogs in
New York have taken to drink. Has
it come to that? It looks as though
the dog has fallen to the level of the
human brute if this thing- keeps up.—
Norwalk Call. _
THE WEATHER
LOS ANGELES, Aug. 16, 1910.
Tlme.|Barom.|Ther.jHum| Wind Vic.|WeatherT
S a7m7r"29.89 159 89~~fE I t | Cloudy.
S p. m.lj»j6_l_g__j 63 I 3W | 10 |' Clear.
Maximum temperature, 77.
Minimum temperature, 68.
FORECAST
BAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 18—California south
!of Tehachapl—Fair Wednesday, overcast In
the morning; light south wind.
Ban Francisco and vicinity—Cloudy Wednes
day; moderate southwent winds.
Santa Clara, valley—Fair Wednesday; cooler;
light south wind.
Sacramento valley—Fair Wednesday; cooler;
light south wind. .
1 San Joaquln valley—Fair Wednesday; cooler;
I light south wind.
CEMETERIES
rosedaleTcemetery
An endowed memorial park, noted for its
natural beauty; endowment fund for per
petual care, over 1250.000; modern receiving
vault, chapel, crematory .and columbarium;
accessible. City office, suite 302-306 . EX
CHANGE BLDQ., northeast corner Third
and. Hill sts. Phones—Main 909: A 3620.
Cemetery office, 1831 W. Washington st.
Phones 72868; West 80. «-il-12mo
HOLLYWOOD CEMETERY
Rolling lawns, trees, shrubbery and beauti
ful lakes.
* MODERN IN EVERY RESrECT
Situated In the most beautiful section of
Southern California, the Ideal location. Just
Inside Los Angeles city limits.
Melrose and Colegrove car lines to grounds.
A CEMETERY THAT IS SELECT
Aim 208 Laughlln Bld(f. Main 391.
Cemetery phones 58055; Hollywood 54*.
EVERGREEN CEMETERY
The Los Angeles Cemetery asMociation. Ho;
Heights, near city limits. Operated under
perpetual charter from Los Angeles city.
Modern chapel and crematory.
Office, 339 Bradbury Building.
Phones—Main li.V! i A.ilfili.
Cemetery — Home 1)1083; lioyle 9.
6-5-12 m
WE HAVE MOVED TO OUR NEW PAR
lors corner Twelfth and Hope streets.
ORR & EDWARDS CO..
Sterling S. Boothe. Pres. and Treas.
John P Paris. V.co Pres. anil Sec. 6-4-tf
BATH 6
medicated' steamTbathb and scien
tific manipulation for rheumatism, paraly
sis, malaria, nervousness and constipa
tion lady specialist. 030 S. BROADWAY.
. . 8-12-lmo
MISS ANITA HEL,DMAN-BATHS, SCALP
treatments and alcohol rubs. Sl4 SANTEE ST..
two blocks cast of Main, near Eighth. 8-13-2Ot
l'l»Vi S. SPRINCJ, SUITE 8-CHIHOPODV.
electricity, massage, vapor and shower baths.
6-5-tf
MASSAGE. BATHS. CHIROPODY. EXPERT
assistant*. JEAN LINN, 620 S. Bway. 2-17-tt
BATHS AND ELECTRIC TREATMENT. 218
|::;O\T)WAY. ROOM 220. 7-30-tf
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS - rKKBUNAJj
injury claims specialty; •s»at-» settled. J.
W MACY. Ml Dowlas bio*. Phones AIM.
Vis In «533. **
CESSPOOLS
rjbHiAl^ uiou'UUl. i'LiAU'IMU CO. —w*
\JI» out 'ariii-i load. West UK; 22040.
3-10-t<
_ „_ DENTISTS
'i ilml.liiunu, XUu-XUU .HUJ.'.lli: llitniu
Bids.. **& H. BUmi». l'j|>nii Main 3»ltt.
7-1-H
ASSAYING
JOHN lIKIIMAN. 2.V8V4 8. Main. Not satis
faction, but accuracy guaranteed. 11-11-tl
Herald
■'Classified Liners
Under more than one hundred special
headings, more than one hundred classl
• dings. The Herald offer* Its elassl
fled advertisers real value In the nay of
publicity. The needs of every business
houae, office, factory and home have en
tered Into consideration . when the list
' was compiled.
You want something that classified
liners will (ret for you, others want some
thing that you have for sale. Exchange
what you don't want for something you
do want •■
■ If you are seeking a position In any
I honest field of endeavor The Herald will
1 publish your request free of charge.
'In placing your classified advertising
you should consider Quality of circula
tion as welt as Quantity.
The Herald does not claim the largest
circulation In the city, but It does claim,
and can prove to you, that as an adver
tising medium It Is second to none. Try
It for results,
ADVERTISERS
The Herald reserves the right to re
vise advertisements and to reject or omit
and refund the amount said.
The Herald will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect tnsortlon of any
advertisement ordered for more than
one time ->
Advertisers should read receipts given
by-The Herald In payment for "liners."
I as no mistakes can be rectified without
them. ■
___
Rates for Classified Ads.
, IF PREPAID
.1 cent ocr word each Insertion.
3 Insertions for price of two.'
7 Insertions for price -of five.
No advertisement taken for less than 100
For contract, solicitors and advertising
advice call , '
SUNSET MAIN 8000
HOME 10211
And ask for classified advertising man
ner. |
BRANCH OFFICES
LONG~BEACH ,
I. Ocean and Pine streets.
OCEAN PARK
144 Pier avenue.
PASADENA
to W. Colorado st.
SAN BERNARDINO
439 Court street.
santaTana
, 818 V Sycamore st.
FOR RENT --^^
ROOMS— FURNISHED
Hotel Seville
TJ2-7J4 a FLOWER ST.
Oar ef the finest family hotels IB Uw all/.
Newly furnlsnel throughout; steam head
kot and cold water: electrlo lights; Europe**
plan. Only a snjrt walk (ram Broadway.
Phones: Main Mlti FtiU, 4-t-tl
fin—: Main Mil: F«m. 4-1-tl
ATAItTMENTS— FURNISHED AND
UNFURNISHED
The St Regis
Housekeplng apartments, 287 8. Flower at.
Main 2:90; A 7386. Near business center; at
tractive building, cool porches, room phones,
clean, nicely furnished apartments, $12. SO
to |25. Single rooms $2.80, 11 weekly | *H.Ui
to $15 monthly. 8-5-tf
Majestic Apartments
Corner First and Hope streets. Modern
conveniences; summer rates now on. All
outside rooms. 8-11-lmo
HOUSES—UNFURNISHED
FOR RENT —8-ROOM HOUSE, ARLING
ton Heights; new, modern, lawn, flowers,
etc. Will lease for 1 year or more at (40
per month. Call at house, 1535 Sixth
aye.. or phone 72993. 8-16-3
PHYSICIANS
~~ DR. AND MRS. WELLS. '
specialists in diseases OF WOMEN
Dr. Wells' Improved antiseptic methods
POSITIVELY GUARANTEED
In all diseases and irregularities of wo
men. Consultation free and confidential
TO] S. SPRING ST.. room 20«. 7-30-lnv>
DR. HICKOK
SPECIALIST IN PAINLESS CONFINE
MENT AND DISEASES OF WOMEN.
MATERNITY HOME AND ADOPTION
IF DESIRED. FREE CONSULTATION
AND EXAMINATION. MODERATE
CHARGES; TERMS TO SUIT.
192 W. SIXTH STREET. SUITE 10T.
g-2-tt
DR. CROCKER
Specialist for Women. »,'
Hamburger's Majestic Theater Building.
Absolute privacy. Hours 10 to 4.
CONSULT FREE.
11-11-ltmg
IF YOU CARE TO BE WELL AND STRONG
read the Book of Truth 10c only; worth
everything to you. Call or write DR.
KURPIER, 846 S. Grand aye. 8-12-17
DESPERATE SKIN DISEASES OUR FORTE.
Will visit hospitals and spell the attendant
a day or two. INSTITUTE, 107 W. First at.
"-"-»
WOMAN'S HOSPITAL
Obstetrics, surgical and medical cases. Terms
reasonable. 1249 S. Flower. F4134. J-13-tf
WOMEN — HOME PREVIOUS TO
confinement. 221 W. JEFFERSON ST..
between Main and Grand. 7-28-*f
DR. TAYLOR. B*7 H S. MAIN ST. DlS
—sea of women. 3-9-tr
MONEY TO LOAN
WE DO NOT LOAN THE LIMIT.. WE CAN
always loan a reasonable amount, both
In good times and bad. Real estate first
mortgages; lowest rates; no commission.
Prompt action. Capital paid in 1500,000.
THE JOHN M. C. k MARBLE
COMPANY
H. W. Hellman Building
■ 8-14-li-17-3t
TO LOT OWNER: ' '
If you own a clear lot we will build for
you on easy terms; no commission; plans
prepared free.
E. 8. WILLIAMSON CO.,
202-204 Grant Bldg. 8-17-2
_ Mi.'Jvl.V TO 1.UA.1 . .",
,000 to loan oil real estate, city or coun
try, I to 1 per cent, , amounts j to suit.
MOYI.R & GILBERT. BUJ H. W. Hellma»
Bldg. Hums phone A 8327; Main 6474.
10-8-tf
SALARY LOANS CHATTEL LOANS.
Sen US before you borrow money.
GREAT WESTERN INV. CO., 611
.Gross* Bid*. r»34S; Main 4928.
7-28-tr
jj JKY TO LOAN-SALARIED MEN AND
women accommodated without delay or pub
licity SOUTHERN CREDIT CO., 41l O. T.
Johnson Bldg. 3-14-tl
H VV. DEXTER, 40» Wll-COX IiLDO.,
•1' loan yo- what you need on real es
tate, stocks and bonds. . Building loans a
■ »clalty.. »-»-tl
iCJ.NKV LOA..ED ON DIAMONDS, FURNl
ture, (lanos and any kind of security; low
rat«». JOHNSON. 839 11. W. Hellman Bldg.
11l It
TO LOAN-SALA!tIKD PEOPLE: NO RED
tape; without security 1 confidential. WEST
COAST EXCHANGE. 411 Henna Bldg.
■ 10-4-tf
LOANK-WK LOAN MONET ON HEAL Hit
tate; low Interest, easy payments. '
A. E. RUDELL. til Mercantile Place.,
. S-»-tf
(600 TO 110,000 TO LOAN AT 7 PER CENT.
T. L. O'BRIEN * CO.. Jefferson and Main.
t-s-tf
WANTED
'■ j—r>T -~s~
HILT MAIJI
WANTED—MEN AND BOYS; NO EXrENSB
to learn trade of electricity, automobiles,
Plumbing, bricklaying by actual contract
jobs; only few months required; 200 students
last year; catalogue free. UNITED TRADE
SCHOOL CONTRACTING CO.. 647 PaeMo
Electric bldg. ■ 8-1-lme
WANTED-AT ONCE, MAN TO WORK A
forty-acre ranch for the coming year. Homo
phone A 1262. • 8-17-1
HELP—KKMAXB
WANTED—LADIES, BEAUTY CULTURE,
pay* big; learn right, salary guaranteed.
"FLORENTINE," the world* largest, 127
Mercantile place, corner Broadway. 8-2-tf
SITUATIONS—MALB
POSITION WANTED— EMPLOYED A
part of the day and would like a place to
•care for lawn and flower garden part of
time for room and board. I thoroughly
understand gardening and love the work.
Am a gentleman with unquestionable ref
erences. Address BOX 72. Herald. -
. - ■ ■ '- 8-14-4
WANTED—SITUATION AB MANAGER OR
foreman In steam laundry, have had four
years' experience as superintendent of
■ large steam laundry at Manila. P. I.;
have excellent recommendation*. Ad
dress BOX 323. Herald. 8-10-7
SITUATION WANTED-3Y AUTOMOBILE
expert, 12 years' experience selling all make*
of motor cars and managing garages and
' shops. Address JOSEPH BELL, 1220 8.
Olive pt. Home phone F2360, Sunset Broad
way 2192. • . 3-14-T
WANTED—THOROUGHLY COMPETENT
chauffeur, desires position with private
family, steady, reliable and able to make
own repairs. References. Call at 469
37TH PLACE, or address BOX 304, Her
aid. i 3-10-7
WANTED—POSITION AS INVENTOR
with manufacturing concern; can bring
several Inventions and will develop new
ones on any lines desired; able to earn
' good salary. Address BOX 136, Herald.
„' ■ 3-13-10
WANTED—A YOUNG MAN THOROUGHLY
acquainted with the meat business would
like to take charge of market either In
or out of city; best of reference*. Ad
dress BOX 286. Herald. 8-10-7
WANTTD—BREWERY AUDITOR. MAKES
a specialty auditing brewery books; one
who has traveled all over this country
for the world's largest brewery. Address,
POX 49. Herald. a 8-10-7
.WANTED —WORK BY A GOOD SOBER
and Industrious man. single, good refer
ences; can do garden. Janitor or porter
work; wages reasonable. Address BOX
363, Herald. . - - ;-.■ 8-18-10
WANTED —CAN YOU USB A GOOD BTEN
ographer, bookkeeper and all around of
fice man, thoroughly experienced and with
best references? If so address BOX 113,
Herald. . 8-10-7
BETHLEHEM FREE) EMPLOYMENT
agency. 610 Vlgne* street. Main (718;
Home A 4884. Men for houaecleanlng, yard
work and general labor. . 8-24-tt
WANTED—POSITION AS BARTENDER, 18
years' experience; start at small salary
and go anywhere. Local reference*. Ad
dress BOX 288. Herald. 8-10-7
WANTED— AS BOOKKEEPER.
Can operate the typewriter. References
good. Will start reasonable. AAiirwa
BOX 63. Herald. - »-10-7
WANTED—BY THOROUGHLY BXPERl
enced bookkeeper, sot of book* to keep
mornings -or afternoons. Address BOX
67. Herald. 3-10-7
WANTEDA SITUATION— AN HON
est, reliable man; handy with most all
(mechanics* tool*. BOX 54. Herald.
3-10-7
WANTED—GRADUATE SURVEYOR AND
assayer, want* position with a mining en
gineer. Address BOX 123. Herald.
3-10-T
WANTED —ELDERLY, ACTIVE, HANDY
man wants work, quick at anything. Ad
dress BOX it. Herald. 8-10-7
LIGHT WO.RK BY YOUNG MAN FOR
room and board; country preferred. BOX
66, Herald. ■ 1-10-10
WANTED—ACCOUNTANT AUDITS BOOKS
and will keep small "eta of books. Ad
dress BOX 122. Herald. 8-10-7
WANTED—POSITION BY FIRST-CLASS
young Chinese cook- In family; beat refer
ences. Address BOX 68. Herald. 3-lt-T
WANTED—SITUATION BY AN HONEST,
reliable man: a fair, all around wood work
er. Address BOX 47, Herald. 6-16-7
-———————————-
, SITUATIONS—FBMAU*
SITUATIONS WANTED—
-Young woman wants chamber work.
Young woman wants housework.
Middle-aged man wants any kind of work.
Phone BETHLEHEM INSTITUTION, A4SS4.
Main 6726. 8-16-5
WANTED—POSITION AS STENOORAPH
er and bookkeeper; am not afraid of
work; local references, salary moderate
to start. Address BOX 287, Herald.
• 8-10-7
YOUNG LADY WITH A-l OIL LINE EX
perlence wants position a* stenographer, bill
er or price work. Can give reference. Phone
EAST 614. 6-l-t<
WANTED— AS BOOKKEEPER
and cashier having had several years'
practical experience. Address BOX 48,
Herald. 8-10-7
WANTED —A YOUNG GERMAN GIRL,
would like a position with small family
In a good bouse. - Address BOX 61, Her
aid. 8-10-7
TUTORING BY EXPERIENCED TEACH
ei—Will live In home of pupils If de
sired; charge reasonable. BOX 117, Her
ald. 8-JO-7
.. i ■ ... .
WANTED—YOUNG LADY EXPERIENCED
In kodak finishing wishes situation. Ad
dress NELLIE SELLERS, 1627 Temple St.
: 8-11-10t
MIDDLE-AGED LADY WISHES POSITION
In real estate office; has had some ex
perlence. BOX 60. Herald. 8-10-7
WANTTD—BY A RESPECTABLE WOM
an, housework In city or country. 819 ii
W. Third st. . 8-9-13
WANTED—EXPERIENCED DEMONSTRA
tor wishes position. Address BOX 141.
Herald. 8-10-T
WANTED—POSITION AS HOUSEKEEP
er for gentleman. 4303 LIMA ST. 8-14-10
WANTED-DAY'S WORK. PHONE 31290.
8-17-llt
61IUAT1ON8—MALE AND FKMAJLJ*
WANTED—WORK IN PRIVATE HOIS*
820 month, room and board, while attend-
Ug school: school hoar* from 1 to I p. m.
P. O. BOX 347. City. 1-IT-tl
1 i
■-. MONEY ' ■■ .■■•y;i*
MONEY WANTED—GILT EDGE LOANS.
11600—3 years at 7 per cent on modern 6
room bungalow worth 33200.
{1800—3 years at 7 per cent on splendid
Swiss chalet, home place, 16300.
85.100—.1 years at 7 per cent, store building,
Al locality, 311,600.
Other loans, ample security.
HARRY F. HOSSACK, 727 W. P. Story Bldg.
F3927; Main 4967. 8-17-1
• —
WANTED— PURCHASE STOCK
WANTED— ■ '
Stock in the Los Angeles Investment com
' pany; any amount up to 140,000; will pay
within 6 per cent of the company's selling
plica. O. F., car* Glob* Saving* Bank,
t.'-v ,'■'■' ;'■•-. ■■ • . • 6-11-tl
TO PURCHASE—MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED— PAID FOR FEATHER
beds 768 SAN PEDRO ST. Phones Main
11011: FBO4I 12-17-tf
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-GENTLEMAN'S STICK PIN. EM
bossed bulldog, pointed ears, pearl collar,
ruby eyes. Address 116 E. SECOND ST.
Main CO9. Reward. 6-17-1
~""-\ CHURCH NOTICEB
P^N7E^rHXuT'2?7^r^i ATNrNOojrPRAT^
er meeting dally; gospel meeting every ,
night. S-l-tn»o

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