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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, August 17, 1910, Image 16

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16
JAMES E. HURLEY
DIES IN EUROPE
Death from Heart Trouble Claims
General Manager of the
Santa Fe Railroad
BEGINS CAREER AS BRAKEMAN
Rises from Ranks and Never For
gets Men with Whom He
Labored
(Associated Press)
TOPEKA, Kas., Aus- 16.—James E.
Hurley, general manager of the Atchl
■on, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad, died
of heart trouble at Carlsbad, Austria,
at noon today. Word of his death was
received by Henry B. Lauts, assistant
to the general manager.
General Manager Hurley left Topeka
July 13 for New York city and sailed
from that city July 15 for Carlsbad,
where he expected to stay a few months
to regain his strength and find relief
from continued attacks of indigestion.
A letter was received Monday from
Mr. Hurley, written at Carlsbad, In
which he said ha had been examined
by physicians and found to have no
organic trouble. His death, therefore,
was entirely unexpected and caused al
most a panic fit the general office of
the company. Men gathered in the cor
ridors and wept, for no man on the
Santa Fe system was so generally es
teemed.
He was exceedingly democratic, and
the humblest workman was always
treated as an equal by the general man
ager. He had risen from the ranks, and
never forgot the men who had labored
with him on the lower rung of the
ladder.
Mr. Hurley was born at Wapello, "la.,
on June 1, 1860, and after finishing his
school at that place spent throe win
ter terms at normal school at Bloom
field, la.
BEGINS AS BBAJKEMtAN
' He entered the service of the Atchl
son. Topeka & Santa Fe in 1880 as
brakeman, and subsequently, until 1882,
was marehouseman and baggageman.
He was for one year telegraph operat
or and station clerk at various stations
In Kansas, and during 1883 was relief
agent on the Rio Grande and New Mex
ico divisions and chief clerk and cash
ier at Hutchinson, Kas. Since that
year he held successively the fol
lowing positions: Agent at Florence,
Kas.; chief clerk to the general super
intendent at Topeka, trainmaster east
ern division, assistant superintendent
Missouri division, assistant superin
tendent Chicago division, in charge of
transportation at Fort. Madison, la.,
from October, 1889, t<» June, 1894; su
perintendent New Mexico division June,
1894, to October, 1894; superintendent
consolidated New Mexico and Rio
Grande divisions, October, 1894, to Jan
uary, 1901; acting general superintend
ent lines west of Albuquerque, at Los
Angeles, Cal., January to October, 1901.
On the latter date he was appointed
general superintendent of the western
grand division at La Junta, Colo., and
in July. 1902, he was made general su
perintendent of the eastern grand di
vision, which position he held until his
promotion to the office of general man
ager on May 1, 1905.
Mr. Hurley leaves a widow and two
children. Mrs. Hurley and daughter,
Elizabeth, are in Las Vegas, N. M.,
and Harlow, the son, is in Denver,
where he Is a participant in the golf
tournament. ">
MRS. HURLEY IS PROSTRATED
EAST LAS VEGAS, N. M., Aug. 16.—
Mrs. James E. Hurley, wife of the gen
eral manager of the Santa Fe railroad,
was Informed of the' death of her hus
band today at Carlsbad. Mrs. Hurley
was prostrated by the news, as she
did not know that her husband had
been seriously ill.
HURLEY'S RISE NOTABLE
IN RAILROAD HISTORY
James E. Hurley, general manager of
the Santa Fe system, who died at
Carlsbad, Austria, yesterday, was well
known in Los Angeles, having nad his
headquarters in this city in 1901, while
he was general superintendent of the
Santa Fe lines west of Albuquerque.
He was one of the most capable as well
as most esteemed officials of the Santa
Fe system.
Mr. Hurley was literally "Santa Fe
made." It was practically the only road
on which he was ever employed, and he
worked himself up from telegraph ope
rator to the position he held until yes
terday. Having risen from the lowest
ranks, he never forgot the men who
had worked by his side, and treated all
as his equals.
ADMITS HE HELD UP THE
CHINA-JAPAN FAST MAIL
Bandit Makes Confession of His
Escape from Officer
FAIRFIELD, Ca!., Aug. 16.—Charles
Dunbar Bishop, who with Charles
Brown is held in Jail here, having con
fessed to holding up the China-Japan
fast mail last April, yesterday con
fessed to holding up an Oakland po
liceman and divesting him of his re
volver. Bishop said the affair occurred
one night last April before the rob
bery of the train.
According to the story told by
Bishop, the policeman, whose number
was 78. arrested Brown and himself as
suspicious characters and was walking
them to jail. He had searched Brown
and taken a revolver away from him,
but had failed to find the revolver on
irtishop.
On the way to the station Bishop
got the drop on the policeman and
made him put up his hands. Brown
then took the patrolman's gun and his
own, according to Bishop's story, and
they sent the officer speeding down the
street.
SEARCH NEAR SWAMPS
FOR SLAYER OF WOMAN
NEW YORK, Aug. 16.—Armfed citi
zens and policemen are skirling the
swamps near North R< rgen, N. X, to
day searching for Bert rand Pond, who
Js wanted (or killing: -"^rs. Mary Unm
chlez in the presence of her 6-year-old
S°The shooting took pi"" las) nlpht,
and the police charge that Pond killed
the woman because she rejected his at
tentions.
CURTISS TO TAKE
PASSENGERS ALOFT
Women to Accompany Aviator on
Flights in Sheepshead Bay
Tournament
WRIGHTS BUILD NEW MACHINE
Brothers Construct Aerial Craft
Which Is Designed to
Carry Five
(Associated Press)
NEW YORK, Aug. 16.—Among the
events of the aviation tournament
which will be held at the Sheepshead
Bay race track beginning Friday of
this week are a number of passenger
flights by Glenn H. Curtiss with wo
men as passengers. -The aviator has
received a number of applications from
persons who wish him to take them
aloft. While it is impossible to com
ply with the wishes of all of these,
he has decided that he will take up
some of the women who wish an air
ride during the meet.
Mars and Willard will also make
flights with passengers in their big
machines.
Among the events for which prizes
are announced is an attempt to bring
the height record back to this country.
Both Curtiss and Willard will enter
the contest for height.
KEW BITLAJJJ3 ABOUSES INTEREST
At the Asbury Park aviation field
intense interest centers on a. new bi
plane being set up by the Wrights
to replace a machine smashed by
Brookins. In the craft, which is de
signed to carry five persons if neces
sary, there is nothing in front of the
driver's seat. The front elevation
planes are gone and the two main
planes stretch the air in initial contact
so far as the aeroplane is concerned.
The elevating plane—there is only
one—is located behind the rear rudder,
and thus one of the earliest features of
the aeroplanes are to reappear in
this new type. Meanwhile the aero
plane colony at Mineola, L. 1., Is pre
paring to test the value of the biplane
for saving life at sea. An imitation
shipwreck is being built in the center
of the aerodrome, in the place here
tofore occupied by the dummy warships
used In the bomb-throwing experi
ments. By next week it will be ready
so that Clifford B. Harmon and his
fellow aviators can make attempts at
dropping a lifeline over it. The ropes
will hang from the tall of the machine
so that It cannot foul the propeller.
ILLINOIS COUNTRY CLUB
ANNOUNCES BULL FIGHT
Mayor of Morgan Park Puts Ban
on Posters
CHICAGO, Aug. 16.—A genuine bull
fight announced by the Ridge Country
club as the main feature of its annual
fair, which -will be held Friday and
Saturday, has attracted the attention
of the authorities In the village of
Morgan Park, near which the pro
posed bull light is advertised to be held.
"No such spectacle shall be given
or advertised in my Jurisdiction," said
Mayor Ney of Morgan park. "I shall
even refuse to permit posters of the
bull fight to be displayed here."
Nevertheless the promoters of the
affair in the Ridge Country club insist
that they will be able to hold the bull
fight on schedule time in spite of the
authorities.
The posters which Mayor Ney re
fused to allow displayed In Morgan
park have a brilliantly colored picture
of a mounted matador. The reading
matter is as follows:
"No need to go to Spain to see a
BULL FIGHT. THE RIDGE COUN
TRY CLUB, regardless of expenses,
will have THE REAL THING. An
imported, rampant, ferocious Andalu
sian bull. You will hear him roaring
on the grounds. No police interfer
ence. Beautiful women, Spanish cos
tumes, matadors, espadas, Hindoos,
Hermets, frljoles."
POLICE FORCE GIRL TO
DISCARD MALE ATTIRE
California Miss Wears Trousers
in Search for Brother
REDDING, Cal., Aug. 16—Attired in
slouch hat, white shirt and black
trousers, Miss Eva Walls, a resident of
Sisson, was taken off the streets in
this city yesterday by the police and
forced to return to her lodgings until
she again resumed her own clothing.
"I don't like these clothes, but my
brother would not write, and I want
to find him without being discovered
myself," explained Miss Walls When
stopped. "My brother Burt went to
Portland, nnd I wrote to him from
Sisson, and he wrote back telling me
he would meet me at Redding. I
thought I could find him better by
wearing men's clothes."
HUNDRED COWS FURNISH
PASSENGERS MILK DIET
NEW YORK, Aug. 16.—Fresh milk
In superfluous quantities was enjoyed
by passengers on the liner Minne
tonka, which has just arrived here
from London. Even a milk bath could
have been had for a mere song, for
after the passengers and the crew had
all the milk they wanted each day
there was still so much left over that
many gallons had to be thrown into
the sea.
This pleasant situation was a result
of the presence aboard of nearly 300
line <o\vh, consigned to farms in the
middle west.
OFFICER KILLS MAN KNOWN
AS THE PINK DOMINO KID'
SACRAMENTO, Aug. 16.—Ernest
Frazler, who was shot and killed by
Patrolman George Maley Friday, was
yesterday identified by I. W. Ash of
Orant'l Pass, Ore., as "The Pink Domi
no Kid," who Is said to have a long
criminal record in Oregon, and who
was recently released from th<> Oregon
penitentiary. Frazler, who also went
by the name of Lane, the name of his
stepfather, lived at Westport, Ore.
ANGELES HERALD: WEDNESDAY MORNING, AUGUST 17, 1910.
[7= — ========== |la&e^^ -:
I — '.'■".* — 1 SEETHE 'iV""/1 ' /V ©v» LUNCH IN I o ~T. Z. '. „ I
"What Others Advertise hill ST. Li/>Y~WvI/Al ! 'Vt/T/VVt ft. OUR BIG Table , Twelve
i: We Sell for Less" WINDOWS! JKLVa M IVj/UjLlJjki^yfi CAFE! Today Sure
you will this to bo literally and ab- IT PAYS 0 W-«K-WW^V-r, CUISINE The vaj|,e ccrta^^^rprijte you
'"'"i^iti^AnvSi^^^Sw' TO WATCH L/ ' tf., V-.-J ANDSERV- 'X-^Shoid^^'E^aiK^S!
Srn^^;| ™em ly|| I vbmteEfeHnPßgHq.^reEEis II ; C E E ST T«E 1 jmi^»r-»-1
THE ANNIVERSARY SALE A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS
Never in our history has the success of a sale been more emphatic. Throngs of eager shoppers filled our aisles from early morning until closing time Tuesday—but
the bargains great enough to attract such numbers have been added to and even strengthened for Wednesday. We have only room to mention a handful of the j
hosts of specially priced items. Come see —but see the others, too /■ }
19c ARABIAN CLOTH 20c AND 25c H'DK'FS. $1-$2.50 AUTO VEILS 56 INCH SUITINGS 50c WHITE APRONS
For drapes that are 1A 1 . A special assortment 1/^l^ Think of it! The cholc- *J gj - By specl a 1 en (HO C A s"°.^ *'" eBJ°,l th<S^"j 'i C /-»
Inexpensive yet ar- i /,"7"C for today that will I est lot of novelties and / ")(; deayor this beau- \J "'v, e.[f"'L at °!:!;. *^O%JV*
. tlstic, this has no XA *1' make you open your -»• Z plain and printed veils *** V- tlful line is here *«''^*'^ quailjr mater ials. ««> - nr - n «
equal It usually mils for twice eyes In wonder at the values. Sheer In the house, 2 and M yards long. In time for this sale Othm shown Cr^s nurses *"i e ?°the^ aprons
this special price at other stores. Swiss and cambric. Beautiful Some, square. Different style bor- at $3.50.. Imported tailored suiting, in a splendid variety, cuoice ror
Buy for fall now. . styles.,. • ders. :-«v Sponged and shrunk! .',■.; d? CI. ■ '.■.•;.-', ' '
IWe planned this Anniversary ' Jg^ OTA DTI IMP o*l C fIC U/HUCU'C (HRT^ To l6SSen \ he bur, d. cn °f
Sale of Stockings some time Jg&P OlMiSl Nb OflLt UF WUmLN 0 JllffirL "'ovniff we have, added to
ago, but circumstances con- Um'MU"U ""^ "' " WIIM-" V WJEfflfch b 'ff s Pcc; al Purchase va"
l spired to give it an added im- /ffcWM|<f4py«g?y y&^, >f^ «^ Tl^ 'TaVgTaUy^Se'd
and must ho moved and enlarged, mIV& «JiwJ^ißLJv 1| 1 Jfi* J& W^m^^ JlLr J^O^ff JE^^^J JBto II &M HUk^i ">' realize how very deeply,
and we want, by this sale, to light- |Lm *s. Fi//: fltv: vsl WlffyiiWßMg'Tßflßß—THFlili »im mIIBIiL JliMßy^Mff^BW"WirTWfyßiHw IK?3 H/^Bk 1 drastically prices are cutl
_ „ ;7 50c #PT#f%l^Ti r% . 59c
Women's pure silk stockings in WOMEN.'S ■ IMPORTED SAMPLE STOCKINGS OF A Women'sgood quality pure silk
i black only. Silk where the stocking Including fine silk and gauze lisles in black and all colors; also lace /fa I " stockings in black only. Four-thread
shows; lisle where the wear comes. and embroidered effects. Split and white foot stockings and out- /-JO heel and toe and lisle to Durable.
snows, iisie wiicrc mc wcdr LoniLb. , j __. . . r .L ■ T ., „ * • *• *_ i • „ _t« B B H ■ „.
sizes.' Plenty of novelty effects, too. It s the big, big stocking sale \J o Te , hone or Mall order, nUed# «d N on.
no Telephone or MaU^ Order, niiea. and None o f the year. Come early—the Values are Startling. Pair.......... •■ Sent C. O. p.
Silk Lisles in Italian Silks .... 7n« Silk Stockings ... C Mfi Gauze Lisles ... . . Ofln Cotton Stockings.. *)Qn
58.50 French Just Six of the Many Styles in This $1.50 Sale Untrimraed
Piumss SC 00 of Children's $2 and $2.50 Summer Shoes Hals at $0,95
—- nmHH11111U111Ui1H1W11inf1H11iiin1ii.».in.......,..,.........,.....^-.....ii i m Anniversary m ——-—
women * frorn Wfar and The group of 'cuts does not half tell the story of the values in this Anniversary special 1 There are so many Fall wear. Get one of
neaH They are -of the morestyles-and you can't see the quality of the leathers, either! Patent leathers-tans dull kid and elkskms these if you want the
quality that lasts! —oxfords and pumps. All of them regularly $2.00 and $2.50. Come, if you'd get the bargain of the day! latest. #
I Women s Muslin Gowns 79c; 25c Gingham Aprons 15c in The Basement Store
~" " " i-ii I.MMBIMIIIWIIWW——I—^—IMMM
NEW YORK TO EDUCATE
SMALL CITY FIREMEN
Admit Outside Recruits to School
of Instruction and Regu
lar Service
NHW YORK, Aug. 16.—Smaller cities
which desire to give their firemen
training on up-to-date fire fighting are
to be accommodated by New York city.
They will be permitted to send a lim
ited number of their firemen to the
school of instruction maintained by
the New York fire department and af
ter graduation will be assigned to com
panies and for a brief period they will
see regular service.
A squad of firemen from Paterson,
N. J., are the first to take advantage
of the new arrangement. The fire de
partment of Pater.son has been the
subject of adverse criticism from the
insurance companies recently and there
has been talk of Increasing the rates.
To raise the efficiency of the depart
ment the mayor decided to send six
picked men to New York. They have
been assigned places with thirty raw
recruits at the school of instruction.
When the visitors return to Paterson
they will be the pioneers In a school
of instruction in which the members
of the Paterson department will keep
abreast of the latest improvements in
metropolitan methods of fighting fires.
GET FIRST CONSIGNMENT
FROM IDITAROD DISTRICT
Seattle Office Receives $53,826
in Alaska Gold
SEATTLE. "Wash., Aug. ]«.—The
United States assay office in Seattle
yesterday received the first consign
ment of gold from the new Iditarod
district in Alaska. The consignment
, uusisted of $53,826 sent by a bank in
Iditarod City, a town that has sprung
up within the last year. Report* re
ceived here indicate that up to August
1 the total output for the Iditarod dis
trict this year has been $60,000.
The gold, as Indicated by the assay,
Is moderately fine, running from $17.25
to $18 00 an ounce. Pure gold, carrying
no base metal, is worth $20.67 an ounce.
Nome gold brings about $18.2"> an
ounce and Fairbanks gold runs the
same The best gold that comes to this
assay office is received from the Koy
ukok district. It runs from $19.00 to
$20.15 an ounce.
WHAT MAY BE TORTOISE
OF NOAH'S DAY IS FOUND
WASHINGTON, Aug. 16.—A petrified
tortoise, which may have been crawl
ing about the vales of Virginia during
the dayß of Noah, has been discovered
Orkney Springs, Va., by two Wash
ington men.
The petrified animal, which weighs
about 400 pounds, will be presented to
the Smithsonian institu' .^'_
PASTOR EXPLAINS WORDS
WHICH CAUSED SENSATION
Elucidates Statement in Regard
to Scarcity of Christians
NEW YORK, Aug. 16.—The Rev. A.
B. Simpson, who created something of
a sensation this week by declaring at
the Old Orchard camp grounds. In
Maine that there are fewer Christians
and more heathens in the world today
than ever before, has explained his
meaning in a telegram to his parish
ioners in New York. He says:
"Religiously we are at once declin
ing and advancing. The bad is grow
ing worse, the good Is getting better.
There are not as many Prote3tant
Christians in the United States in pro
portion to the population as a century
ago. The causes are chiefly higher
criticism and free thought in the pul
pit and worldliness among the people.
Some of us still believe the only rem
edy for this lost world is the old gos
pel, and people who believe in it and
live it will do their parts."
BRINGS SOUTH AMERICAN
ORCHIDS WORTH $25000
Connecticut Farmer Obtains 85
Crates of Rare Flowers
CROMWELL,, Conn., Aug. 16.—An
drew Benson, a Connecticut farmer,
has returned from a seven-months' ex
pedition to the United States of Co
lumbia with eighty-five crates of rare
orchids which he values at more than
$25,000.
Among his prizes are four specimens
of a pure white orchid so rare that
each plant commands a price of $1000
in this country. From the shoulder of
a mountain near the border line of
Colombia and Venezuela, Benson
looked down upon hundreds of thou
sands of dollars' worth of these rare
orchids, but each plant was in such an
inaccessible place that he was unable
to obtain more than the four speci
mens he brought back with him.
Benson's expedition was accompanied
through dense forests by a guard of
forty Indians, together with guides,
porters and pack mules. The hard
ships were so great that eight native
members of the party died during the
trip.
INVITE FRENCH ADMIRAL
TO VISIT SAN DIEGO
SAN DIEGO, Cal., Aug. 16.—Hearing
on invitation to Admiral La Croix Cas
tries of the French armored cruiser
Montcalm, now at San Francisco, to
visit San Die^o in his ship and as.sl.st
in the ceremony of breaking ground
for the exposition this city will give
in 1915, M. Foucher, foreign secretary
of the local chamber of commerce, Is
on his way north.
He has letters of Introduction from
the chamber of commerce, Mayor
Grant Conard, the exposition company
and the Alliance Francaise. The in
vitaiton he bears is supplemental to
the one extended by L. A. Blochman,
French consul at San Diego, and the
French consul at San Francisco.
TO SHOW GIRLS HOW TO
SHE ON HUSBANDS' PAY
To Introduce Study of Household
Economics in High Schools
of Chicago
CHICAGO, Aug. 16.—A new system
of household economics Is to be Intro
duced into Chicago by the new two
year vocational' course In the Chicago
high schools. One of the studies that
the girls who take the household arts
course will have to master Is named
"division of income." Mrs. Ella Flagg
Young, superintendent of schools, says
that the girls are going to know how
to split up a pay check so closely that
they will foresee a needed yeast cake
four days ahead.
"We want the young wife to under
stand what part of the family income
should be devoted to the home," said
Mrs. Young. "We want her to know
how to spend it. She will be taught
in the high school to watch the daily
papers for the market prices and to
know Just what things should cost from
day to day.
"When she sees a thing she wants
we want her to be able to figure out
whether she can afford it—whether it
will be worth as much to her as It
costs.. She must take her husband's
check and figure out what per ceht
must go for meat, for bread, fuel,
light and all other needs of a home.
When she gets through her husband
can take care of his insurance, cloth-
Ing and the other essentials."
PAN-AMERICAN CONGRESS
CLOSES WORK THIS WEEK
WASHINGTON, Aug. 16.—The Pan
American convention of the Latin-
American nations, which has been in
session at Buenos Ayres for almost a
month, is expected to conclude its
work next Saturday, according to the
latest information received at the state
department.
The American delegation will prob
ably visit Montevideo, after ttie con
ference and during the first week of
September will go to Brazil, return
ing to the United States by the way
of the western coast of South Ameri
ca and probably across the Isthmus
of Panama.
DEATH CALLS MOTHER OF
STEFFENS, REFORM WRITER
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 16.—Mrs.
Elizabeth L. S. Steffens, wife of Joseph
Steffens of Sacramento and mother of
J. Lincoln Steffens, the reform writer
and author of "Shame of the Cities"
and other books, died in this city yes
terday.
The body will be taken to Sacramen
to for burial. The services will be held
from her late residence, 815 Fifteenth
street, Sacramento, Wednesday.
BRITISH BANK FAILS
LONDON, Aug. 16.—The British
Bank of Commerce, a small private
concern, closed its doors today. No
importance is attached to the failure
of the bank, which started In business
.-w In 1908.
WOMAN DIES IN GIVING
HELP TO MAN INJURED
Exertion Brings on Hemor/hage
Which Results in Death
BAKERSFIELD, Cal., Aug. 16.—
While striving to offer aid to a car
penter who was Injured while at work,
Mrs. Floyd Osborne, a negress, so ex
erted herself that a hemorrhage of the
lungs occurred and from this she died
In a few minutes. The man was not
seriously hurt. A stick of wood fell
from the top of the building and strik
ing him on the head-felled him.
Mrs. Osborne, who was a sufferer
from tuberculosis. Raw the accident
and grabbing a bottle of alcohol she
rushed across the street. A hemorr
age seized her and she died before she
could be carried back to her porch.
FALL FROM FIFTY-FOOT
TOWER KILLS LINEMEN
PLEASANTON. Cal., Aug. 16.—Bert
Kraimer and G. H. Lavelle, linemen
employed by the Sierra and San Fran
cisco Power company, were Instantly
killed near here today by falling from
a fifty-foot tower.
They lost their fcalance when the
breaking- of the wire caused the tower
to lurch. Lavelle came from Fair
mount, Va. Little is known of Krai
mer, but he is believed have a
brother in Stockton and another in
Oregon.
DELAWARE MANUFACTURERS
MAKE 28 PER CENT GAIN
WASHINGTON, Au«. 16.—The value
of the annual product of the manu
factures of Delaware, the first given
out by the census bureau as the result
of its investigations in connection with
the thirteenth census, is $52,871,041.
This is a gain of more than 28 per cent
since 1904.
There was a 29 per cent gain in sal
aries and wages, of 17 per cent In the
number of establishments and of al
most 20 per cent In the capital em
ployed.
REPORT MAN KILLED IN
SCHOOL ELECTION FIGHT
LEXINGTON, Ky., Aug. 16.—Word
was received here today of a general
fight in a'school election in Breathltt
county, in which Lewis Napier was
shot and killed and several others were
wounded.
Several arrests were made, the pris
oners being taken to Jackson.
INDORSE FOLK FOR 1912
KIRKSVILLE, Mo., Aug. 16.—The
candidacy of Joseph W. Folk for the
presidency in 1912 was unanimously
indorsed today at the meeting of the
Democratic committee for the First
congressional district.
FRENCH CRUISER DRYDOCK3
VALLEJO, Cal., Aug. 16.—The French
cruiser Montcalm came to the Mare
Island yard at noon today and imme
diately went into the drydock. She is
expected to remain about a week, un
dergoing an overhauling.
FRENCH CHEESE MAKERS
INCREASE PRODUCTION
United States Consumes a Great
Quantity of the Roque
fort Product
WASHINGTON, Aug. 16.—Cheese
making In France has Increased con
siderably during the last five years
and the progress made In the industry
In general has been phenomenal, ac
cording to United States Consul Hunt
of St. Etienne. France, who says that
Americans hold first rank among for
eign countries aa consumers of Roque
fort cheese, not even barring Germany.
In the making of Roquefort cheese
last year 42,267,000 quarts of sheep's
milk were used in 510 dairies through
out the department of Aveyron and
neighboring departments. This was
valued at $2,207,000 and 4,000,000 cakes,
or about 20,725,000 pounds of Roquefort
cheese, valued at $3,850,000.
Owing to Improvements In the
methods of handling the cheese in the
caves and rigid inspection of the
dairies and quality of milk furnished
the Roquefort cheese la now much bet
ter than it was a few years ago, tho
consul adds.
The United States imported from St.
Ktlenne last year 1388,522 worth of
Roquefort cheese.
MINISTER DECLINES
CONGRESSIONAL HONORS
Refuses Nomination to Congress
When Bosses Dictate
HOLDEN, Mo., Aug. 16.—Friction
over the tactics of the Republican con
gressional committee led F. H. D«Vot,
of Holden to decline yesterday the
nomination for representative from tha
Sixth Missouri district given him at
the recent primaries.
DeVot la a minister. He was the
candidate chosen by the congressional
committee and entered the race with
avowed progressive Republican Ideas.
This did not coincide with the views
of the committee and DeVot was In
duced to switch to a standpat plat
form.
His declination is attributed to the
fact that there has been a wide con
demnation among the voters of his
adoption of the conservative ideas.
ARREST CHINESE FOR
IMPORTING SLAVE GIRL
SAN FRANCISCO. Aug. 16.—At the
request of the federal authorities, the
local police today arrested Man Gow,
a Chinese, charged with having im
ported L.l So, a Chinese girl, for im
moral purposes.
The police claim that the arrest of
Man Gow has revealed a widespread
conspiracy for bringing Chinese slave
girls into the country under the guise
of wives of native born Chinese. They
assert that Man Gow'a brother, a na
tive of this city, is now en route here
accompanied by a Chinese slave glrL

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