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Los Angeles herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, August 23, 1910, Image 1

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PRICE: 50 CEiNXS I>EH MONTH
TAFT URGES N.Y.
LEADERS TO TALK
WITH ROOSEVELT
President Declares He Had No In
tention of Conveying Idea
He Opposed Colonel
PLEADS FOR PARTY HARMONY
Makes Reply to Communication
from Griscom About Empire
State Muddle
(Associated Press*
NEW YORK. Aug. 22.—President
Taft and ex-President Roosevelt are
again fellow workers In the same po
litical field.
The threat that they might pull apart,
has been for.fpited try a full explanation
on one side and an unreserved accept
ance on the other.
The president made It plain in a
letter given out hero today by Lloyd
C. (JriHoom, chairman of the New York
Republican county commlttoo, how the
misunderstanding arose. He ex
plained he never took any part in a
committee cabal to defeat Colonel
Roosevelt for temporary chairman of
the coming Republican state conven
tion. On the contrary! ho explicitly
deplore! the result of the committee
meeting which chose Vice President
Sherman; he rebukes the party lead
ers who have permitted it to go abroad
uncontradicted that the president of
the United States was behind their
factional preference; ho Insists that at
every opportunity he advised the full
est conference with Roosevelt, and he
explains he has been pained by the
"columns of unfounded Btorles In news
papers concerning my attitude In re
spect to the New York situation."
ROOfIEVELT PU-ASEn
For his part. Colonel Roosevelt, when
li<> lvad President Taft's letter aa com
municated to him at Oyster Bay, said:
"I am very glad to see President
Taft's letter and am pleased with It"
The president's letter comes in re
ply to Mr. Grlscom's blunt assertion
by telegraph that the "absence of any
authorltatlvo information ns to your
nttltudoi Is seriously I isleadlng many
Republicans,"
Mr. Taft tells how, when he first
learned from Vice President Sherman
of the plan to oppose Roosevelt, he
"peremptorily declined" to bo drawn
into a light "with Mr. Roosevelt, and
again renewed his urgent advice that
there be full personal conference with
Roosevelt. Finally he asserts the so
lut'.'n of the direct primary issue can
be found In provisions similar to those
of the Cobb bill, defeated by the last
legislature In direct reouko to Mr.
Roosevelt and Governor Hughes.
In the course of the correspondence
there comes out n. telegram from the
president to the vice president, hitherto
withheld. In substance, the president
Informed Timothy I*. "Woodruff, Repub
lican state chairman, and William L.
Ward of the national Republican cora
mtit<-e that the "thing of all others
that ought to be avloded Is any contro
versy in the convention."
GItAVK OHAHGKS
The president's letter throughout is
temperate, although positive. Mr.
Ciiscom in his .comment was much
more outspoken. He did not hesitate
to chaege the Republican organization
of the state had played politics with
the president's name and had misrep
resented his attitude. Ho asserted In
bo many words that "some of the 'old
guard' are not seeking Republican suc
cess at the coming election; they wish
to perpetuate their control of the Re
publican organization at any cost to
the party."
Griscom goes on to particularize that
in such event they would have been
glad to unload defeat on the shoulders
of the president on the ground that he
had Ignored the pollclos of Hughes ami
snubbed Theodore Roosevelt, the very
man whom they had consistently op
posed at every turn.
Lastly, ho charges that in the last
two legislatures they had been In dis
graceful alliance with "Tammany hall
and some of the 'old guard' leaders."
Col. Roosevelt, In his statement given
out at Oyster Bay, explains what had
been the bourse <>f his negotiations
With the organization and how after
his successive rebuffs he had felt that
further overtures could not consistent
ly come from him. His future attitude
ho does not define, because he is as yet
uncertain what effect on public senti
ment President Taft's letter will have
when It has been read by the voters of
the state.
The following letter from President
Taft to Lloyd Griscom, chairman
of the New York Republican county
committee, was given out hero today
by Mr. Griscom:
PKKSinJSNT'S IJSTTER
"Beverly, Mass., Aug. 20, 1910.
"My Dear Mr. Griscom: As you
know from your telephone conversa
tion with my office, I have steadily
refused to admit the propriety or neces
sity of the president's replying to news
paper statements which are not based
on any act or authorized word of his
and have no sponsor. lam entirely
willing, howe er, to reply categorically
to your telegram of August lit, which
has Just arrived and which Is as fol
lows:
"'I am Informed and believe that
several memberß of the New York Re
publican state committee who voted
for "Vice President Sherman over ex-
President Roosevelt as nominee for
temporary chairman of the state con
vention were influenced by statements
that the vice president's name was
presented to defeat Col. Roosevelt in
accordance with your wish. A member
of the state committee declared to me
before the meeting that Mr. Sherman's
candidacy had been arranged with you
by telephone the previous day. Efforts
have been made to create an Impres
sion that you favor a particular can
didate for election as state chairman.
I want you to know that the injection
of the name cf a high member of your
administration Into a factional conflict
lias produced a most complicated situa
tion, and the absence of any authori
tative Information as to your attitude
Is seriously misleading many ftepubll
cans and Impairing a movement for a
progressive party leadership and clean
government In this state. I k'low you
'Continued oa l'unn I iv« I
LOS ANGELES HERALD
INDEX OF
HERALD'S NEWS
TODAY
FOHECABT
I/or Angeles and vicinity: Fair TneMlay.
moderately mmii; light north wind chang
ing to west. Maximum temperature yenter
day, 88 degrees; minimum temperature, 65
ret*.
LOS ANGELES
Compton constable arrests youthful elopers.
PAGE 3
Willis Booth heads party of business men
which leaves for China. ' I'AOB 16
Police commission la swamped by applica
tions Cor licences. Puts ban on com
mercial lunches. PAGE 13
Increase In passenger traffic causes coast
steamship companies to Increase 1 fleet*
anil equipment. ■. ■ . PAGE 13
James Glbbs, crushed under wheel of fire
engine, dies In receiving hospital. FAOI3 13
11. F. McKlroy, arrested on charge of at
lempttng to pass worthless check, breaks
from police at Jail door but Is recap
tured. - ■ I'AOE 13
It. 8. Haupt Is made captain of police to
succeed C. E. Dlxon, discharged. PA<! l<; 13
North Pacific Steamship company to open
line between Los Angeles and San Diego.
<> PAGE 13
li. J. Llckley announces plans for dealing
with truant lads In schools. PAGE) 9
Knights of Columbus to obeerve Discovery
day August 12. PAGE 9
Members of election boards make correc
tions In returns and supervisors will
complete tabulations by end of week.
PAGE 9
Federal officials commence hearing of Palo •
Verde land case. PAGE 9
Public schools of city open for fall term
September 12. PAGE 9
Bureau of harbor Improvement submits In
teresting report on work to be done at
Wilmington. PAGE 8
Mining company brings suit for 1100.000
damages. . PAGE] 8
Theaters. -U'?; PAGE 16
Society and music. PAGE 6
Mining and oil fields. PAGE 6
Citrus fruit report. . PAGE 7
Building permits. PAGE 6
Shipping. PAGE 6
Market and financial. PAGE 7
News of the courts. PAGE 8
Municipal affair*. PAGE 8
Sports. • ■ PAGE 10
Editorial and Letter Box. . PAGE 12
Marriage licenses, births, deaths. PAGE 14
Classified advertising. PAGE 15
SOUTH CALIFORNIA
Veterans enjoying selves in camp at Hunt-
Ington Beach. ' PAGE 14
Long Beach family escapes Injury when
auto turns over. PAGE 14
Pasadena Justice of peace - denies change
of venue In fight film case. PAGE 14
Paul Marks, German, of San Bernardino
poisons daughters and daughters; ends
own life with bullet. PAGE 3
COAST
Oakland welcomes first transcontinental
train of Western Pacific. ' , PAGE 8
Steamship Buchanan arrives In San
Francisco with captain dead In cabin
and modern buccaneer In Irons.
PAGE 4
Senator Ptone resumes Investigation of ..
methods of procedure In criminal
cases. PAGE 4
Crew narrowly escapes death when fire
almost destroys steamer Kilburn In
San Francisuo bay. PAGE 4
Ban Joaquln county gives Johnson big
I vote. ; ■..'■'.- . PAGE I
Forest fires In Idaho and Montana de- .
stroy four towns; ten thousand men
fight flames, and president orders out
troops. PAGE 1
EASTERN I
Attorney for Choctftw nation tells of con
tracts . calling for 50 per cent fee for
Senator Owen in Indian land cases.
PAGE 8
President of New York lunacy commis
sion claims Insanity has Increased 27.8
percent since 1840. , , PAGE 4
District Forester Cecil of Portland
claims forest fires of Incendiary origin.
PAGE 2
President Taft In reply to Inquiry of
Cirlscom declares he urged New York
Republican leaders to confer with
Roosevelt about state convention
chairmanship. PAGE 1
President Ilarahan of , Illinois Central '
on stand In car repair cases.
PAGE 3
FOREIGN '; : ]-:y
British cruiser Bedford wrecked off
island on Korean coast and eighteen
men in engine room are killed by In
rush of waters. PAGE 4
Madrlz abdicates and revolutionists are
now within a mile of Managua. PAGE 1
Molssant, American aviator, falls twice
to complete his Parts to T»ndon
flight. PAGE 2
Minister Jackson halts American mob
which would storm Isle of Pines
Jail to' release Imprisoned colonists.
PAGE 1
MINING AND OIL •.;;
Conservation may cause split In relations
between east and west, says Sidney Nor- •■'
man after attending governors' congress
nt Salt Lake City. PAGE «
Midway Northern will dispose of all Its
output. PAGE 6
Big Butte prospecting mill makes favorable
* run. , PAGE 6
Lawyer Is proud that Doheny studied law
in his office. PAGE 6
GOVERNOR MAY DECLARE
NEED OF EXTRA SESSION
Plans Made for Amendments to
Secure Exposition Fur\ds
SACRAMENTO, Aug. 22.—Unless
there Is a decided change in Governor
Gillett's feelings in the next twenty-
Jour hours, he will issue a call for an
extra session of the legislature some
time tomorrow. This session will be
called for the purpose of adopting reso
lutions to be submitted to the voters
of, the state at the November elec
tion, by which the state constitution
may be amended so that a special tax
of 4 cents on each $100 can be Imposed
for a period of live yefcrs, for # exposi
tion purposes, alone.
This is In furtherance of the plan of
bringing the Panama-Pacific interna
tional exposition to San Francisco and
will net about $5,000,000 to the fund.
Another resolution will provide for
the changing of the charter of San
Francisco, so that the municipality
can increase its bonded Indebtedness
and raise $5,000,000 for the fund.
WOMAN 100 YEARS OLD
CELEBRATES ON BIRTHDAY
WHITTIER, Aug. 22.—10 rd la Heald
Sharpless celebrated her 100 th birthday
iit the Friends' church here today.
About fifty children, grandchildren and
great-grandchildren were present and
she wan present at a picnic dinner with
them. Her father lived to be 101 years
nf a irA.
TUESDAY MORNING, AUGUST 23, 1910.
Three Cities in the Coeur d'Alene District, Idaho,
and One of the Great Mines, All Imperiled by Fires
ABOVK (LEFT TO KI(iHT)—CITIEH OF OEM ASB MULLAN, n>AIIO.
BBLOW (LEFT TO HIOHT)— HKLKXA-ITUSCO MINE AJiD BURKE. IDAHVr.
REVOLUTIONISTS
NEARING MANAGUA
Madriz, with Generals, Flees to
Corinto—Pittman Is Free
at Consulate
MANAGUA, Aug. 22.—The advance
guard of the revolutionists is now one
mile from Managua.
President Madriz left the capital
Sunday night for Corinto, accompanied
by his chief advisers.
William Pittman, the Boston en
gineer accused of laying mines, is free
at the American consulate.
The situation is critical.
Madriz, before departing for Corinto
with Generals Toledo, Vasquez, Ortiz
and Montenegro and Dr. Julian Bias,
turned over the presidency to Jose
Dolores Estrada, a brother of Gen.
Juan Estrada, leader of the revolu
tion.
Immediately afterward Jose Estrada
Issued a proclamation saying he would
give the office to his brother, and
started a peace commission, composed
of foreign consuls, for Granada to In
form General Estrada of his inten
tion.
The commission was compelled to re
turn to Managua, however, as the rail
road tracks had been torn up.
ESTRADA PROCLAIMED BY
BROTHER AS PRESIDENT
Managua Falls and Nicaraguan
Revolutionists Are Victors
.NEW ORLEANS, Aug. 22.— Managua
has fallen. The Nicaraguan revolu
tionists have finally reached the goal
for which they have been fighting for
ten months. President Madriz did not
flee. He remained in the capital city
until the last. Cablegrams to this ef
fect were received here today.
"Jose Delores Estrada today issued a
proclamation declaring his brother.
General Juan J. Estrada, president of
the reunited republic of Nicaragua.
Revolutionists are pouring into Manag
ua. The situation is alarming.''
This cablegram, was received from
Managua this afternoon by Harvey,
Smith, who served the Madriz govern
ment here as consul general.
ESTRADA CABLES KNOX;
CHAMORRO IN CHARGE
BLUEFIELDS, Aug. 22.—General
Estrada today cabled Secretary Knox
at Wnshlngton an assurance of his
warm regard for the American people
and offered to make amends for the
execution of the Americans, Cannon
and Grose, and other unfriendly acts
by Zelaya and Madriz.
General Chamorro, acting as dele-
gate for General Estrada, Is now pro
visional president of the republic, and
is awaiting the arrival of General Es
trada at Managua.
110 CHILDREN MARCH OUT
OF BURNING ORPHANAGE
SAN RAFAEL, Aug. 22.—One hun
dred and ten children were awakened
from their sleep and marched out of a
burning building at the Presbyterian
orphanage tonight, and although the
halls were filled with smoke and the
basement of the dormitory building
was nblaze the lltcle ones reached the
playgrounds of the institution without
mishap.
Superintendent P. A. Doane, who
sounded the alarm for the fire drill,
took charge of the situation. Mrs. E.
Aigeltlnger and Mrs. Robert Dollar
cared for the children.
DEATH OF GUSTAVE MOYNER
GENEVA, Switzerland, August 22.—
Guitave Moyner, president of the in
ternational committee of the Red Cross
since the foundation of the committee
in 1863, died here today. He was 84
VMrH old.
WARNER WILL NOT SEEK
TO CONTINUE IN SENATE
Missourian Declares His Health
Will Compel Retirement
WASHINGTON, Aug. 22.—Senator VVU
liiini Warner of Missouri announced to
night that he would not be a candidate
for re-election to the United States sen
ate. The announcement was mude In a
formal statement addressed to the "Re
publicans of Mlxsouri." It follows:
"I announce that I shall not be a can
didate for re-election to the senate of
the United States. My health will not
permit. The making of this announce
ment Is, to me, a matter ot deep regret
because I feel It will be disappointing U>
my friends, and more loyal or disinter
ested friends no man ever bad. I make
no attempt to convey to tuemmy heart
felt thanks for the consideration of me
In the past, for such an attempt would
be to reveal the poverty of words at my
command."
The senator Is In his seventy-first year,
and for several months has not been in
good health. His term expires March 4.
ASSESSMENTS OF NINE
COUNTIES TO BE RAISED
Los Angeles County Cited for a
Hear^ig by State Board
SACRAMENTO, Aug. 22.—The state
board of equalization today issued cita
tions to nine counties In the state
which must submit to having their as
sessments increased this year in order
to bring them on tho horizonal basis
with the other counties of the state.
The counties, with the dates for the
various hearings are as follows: Ala
meda, Butte and San Joaquin, August
30; Kiverside, San Luis Obispo, Santa
Barbara and Santa Cruz, August 31;
Los Angeles and San Francisco, Sep
tember 1.
With the exception of Butte and San
Luis Obispo counties the others were
before the board last year among the
thirty-two counties cited, eighteen of
which were increased.
The increases this year, according to
present indications, will not be great
in any of the counties. Most of them
have tried to come up to the standards
set by the board, with the exception of
Santa Cruz county, which did not meet
the requirement. By having these
counties adjusted to compare favorably
with the other assessments through
out the state, there seems Jo be no
reason for the state tax rate to be any
higher this year than last when it
was 36.4 cents, the lowest in the state's
history.
AUTO CRASH ENDANGERS
DAUGHTER OF ROOSEVELT
Mrs. Nicholas Longworth in Car
When Collision Occurs
NEWPORT, R. 1., Aug. 22.—1t has
Just become known that Duke Frana
Josef of Bavaria and Congressman
and Mrs. Nicholas Longworth, who
have been guests at the home of Rob
ert Goelet, with their hostess, had a
narrow escape in an automobile acci
dent Sunday.
The party were on their way in the
Goelat machine to make a call when
Vincent Astor, son of John Jacob
Astor, in his machine, collided with
them. Astor came around a corner
unexpectedly. The Goelet . car was
badly damaged, but no one was hurt.
GRAND JURY NEARS END
OF BEEF TRUST INQUIRY
CHICAGO, Augr. 22.—The end of the
beef trust Investigation Is close at
hand. By Thursday the government
officials believe the federal grand Jury
will have completed Its Inquiry Into
the packers, and indictments, if any
are deemed necessary by the Jury, will
be voted. Twenty-five employes of
local packing companies have been
summoned to testify before the Jury
this week.
HALTS AMERICANS
IN ISLE OF PINES
Minister Jackson Prevents Mob
from Storming Jail to
Rescue Prisoners .£...
" {Associated Press)
HAVANA, Aug. 22.—Passengers ar
riving i today from the : Isle of j Pines,
where A. W. Gardner and seven other
Americans were arrested yesterday on
a charge of threatening homicide and
arson, >aay that only the .'arrival of
John J. Jacobson, the United States
minister to Cuba, prevented a serious
conflict with the local authorities.
American colonists on the Isle of Pines,
who number several hundred, had
gathered from all sections of the island
at Nueva Gerona, the capital, •to pro
test agalnst\the arrest of the Ameri
cans 'on : what is claimed to be a
trumped-up charge preferred last May
by a Cuban squatter on Mr. Gardner's
property.
A local judge then refused to con
sider the charges, and the .case was
apparently closed. Then on Friday the
prosecuting attorney at Havana or
dered the accused arrested and- con
fined in jail until they could be sent
to Havana for trial.
The American colonists were de
termined to oppose the deportation of
the prisoners, and were prepared if
necessary to prevent the landing of
the revenue cutter sent to transport
them to Havana and to storm the jail
and release the prisoners.
Minister Jackson immediately upon
his arrival assembled the indignant
colonists and warned them that they
must obey the Cuban law or suffer
serious consequences.
Late this afternoon the department
made public the names of the Ameri
cans under arrest. The names signed
to the appeal for assistance were Gilt
ner, Gardner, Ramsdell, Clark and
Nelson. The first names were not
given.
SPOKANE BANK ISSUES
FIRST SANITARY BILLS
WASHINGTON, Aug. 22.—T0 tho Old
National bank of Spokane, Wash., be
longs the distinction of circulating the
first antiseptic national bank notes. The
United States treasury is experimenting
with devices intending to launder dir
ty bank notes into bright crisp ones,
but the spokane bank has the first
sanitary money on record.
but the Spokane bank has the first
put out by the bank were signed with
an ink composed largely of carbolic
uriel, which Is fatal to disease germs.
HEINZ TO WED ACTRESS
AND VISIT COPPER MINE
NEW YORK, Aug. 22.—Fritz Augus
tus Heinz, at his office today, con
firmed the report that he Is to marry
Miss Bernlce Henderson, an actress.
Mr. Heinz said the ceremony would
tnke place about September 1 and that
they would go to Europe and then
visit his copper mine in Butte, Mont.
CHILD STARTS COSTLY BLAZE
CORTE MADERA, Cal., Aug. 22.—
Playing' with matches, Viola Andrew,
the five-year-old niece of Mrs. Robert
Kendall, caused a lire tonight which
destroyed the Kendall residence, the
homes of Julius Godast and Mrs. Mary
Relger, and three barns. Xhe loss Is
estimated at $18,000. The child escaped
from the flames uninjured.
WEALTHY SPEEDER RELEASED
NEW YORK, Aug. 22.—Edward T.
Rosenhelmer, the young millionaire
who is accused of running down Miss
Grace Hough In his automobile and
leaving her in the road to die, found
last night the $25,000 ball demanded and
was released. He had been locked up
for three days on a charge of homi
cide.
CALIFORNIAN ARRESTED
MANILA. Aug. 22.—Curtlss Hill was
arrested here today on the request of
the California authorities. He la
charged with embezzlement. He denies
his guilt but will not oppose extradi
tion.
CJTTVT/ < I I? I YIPrT-fSS • DAILT to. ON TRAINS Be.
!*>li\(xlJ < vAJL lUnS. KUMJAVS 50. ON trains ie«.
FIRE LEAVES 4 TOWNS IN ASHES,
LOSS OF LIFE INCREASES HOURLY;
TAFT RUSHES TROOPS TO MONTANA
Ten Thousand Men Fight Flames That Sweep
Over Northwest and Trains with Refugees
Dash Through Blazing Avenues
APPEAL TO GOVERNORS FOR MILITIA
River *Boats Keep Up Steam at Docks, Ready
at Moment's Notice to Leave with
Hundreds of Homeless Survivors
TACOMA, Wash., Aug. -•■ —Fanned
Into a seething wall of fUme 1000 feet
wide, »nd Awing before a bis wind, a
forest lire menaced the southwestern end
of Tacoma this afternoon. As darkness
drew on, however, the wind died down,
checking the adranre of the names and
leaving them almost harmless a mile
west of the end of Center street. There
was po property lows. _^____^^^^__^— I
MISSOULA, Mont., Aug. 22.—The
fire situation in western Montana and
Idaho has cleared considerably and to
night is more hopeful than far three
days.
Mullan and Saltese have been saved;
Henderson, threatened last night and
today, is In a fair way to be placed in
security. There are 300 men back-firing
at St. Regis, and It is believed their
efforts will result In turning the flre
around the town. Ten thousand men
are fighting the flames.
On the other side of the account,
there are the smoktoig ruins of Do Bor
gia, Houghton, Bryson, Taft and slight
flre damage to one corner of Saltese;
the Milwaukee railroad has twenty-four
out of tweuty-nlne bridges ruined, and
the remaining five are badly damaged;
nine lives have been lost in the hills
above Saltese and at least six others
in a flre on Cedar creek that came over
the Tdaho divide at the head of Oregon
gulch.
COSTI/T POWER I'LANT LOST
This last flre destroyed the Amador
properties at the head of Cedar creek
and the buildings and power plant of
the Kansas City Commercial company
on Cedar creek, but swept over the
big dredge of the company without
much damage. This was the most
serious loss of the day. The total num
ber of dead in the fires is variously
estimated at from fifty to two hun
dred.
At iron Mountain there la no danger,
and, with the fires well in hand at St.
Regis, it seems the crisis is passed.
There is no wind tonight, the gale
which prevailed since Sunday sub
siding this afternoon. Up the Black
foot river conditions are also improved.
The flre at Camas Prairie was checked
last night and the farms in tho valley
are safe. In the timber above the val
ley the situation is not entirely cleared,
but it is believed that without wind
the flre will be under control in the
morning.
TWO THOUSAND KKFI'C.EES WAIT
There are nearly 2000 refugees in
Mlssoula tonight. Trains today have
added their quota, and the exhausted
fighters in the burned district are
straggling in. Two young men came
in tonight who were caught in the Ore
gon gulch fire. They started with
eight companions and sony; pack
horses. They say they know the horses
are all dead, but do not know where
their companions are. The flre came
down and cut them off.
A distressing feature of the situation
is the fact that so many parties are
not accounted for.
Among the injured in the Wallace
hospital, none of whom is fatally hurt,
is W. A. Juergens of Los Angeles.
LOSS OF LIFE BY FIRES
IS HOURLY INCREASING
Six Seek Refuge in Tunnel and
Are Suffocated
SPOKANE. Aug. 22.—Specials tonight
from the forest flre zone accentuate
the horrors of the situation, and indi
cate the loss of life is hourly increas-
ing.
News comes from Wardner, Idaho,
that F. M. Bedell of Kellogs, fore
man of a crew of 70 men under Han
gers Pulaskl and Lewis, on the Big
creek flre, was brought home last night
in an almost blinded condition. His
arms, hand 3 and face are badly blis
tered and show the marks of his des
perate fight for life. His crew was
working on the east side of the fire
in the Big creek basin. Their position
became untenable, and under the lead
ership of the rangers they scrambled
In the dim light of the fire to the crest
of the ridge, expecting to pass over to
Placer creek and out by way of Wal
lace. Seeing their position practically
hopeless, the men broke into a wild
stampede for the creek bottom below.
Bedell and seven others reached the
creok and sought refuge In the tun
nel. Six were suffocated there.
Bedell says H. J. Hennis, H. S.
Smith and Will Cameron, all of Ward
ner, are among the dead.
Survivors of the Big creek disaster
reached Wallace late this afternoon.
They said a relief party headed by
Ranger Wells had reached their gang
and medical aid was at hand.
Twelve men were killed In this party.
They will be burled In the woods where
they died.
MKET TERRIBLE FATE
"We were in the heart of the fire for
an hour and a half," said Walter Inger
soll, an eighteen-year-old flre fighter,
who escaped with slight burns. "When
the men saw the tire coming down the
.gulch on four aides of them they were
sV^ENTS
(Associated Press)
panic stricken and with two home
steaders, Amei and Beauuhamp, ran
and hid in a small cave. Beauchamp
had provided the cave to hold his valu
ables. Six or seven were suffocated in
the cave. Others were killed by fall
ing trees and terrific wind picking up
great trees and throwing them about
In every direction. Out of twenty-five
men in the Big creek party, perhaps
eight escaped uninjured."
It is not thought the rescuing parties
sent to Big crock this morning can re
turn tonight with the injured and dead
of the Bell party. Fallen trees are
strewn thickly along the way and a
trail has to be made to reach the party
in distress.
A supply of medicine and first aid
appliances has been taken.
Mr. and Mrs. O. E. Kenyon, of Spo
kane, with their month-old baby, stay
ed through the fire Saturday night and
say they were not anxious to leave.
Mrs. Kenyon is one of the women who
did not try to escape from the city
when it looked as though everything
would be destroyed. She stayed In her
rooms in the Samuels hotel until the
windows began to break from the heat,
then went out until the tire had sub
sided and came back again.
"There was really no reason why I
should leave," she said. "I knew I
could escape if the lire got too close
and then I did not know but that I
might be of service if I stayed."
PRESIDENT ORDERS OUT
30 FEDERAL COMPANIES
EEVEKLY, Mass., Aug. 22.—Presi
dent Taft has received alarming re
ports as to the situation in the forest
fire districts of the west, and has di
rected General Leonard Wood, chief
of staff, to render every assistance in
his power.
The president tonight sent the follow
ing telegrams to Governors Brady of
Idaho, Morris of Montana, and Hay
of Washington:
"General Wood has sent thirty cpm
panies of federal troops in addition to
pack trains and extra, medical officers
to the forest lire districts, and I have
directed him to do everything in his
power to co-operate in saving life
and lighting fire. Will you telegraph
me the exact situation? Do you intend
to place state troops In the threatened
towns to do police work? The reports
which reach me are most serious and
I desire exact information.
"W. H. TAFT."
FLAMES DESTROY GRAIN,
AND MEN ARE POWERLESS
Fifteen Hundred Sheep Lost in
Montana Grazing Section
BUTTE, Mont., Aug. 22.—Aside from
western and northern Montana the
most serious fire scene in Montana to
night is in the Gallatin forest near
Boaeman, from which point urgent ap
peals have been addressed to Gover
nor Norris asking him to order out tho
militia at Bozeman to join the fire
lighters.
The situation is ciitical, according to
a report from Supervisor Conkllng.
He states twenty sections of heavy
timber land already have been burned
over and the flre lighting forces, num
bering about 250, are making little
headway. The flams* are being driven
by a stiff wind which set in late this
afternoon.
Several grain fields have been swept
over and a Hock of 1500 sheep de
stroyed. A large amount of range
country and a vast section of timber
land in the Pryor mountain country In
the extreme southeastern portion of
the state and northwestern Wyoming
is being devastated, the fire-swept area
tonight being twelve square miles.
From Fergus county comes another
appeal to Governor Norris to order out
the militia. Near Maiden in the Ju
dith mountains tho timber destruction
is very heavy. Fires are also raging in
the Little Rockies and in the Little
Belt mountains.
The Northern Pacific hopes to re
sumo its overland train service some
time tonight, but the prospects seem
remote. The Milwaukee road is tied
up for at least two weeks by the burn
ing out of a half dozen trestles. Fires
are reported tonight along the line of
the Great Northern to Prickly Pear
canyon, between Butte and Great Falls.
NEGRO SOLDIERS WITH GUNS
LOADED RjfROL WALLACE
Regulars Are Given Orders to
Shoot Vandals
SPOKANE, Augr. 23—A special te
the Chronicle from Wallace says the
soldiers from the twenty-flfth Infantry,
colored, who are patrolling Wallace un
der the direction of Mayor W. H.
Hanson, have been furnished with am
munition and tlven orders to shoot
vandals whose depredations have al
ready become serious. Chicago, MU-
XCoßttaiwd on !'■«• ThrMJ

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